3.5-inch SBC can load Ryzen Embedded V1000 or R1000

By Eric Brown

Ibase has launched a 3.5-inch “IB918” SBC that runs Ubuntu or Windows on an AMD Ryzen Embedded V1000 or R1000 and offers 2x GbE, SATA III via M.2, and up to four simultaneous displays via 2x HDMI 2.0a, eDP and LVDS.

Ibase previewed its IB918 back in April in conjunction with the release of AMD’s the Ryzen Embedded R1000 SoC. In announcing the release of this 3.5-inch SBC, the company as revealed that it can also run the earlier, more advanced Ryzen Embedded V1000, supporting both Ubuntu and Windows 10.


 
IB918
(click images to enlarge)

Customers can choose among the quad-core V1605B (IB918F-1605) and the dual-core V1202B (IB918F-1202), R1606G (IB918F-1606G), and R1505G (IB918F-1505G), which are detailed in the charts below. Like the V1000, the R1000 is a 14nm-fabricated SoC with essentially the same Zen CPU and Vega GPU cores. Although the R1000 lacks the ability to drive 4x independent [email protected] displays, as seen on the V1000, it does similarly support triple 4K displays, which is all that is possible on the IB918.

Since the two V1000 SoCs are the two lower end models, all four processors supported here have relatively low 12-25W TDPs. Applications are said to include panel PC, kiosk, POS, medical display and industrial scenarios.



Ryzen Embedded V1000 models (the IB918 supports the bottom two)
(click image to enlarge)

The IB918 supports up to 32 GB of dual-channel DDR4-2400, including ECC RAM. It exploits the power of the high-end Vega GPU with dual HDMI 2.0A ports with 4K support plus a 4K-ready eDP interface and HD-ready, 24-bit LVDS. There are dual Intel I211AT driven GbE ports and 4x USB 3.0 ports, which are now called USB 3.1 in the new wackydoodle USB naming scheme. (We cannot blame Ibase here for confusingly listing them as both USB 3.0 and USB 3.1 because that is sort of true.)



Ryzen Embedded R1000 models
(click image to enlarge)

The IB918 is further equipped with a RS232/422/485 DB9 COM port, as well as internal connections including 3x RS232, USB 2.0, and 4-in/4-out DIO. You also get a Realtek ALC269Q-VC3-GR audio interface and a class-D amplifier, as well as a Fintek F81964D-I I/O chip, a watchdog, HW monitoring, and TPM 2.0 security.



IB918 detail views
(click image to enlarge)

There’s a SATA III interface via an M.2 M-Key expansion slot plus two more user-accessible M.2 sockets. The second M-Key socket is a 2280-ready interface that supports NVMe storage. There’a also an E-Key 2230 with CNVi support.



More IB918 detail views
(click image to enlarge)

The 147 x 102mm board has a 12VDC input with consumption ranging from 2.34A to 2.55A, depending on the SoC model. The SBC supports 0 to 60°C temperatures with “90% ([email protected]°C)” humidity resistance. A heatsink with fan and heatspreader are optional.

 Further information

The IB918 is available now at an undisclosed price. More information may be found in Ibase’s IB918 announcement and product page.

This article originally appeared on LinuxGizmos.com on October 1.

Ibase Technology | www.ibase.com.tw

Qualcomm IPQ4019-Based SoM and Dev Board Run OpenWrt Linux

By Jeff Child

The “Habanero” module from 8devices runs OpenWrt on Qualcomm’s IPQ4019 SoC. The $55 open spec board supports dual-band, MU-MIMO 802.11ac (Wave2). A development kit for with module adds 5 Ethernet ports and USB.

8devices has added the Habanero as a new member to its line of dual-band system-on-modules (SOMs). The SOM is available in two versions. The Habanero, based on Qualcomm’s IPQ4019 SoC, is open for pre-orders for $55. And the Habanero-I, based on Qualcomm’s IPQ4029 SoC can be bought on pre-order for $69. A $119 development kit, the Habanero DVK, provides the IPQ4019 SoC along with Ethernet, USB and other I/O.

8devices provides a number of modules that run OpenWrt Linux, the most recent of which was its Komikan SOM based on a MIPS24k-based Realtek SoC. The Habanero appears to be the company’s 2nd module based on a Qualcomm SoC, following its IPQ4018 SoC-based Jalapeno board.


 
Habanero SOM top (left) and bottom
(click images to enlarge)


The Qualcomm’s IPQ4019 and IPQ4029—used on Habanero and Habanero-I, respectively, both feature Wave2 (or Wave 2) — the revised version of 802.11ac (WiFi 5) radios with dual-band MU-MIMO technology for simultaneous WiFi connections to multiple devices. Incorporating a quad-core Arm Cortex-A7 processor with NEON and FPU, the 40nm IPQ4019/IPQ4029 SoCs have Qualcomm security features and support for up to 5x Ethernet ports. In June, we covered three boards that sport a Qualcomm IPQ4019 SoC: the Dakota DR4019, MicroTik’s RB450Gx4 and the Kefu DB11 dev kit.



Habanero SOM block diagram
(click image to enlarge)


The 45 x 49 mm Habanero module, which came to our attention from an electronics-lab.com post, has a QCA8075C PHY that supports 5x Gigabit Ethernet ports. It also has USB 3.0 and USB 2.0 ports and supports other miscellaneous interfaces (details below), which can be configured as general-purpose I/O pins. Hardware based NAT engine and security features like crypto engine and secure boot make the SOM well suited for high-end, fast and secure networking applications. The Habanero comes in commercial 0 to 65°C, and industrial -40 to 85°C temperature range versions.

For memory, the Habanero SOM provides 32 MB NOR flash and 512 MB DDR3L RAM. There’s also up to 1 GB NAND available externally on the Habanero-DVK. Interfaces on the module include 46x GPIO, 1x PCie 2.0, 1x USB 3.0, 1x USB2.0, 2x UART, 1x SPI, 2x I2C, 4x PWM, 1x JTAG, 1x I2S/TDM, 5x Ethernet ports, 1x RGMII, 1x SDIO3.0/eMMC and parallels for NAND flash memory and an LCD controller.



Habanero development board details
(click image to enlarge)


The Habanero DVK board provides several sockets and connectors that developers can use to take advantage of the SOM’s capabilities. The DVK has 5 Ethernet ports, an eMMC socket, an SD card socket, a USB 3.0 port, a USB 2.0 port, LEDs, buttons for GPI08 and Reset and 12V-24V power socket.


 
Habanero dev board with shield covering SOM (left) and shield (right)
(click images to enlarge)

 
Further information

The Habanero module and Habanero-DVK (including module) are available for pre-orders with shipments beginning September 23. More information may be found on 8devices’ Habanero product pages well as the HabaneroHabanero-I and Habanero-DVK shopping pages.

This article originally appeared on LinuxGizmos.com on September 12.

8devices | www.8devices.com

Bluetooth LE Solar Dev Kit for IoT Taps Nordic Semi’s BLE SoC

Nordic Semiconductor has announced that PowerFilm, a company specializing in custom solar solutions, employs Nordic’s nRF52832 Bluetooth Low Energy (Bluetooth LE) SoC in its “Indoor Solar Development Kit with Nordic BLE” for IoT developers, engineers and hobbyists looking to power electronics by harvesting indoor light energy. Once harvested, the energy is stored in a rechargeable battery or capacitor bank.

The development kit simplifies the design process for OEMs incorporating indoor solar energy in Bluetooth LE devices, with applications including smart home, building automation, inventory and retail management, asset tracking, and industrial monitoring. In addition to the Nordic SoC, the plug and play kit incorporates an onboard energy harvester/power management IC and indoor solar panels. In operation, the nRF52832 SoC automatically connects to the power when energy is available—enabling Bluetooth LE operation of the solar-powered device—before disconnecting when the stored energy is depleted.

The high performance indoor solar panels are able to sustain Bluetooth LE operation even in dimly lit indoor environments such as those typically seen in warehouses and industrial plants, thanks in part to the ultra-low power characteristics of the Nordic SoC. The nRF52832 has been engineered to minimize power consumption with features such as the 2.4 GHz radio’s 5.5 mA peak RX/TX currents and a fully-automatic power management system that reduces power consumption by up to 80% compared with Nordic’s nRF51 Series SoCs.

The development kit’s onboard capacitor charger provides two key benefits: First, it enables applications that don’t need the extra storage capacity to operate without a battery; and second, it charges the capacitors directly from the solar panel, without any conversions, which boosts performance over a standard energy harvesting power management integrated circuit.

Nordic’s nRF52832 multiprotocol SoC combines a 64 MHz, 32-bit Arm Cortex M4F processor with a 2.4 GHz multiprotocol radio (supporting Bluetooth 5, ANT, and proprietary 2.4 GHz RF protocol software) featuring -96-dB RX sensitivity, with 512 KB Flash memory and 64 KB RAM. The SoC is supplied with Nordic’s S132 SoftDevice, a Bluetooth 5-certifed RF software protocol stack for building advanced Bluetooth LE applications. The S132 SoftDevice features Central, Peripheral, Broadcaster and Observer Bluetooth LE roles, supports up to twenty connections, and enables concurrent role operation.

Nordic Semiconductor | www.nordicsemi.com

Linux-Driven Modules to Showcase New MediaTek AIoT SoCs

By Eric Brown

Innocomm, which has produced NXP-based compute modules such as the i.MX8M Mini driven WB15 and i.MX8M powered WB10, will soon try on some MediaTek SoCs for size. First up is an SB30 SoM due to launch in October that will run Linux or Android on MediaTek’s 1.5 GHz, quad-core, Cortex-A35 based MediaTek i300 (MT8362) SoC. In November, the company plans to introduce an SB50 SoM based on the MediaTek i500 (MT8385).


 
SB30 SoM (left) and SB50 SoM
(click images to enlarge)

Innocomm has provided us with specs for the SB30 (see farther below). As for the SB50 SoM, we know it has the same form-factor and edge connector as the WB15 and new SB30 SoM and similarly connects to its carrier board via a pair of M.2 E-Key expansion slots. Like the SB30, the SB50 will offer Linux and Android support.

The SB50 SoM (AKA SB50 MTK i500 SoM) is designed for AI/AR/VR applications. Its MediaTek i500 SoC was announced (translated) with the MediaTek i300 in April. In July, MediaTek followed up with its high-end MediaTek i700 (AI IoT platform i700). All three of these “AIoT” platforms are designed for media-enhanced edge computing, with the i500 and i700 also targeting AI on the edge.

The MediaTek i500 is the mid-range model of the three, despite having specs that would beat or match any Arm processor running on one of the 125 open-spec SBCs featured in our recent Linux hacker board roundup. The SoC combines 4x Cortex-A73 and 4x Cortex A53 cores, all clocked at 2.0GHz. There’s also an 800MHz Arm Mali-G72 MP3 and a 500MHz AI processor (APU) for deep learning, neural network acceleration and computer vision applications.

MediaTek i300

The “cost-effective MediaTek i300 (MT8362) inside the SB30 SoM is a more modest affair. The SoC is built around 4x power-efficient Cortex-A35 cores clocked up to 1.5GHz. Other Cortex-A35 SoCs include NXP’s quad-core i.MX8X and Rockchip’s RK3308, as well as an upcoming NXP i.MX8 variant optimized for Microsoft’s Azure Sphere platform that uses FD-SOI power management.

The MediaTek i300 is further equipped with an Imagination PowerVR Series8XE GE8300 GPU aimed at entry-level markets. Launched earlier this year, the GPU also appeared recently on the dual -A53 Renesas RZ/G2E SoC.

The MediaTek i300 integrates a PMIC and an RF chip for 2.4GHz 802.11/b/g/n and Bluetooth 4.0, and also supports integration of a MediaTek MT7668 chipset for 802.11ac (WiFi 5). The SoC has a 13-megapixel and 720P ready ISP and focuses on portable and HMI devices with up to 1920 x 1080-pixel touchscreens. Its audio subsystem targets voice-controlled devices.

B30 SoM

Innocomm’s SB30 SoM (SB30 MTK i300 SoM) is designed for audio/video, kiosk, digital signage, and fitness console applications. It combines the MediaTek i300 with 1GB or 2GB LPDDR3, 16GB eMMC, and either dual-band 802.11ac and Bluetooth 5.0 or 2.4GHz 802.11n with Bluetooth 4.0.

The SB30’s media interfaces include MIPI-DSI, LVDS, and HDMI 1.4a, as well as I2S for audio. You also get USB 2.0 host and OTG connections plus I2C, SPI, UART, and more.



SB30 Evaluation Kit
(click image to enlarge)

The SB30 Evaluation Kit (EVK) combines the module with 10/100 Ethernet, USB 2.0 host, and micro-USB device ports. There’s also a microSD slot, an RS232 header, and an expansion connector for I2C, SPI, I2S, USB, and UART interfaces. Judging from the photo, this does not appear to be the standard RPi-style 40-pin connector found on the WB15.

Display features include an HDMI 1.4a port, dual-channel LVDS for up to 21-inch displays, and a MIPI-DSI connector that supports the Raspberry Pi 7-inch LCM. The board is further equipped with a dual MIPI-CSI connector, a PDM-based digital mic, and a 10W stereo amp. The EVK has a 12V DC jack plus an antenna connector.

Further information

The SB30 SoM and EVK will launch in October and the SB50 SoM and EVK will launch in November. Pricing was undisclosed. More information should appear in the coming months on Innocomm’s very preliminary SB30 SoM and SB50 SoM product pages.

This article originally appeared on LinuxGizmos.com on August 21.

Innocomm | www.innocomm.com
 

Compute Module Offers Three Flavors of i.MX6 UltraLite

By Eric Brown

Variscite has launched its SODIMM-style “VAR-SOM-6UL” module that runs Linux on NXP’s power-efficient i.MX6 UL, ULL, and ULZ SoCs. The WiFi-equipped, -40 to 85°C ready module ships with a new “Concerto” carrier.

Prior to Embedded World in late February, Variscite previewed the VAR-SOM-6UL with incomplete details. The SODIMM-200 form-factor module has now launched starting at $24 in volume along with a VAR-SOM-6UL Development Kit and Starter Kit equipped with a Concerto carrier board. New features include memory and storage details and the availability of 0 to 70°C and -40 to 85°C models.


 
VAR-SOM-6UL, front and back
(click images to enlarge)

The VAR-SOM-6UL offers a choice of three Cortex-A7-based i.MX6 UltraLite variants at up to 900MHz: the original i.MX6 UL and almost identical i.MX6 ULL and the newer, stripped down i.MX6 ULZ. The i.MX6 ULZ is also available on Variscite’s smaller DART-6UL module along with the UL and ULL.

The headless, up to 900MHz Cortex-A7 ULZ SoC offers most of the I/O of the of the i.MX6 UL and ULL, including their extensive audio interfaces. However, it lacks features such as the 2D Pixel acceleration engine and dual Ethernet controllers.

Recently, NXP launched a next-gen follow-on to the UltraLite line with its 28nm, FD-SOI fabbed i.MX7 ULP. The SoC adds a 3D GPU and Cortex-M4 to the power-sipping, single-core -A7.

The 3.3V powered, 67.6 × 33mm VAR-SOM-6UL offers BSPs for Yocto Thud and Debian Stretch, both with Linux Kernel 4.14.78. Boot2QT is said to be coming soon. The module ships with 128MB to either 512MB or 1GB DDR3L RAM, depending on differing citations. You also get 128MB to 512MB SLC NAND and 4GB to 64GB eMMC storage.

The VAR-SOM-6UL provides certified dual-band WiFi 802.11ac and Bluetooth 4.2 BLE, as well as dual 10/100 Ethernet controllers. (It’s unclear if these are included on the ULZ model.) Supported I/O includes USB 2.0 host and OTG ports, 8x UARTs at up to 5Mbps, and SD/MMC, 4x I2C, 4x SPI, and 2x CAN. There are also dual, 10-channel 12-bit ADC interfaces and support for a carrier-deployed RTC.


 
VAR-SOM-6UL block diagram and Development Kit
(click images to enlarge)

Media interfaces include 24-bit Parallel LCD and 18-bit LVDS, both at up to 1366 × 768 pixels with resistive and capacitive touch support. There’s also a 24-bit Parallel camera interface and audio features including analog line-in/out, headphone support, and digital SPDIF and SSI.

The module offers extended lifetime availability, 3D and DXF mechanical files, and pin-to-pin compatibility with other VAR-SOM modules. These include the quad-core VAR-SOM-MX6 and more recent VAR-SOM-MX8X, among others.

VAR-SOM-6UL evaluation kits

The VAR-SOM-6UL is available with a $149 VAR-SOM-6UL Starter Kit and a more feature-rich, $269 Development Kit. Both kits provide the module and “Concerto” carrier board plus a debug cable, antenna, boot/rescue card, and a carrier board design package. The Development Kit adds an Ethernet cable, a 12V power supply, and a 7-inch capacitive touchscreen.


 
VAR-SOM-6UL Development Kit contents and Concerto carrier block diagram
(click images to enlarge)

The Concerto carrier, which is available with schematics, is equipped with dual 10/100 Ethernet ports, a microSD slot, and an LVDS connector with backlighting controls and resistive and capacitive touch support. There are also dual audio jacks and an onboard digital mic.

The specs don’t include other features shown in the image and block diagram, including a USB 2.0 host port, a micro-USB OTG port, and a micro-USB debug port. There are also headers for CAN, UARTs, and other I/O.

 
Further information

The VAR-SOM-6UL module is available now starting at $24 in 1K volume. The VAR-SOM-6UL Starter Kit costs $149 and the VAR-SOM-6UL Development Kit goes for $269. More information may be found in Variscite’s VAR-SOM-6UL announcement and product page, as well as the VAR-SOM-6UL evaluation kits product page — all with links to shopping pages.

This article originally appeared on LinuxGizmos.com on August 15.


Variscite | www.variscite.com

Ryzen Embedded V1000 Module Supports Four USB 3.1 Ports

By Eric Brown

Ibase has announced a COM Express Type 6 module equipped with AMD’s Ryzen Embedded V1000 system-on-chip. The announcement refers to the ET876 as a Compact module (95 x 95mm) like Ibase’s earlier, Intel 7th Gen “Kaby Lake” ET975, but the spec sheet and the photo indicate it’s a larger 125 x 95mm Basic module like Ibase’s 7th Gen ET970.


 
ET976, front and back
(click images to enlarge)

The ET976 follows other V1000-based COM Express Type 6 modules including Seco’s Compact COMe-B75-CT6, Kontron’s Compact COMe-cVR6, Advantech’s Basic SOM-5871, and MEN Micro’s Basic CB71C. The Kontron and MEN Micro modules also support the new stripped-down Ryzen Embedded R1000.

Ibase listed no OS support for the ET976, but all the other V1000-based modules either ship with Linux as the default or support Linux and Windows. The module supports the dual-core V1202B and the quad-core V1605B, V1807B, and V1807B SoCs at up to 3.8GHz. Applications include graphics-intensive devices used in industrial automation, medical imaging, transportation, gaming, payment systems, and ATM machines.

Claimed to be up to twice as fast as AMD’s earlier R-Series SoCs, the Ryzen Embedded V1000 competes with Intel’s similarly 14nm-fabricated Kaby Lake and Coffee Lake Core processors. The SoC offers up to four dual-threaded Zen CPU cores for 8x threads total, as well as high-end Radeon Vega 3 graphics with up to 11 compute units.



ET976 
(click image to enlarge)


The ET976 supports up to 8GB of DDR4, including ECC RAM. It integrates an Intel I210IT GbE controller a watchdog, hardware monitoring functionality, and support for TPM 2.0.

The announcement mentions triple independent displays, but the product page says there are only dual displays. In any case, they are enabled with 2x DDI and either an LVDS or optional eDP interface. No resolution was mentioned, but some of the other modules support 4K video.

This is the first V1000-based module we’ve seen with USB 3.1 support as opposed to USB 3.0. The ET976 expresses I/O including 4x USB 3.1, 8x USB 2.0, 2x SATA III, 2x UART, HD audio, and 4-in/4-out DIO. The module provides a single PEG x8 connection and 8x PCIe expansion interfaces, and there’s support for 0 to 60°C temperatures.

 
Further information

No pricing or availability information was provided for the ET976. More information may be found in Ibase’s ET976 announcement and product page.

This article originally appeared on LinuxGizmos.com on July 16.

Ibase | www.ibase.com.tw

Nordic Semi’s Modules Selected for IoT Positioning Platform

Nordic Semiconductor has announced that its nRF9160 System-in-Package (SiP) LTE-M/NB-IoT cellular IoT modules and nRF52840 Bluetooth 5/Bluetooth Low Energy (Bluetooth LE) SoCs are being used in the turnkey “GEPS” indoor and outdoor IoT positioning platform developed by Swedish industrial IoT startup, H&D Wireless.

GEPS is a turnkey, application-as-a-service solution that is designed to bridge the information gap between physical assets and business systems. It requires no upfront investment in hardware or software, and instead employs small 59 mm x 52 mm x 23 mm battery-powered, industrial-grade IoT tags embedded with either a Nordic nRF9160 SiP or nRF52840 SoC to track key assets and equipment via cellular, GPS or Bluetooth wireless technology in real-time.

Each tag (depending on application) can be configured with a rechargeable or AA-size battery, and achieve a minimum one year and maximum 10-year battery life. Operating either standalone or in conjunction with leading business and AI systems, the ultimate aim is to boost key operational metrics such as efficiency, safety, security, throughput, responsiveness, and ultimately profits. All this data is displayed via cloud-based visual dashboards accessible from desktop PCs, tablets or smartphones.

In asset management applications, for example, H&D Wireless is finding that its customers are saving between 20-40% in operational costs due to a combination of better utilization of their assets and the ability to get rid of 30% of the assets previously required to perform the same job. Key target industries for the GEPS platform include logistics (e.g. asset and fleet management), construction (for example tools, people and equipment), and manufacturing industries (such as sub-assemblies).

At just 10 mm x 16 mm x 1 mm in size, the nRF9160 includes everything a cellular connection and IoT application needs beyond requiring just an external battery, SIM and antenna. To achieve this ultra-high integration Nordic partnered with Qorvo to make a “System-in-Package” (SiP) that more closely resembles an integrated chip than a module.

The SiP includes a powerful application processor (Arm Cortex M-33), GPS support, standard microcontroller peripherals, and enough chip-integrated memory to execute IoT applications with edge computing. Yet this is not achieved by sacrificing on-air performance: the nRF91 is capable of delivering class-leading output power (+23 dBm) and sensitivity – vital for its GPS functionality

Nordic’s nRF52840 multiprotocol SoC is Nordic’s most advanced ultra low power wireless solution. The SoC supports complex Bluetooth LE and other low-power wireless applications that were previously not possible with a single-chip solution. The nRF52840 is Bluetooth 5-, Thread 1.1-, and Zigbee PRO (R21) and Green Power proxy specification-certified and its Dynamic Multiprotocol feature uniquely supports concurrent wireless connectivity of the protocols. The SoC combines the Arm processor with a 2.4GHz multiprotocol radio. The chip supports all the features of Bluetooth 5 (including 4x the range or 2x the raw data bandwidth (2Mbps) compared with Bluetooth 4.2). Designed to address the inherent security challenges brought by the IoT, the nRF52840 SoC incorporates the Arm CryptoCell-310 cryptographic accelerator.

Nordic Semiconductor | www.nordicsemi.com

Ryzen R1000 SoC Offers Dual Zen and Triple Vega Cores with a 12-25 W TDP

By Eric Brown

AMD has unveiled a lower-powered version of the Ryzen Embedded V1000 SoC called the Ryzen Embedded R1000 with dual quad-threaded cores, 12-25 W TDPs, triple 4K displays, and support for dual 10GbE ports.

When AMD unveiled the Ryzen Embedded V1000 in Feb. 2018, the chipmaker claimed the x86-based CPU delivered twice the performance of its earlier R-Series chips. Now, the chipmaker has introduced a stripped-down Ryzen Embedded R1000 variant with the same low power consumption as the old R-Series while still offering considerably better CPU and GPU performance.

The Ryzen Embedded R1000 offers the same Zen CPU and Vega GPU cores as the V1000 while providing “3x generational performance improvement per watt” compared to the R-Series Merlin Falcon. The Linux-friendly chips are hardware and software compatible with the V1000.

The R1000 is designed for fanless embedded systems in applications including digital displays, high-performance edge computing, networking, and thin clients. Early adopters include Atari, which is using it for its VCS console, and Ibase, which announced an SBC and signage player (see farther below).


Ryzen Embedded R1000 models
(click image to enlarge)
The 14 nm FinFET fabricated Ryzen Embedded R1000 is available initially in two very similar R1606G and R1505G models. Like the lowest end V1202B version of the V1000, the new SoCs offer dual-core, quad-threaded CPUs, triple-core GPUs, and 12-25 W TDPs. They similarly provide 1 MB L2 and 4 MB L3 cache. Like all the Zen-based chips, they ship in an FP5 BGA form factor.

Although the R1000 lacks the support for 4x independent [email protected] displays available with all the V1000 models, it does offer triple 4K displays. The first two models are also faster than the V1202B. The R1606G has a 2.6GHz (3.5GHz boost) CPU and the R1505G goes to 2.4 GHz / 3.3 GHz.


Ryzen Embedded R1000 benchmarks
(Source: AMD)
(click image to enlarge)
Like the V1202B, the lower-end R1505G has a 1GHz GPU, while the R1606G clocks its Vega GPU cores to 1.2GHz. Video support includes VP9 10-bit decode, H.265 10-bit decode and 8-bit encode, and H.264 encode and decode.

Security features are the same as those on the V1000, including an AMD Secure Processor “that encrypts data before it feeds to the I/O” and Platform Secure Boot capabilities, says AMD. One-time programmable (OTP) capabilities enable system designers to manage their own keys.

 
Ryzen Embedded R1000 and block diagram
(click images to enlarge)
Like the two lower-end V1000 models, the R1000 SoCs support up to 2400MT/s DDR4 instead of 3200MT/s on the two higher end V1000 chips. As with the V1000 models except the dual-core V1202B, the R1000 chips support up to dual 10GbE ports as well as various 1GbE and 2.5GbE configurations.

Like Intel’s latest 8th Gen, low-power Whiskey Lake-U CPUs, the chips support USB 3.1 Gen2 for up to 10Gbps throughput. Like the V1000, the R1000 SoC can drive up to 4x USB 3.1 ports as well as a USB Type-C port with DP support. PCIe support tops out at 8x lanes rather than 16x on the V1000. Other I/O support is mostly the same, including dual SATA and NVMe support.

The default OS for the R1000 is Mentor Embedded Linux (MEL) from Siemens. This Yocto Project flavored distro is now called “MEL Flex OS” to differentiate it from the new binary Debian version, called MEL Omni OS. AMD also lists support for Ubuntu 18.04.1, Yocto 2.5, and Windows 10.


Atari VCS

Early adopters: Atari VCS, Ibase SBC, and more

Early R1000 adopters include Advantech, ASRock Industrial, Atari, Axiomtek, DFI, Ibase, Kontron, MEN, Netronome, Quixant, Sapphire, Stratacache, and zSpace. Atari will be using it for its Ubuntu powered Atari VCS in place of the originally announced AMD A1 CPU. “With the AMD Ryzen Embedded R1000 powering the Atari VCS, we can support the 4K 60fps HDR content that users expect from a modern, secure gaming and entertainment system,” stated Michael Arzt, COO of Atari Connected Devices.

Stratacache will use the R1000 in upcoming multi-output digital signage players across its Stratacache, Scala, X2O Media, and Real Digital Media product families. Netronome plans to make R1000-based networking solutions, security appliances, and edge cloud computing systems. Quixant will deploy the SoC in a lower-end version of its V1000-based QXi-7000 casino gaming system called the QXi-7000 LITE.


Ibase SI-323-N and IB918 
(click image to enlarge)
Ibase Technology offered more details on an upcoming 3.5-inch IB918 SBC and SI-323-N signage player. The IB918 supports either R1000 model. You can load up to 32GB DDR4-2400 including ECC memory.

The IB918 SBC offers a SATA III port and an M.2 M-key interface for storage as well as 2x M.2 slots for 2280/2230 card expansion. Other features include 2x HDMI, 1x eDP, 2x GbE, and 4x USB 3.1 ports. There’s a 12-24V DC input and an optional heatsink with fan.

The SI-323-N digital signage player, which follows Ibase’s V1000-based SI-324, uses the higher-end R1606G model with the faster Vega GPU. The fanless system offers 3x HDMI 2.0 ports with independent audio and hardware EDID support.

Further information

The AMD Ryzen Embedded R1000 will be available to ODMs and OEMs worldwide later in this current second quarter. More information may be found in AMD’s R1000 announcement and product page.

This article originally appeared on LinuxGizmos.com on April 16.

AMD | www.amd.com

Rugged COMe Board Sports Ryzen Embedded V1000/R1000 SoC

MEN Micro has announced the CB71C, a rugged COM Express module for rail, public transportation and industry applications.  The module is 100% compatible with the COM Express Type 6 pin-out and conforms to the VITA 59 standard, which specifies robust mechanics to ensure reliable operation under the harsh environmental conditions.
The CB71C Rugged COM Express Module can be equipped with the new Ryzen Embedded R1000 SoC in addition to the Ryzen Embedded V1000 SoC. The new AMD Ryzen Embedded R1000 SoC features a Radeon Vega graphics engine with three compute units and support for up to three displays with a resolution of up to 4k without additional graphics hardware. With up to four “Zen” processor cores, when using the AMD Ryzen Embedded V1000 SoC, the CB71C is also suitable for virtualization.

The module provides passive cooling and a temperature range from -40°C to +85°C are possible with the low-power versions. The CB71C can be equipped with up to 32 GB directly soldered DDR4 main memory and a 16 GB eMMC. PCI Express 3.0, DDI (DP, eDP, HDMI), SATA 3.0, Gigabit Ethernet and USB 3.0 are available as high-speed interfaces.

The COM module has a board management controller with monitoring functions and a trusted platform module. The module also uses the Secure Memory Encryption capability in the AMD Ryzen Embedded R1000 SoC. That feature is essential for security-critical applications such as payment and ticketing terminals, fleet management or monitoring, according to MEN Micro.

Features:

  • AMD Ryzen Embedded V1000/R1000 series
  • Up to 32 GB DDR4 RAM with ECC
  • Up to 4 Digital Display Interfaces (DP, eDP, HDMI, DVI)
  • Hardware memory encryption
  • Safety-relevant supervision functions
  • Virtualization
  • Supports up to -40°C to +85°C Tcase, conduction cooling
  • VITA 59 in process, compliant with COM Express Basic, type 6
  • PICMG COM.0 COM Express version also available

MEN Micro | www.menmicro.com

 

SOMs based on RK3399 and PX30 SoCs target IoT

Arbor Technology has introduced a pair of System-on-Module (SOM) products both based on Rockchip SoCs, the RK3399-based SOM-RK391 and the Rockchip PX30-based SOM-RP301. Both modules run Ubuntu, Buildroot, or Android 9.0. Along with the pair of modules, the company has also released the PBA-9000-A, its SOM-Series, single pin-out design carrier board.

The Rockchip RK3399 SoC has been a favorite among high-end community backed Arm-based boards over the last couple years, and we’ve covered at least one every month over that period. Recent examples include Arbor’s own EmQ-RK390 Qsevenmodule, Geniatech’s DB9 SBC and Vamr’s 96Boards CE-compatible Rock960 Model C. In contrast, the SOM-RP301 appears to be the first module we’ve seen based on Rockchip’s low-power PX30 SoC.

SOM-RK391

Built around the Rockchip RK3399 hexa-core (2x Cortex-A72 + 4x Cortex-A53) SoC, the SOM-RK391 is designed for high-performance applications such as AI computing, edge computing and machine vision, according to Arbor.


SOM-RK391
For memory, the RK391 provides 2GB to 4GB of LPDDR4 DRAM and mass storage via 16GB eMMC flash plus support SD Card boot up. The Mali-T860MP4 GPU supports OpenGL ES1.1/2.0/3.0/3.1, OpenVG1.1, OpenCL and DX11. Display support includes eDP, MIPI DSI and HDMI. The compact 69.6 x 70 mm SOM supports extended operating temperatures from 10 to 70ºC.

The RK391 also provides WiFi /Bluetooth support including 2T2R 802.11 a/b/g/n/ac for WiFi and Bluetooth 5.0 with real simultaneous dual-band (RSDB). You also get 2x MIPI CSI RX camera interfaces with 13MP ISP. For I/O you get 4x USB 2.0, 2x USB 3.0 2 (Type C), 2x 2-wire UART ports and 2x 4-wire UART ports. There’s also support for RTC, 10-bit 1MS/s ADC, SDIO, DIO, GPIO, SPI and I2C.

SOM-RP301

The SOM-RP301 meanwhile is based on the Rockchip PX30 Quad-Core Cortex-A35 processor and measures a compact 70 x 50 mm. Arbor touts the board for its low power consumption, flexible thermal management, cost-efficiency and its suitability for IIoT applications. The combination of its hardware media decoder and processing power makes it a fit to implement in retail kiosks such as electronic restaurant menus, automated currency exchange machines, ticketing kiosks and so on, according to Arbor.



SOM-RP301
The SOM-RP301 offers provides 1GB to 4GB of LPDDR4DRAM and mass storage via 16GB eMMC flash plus support SD Card boot up. The Mali-T860MP4 GPU supports OpenGL ES1.1/2.0/3.0/3.1, OpenVG1.1, OpenCL and DX11. Display support includes LVDS and MIPI DSI, and those interfaces share the same pinout. Like the RK391, this modules also supports extended operating temperatures from 10 to 70ºC.

The RK391 also provides WiFi /Bluetooth support including 1x 802.11 a/b/g/n/ac for WiFi and Bluetooth 4.0. You also get 1x MIPI CSI RX camera interface with 8MP ISP. For I/O the RP301 provides the all the same ports as the RK391 as described above. Despite the fact that Arbor touts the RP301 as a low power solution, its datasheet currently says “TBD” for the board’s power consumption.

PBA-9000-A SOM Carrier Board

Arbor’s PBA-9000-A Carrier Board for its SOM-series features a single pin-out design that enables it to easily support future boards in the Arbor SOM-series CPU Board family. The PBA-9000-A’s I/O configuration supports all of the interfaces on the SOM-series boards.



PBA-9000-A SOM carrier board detail
(click image to enlarge)

Further information

More information on the three boards can be found on the announcement page. No pricing was provided. Links to datasheets for the SOM-RK391, SOM-RP301 and PBA-9000-A boards can be found on Arbor’s ARM-computing product page.

This article originally appeared on LinuxGizmos.com on April 8.

Arbor Technology | www.arbor-technology.com

IoT Smart Water Care System Leverages Nordic’s BLE SoC

Nordic Semiconductor has announced that ConnectedYard has selected Nordic’s nRF51822 Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) SoC to provide the wireless connectivity for pHin, a smart water care solution designed to simplify the care and maintenance of backyard swimming pools and hot tubs. pHin combines an nRF51822 SoC- and Wi-Fi-enabled smart monitor and smartphone app that monitors water chemistry and temperature around the clock and notifies customers when they need to take action.
The pHin Smart Monitor floats in the pool or hot tub and continuously monitors water temperature and water chemistry—including pH and oxidation reduction potential (ORP)—and then wirelessly sends the water chemistry data over the Nordic SoC-enabled Bluetooth LE connection to the pool owner’s Bluetooth 4.0 (or later) smartphone and the ‘pHin WiFi bridge’. The data is also available via the pHin Partner Portal, which allows retailers, service technicians, and pool builders to remotely monitor water conditions and provides features that help drive consumers back to their local retailer for chemicals and other products. pHin uses a coin cell battery to achieve over two years of battery life between replacement, thanks in part to the ultra low power consumption of the nRF51822 SoC.

Nordic’s nRF51822 is ideally suited for Bluetooth LE and 2.4GHz ultra low power wireless applications. The nRF51822 is built around a 32-bit Arm® Cortex M0 CPU, 2.4GHz multiprotocol radio, and 256kB/128kB Flash and 32kB/16kB RAM. The SoC is supplied with Nordic’s S130 SoftDevice, a Bluetooth 4.2 qualified concurrent multi-link protocol stack. Nordic’s software architecture includes a clear separation between the RF protocol software and the application code, simplifying development for ConnectedYard’s engineers and ensuring the SoftDevice doesn’t become corrupted when developing, compiling, testing and verifying application code.

Nordic Semiconductor | www.nordicsemi.com

Infineon, Xilinx and Xylon Team Up for Safety-Critical MCU Effort

Infineon Technologies has announced an effort with Xilinx and Xylon to produce a new Xylon IP core called logiHSSL. It enables high-speed communication between Infineon’s AURIX TC2xx and TC3xx microcontrollers and Xilinx’ SoC, MPSoC and FPGA devices via the Infineon High Speed Serial Link (HSSL). This serial link supports baudrates of up to 320 Mbaud at a net payload data-rate of up to 84%. The HSSL is an Infineon native interface, low-cost in regards to pin-count because it requires only five pins-–-two LVDS with two pins each and one CLK pin. So far, the HSSL interface is used to exchange data between AURIX devices and customer ASICs for performance or functional extension.

Now, the new IP core will allow system developers to combine safety and security provided by AURIX with the wide range of functional possibilities brought to the table by the Xilinx devices. Linked devices can access and control each other’s internal and connected resources through the HSSL.

To support development activities the partners are offering a starter kit. It includes a Xilinx evaluation kit, an Infineon AURIX evaluation board and a Xylon FMC board. Kit deliverables include the reference design with the test software application, Xylon’s logicBRICKS evaluation licenses, documentation and technical support.

The new IP core and the development kit will be available this month (March 2019).

Infineon Technologies | www.infineon.com
Xilinx | www.xilinx.com
Xylon | www.logicbricks.com

Tailored Solutions Tackle Design Needs for Wearables

Low Power Priorities

For wearable devices, every drop of power is precious. That’s driving designers of these embedded systems to attack the power challenge from multiple angles. Fortunately, a slew of analog, power and system ICs have emerged that address the wearable market’s particular needs.

By Jeff Child, Editor-in-Chief

While power is an important issue in any embedded system design, it’s especially critical in wearable devices. Today’s generation of wearable electronics require longer battery lives, more functionality and better performance—all in extremely small form factors. Wearables comprise a wide variety of products including smartwatches, physical activity monitors, heart rate monitors, smart headphones and more.
Today’s wearable electronic devices share some common design priorities. First, they have an extremely low budget for power consumption. And because they’re not suited to being powered by replaceable batteries, they usually require a way for the unit to be recharged. Meanwhile, most modern wearables require some kind of wireless connectivity.

Feeding those needs, chip vendors—primarily from the microcontroller (MCU) and analog sectors—over the past 12 months have announced a generous mix of solutions to help keep power consumption low, to aid recharging and to enable new capabilities while maintaining narrow power constraints. Chip and platform solutions aimed at wearables span the range from specialized power management ICs (PMICs), data converters and power regulator chips, to wireless charging solutions and even complete reference design platforms specially for wearables.

Wrist-Worn Health Gear

Wearables have evolved from being more than just fun devices for health and fitness. Using sophisticated sensors and other capabilities, devices are being designed to do virtual care monitoring, assess chronic conditions and evaluate overall well-being. Along just those lines, in September Maxim Integrated announced its Health Sensor Platform 2.0 (HSP 2.0) (Figure 1). This wrist-worn platform can be used for rapid prototyping, evaluation and development. It provides the ability to monitor electrocardiogram (ECG), heart rate and body temperature from a wrist-worn wearable, saving up to six months in development time, according to Maxim.

Figure 1
The Health Sensor Platform 2.0 is a wrist-worn platform that can be used for rapid prototyping, evaluation and development. It provides the ability to monitor electrocardiogram (ECG), heart rate and body temperature from a wrist-worn wearable.

In the past, system developers have found it challenging to derive precise ECG monitoring from the wrist—most alternatives require a wearable chest strap. Getting accurate body temperature typically requires using a thermometer at another location. Maxim has overcome these challenges in the HSP 2.0. by using its proprietary sensor and health monitoring technology.

Enclosed in a watch casing, the wrist-based form factor enables HSP 2.0 to provide basic functionality out of the box, with body-monitoring measurements starting immediately. Data can be stored on the platform for patient evaluation or streamed to a PC for analysis later. Unlike other wearables, the data measurements collected by the HSP 2.0 can be owned by the wearer. This alleviates data privacy concerns and enables users to conduct their own data analysis. Also, because HSP 2.0 is an open platform, designers can evaluate their own algorithms on the board. In addition, the modular format is future proof to quickly accommodate new sensors over time.

HSP 2.0 includes the following Maxim chips: the MAX32630 DARWIN low-power MCU for wearables; the MAX32664 ultra-low-power biometric sensor hub with embedded heart-rate algorithm; the MAX20303 PMIC; the MAX30205 human body temperature sensor with ±0.1°C accuracy; the MAX30001 single-channel integrated biopotential and bioimpedance analog front-end (AFE) solution; and the MAX86141 optical pulse oximeter and heart-rate sensor.

Energy Controller for Wearables

For its part, Renesas Electronics has been working on meeting extreme low power demands by applying innovations in semiconductor process development. In November the company unveiled an innovative energy-harvesting embedded controller that can eliminate the need to use or replace batteries in a device. Developed based on Renesas’ SOTB (silicon-on-thin-buried-oxide) process technology, the new embedded controller achieves extreme reduction in both active and standby current consumption. The extreme low current levels of the SOTB-based embedded controller enables system designers to completely eliminate the need for batteries in some of their products through harvesting ambient energy sources such as light, vibration and flow (Figure 2).

Figure 2
The extreme low current levels of the SOTB-based embedded controller enables system designers to completely eliminate the need for batteries in some of their products through harvesting ambient energy sources such as light, vibration and flow.

Although the solution was developed with IoT devices in mind, the controller is more broadly aimed at what they call the new market of maintenance-free, connected IoT sensing devices with endpoint intelligence. This includes health and fitness apparel, shoes, wearables, smart watches and drones. Renesas’ first commercial product using SOTB technology, the R7F0E embedded controller, is a 32-bit, Arm Cortex-based embedded controller. The device is capable of operating up to 64 MHz for rapid local processing of sensor data and execution of complex analysis and control functions.

The R7F0E consumes just 20 μA/MHz active current, and only 150 nA deep standby current, approximately one-tenth that of conventional low-power MCUs. According to the company, samples of the new R7F0E embedded controller are available now for beta customers, and samples are scheduled to be available for general customers from July 2019. Mass production is scheduled to start from October 2019.

LDO Regulator for Wearables

Achieving longer battery lives is a problem that can be attacked from many angles. Power regulator electronics are among those. With that in mind, Microchip Technology in October introduced a linear Low Dropout (LDO) regulator that extends battery life in portable devices up to four times longer than traditional ultra-low quiescent (IQ) LDOs. With an ultra-low IQ of 250 nA versus the approximately 1 µA operation of traditional devices, the MCP1811 LDO reduces quiescent current to save battery life, enabling end users to recharge or replace batteries less often (Figure 3).

Figure 3
With an ultra-low IQ of 250 nA versus the approximately 1 µA operation of traditional devices, the MCP1811 LDO regulator saves battery life, enabling end users to recharge or replace batteries less often.

Well suited for IoT and battery-operated applications such as wearables, remotes and hearing aids, the LDO reduces power consumption in applications by minimizing standby or shutdown current. Reducing standby power consumption is critical in remote, battery-powered sensor nodes, where battery replacement is difficult and operating life requirements are high. Available in package options as small as 1 mm x 1 mm, the MCP1811 consumes minimal board space to meet the needs of today’s compact portable electronic designs. Depending on the application and number of LDOs, designers can take advantage of the extra board space with a larger battery to further increase battery life.

An additional benefit the MCP1811 offers is faster load line and transient response when compared to other ultra-low IQ LDOs. Faster response times can accelerate wake-up speed in devices such as monitors or sensors that require immediate attention. Faster transient response can help designers avoid undervoltage and overvoltage lockout measures used in sensitive applications where transient spikes can lead to catastrophic results.

Secure Payments with Wearables

An important capability in a certain class of wearables is the ability to support electronic retail transactions directly from the wearable device. While this is arguably a whole separate technology category in itself, we’ll touch on a couple developments here. In November, Infineon Technologies announced an EMV-based payment solution for key chains, rings, wristbands, bracelets and other wearable devices.

The SECORA Pay W for Smart Payment Accessories (SPA) combines an EMV chip with the card operating system, payment applet as well as the antenna directly on the unit. As a turnkey solution it allows card vendors, device manufacturers, financial institutions or event organizers to quickly and cost-efficiently introduce fashion accessories for payment and even access.

Infineon’s SECORA Pay solutions portfolio comprises the SECORA Pay S for standard Visa and MasterCard payment cards, SECORA Pay X for applications with extended features such as multi-application, national debit and white label schemes or access management and SECORA Pay W for payment accessories. All SECORA turn-key solutions are pre-certified by Mastercard and Visa and will accelerate the deployment of contactless payment. The EMV Chip Specifications (www.emvco.com) define globally valid requirements for chip-based payment solutions and acceptance terminals. They enable secure contact- and contactless applications and the use of other emerging payment technologies.

Complete Payment SoC

Likewise a player in the contactless transaction market, STMicroelectronics (ST) back in October announced teaming up with Fidesmo to create a turnkey active solution for secure contactless payments on smart watches and other wearable technology. The complete payment system-on-chip (SoC) is based on ST’s STPay-Boost IC, which combines a hardware secure element to protect transactions and a contactless controller featuring proprietary active-boost technology that maintains reliable NFC connections even in devices made with metallic materials. Its single-chip footprint fits easily within wearable form factors (Figure 4).

Figure 4
The STPay-Boost IC combines a hardware secure element to protect transactions and a contactless controller featuring proprietary active-boost technology that maintains reliable NFC connections even in devices made with metallic materials. Its single-chip footprint fits easily within wearable form factors.

ST’s proprietary NFC-boosting active load modulation technology simplifies RF design and accelerates time to market by ensuring superior performance with little or no circuit optimization needed. A small-size antenna can sustain robust and reliable wireless connection, permitting smaller overall product dimensions and lower power consumption resulting in longer battery life.

Fidesmo’s MasterCard MDES tokenization platform completes the solution by allowing the user to load the personal data needed for payment transactions. Convenient Over-The-Air (OTA) technology makes personalization a simple step for the user without any special equipment. Kronaby, a Sweden-based hybrid smartwatch maker, has embedded the STPay-Boost chip in its portfolio of men’s and women’s smart watches that offer differentiated features such as freedom from charging and filtered notifications. The SoC with Fidesmo tokenization enables Kronaby watches to support a variety of services such as payments, access control, transportation and loyalty rewards.

Data Converters

Data converters also have role to play in efforts to meet the extreme low power needs of wearable devices. Along such lines, in December Texas Instruments (TI) introduced four tiny precision data converters (Figure 5). The new data converters enable designers to add more intelligence and functionality, while shrinking system board space. The DAC80508 and DAC70508 are eight-channel precision digital-to-analog converters (DACs) that provide true 16- and 14-bit resolution, respectively.

Figure 5
The DAC80508 and DAC70508 are eight-channel precision DACs that provide true 16- and 14-bit resolution, respectively. The ADS122C04 and ADS122U04 are 24-bit precision ADCs that feature a two-wire, I2C-compatible interface and a two-wire, UART-compatible interface, respectively.

The ADS122C04 and ADS122U04 are 24-bit precision analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) that feature a two-wire, I2C-compatible interface and a two-wire, UART-compatible interface, respectively. The devices are optimized for a variety of small-size, high-performance or cost-sensitive electronics applications such as wearables.

Both DACs include a 2.5-V, 5-ppm/°C internal reference, eliminating the need for an external precision reference. Available in a 2.4-mm-by-2.4-mm die-size ball-grid array (DSBGA) package or wafer chip-scale package (WCSP) and a 3-mm-by-3-mm quad flat no-lead (QFN)-16 package, these devices are up to 36% smaller than the competition, says TI. Meanwhile, the tiny, 24-bit precision ADCs are available in 3-mm-by-3-mm very thin QFN (WQFN)-16 and 5-mm-by-4.4-mm thin-shrink small-outline package (TSSOP)-16 options. The two-wire interface requires fewer digital isolation channels than a standard serial peripheral interface (SPI), reducing the overall cost of an isolated system. These precision ADCs eliminate the need for external circuitry by integrating a flexible input multiplexer, a low-noise programmable gain amplifier and other circuitry.

Memory Innovations

Among the latest innovations aimed at wearables from Cypress Semiconductor is an FRAM (ferroelectric random access memory)-based data logging solution. In November, Cypress introduced a nonvolatile data-logging solution with ultra-low power consumption. This solution is well suited for portable medical and wearable devices that demand nonvolatile memories to continuously log an increasing amount of user and sensor data while using as little power as possible.

Cypress’ Excelon LP FRAM is an energy-efficient device that provides instant-write capabilities with virtually unlimited endurance (Figure 6). This enables wearable systems to perform mission-critical data logging requirements while maximizing battery life. The Excelon LP series is available in a low-pin-count, small-footprint package that is suited for space-constrained, wearable applications.

Figure 6
The Excelon LP FRAM provides instant-write capabilities with virtually unlimited endurance. This enables wearable systems to perform mission-critical data logging requirements while maximizing battery life.

The Excelon LP series offers 4-Mb and 8-Mb industrial and commercial-grade densities with 50 MHz and 20 MHz Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI) performance. The series reduces power consumption with 100 nA hibernate and 1 µA standby modes that greatly improve a battery-powered product’s user experience by extending system operating time. The device’s inherent instant writes also eliminate power failure “data-at-risk” due to volatile data buffers in legacy memories. The family features wide voltage operation from 1.71 V to 3.6 V and is available in RoHS-compliant industry-standard packages that are pin compatible with EEPROMs and other nonvolatile memories. Excelon LP F-RAMs provide 1,000-trillion (1015) read/write cycle endurance with 10 years of data retention at 85°C or 151 years at 65°C.

Charging Wearables

A common aspect of wearable devices is that they tend not to be suited for replaceable batteries. As a result, they typically need to be recharged. Wireless (cordless) battery charging is beginning to take hold as a solution. Feeding such needs, in October Analog Devices announced its Power by Linear LTC4126 as an expansion of its offerings in wireless battery charging. The LTC4126 combines a wireless powered battery charger for Li-Ion cells with a high efficiency multi-mode charge pump DC-DC converter, providing a regulated 1.2 V output at up to 60 mA (Figure 7).

Figure 7
The LTC4126 combines a wireless powered battery charger for Li-Ion cells with a high efficiency multi-mode charge pump DC-DC converter, providing a regulated 1.2 V output at up to 60 mA.

Charging with the LTC4126 allows for a completely sealed end product without wires or connectors and eliminates the need to constantly replace non-rechargeable (primary) batteries. The efficient 1.2 V charge pump output features pushbutton on/off control and can directly power the end product’s ASIC. This greatly simplifies the system solution and reduces the number of necessary external components. The device is ideal for space-constrained low power Li-Ion cell powered wearables such as hearing aids, medical smart patches, wireless headsets and IoT devices.

The LTC4126, with its input power management circuitry, rectifies AC power from a wireless power receiver coil and generates a 2.7 V to 5.5 V input rail to power a full-featured constant-current/constant-voltage battery charger. Features of the battery charger include a pin selectable charge voltage of 4.2 V or 4.35 V, 7.5 mA charge current, automatic recharge, battery temperature monitoring via an NTC pin, and an onboard 6-hour safety charge termination timer. Low battery protection disconnects the battery from all loads when the battery voltage is below 3.0 V. The LTC4126’s charge pump switching frequency is set to 50 kHz/75 kHz to keep switching noise out of the audible range, ideal for audio related applications such as hearing aids and wireless headsets. The IC is housed in a compact, low profile (0.74 mm) 12-lead 2 mm × 2 mm LQFN package. The device is guaranteed for operation from –20°C to 85°C in E-grade.

Kit for Wireless Charging

Also facilitating building wireless chargers for wearables, ST for its part offers a kit-level solution. The ST plug-and-play wireless battery-charger development kit (STEVAL-ISB045V1) lets users quickly build ultra-compact chargers up to 2.5 W with a space-saving 20 mm-diameter coil, for charging small IoT devices and wearables such as smart watches, sports gear or healthcare equipment (Figure 8).

Figure 8
The ST plug-and-play wireless battery-charger development kit lets users quickly build ultra-compact chargers up to 2.5 W with a space-saving 20 mm-diameter coil, for charging small IoT devices and wearables such as smart watches, sports gear or healthcare equipment.

Built around the STWBC-WA wireless charging-transmitter controller, the kit comprises a charging base unit containing a transmitter board with the 20 mm coil already connected and ready to use. Getting started is easy, using the PC-based STSW-STWBCGUI software to configure the STWBC-WA and monitor runtime information such as power delivered, bridge frequency, demodulation quality and protocol status. The kit includes a dongle for running the GUI. The supporting ecosystem includes certified reference boards, software and detailed documentation to help developers quickly design chargers for wearables.

The STWBC-WA controller chip contains integrated drivers and natively supports full-bridge or half-bridge topologies for powering the antenna. The half-bridge option allows charging up to 1 W with a smaller-diameter coil for an even more compact form factor. The chip supports all standard wireless-charging features, including Foreign Object Detection (FOD) and active presence detection for safe charging, and uses digital feedback to adapt the transmitted power for optimum efficiency at all load conditions. Two firmware options give users the choice of a fast turnkey solution or customizing the application using APIs to access on-chip peripherals including an ADC, a UART and GPIOs.

Clearly there are many facets and angles to address the low power needs of wearables. As demands for more functionality rise, system developers will need to remain ever mindful of keeping battery life at the same lengths or longer. Fortunately, there seems to be no stopping the innovation among chip vendors targeting this growing wearables market.

RESOURCES

Analog Devices | www.analog.com
Cypress Semiconductor | www.cypress.com
Infineon Technologies | www.infineon.com
Maxim Integrated | www.maximintegrated.com
Microchip Technology | www.microchip.com
Renesas Electronics America | www.renesas.com
STMicroelectronics | www.st.com
Texas Instruments | www.ti.com

This article appeared in the March 344 issue of Circuit Cellar

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i.MX 8M SoC-Based Solution Enables Immersive 3D Audio

NXP Semiconductors has announced its Immersiv3D audio solution for the smart home market. The solution combines NXP software on its i.MX 8M Mini applications processor and will support both Dolby Atmos and DTS:X immersive audio technologies in future devices that integrate the i.MX 8M Mini SoC. The i.MX 8M Mini also brings smart capabilities like voice control to a broader range of consumer devices including soundbars, smart speakers, and AV receivers with the option for adding additional speakers to distribute smart voice control and immersive audio throughout the home.

TVs and audio systems are becoming more advanced thanks in large part to the development of Dolby Atmos and DTS:X. Both technologies are a leap forward from surround sound and transport listeners with moving audio that fills the room and flows all around them. Listeners will feel like they’re inside the action as the sounds of people, places, thing, and music come alive with breathtaking realism. NXP’s Immersiv3D audio solution was designed to enable OEMs to bring to market affordable consumer audio devices capable of supporting Dolby Atmos and DTS:X in their next-generation devices.

Conventional design approaches to audio systems use Digital Signal Processors (DSPs) to deliver complex, controlled and low-latency audio processing to enable audio and video synchronization. But Traditional embedded systems have evolved over time, and today they are capable of processing the latest 3D audio formats, but audio systems need to be designed to take advantage of today’s advanced processor cores. In conjunction with the NXP i.MX 8M family of processors, the Immersiv3D audio solution introduces an advanced approach that features scalable audio processing integration into the SoC Arm cores. This approach eliminates the need for expensive discrete DSPs, and also once-proprietary DSP design foundations, to embrace licensable cores.

The solution delivers high-end audio features such as immersive multi-channel audio playback, natural language processing and voice capabilities to fit today’s digitally savvy connected consumer. The NXP Immersiv3D audio solution gives audio developers, designers and integrators a leap forward to add intelligence and Artificial Intelligence (AI) functionality while reducing cost. This includes development of enhancements like selective noise canceling where only certain sound elements are removed like car traffic or speech processing like changing speaker dialect or languages.

The solution introduces an easy-to-use, low-cost enablement for voice capability expansion. Audio systems built using NXP’s Immersiv3D with the i.MX 8M Mini applications processor will give consumers the flexibility to add different audio speakers, regardless of brand, to stream simultaneous and synchronized audio with voice control from their systems.

NXP showcased its i.MX applications processor family including Immersiv3D at the CES 2019 show.

NXP Semiconductors | www.nxp.com

Mini-ITX SBC Sports AMD Ryzen APU SoC

WIN Enterprises has announced the MB-73480 which supports the AMD Ryzen Embedded V1000 processor family. The AMD processors combine the performance of the AMD “Zen” CPU and “Vega” GPU architectures in an integrated SoC solution. In addition, the AMD Ryzen processors deliver discrete-GPU caliber graphics and multimedia processing. Compute performance clocks to 3.61 TFLOPS with thermal design power (TDP) as low as 12 W and as high as 54 W.

The advanced AMD Ryzen CPUs and its other features make the MB-73480 well suited for applications requiring high performance graphics and advanced processing power. Applications include: gaming machines, digital signage, medical imaging, industrial control/automation, thin client, office automation and communication infrastructure. WIN Enterprises will customize the PL-81280 based on a customer’s more specific market needs.

MB-73480 Features:

  • AMD embedded components ensure long product life
  • AMD V1000 Socket FP5 BGA Type CPU mounted onboard (Zen Core-4/8 cores with 2 MB L2 Cache) drawing up to 54 W
  • Supports 4x Independent Displays with 4x DP++ Output
  • AMD Radeon™ Vega core, up to 11 Compute Units
  • Dual DDR4 SO-DIMM Socket and supports from DDR4 1333~3200 SO-DIMM (ECC or non-ECC)
  • 2x RJ45 Port with 10/100/1000 Mbps Transfer speed (Intel I211AT)
  • 5x USB 3.0, 1x USB 2.0, 5x COM, 1x CFast Card, 1x M.2 2280 Socket (B+M key),1x Audio-Jack
  • 2x SATA III Ports with 5 V Power; supports 2x 8G UMLC SATA DOM
  • TPM 2.0
  • 0°C to +60°C operating temperature

WIN Enterprises | www.win-ent.com