September Circuit Cellar: Sneak Preview

The September issue of Circuit Cellar magazine is out next week! This 84-page publication stitches together a fine tapestry of fascinating embedded electronics articles crafted for your reading pleasure.

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Here’s a sneak preview of September 2019 Circuit Cellar:

TECHNOLOGY FOR SECURITY, SENSORS & THE IoT

Security Solutions for IoT
By Jeff Child
In this IoT era of connected devices, microcontrollers have begun taking on new roles and gaining new capabilities revolving around embedded security. MCUs are embedding ever-more sophisticated security features into their devices-both on their own and via partnerships with security specialists. Here, Circuit Cellar’s Editor-in-Chief, Jeff Child, looks at the latest technology and trends in MCU security.

Electromagnetic Fault Injection: A Closer Look
By Colin O’Flynn
Electromagnetic Fault Injection (EMFI) is a powerful method of inserting faults into embedded devices, but what does this give us? In this article, Colin dives into a little more detail of what sort of effects EMFI has on real devices, and expands upon a few previous articles to demonstrate some attacks on new devices.
 
Product Focus: IoT Gateways
By Jeff Child
IoT gateways are a smart choice to facilitate bidirectional communication between IoT field devices and the cloud. Gateways also provide local processing and storage capabilities for offline services as well as near real-time management and control of edge devices. This Product Focus section updates readers on these technology trends and provides a product gallery of representative IoT gateways.
 
Comparing Color Sensor ICs
By Kevin Jensen
Driven by demands from mobile phone, display and specialty lighting equipment manufacturers, the need for sophisticated and accurate chip-scale color and spectral sensors has become stronger than ever. In this article, ams’ Kevin Jensen describes the types of optical sensors and detectors. He also provides ideas on evaluating the suitability of each type for specific applications.

PC-BASED SOLUTIONS FOR EMBEDDED SYSTEMS
 
Mini-ITX, Pico-ITX and Nano-ITX Boards
By Jeff Child
Products based on the various small-sized versions of the ITX form factor—Mini-ITX, Pico-ITX and Nano—ITX-provide system developers with complete PC-functionality and advanced graphics. Circuit Cellar Chief Editor Jeff Child explores the latest technology trends and product developments in these three ITX architectures.
 
Using Small PCs in New Ways
By Wolfgang Matthes
Even simple MCU-based projects often require some sort of front panel interface. Traditionally such systems had to rely on LEDs and switches for such simple interfaces. These days however, you can buy small, inexpensive computing devices such as mini-PCs and notebook computers and adapt them to fill those interfacing roles. In this article, Wolfgang steps you through the options and issues involved in connecting such PC-based devices to an MCU-based environment.



FOCUS ON MICROCONTROLLERS
 
Guitar Game Uses PIC32 MCU
By Brian Dempsey, Katarina Martucci and Liam Patterson
Guitar Hero has been an extremely popular game for decades. Many college kids today who played it when they were kids still enjoy playing it today. These three Cornell students are just such fans. Learn how they used Microchip’s microcontroller and 12-bit DAC to craft their own version that lets them play any song they wish by using MIDI files.
 
Offloading Intelligence
By Jeff Bachiochi
While some embedded systems do just fine with a single microcontroller, there are situations when offloading some processing into a second processing unit, such as a second MCU, offers a lot of advantages. In this article, Jeff explores this question in the context of a robotic system project that uses Arduino and an external motor driver.
 
Building a Portable Game Console
By Juan Joel Albrecht and Leandro Dorta Duque
32-bit MCUs can do so much these days—even providing all the needed control functionality for a gaming console. Along just those lines, learn how these three Cornell students built a portable game console that combines a Microchip PIC32 MCU embedded in a custom-designed 3D-printed case, printed circuit board and in-house gameplay graphics. The device includes a 320 x 240 TFT color display.
 


… AND MORE FROM OUR EXPERT COLUMNISTS
 
Variable Frequency Drive Part 2
By Brian Millier
In Part 1 Brian started to describe the process he used to convert a 3-phase motor and OEM Variable Frequency Drive (VFD) controller—salvaged from his defunct clothes washer—into a variable speed drive for his bandsaw. In this article, he completes the discussion this tim,e covering the Cypress Semi PSoC5LP SoC he used, the software design and more.
 
Semiconductor Fundamentals Part 1
By George Novacek
Embedded systems—or even modern electronics in general—couldn’t exist without semiconductor technology. In this new article series, George delves into the fundamentals of semiconductors. In Part 1 George examines the math, chemistry and materials science that are fundamental to semiconductors with a look at the basic structures that make them work.
 

 

August Circuit Cellar: Sneak Preview

The August issue of Circuit Cellar magazine is out next week! This 84-page publication rustles up a powerful herd of compelling embedded electronics articles prepared for your reading pleasure.

Not a Circuit Cellar subscriber?  Don’t be left out! Sign up today:

 

Here’s a sneak preview of August 2019 Circuit Cellar:

MCU AND EMBEDDED SYSTEM TECHNOLOGIES

MCUs for Driverless Cars
By Jeff Child
Driverless cars are steadily advancing toward becoming a mainstream phenomenon. Building toward that goal, chip vendors are evolving their driver assistance technologies into complete driver replacement solutions. These solutions make use of powerful microcontroller solutions to analyze a car’s surroundings, process the information and employ control functionality to steer cars safely. Circuit Cellar Chief Editor Jeff Child examines the MCU technology and product trends that are key to driverless vehicle evolution.

Product Focus: Small and Tiny Embedded Boards
By Jeff Child
An amazing amount of computing functionality can be squeezed on to a small form factor board these days. These small—and even tiny—board-level products meet the needs of applications where extremely low SWaP (size, weight and power) beats all other demands. This Product Focus section updates readers on this technology trend and provides a product album of representative small and tiny embedded boards.

Portable Digital Synthesizer
By T.J. Hurd and Ben Roberge
Gone are the days when even a basic music synthesizer was a bulky system requiring highly specialized design knowledge. These two Cornell students developed a portable musical synthesizer using a Microchip PIC32 MCU. The portable system performs digital audio synthesis on the fly and produces sounds that range from simple sine waves to heavily modulated waveforms.

Displays for Embedded Systems
By Jeff Child
Thanks to advances in displays and innovations in graphics ICs, embedded systems can now routinely feature sophisticated graphical user interfaces. What used to require a dedicated board-level graphics/video board, now can be integrated into a chip or just a part of a chip. Circuit Cellar Chief Editor Jeff Child dives into the latest technology trends and product developments in displays for embedded systems.

Building a Twitter Emote Robot
By Ian Kranz, Nikhil Dhawan and Sofya Calvin
Social media is so pervasive these days that it’s hard to image life without it. But digital interactions can be isolating because the physical feedback component gets lost. Using PIC32 MCU technology, these three Cornell students built an emotionally expressive robot which physically reacts to tweets in a live setting. Users can tweet to the robot’s Twitter account and receive near instant feedback as the robot shares its feelings about the tweet via physical means such as sounds, facial expressions and more.

Understanding the Role of Inference Engines in AI
By Geoff Tate, Flex Logix
Artificial Intelligence offers huge benefits for embedded systems. But implementing AI well requires making smart technology choices, especially when it comes to selected a neural inferencing engine. In this article, Flex Logix CEO Geoff Tate explains what inferencing is, how it plays into AI and how embedded system designers can make sure they are using the right solution for their AI processing.


FUN WITH LIGHT AND HEAT

Watt’s Up with LEDs?
By Jeff Bachiochi
When Jeff puts his mind to a technology topic, he goes in deep. In this article, he explores all aspects of LED lighting—including the history, math, science and technology of LEDs. He discusses everything from temperature issues to powering LEDs. After purchasing some LEDs, Jeff embarks on a series of tests and shares his results and insights.

Automating the Art of Toast
By Michael Xiao and Katie Bradford
The emergence of culinary robotics and automation has already begun to revolutionize the way we prepare our meals. In this article, learn how these two Cornell undergraduates designed an advanced toaster that’s able to toast any pattern—image, text or even today’s weather—onto a piece of bread. The project makes use of Microchip’s MIC32 MCU and a Raspberry Pi Zero W board.

Build an RGB LED Controller
By Dirceu R. Rodrigues Jr.
There are a lot of fun and interesting things you can do with LEDs and different ways to control them. In this article, Dirceu describes an alternative approach to control RGB LEDs using the parallel FET dimming technique. He steps through his efforts to design and build an alternative lightning system based on power RGB LEDs. To control them he goes very old school and uses an 8-bit MCU and the BASIC programming language.


… AND MORE FROM OUR EXPERT COLUMNISTS

Energy Monitoring Part 3
By George Novacek
This is the final installment of George’s energy monitoring article series. He discussed the solar power supply in Part 1 and the utility power data acquisition in Part 2. In Part 3, he wraps up the series by looking at the remaining modules that comprise his home energy monitoring setup, including the sensors, the natural gas monitor and the real-time clock.

The Fundamentals of Fuseology
By Robert Lacoste
Just because an electronic device is simple you shouldn’t relegate it to an afterthought in your embedded system design. Such is the case with fuses. Robert explores the fundamentals of this seemingly simple device. In this article, he dives into the history, key specifications and technology of fuses. He also steps you through an experiment to analyze the performance of fuses and shares his results.

Bluetooth Mesh (Part 4)
By Bob Japenga
In this next part of his article series on Bluetooth mesh, Bob looks at how models are defined in the Bluetooth Mesh specification and how practical it is to use them. He looks at the models defined by the Bluetooth SIG and discusses creating your own models for Bluetooth Mesh.

 

 

 

July Circuit Cellar: Sneak Preview

The July issue of Circuit Cellar magazine is out next week! This 84-page publication will make a satisfying thud sound when it lands on your desk and it’s crammed full of excellent embedded electronics articles prepared for you.

Not a Circuit Cellar subscriber?  Don’t be left out! Sign up today:

 

Here’s a sneak preview of July 2019 Circuit Cellar:

CONNECTED SYSTEMS IN ACTION

Embedded Computing
in Railway Systems
Railway systems keep getting more advanced. On both the control side and passenger entertainment side, embedded computers and power supplies play critical roles. Railway systems need sophisticated networking, data collection and real-time control, all while meeting safety standards. Circuit Cellar Chief Editor Jeff Child looks at the latest technology trends and products relevant to railway applications.

Product Focus:
IoT Interface Modules
The fast growing IoT phenomenon is driving demand for highly integrated modules designed for the IoT edge. Feeding those needs, a new crop of IoT modules have emerged that offer pre-certified solutions that are ready to use. This Product Focus section updates readers on this technology trend and provides a product album of representative IoT modules.

TECHNOLOGIES AND TECHNIQUES FOR ENGINEERS

FPGA Signal Processing
Offering the dual benefits of powerful signal processing and system-level integration, FPGAs have become a key technology for embedded system developers. Makers of chip and board-level FPGA products are providing complete solutions to enable developers to meet their application needs. Circuit Cellar Chief Editor Jeff Child explores the latest technology trends and product developments in FPGA signal processing.

Macros for AVR Assembler Programming
The AVR microcontroller instruction set provides a simplicity that makes it good for learning the root principles of machine programming. There’s also a rich set of macros available for the AVR that ease assembler-level programming. In this article, Wolfgang Matthes steps you through these principles, with the goal of helping programmers “think low-level, write high-level” when they approach embedded systems software development.

Inrush Current Limiters in Action
At the moment a high-power system is switched on, high loads can result in serious damage—even when the extra load is only for short time. Inrush current limiters (ICLs) can help prevent these issues. In this article, TDK Electronics’ Matt Reynolds examines ICLs based on NTC and PTC thermistors, discussing the underlying technology and the device options.

A Look at Cores with TrustZone-M
It’s not so easy to keep up with all the new security features on the latest and greatest embedded processors—especially while you’re busy focusing on the more fundamental and unique aspects of your design. In this article, Colin O’Flynn helps out by examining the new processor cores using TrustZone-M, a feature that helps you secure even low-cost and lower power system designs.

PROJECTS THAT REUSE & RECYCLE

Energy Monitoring Part 2
In Part 1 of this article series, George Novacek began describing an MCU-based system he built to monitor his household energy. Here, he continues that discussion, this time focusing on the electrical power tracking module. As the story shows, he stuck to a design challenge of building the system with as many components he already had in his component bins.

Variable Frequency Drive Part 1
Modern appliances claim to be more efficient, but they’re certainly not designed to last as long as older models. In this project article, Brian Millier describes how he reused subsystems from a defunct modern washing machine to power his bandsaw. The effort provides valuable insights on how to make use of the complete 3-phase Variable Frequency Drive (VFD) borrowed from the washing machine.

FUN PROJECT ARTICLES WITH ALL THE DETAILS

Windless Wind Chimes (Part 2)
In part 1 of this article series, Jeff Bachiochi built a system to simulate breezes randomly playing the sounds of suspended wind chimes. In part 2 the effort evolves into a less random, more orchestrated project. Jeff decided this time to craft a string of chromatically tuned chimes, similar to what an orchestra might use so the project could be used to play music. The project relies on MIDI, an industry standard music technology protocol designed to create and share music and artistic works.

Building a Smart Frying Pan
There’s almost no limit to what an MCU can be used for—-including objects that previously had no electronics at all. In this article, learn how Cornell University graduate Joseph Dwyer build a Microchip PIC32 MCU-based system that wirelessly measures and controls the temperature of a pan on a stove. The system improves both the safety and reliability of cooking on the stove, and has potentially interesting commercial applications.

EOG-Controlled Video Game
There’s much be to learned about how electronics can interact with biological signals—not only to record, but also to see how they can be used as inputs for control applications. With ongoing research in fields such as virtual reality and prosthetics, new systems are being developed to interpret different types of signals for practical applications. Learn how Cornell graduates  Eric Cole, Evan Mok and Alex Huang use electrooculography (EOG) to control a simple video game by measuring eye movement.

Q&A: Andrew Godbehere, Imaginative Engineering

Engineers are inherently imaginative. I recently spoke with Andrew Godbehere, an Electrical Engineering PhD candidate at the University of California, Berkeley, about how his ideas become realities, his design process, and his dream project. —Nan Price, Associate Editor

Andrew Godbehere

Andrew Godbehere

NAN: You are currently working toward your Electrical Engineering PhD at the University of California, Berkeley. Can you describe any of the electronics projects you’ve worked on?

ANDREW: In my final project at Cornell University, I worked with a friend of mine, Nathan Ward, to make wearable wireless accelerometers and find some way to translate a dancer’s movement into music, in a project we called CUMotive. The computational core was an Atmel ATmega644V connected to an Atmel AT86RF230 802.15.4 wireless transceiver. We designed the PCBs, including the transmission line to feed the ceramic chip antenna. Everything was hand-soldered, though I recommend using an oven instead. We used Kionix KXP74 tri-axis accelerometers, which we encased in a lot of hot glue to create easy-to-handle boards and to shield them from static.

This is the central control belt-pack to be worn by a dancer for CUMotive, the wearable accelerometer project. An Atmel ATmega644V and an AT86RF230 were used inside to interface to synthesizer. The plastic enclosure has holes for the belt to attach to a dancer. Wires connect to accelerometers, which are worn on the dancer’s limbs.

This is the central control belt-pack to be worn by a dancer for CUMotive, the wearable accelerometer project. An Atmel ATmega644V and an AT86RF230 were used inside to interface to synthesizer. The plastic enclosure has holes for the belt to attach to a dancer. Wires connect to accelerometers, which are worn on the dancer’s limbs.

The dancer had four accelerometers connected to a belt pack with an Atmel chip and transceiver. On the receiver side, a musical instrument digital interface (MIDI) communicated with a synthesizer. (Design details are available at http://people.ece.cornell.edu/land/courses/ece4760/FinalProjects/s2007/njw23_abg34/index.htm.)

I was excited about designing PCBs for 802.15.4 radios and making them work. I was also enthusiastic about trying to figure out how to make some sort of music with the product. We programmed several possibilities, one of which was a sort of theremin; another was a sort of drum kit. I found that this was the even more difficult part—not just the making, but the making sense.

When I got to Berkeley, my work switched to the theoretical. I tried to learn everything I could about robotic systems and how to make sense of them and their movements.

NAN: Describe the real-time machine vision-tracking algorithm and integrated vision system you developed for the “Are We There Yet?” installation.

ANDREW: I’ve always been interested in using electronics and robotics for art. Having a designated emphasis in New Media on my degree, I was fortunate enough to be invited to help a professor on a fascinating project.

This view of the Yud Gallery is from the installed camera with three visitors present. Note the specular reflections on the floor. They moved throughout the day with the sun. This movement needed to be discerned from a visitor’s typical movement .

This view of the Yud Gallery is from the installed camera with three visitors present. Note the specular reflections on the floor. They moved throughout the day with the sun. This movement needed to be discerned from a visitor’s typical movement .

For the “Are We There Yet?” installation, we used a PointGrey FireFlyMV camera with a wide-angle lens. The camera was situated a couple hundred feet away from the control computer, so we used a USB-to-Ethernet range extender to communicate with the camera.

We installed a color camera in a gallery in the Contemporary Jewish Museum in San Francisco, CA. We used Meyer Sound speakers with a high-end controller system, which enabled us to “position” sound in the space and to sweep audio tracks around at (the computer’s programmed) will. The Meyer Sound D-Mitri platform was controlled by the computer with Open Sound Control (OSC).

This view of the Yud Gallery is from the perspective of the computer running the analysis. This is a probabilistic view, where the brightness of each pixel represents the “belief” that the pixel is part of an interesting foreground object, such as a pedestrian. Note the hot spots corresponding nicely with the locations of the visitors in the image above.

This view of the Yud Gallery is from the perspective of the computer running the analysis. This is a probabilistic view, where the brightness of each pixel represents the “belief” that the pixel is part of an interesting foreground object, such as a pedestrian. Note the hot spots corresponding nicely with the locations of the visitors in the image above.

The hard work was to then program the computer to discern humans from floors, furniture, shadows, sunbeams, and cloud reflections. The gallery had many skylights, which made the lighting very dynamic. Then, I programmed the computer to keep track of people as they moved and found that this dynamic information was itself useful to determine whether detected color-perturbance was human or not.

Once complete, the experience of the installation was beautiful, enchanting, and maybe a little spooky. The audio tracks were all questions (e.g., “Are we there yet?”) and they were always spoken near you, as if addressed to you. They responded to your movement in a way that felt to me like dancing with a ghost. You can watch videos about the installation at www.are-we-there-yet.org.

The “Are We There Yet?” project opens itself up to possible use as an embedded system. I’ve been told that the software I wrote works on iOS devices by the start-up company Romo (www.kickstarter.com/projects/peterseid/romo-the-smartphone-robot-for-everyone), which was evaluating my vision-tracking code for use in its cute iPhone rover. Further, I’d say that if someone were interested, they could create a similar pedestrian, auto, pet, or cloud-tracking system using a Raspberry Pi and a reasonable webcam.

I may create an automatic cloud-tracking system to watch clouds. I think computers could be capable of this capacity for abstraction, even though we think of the leisurely pastime as the mark of a dreamer.

NAN: Some of the projects you’ve contributed to focus on switched linear systems, hybrid systems, wearable interfaces, and computation and control. Tell us about the projects and your research process.

ANDREW: I think my research is all driven by imagination. I try to imagine a world that could be, a world that I think would be nice, or better, or important. Once I have an idea that captivates my imagination in this way, I have no choice but to try to realize the idea and to seek out the knowledge necessary to do so.

For the wearable wireless accelerometers, it began with the thought: Wouldn’t it be cool if dance and music were inherently connected the way we try to make it seem when we’re dancing? From that thought, the designs started. I thought: The project has to be wireless and low power, it needs accelerometers to measure movement, it needs a reasonable processor to handle the data, it needs MIDI output, and so forth.

My switched linear systems research came about in a different way. As I was in class learning about theories regarding stabilization of hybrid systems, I thought: Why would we do it this complicated way, when I have this reasonably simple intuition that seems to solve the problem? I happened to see the problem a different way as my intuition was trying to grapple with a new concept. That naive accident ended up as a publication, “Stabilization of Planar Switched Linear Systems Using Polar Coordinates,” which I presented in 2010 at Hybrid Systems: Computation and Control (HSCC) in Stockholm, Sweden.

NAN: How did you become interested in electronics?

ANDREW: I always thought things that moved seemingly of their own volition were cool and inherently attention-grabbing. I would think: Did it really just do that? How is that possible?

Andrew worked on this project when computers still had parallel ports. a—This photo shows manually etched PCB traces for a digital EKG (the attempted EEG) with 8-bit LED optoisolation. The rainbow cable connects to a computer’s parallel port. The interface code was written in C++ and ran on DOS. b—The EKG circuitry and digitizer are shown on the left. The 8-bit parallel computer interface is on the right. Connecting the two boards is an array of coupled LEDs and phototransistors, encased in heat shrink tubing to shield against outside light.

Andrew worked on this project when computers still had parallel ports. a—This photo shows manually etched PCB traces for a digital EKG (the attempted EEG) with 8-bit LED optoisolation. The rainbow cable connects to a computer’s parallel port. The interface code was written in C++ and ran on DOS. b—The EKG circuitry and digitizer are shown on the left. The 8-bit parallel computer interface is on the right. Connecting the two boards is an array of coupled LEDs and phototransistors, encased in heat shrink tubing to shield against outside light.

Electric rally-car tracks and radio-controlled cars were a favorite of mine. I hadn’t really thought about working with electronics or computers until middle school. Before that, I was all about paleontology. Then, I saw an episode of Scientific American Frontiers, which featured Alan Alda excitedly interviewing RoboCup contestants. Watching RoboCup [a soccer game involving robotic players], I was absolutely enchanted.

While my childhood electronic toys moved and somehow acted as their own entities, they were puppets to my intentions. Watching RoboCup, I knew these robots were somehow making their own decisions on-the-fly, magically making beautiful passes and goals not as puppets, but as something more majestic. I didn’t know about the technical blood, sweat, and tears that went into it all, so I could have these romantic fantasies of what it was, but I was hooked from that moment.

That spurred me to apply to a specialized science and engineering high school program. It was there that I was fortunate enough to attend a fabulous electronics class (taught by David Peins), where I learned the basics of electronics, the joy of tinkering, and even PCB design and assembly (drilling included). I loved everything involved. Even before I became academically invested in the field, I fell in love with the manual craft of making a circuit.

NAN: Tell us about your first design.

ANDREW: Once I’d learned something about designing and making circuits, I jumped in whole-hog, to a comical degree. My very first project without any course direction was an electroencephalograph!

I wanted to make stuff move on my computer with my brain, the obvious first step. I started with a rough design and worked on tweaking parameters and finding components.

In retrospect, I think that first attempt was actually an electromyograph that read the movements of my eye muscles. And it definitely was an electrocardiograph. Success!

Someone suggested that it might not be a good idea to have a power supply hooked up in any reasonably direct path with your brain. So, in my second attempt, I tried to make something new, so I digitized the signal on the brain side and hooked it up to eight white LEDs. On the other side, I had eight phototransistors coupled with the LEDs and covered with heat-shrink tubing to keep out outside light. That part worked, and I was excited about it, even though I was having some trouble properly tuning the op-amps in that version.

NAN: Describe your “dream project.”

ANDREW: Augmented reality goggles. I’m dead serious about that, too. If given enough time and money, I would start making them.

I would use some emerging organic light-emitting diode (OLED) technology. I’m eyeing the start-up MicroOLED (www.microoled.net) for its low-power “near-to-eye” display technologies. They aren’t available yet, but I’m hopeful they will be soon. I’d probably hook that up to a Raspberry Pi SBC, which is small enough to be worn reasonably comfortably.

Small, high-resolution cameras have proliferated with modern cell phones, which could easily be mounted into the sides of goggles, driving each OLED display independently. Then, it’s just a matter of creativity for how to use your newfound vision! The OpenCV computer vision library offers a great starting point for applications such as face detection, image segmentation, and tracking.

Google Glass is starting to get some notice as a sort of “heads-up” display, but in my opinion, it doesn’t go nearly far enough. Here’s the craziest part—please bear with me—I’m willing to give up directly viewing the world with my natural eyes, I would be willing to have full field-of-vision goggles with high-resolution OLED displays with stereoscopic views from two high-resolution smartphone-style cameras. (At least until the technology gets better, as described in Rainbows End by Vernor Vinge.) I think, for this version, all the components are just now becoming available.

Augmented reality goggles would do a number of things for vision and human-computer interaction (HCI). First, 3-D overlays in the real world would be possible.

Crude example: I’m really terrible with faces and names, but computers are now great with that, so why not get a little help and overlay nametags on people when I want? Another fascinating thing for me is that this concept of vision abstracts the body from the eyes. So, you could theoretically connect to the feed from any stereoscopic cameras around (e.g., on an airplane, in the Grand Canyon, or on the back of some wild animal), or you could even switch points of view with your friend!

Perhaps reality goggles are not commercially viable now, but I would unabashedly use them for myself. I dream about them, so why not make them?