Next Newsletter: Embedded Boards

Coming to your inbox tomorrow: Circuit Cellar’s Embedded Boards newsletter. Tomorrow’s newsletter content focuses on both standard and non-standard embedded computer boards that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up to production volumes.

Bonus: We’ve added Drawings for Free Stuff to our weekly newsletters. Make sure you’ve subscribed to the newsletter so you can participate.

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You’ll get your
Embedded Boards newsletter issue tomorrow.

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Our weekly Circuit Cellar Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

Analog & Power. (7/2) This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AC-DC converters, power supplies, op amps, batteries and more.

Microcontroller Watch (7/9) This newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

IoT Technology Focus. (7/16) Covers what’s happening with Internet-of-Things (IoT) technology–-from devices to gateway networks to cloud architectures. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

Khadas Vim3 SBC Rides High with Cortex-A73 SoC and NVMe Support

By Eric Brown

Khadas has unveiled a “Khadas Vim3” SBC that runs Linux on an Amlogic S922X with 4x -A73 and 2x -A53 cores, with a future model featuring a neural processor. You get up to 4 GB RAM and 32GB eMMC plus expansion via 40-pin GPIO, PCIe, and M.2 with NVMe.

Shenzhen Wesion’s Khadas project will soon launch the second Linux hacker board to offer Amlogic’s hexa-core S922X after Hardkernel’s Odroid-N2. The Khadas Vim3, which follows the quad-core Amlogic S905X based Khadas Vim1 and octa-core Amlogic S912 Khadas Vim2, is “coming soon” with high-end features like NVMe storage and a combo interface that can be used for either PCIe or USB 3.0.

 
Khadas Vim3
(click images to enlarge)
Despite having fewer CPU cores, the Khadas Vim3’s Amlogic S922X is much more powerful than the Vim2’s octa-core, Cortex-A53 S912, as well as the Rockchip RK3399 (2x -A72 and 4x -A53). According to Hardkernel benchmarks using the Odroid-N2, this 12 nm-fabricated SoC with 4x 1.8 GHz Cortex-A73 cores and 2x 1.9 GHz -A53 cores delivers about 20 percent faster CPU performance than the widely deployed RK3399. It also offers a Cortex-M4 chip and an advanced Arm Mali-G52 GPU equipped with 6x 846MHz EEs.

The specs below are only for the first of three Khadas Vim3 models. Judging from the mention of “next generation, deep-neural-network applications, at 2.5 TOPS,” at least one of the other Vim3 models will feature a processor with an neural processing unit (NPU), which is unavailable on the S922X. As noted by the CNXSoft story that alerted us to the SBC, this is likely the upcoming Amlogic S922D, which appears to be the same as the S922X except for the addition of an A311 neural processor.

The Khadas Vim3 has the same, somewhat Raspberry Pi-like 82 mm x 58 mm x 11.5 mm footprint and layout as the earlier Vim boards, and similarly offers a 40-pin GPIO. The Vim3 will likely continue the Khadas tradition of shipping with schematics and other open source files, as well as supporting Linux and Android. All the Khadas project is saying about OS support now is that there will be a Felix Script app for “one-click” builds of Linux distributions.

A few key specs are still up in the air, such as whether it will include a microSD slot or whether pogo pads will be included. The precise nature of the pins supported on the M.2 socket is also uncertain, and there is also a question about the dual USB 2.0 host ports, suggesting the possibility that one or more might jump to 3.0.

 
Preliminary specs for the Khadas Vim3
(click images to enlarge)
The Khadas Vim3 will ship in Basic (2 GB LPDDR4 and 16 GB eMMC 5.1) or Pro ( 4 GB/ 32 GB) models, both of which offer 16 MB SPI flash. Unlike the Vim2 (or Odroid-N2), there’s an M.2 2280 socket, and it supports high-speed NVMe storage. Another novelty is the new PCIe 2.0 x1 interface, which is accessible via a combo socket that can switch to USB 3.0.

Dual simultaneous displays are now available via the 4K@60 ready HDMI 2.1 port and the new 4-lane MIPI-DSI interface with touch-panel support. There’s also a new 3-axis accelerometer.

The Vim 3 follows the Vim2 in offering a GbE port with Wake-on-LAN, as well as 802.11ac and Bluetooth 5.0. Other similar features include the RTC, IR receiver, LEDs, and 2x USB 2.0 ports.

Like the Vim2, the Vim3 offers a USB Type-C port with power input, but it now adds support for wide-range, 5-20 V DC support, which Khadas says is useful for running power-hungry devices such as a mic array and speakers. An STMicro STM8S003 based power management chip includes a programmable EEPROM.

The board offers several advantages over the Odroid-N2 including eMMC storage, accelerometer, PCIe, and the M.2 option for NVMe. It’s smaller and its DSI interface is a step up from the Odroid-N2’s composite video interface. On the other hand, Hardkernel’s board has 4x USB 3.0 host ports and an SPDIF interface and audio DAC.

Further information

The first of three Khadas Vim3 models is “coming soon” at an undisclosed price. More information and a signup form for notifications may be found on Shenzhen Wesion’s Khadas Vim3 announcement and preliminary launch page.

This article originally appeared on LinuxGizmos.com on May 14.

Khadas | www.khadas.com

Small Form Factor SBC Serves Up Kaby Lake Processors

American Portwell Technology has launched the WUX-7x00U, a small form factor (SFF) embedded board featuringIntel Core i5 7300U and i3 7100U processors, formerly codenamed Kaby Lake. The Intel processors integrate the Intel HD 620 graphics engine with 24 execution units, enabling enhanced 3D graphics performance and higher speed for 4K encode and decode operations. Portwell says the embedded board is well suited for applications such as medical equipment, IoT gateway, industrial automation, warehouse automation, digital signage and more.

Portwell’s WUX-7x00U embedded board, designed with a compact footprint (101.6 mm x 101.6 mm; 4˝x 4˝), features up to 32 GB DDR4 (2133 MHz) SDRAM and multiple storage interfaces like 1x SATA III port and 1x M.2 Key M for SSD. For functionality extension, it provides 3x USB 3.0 ports and 1x USB 3.0 Type-C port. The powerful Intel 620 HD graphics engine can support triple display with onboard 1x DisplayPort (DP) and 2x HDMI connector with resolution up to 4096 x 2304. Moreover, WUX-7x00U integrates with 1x M.2 Key E for wireless module connectivity including Wi-Fi and Bluetooth which makes it become an ideal solution for communication and IoT applications.

The Portwell WUX-7x00U delivers efficient computing and graphic performance, yet it operates with thermal design power (TDP) of 15 W. The integrated low-profile fan ensures long-time and stable operation. With the wide voltage power input from 12V to 19V, it provides the flexibility for various power sources. With its ingenious design and multi-core processing power via Intel Core processors the Portwell WUX-7x00U embedded board is equipped with the ability to execute an extensive array of applications that demand processing power as well as I/O and wireless connectivity such as digital signage, industrial automation, video analytics-based appliances and IoT gateway devices.

American Portwell Technology | www.portwell.com

 

 

Tuesday’s Newsletter: IoT Tech Focus

Coming to your inbox tomorrow: Circuit Cellar’s IoT Technology Focus newsletter. Tomorrow’s newsletter covers what’s happening with Internet-of-Things (IoT) technology–-from devices to gateway networks to cloud architectures. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

Bonus: We’ve added Drawings for Free Stuff to our weekly newsletters. Make sure you’ve subscribed to the newsletter so you can participate.

Already a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber? Great!
You’ll get your IoT Technology Focus newsletter issue tomorrow.

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Don’t be left out! Sign up now:

Our weekly Circuit Cellar Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

Embedded Boards.(6/25) The focus here is on both standard and non-standard embedded computer boards that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up to production volumes.

Analog & Power. (7/2) This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op amps, batteries and more.

Microcontroller Watch (7/9) This newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

Adapter Enables Offline Speech Board to Work with Raspberry Pi

By Eric Brown

Audeme has released a $6.50 “Raspberry Pi MOVI Adapter” board and API to enable a Raspberry Pi pairing with its MOVI Arduino Shield for offline speech recognition and synthesis.

We’re used to seeing Arduino compatible, MCU-driven HATs and other add-ons for the Raspberry Pi, but in 2015 Audeme flipped that combo on its head with a Linux-driven voice shield for the Arduino called the MOVI Arduino Shield Speech Recognizer and Speech Synthesizer. At the recent Maker Faire Bay Area 2019, the company released a $6.50 adapter board that lets the MOVI Arduino Shield work with a Raspberry Pi.

 
MOVI Arduino Shield with Raspberry Pi and new Pi Adapter (left) and the current v1.1 version of the MOVI shield on its own
(click images to enlarge)
The $75 MOVI (My Own Voice Interface) Arduino Shield offers “Internet-free” speech recognition and synthesis for up to 150 customizable English sentences. MOVI offers voice control for applications like turning devices on and off, entering alarm codes, and carrying on programmed conversations. The device is speaker independent, so there’s no voice training involved, and it uses no cloud services, thereby enabling offline applications free from privacy or reliability concerns.

 
Raspberry Pi MOVI Adapter, front and back
(click images to enlarge)
The MOVI board runs Debian Linux on the 1 GHz, Cortex-A8 based Allwinner A13. An SD card stores the Debian build, along with sentence, call sign, and configuration data. The board has a microphone with automatic gain-control to detect speech at up to 10 feet in a quiet environment. An external microphone input is available, and a speaker is optional.

At the time of the Kickstarter launch, Audeme said that Linux hackers could access the board’s low -level serial interfaces to use it with the Raspberry Pi. The new adapter eases the much-requested Pi pairing along with a new Raspberry Pi-friendly version of its open source, Arduino IDE-based library.

Audeme also added an open source Python API for the Pi, and previous Arduino projects can be compiled against the C++ version of the PI library without code change. Community features on the website include a forum.

Further information

The Raspberry Pi MOVI Adapter is available for $6.50 and the MOVI Arduino Shield sells for $74.90. More information may be found at Audeme’s Raspberry Pi MOVI Adapter and MOVI Arduino Shield shopping pages, as well as the MOVI C++ libraryand MOVI Python API GitHub pages.

This article originally appeared on LinuxGizmos.com on May 21.

Audeme | www.audeme.com

Tuesday’s Newsletter: Microcontroller Watch

Coming to your inbox tomorrow: Circuit Cellar’s Microcontroller Watch newsletter. Tomorrow’s newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

Bonus: We’ve added Drawings for Free Stuff to our weekly newsletters. Make sure you’ve subscribed to the newsletter so you can participate.

Already a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber? Great!
You’ll get your Microcontroller Watch newsletter issue tomorrow.

Not a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber?
Don’t be left out! Sign up now:

Our weekly Circuit Cellar Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

IoT Technology Focus. (6/18) Covers what’s happening with Internet-of-Things (IoT) technology–-from devices to gateway networks to cloud architectures. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

Embedded Boards.(6/25) The focus here is on both standard and non-standard embedded computer boards that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up to production volumes.

Analog & Power. (7/2) This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AC-DC converters, power supplies, op amps, batteries and more.

Catalog of 125 Open-Spec Hacker Boards: Spring 2019 Edition!

Circuit Cellar’s sister website Linuxgizmos,com has posted its annual Spring edition catalog of hacker-friendly, open-spec SBCs that run Linux or Android.

The catalog includes summaries of 125 community-backed Linux/Android hacker boards under $200 are listed in alpha order.

They list specs and lowest available pricing recorded in the last two weeks of May 2019, with products either shipping or available for pre-order with expected ship date by the end of June.

CHECK IT OUT HERE!

Tuesday’s Newsletter: Analog & Power

Coming to your inbox on Tuesday: Circuit Cellar’s Analog & Power newsletter. This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including ADCs, DACs, DC-DC converters, AC-DC converters, power supplies, op amps, batteries and more.

Bonus: We’ve added Drawings for Free Stuff to our weekly newsletters. Make sure you’ve subscribed to the newsletter so you can participate.

Already a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber? Great!
You’ll get your Analog & Power newsletter issue tomorrow.

Not a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber?
Don’t be left out! Sign up now:

Our weekly Circuit Cellar Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

Microcontroller Watch. (6/11) This newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

IoT Technology Focus. (6/18) Covers what’s happening with Internet-of-Things (IoT) technology–-from devices to gateway networks to cloud architectures. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

Embedded Boards.(6/25) The focus here is on both standard and non-standard embedded computer boards that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up to production volumes.

Open-Spec Omega2 LTE SBC Features Cat 4 and GNSS

By Eric Brown

Last December, Onion updated its MIPS-based, WiFi-enabled Omega2 board with a similarly OpenWrt-driven Omega2 Pro SBC that increased RAM to 512 MB and flash to 8 GB and added real-world USB host and micro-USB ports. Now, the company has returned to Crowd Supply with a similarly open source, OpenWrt Linux driven Omega2 LTE model with 4G LTE and GNSS location connectivity. Pricing ranges from $99 for the board alone to $199 for a fully loaded “Ultimate Collection” kit, all with early August shipments.

 
Omega2 LTE
(click images to enlarge)
The Omega2 LTE is not based on the Omega2 Pro, but rather the earlier, surface-mount Omega2S+ compute module version of the Omega2 announced back in 2017. Designed for the OEM market, the 42.9 mm x 26.4 mm  x 9.9 mm Omega2S+ module is equipped with the same MIPS-based, 580MHz MediaTek MT7688 SoC with 2.4GHz 802.11b/g/n radio found on the Omega2 and Omega2 Pro. However, it has a smaller allotment of 128 MB RAM and 32 MB flash.


Omega2 Pro

The 80 mm x 50 mm Omega2 LTE board is slightly larger than the 73 mm x 44 mm Omega2 Pro. The 5 V board features a JST-PH battery connector and LiPo battery management for mobile and remote applications. The SBC is designed for applications including remote sensor hubs and real-time asset and fleet tracking gizmos that need to report “geoposition, an accurate timestamp, and other data to remote servers,” says Onion.

The Omega2 LTE is equipped with a Quectel EC25 chipset available in variants for North American and global LTE Cat 4 networks. Cat 4 provides 150Mbps downlink and 50Mbps uplink speeds. The Omega2 LTE board supports the module with a nano-SIM slot and U.FL connectors for main and diversity antennas.

The Quectel EC25 also supplies a “high-sensitivity, multi-constellation” GNSS receiver for satellite positioning with support for GPS, GLONASS, BeiDou, Galileo, and QZSS networks. With the help of a built-in U.FL connector, the GNSS receiver provides “accurate time data worldwide,” says Onion.

You can set up the system to keep the power-sucking LTE modem asleep for most of the time, waking only at intervals to transmit cached data stored on the microSD card. At the same time, you can keep the lower-powered GNSS connection operating continually. The system can also be configured to share the LTE connection over the Omega 2S+ WiFi radio, which can simultaneously establish an access point while running a client session. As usual, the WiFi radio includes with u.FL connector and is accompanied by a 2 dBi directional chip antenna.

 
Omega2 LTE detail views
(click images to enlarge)
The Omega2 LTE lacks the USB 2.0 host port of the Omega2 Pro. In place of the micro-USB port, it supplies a USB Type-C port with power and serial communications support. A USB-to-serial chip provides always-on access to the command line for configuration and debugging. Alternatively, you can use a more secure command-line terminal connection through the local network using SSH.

The SBC is further equipped with a power switch, a programmable button, multi-colored status LEDs for LTE and general operation, and a 30-pin GPIO connector. The latter supports the same add-on modules that debuted on the Omega2 Pro. including 10/100 Ethernet, 1-inch OLED, 16-signal servo, 4-channel, 16-bit ADC, NFC/RFID, and a proto-pad breadboard for soldering.

 
Omega2 LTE pinout and add-on modules
(click images to enlarge)
A $129 Essential Collection gives you the Ethernet and ADC modules, as well as a $10 3-in-1 Flex Antenna Kit. The Ultimate Collection adds the OLED, servo, NFC/RFID, and Proto-pad modules, as well as a $49 Pro Antenna Kit.

Like the Omega2 Pro, the board offers the OnionOS GUI stack on top of the underlying OpenWrt 18.06 Linux distro stored in flash. Running within a browser, OnionOS supports languages such as Python, GoLang, NodeJS, PHP, C, and C++. It also includes Terminal and Code Editor apps.

Further information

The Omega2 LTE is available for the next 36 days on Crowd Supply starting at $99 with volume discounts. Shipping is free in the U.S. and $10 to $15 worldwide, and current orders will be fulfilled Aug. 9. More information may be found on the Omega2 LTE Crowd Supply page and the Onion website.

This article originally appeared on LinuxGizmos.com on May 22.

Onion | onion.io

Tuesday’s Newsletter: IoT Tech Focus

Coming to your inbox tomorrow: Circuit Cellar’s IoT Technology Focus newsletter. Tomorrow’s newsletter covers what’s happening with Internet-of-Things (IoT) technology–-from devices to gateway networks to cloud architectures. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

Bonus: We’ve added Drawings for Free Stuff to our weekly newsletters. Make sure you’ve subscribed to the newsletter so you can participate.

Already a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber? Great!
You’ll get your IoT Technology Focus newsletter issue tomorrow.

Not a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber?
Don’t be left out! Sign up now:

Our weekly Circuit Cellar Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

Embedded Boards.(5/28) The focus here is on both standard and non-standard embedded computer boards that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up to production volumes.

Analog & Power. (6/4) This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op amps, batteries and more.

Microcontroller Watch (6/11) This newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

Ultra96-V2 SBC adds Certified Wi-Fi and Industrial Temp Support

By Eric Brown

Avnet has unveiled a minor upgrade to its open-spec, 96Boards CE form-factor Ultra96 SBC. The Ultra96-V2 retains the $249 price and core features of the Ultra96, including the Arm/FPGA hybrid Xilinx Zynq UltraScale+ MPSoC, but it also makes a few key additions.

The biggest touted improvement is a new Microchip wireless module with the same 802.11n Wi-Fi capability, but with Bluetooth improving to 5.0 BLE. The major advantage here is that the module is said to be pre-certified in 75 countries.


 
Ultra96-V2 (left) and Ultra96-V1
(click images to enlarge)
Avnet has also “updated all components on the Ultra96-V2 to allow industrial temperature grade options so that the board can operate in harsh industrial applications.” We saw no details, however, on the specifics of the standard and industrial options. The term “industrial temperature” usually refers to -40 to 85°C.

Other new features include an Infineon power management IC (PMIC) and dedicated headers for UART and JTAG. The product page suggests that the previous I2C header has been removed, with I2C now being available only on the 40-pin low-speed header, but the block diagram indicates otherwise. There also appear to be four new LEDs.

Like the original, the Ultra96-V2 runs PetaLinux on the Zynq UltraScale+ MPSoC with a 1.5GHz quad-core, Cortex-A53 CPU block, a Mali-400 MP2 GPU, and a ZU3EG A484 FPGA — one of the lower-end UltraScale+ FPGA options. The SoC also features 2x 600MHz Cortex-R5 MCUs with vector FPUs and memory protection units for improved real-time processing. Avnet recently released a MSC SM2S-ZUSP module billed as the world’s first Zynq UltraScale+ based SMARC module.


Ultra96-V2 block diagram
(click image to enlarge)
As before, the SBC provides 2GB of Micron LPDDR4, and boots from a 16GB Delkin microSD card pre-loaded with Xilinx’s PetaLinux. Major ports include mini-DP, 2x USB 3.0, and single USB 2.0 host and micro-USB 3.0 ports.

Specifications listed for the Ultra96-V2 include:

  • Processor — Xilinx Zynq UltraScale+ MPSoC ZU3EG A484 (4x Cortex-A53 @ 1.5GHz); FPGA with 154K logic cells, 141K flip-flops, and 70K LUTs; Mali-400 MP2 GPU; 2x Cortex-R5 MCUs
  • Memory/storage:
    • 2GB LPDDR4 RAM (“512M x 32” Micron).
    • MicroSD slot with 16GB Delkin card pre-loaded with PetaLinux
  • Wireless — Microchip 802.11 b/g/n and Bluetooth 5 BLE (certified in 75 countries)
  • Other I/O:
    • Mini-DisplayPort
    • 2x USB 3.0 host ports
    • USB 2.0 host port
    • Micro-USB 3.0 “upstream” port
    • I2C, UART, and JTAG headers
    • 40-pin low-speed connector
    • 60-pin high-speed connector
  • Other features — 4x LEDs; optional USB-to-JTAG/UART pod
  • Operating temperature — industrial temp version available
  • Power — 12V input; Infineon PMIC
  • Dimensions — 85 x 54mm; 96Boards CE
  • Operating system — PetaLinux; voucher for Xilinx SDSoC license

Further information

The Ultra96-V2 is available for pre-order at $249, with shipments due by May, according to the announcement and June 4 per the shopping page. More information may be found on Avnet’s Ultra96-V2 product page.

This article originally appeared on LinuxGizmos.com on March 27.

Avent | www.avnet.com

Tuesday’s Newsletter: Microcontroller Watch

Coming to your inbox tomorrow: Circuit Cellar’s Microcontroller Watch newsletter. Tomorrow’s newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

Bonus: We’ve added Drawings for Free Stuff to our weekly newsletters. Make sure you’ve subscribed to the newsletter so you can participate.

Already a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber? Great!
You’ll get your Microcontroller Watch newsletter issue tomorrow.

Not a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber?
Don’t be left out! Sign up now:

Our weekly Circuit Cellar Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

IoT Technology Focus. (5/21) Covers what’s happening with Internet-of-Things (IoT) technology–-from devices to gateway networks to cloud architectures. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

Embedded Boards.(5/28) The focus here is on both standard and non-standard embedded computer boards that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up to production volumes.

Analog & Power. (6/4) This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op amps, batteries and more.

Rugged COMe Board Sports Ryzen Embedded V1000/R1000 SoC

MEN Micro has announced the CB71C, a rugged COM Express module for rail, public transportation and industry applications.  The module is 100% compatible with the COM Express Type 6 pin-out and conforms to the VITA 59 standard, which specifies robust mechanics to ensure reliable operation under the harsh environmental conditions.
The CB71C Rugged COM Express Module can be equipped with the new Ryzen Embedded R1000 SoC in addition to the Ryzen Embedded V1000 SoC. The new AMD Ryzen Embedded R1000 SoC features a Radeon Vega graphics engine with three compute units and support for up to three displays with a resolution of up to 4k without additional graphics hardware. With up to four “Zen” processor cores, when using the AMD Ryzen Embedded V1000 SoC, the CB71C is also suitable for virtualization.

The module provides passive cooling and a temperature range from -40°C to +85°C are possible with the low-power versions. The CB71C can be equipped with up to 32 GB directly soldered DDR4 main memory and a 16 GB eMMC. PCI Express 3.0, DDI (DP, eDP, HDMI), SATA 3.0, Gigabit Ethernet and USB 3.0 are available as high-speed interfaces.

The COM module has a board management controller with monitoring functions and a trusted platform module. The module also uses the Secure Memory Encryption capability in the AMD Ryzen Embedded R1000 SoC. That feature is essential for security-critical applications such as payment and ticketing terminals, fleet management or monitoring, according to MEN Micro.

Features:

  • AMD Ryzen Embedded V1000/R1000 series
  • Up to 32 GB DDR4 RAM with ECC
  • Up to 4 Digital Display Interfaces (DP, eDP, HDMI, DVI)
  • Hardware memory encryption
  • Safety-relevant supervision functions
  • Virtualization
  • Supports up to -40°C to +85°C Tcase, conduction cooling
  • VITA 59 in process, compliant with COM Express Basic, type 6
  • PICMG COM.0 COM Express version also available

MEN Micro | www.menmicro.com

 

Tuesday’s Newsletter: Analog & Power

Coming to your inbox on Tuesday: Circuit Cellar’s Analog & Power newsletter. This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including ADCs, DACs, DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op amps, batteries and more.

Bonus: We’ve added Drawings for Free Stuff to our weekly newsletters. Make sure you’ve subscribed to the newsletter so you can participate.

Already a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber? Great!
You’ll get your Analog & Power newsletter issue tomorrow.

Not a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber?
Don’t be left out! Sign up now:

Our weekly Circuit Cellar Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

Microcontroller Watch. (5/14) This newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

IoT Technology Focus. (5/21) Covers what’s happening with Internet-of-Things (IoT) technology–-from devices to gateway networks to cloud architectures. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

Embedded Boards.(5/28) The focus here is on both standard and non-standard embedded computer boards that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up to production volumes.

Next Newsletter: Automotive Electronics

Coming to your inbox tomorrow: Circuit Cellar’s Automotive Electronics newsletter. April has a 5th Tuesday, so we’re bringing you a bonus newsletter:
Automotive Electronics. Automotive dashboard are evolving into so-called infotainment systems at the same time more of the car is being controlled by embedded  computing. That’s driving a need for powerful MCU-based solutions that support these trends. This newsletter looks at the latest technology trends and product developments in automotive electronics.

Bonus: We’ve added Drawings for Free Stuff to our weekly newsletters. Make sure you’ve subscribed to the newsletter so you can participate.

Already a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber? Great!
You’ll get your
Automotive Electronics newsletter issue tomorrow.

Not a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber?
Don’t be left out! Sign up now:

Our weekly Circuit Cellar Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

Analog & Power. (5/7) This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op amps, batteries and more.

Microcontroller Watch (5/14) This newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

IoT Technology Focus. (5/21) Covers what’s happening with Internet-of-Things (IoT) technology–-from devices to gateway networks to cloud architectures. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

Embedded Boards.(5/28) The focus here is on both standard and non-standard embedded computer boards that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up to production volumes.