Low-Profile SDM Signage Board Features Whiskey Lake-U

By Eric Brown

Axiomtek has launched an SDM form-factor “SDM500L” signage board with an 8th Gen Whiskey Lake-U processor with triple 4K display support, up to 32 GB RAM, 3x M.2 sockets, and extended temperature support.

Like the 6th Gen Skylake-based Nexcom NDiS S538 that we covered earlier this week, Axiomtek’s new SDM500L signage computer conforms to Intel’s Smart Display Module-Large (SDM-L) form factor, a sleeker version of its OPS (Open Pluggable Specification). It’s similarly designed to be integrated with SDM compliant displays via a PCIe x8 edge interface in special cabinetry aimed at locations with space constraints. Like OPS, SDM also supports remote management.


 
SDM500L, front and back
(click images to enlarge)


Like the Nexcom product, the 175 x 100 x 1.6mm SDM500L board lacks external housing and offers a mounting bracket and panel for the coastline ports. This would appear to boost the width to the SDM-L standard 20mm. The product lacks the fan and top covering of the NDiS S538.

Axiomtek offers an optional SDB100 peripheral interface board (PIB) per the SDM spec to house the board for testing before placing it into a custom enclosure. It offered no further details on the SDB100, however.

The SDM500L is designed for digital signage, interactive flat panel displays, interactive touch computers, video walls, bedside terminals for hospital patients, and factory automation solutions. The system is equipped with a choice of Intel’s 8th Gen Core i7/i5/i3 Whiskey Lake U-series processors with Intel AMT 12 support. No OS support was listed.


 
SDM500L with I/O panel mounting and detail view
(click images to enlarge)


Triple independent 4K displays are available via a coastline HDMI 1.4 port (4096 x 2160 @ 30p) plus HDMI 2.0 (4096 x 2160 @ 60p) and DP 1.2 (4096 x 2304 @ 60p) interfaces expressed via the PCIe x8 connector. There’s also an audio mic/headphone combo jack.

The board supports up to 32GB DDR4-2400 via dual sockets. There are 4x USB 3.0 host ports and single USB Type-C and GbE ports. The latter offers Wake-on-LAN, and it supports Intel vPro when using a Core i5 or i7 CPU model.

An M.2 E-key slot can load a WiFi/Bluetooth module, and there are M.2 M-key and B-key slots for SSD storage. The PCIe golden finger expresses a fifth USB 3.0 interface, as well as 2x I2C, a serial interface, and +12V & +3.3VBS power input, in addition to the HDMI and DP connections.

The SDM500L is further equipped with a watchdog, a Lithium 3V/220mAH battery, a reset button, and dual antenna mounts. There’s humidity resistance and a 0 to 60ºC operating range.

 
Further information

The SDM500L will be available this month at an undisclosed price. More information may be found in Axiomtek’s SDM500L announcement and product page.

This article originally appeared on LinuxGizmos.com on July 5.

Axiomtek | www.axiomtek.com

Avoid Reinventing the Wheel on Industrial Designs

Software updates are easy to roll out, but hardware upgrades on custom designs often require a major investment of time and money. A modular approach can speed up this process. In this article, congatec’s Dan Demers explains how.

Make slow progress or speed ahead with buy-in?

By Dan Demers, Director of Sales and Marketing – Americas, congatec

We are used to receiving software updates on-the-fly today. So why not utilize converged embedded computing platforms to upgrade our hardware? This would enable us to take direct advantage of the rapid development cycles of the computing, vision and AI industries.

There are plenty of examples on how to upgrade the hardware during running series production. In the medical sector, for instance, where medical devices even require certification. But it appears that some system developers have not yet learned how to consistently build computing core upgrades into their product development.

This is because full custom designs are still quite common. The integration of expensive navigation systems by premium vehicle manufacturers is a bad example of this. Although pretty and expensive, they are often much slower than the driver’s considerably cheaper mobile phone. Before the computer technology that’s installed in the vehicle gets used by the customer, it is usually already obsolete.  Market acceptance for such monolithic solutions is therefore dwindling noticeably.

The problem of these manufacturers is anchored in the design principles of mass production, where every cent matters, but no attention is paid to the innovation cycle demanded by users. This has fatal consequences: If the computing part is entirely custom designed, an upgrade will in many cases require a redesign, where the ability to reuse blocks of the previous generation is limited. So all in all, we’re talking about a major investment to always deploy the latest computer technology in an application.

But there’s another way: To avoid having to reinvent the wheel every time, the Computer-on-Module concept was developed at the end of the 90s. Modular approaches had existed before then, but it is only since the Computer-on-Module concept emerged, that modules stopped being proprietary and became available as standardized components from numerous providers.

congatec offers SFF Computer-on-Modules for all leading standards: SMARC 2.0, Qseven, COM Express Mini and COM Express Compact modules.

Computer-on-Modules are available in different designs. For low-power CPUs such as Intel Atom, AMD G-Series or the ARM i.MX6 and i.MX8 platforms from NXP, the Qseven and SMARC Computer-on-Module standards are particularly suitable. For higher computing power and interface demands, COM Express is the best standard. COM Express Type 6 modules support fast CPUs, like the AMD V1000 or the latest Intel Core processors.

Type 7 was defined for edge server processors and 10 Gbit Ethernet support; however, in true server fashion, it no longer supports any video interfaces. The upcoming PICMG COM-HPC standard will support even faster interfaces. The specification is due to be published in 2019, with first products expected in 2020.

With Server-on-Modules a modular approach is even suitable for the development and constant update of high-performance microservers by just exchanging the modules. This significantly reduce the efforts and cost connected for upgrades.

All in all, Computer-on-Modules are an ideal and easy way to equip machines and devices with the latest processor technology. So anyone who wants to use converged system platforms as part of their closed-loop engineering, will find that Computer-on-Modules are a perfect platform for performance upgrades. However, this doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t implement a full custom design when it comes to mass production. But here too, getting the module supplier to implement a fusion of modules and carrier board works significantly better than the OEM developing everything from scratch.

congatec | www.congatec.com/us

 

Sponsored by: congatec

Ryzen Embedded V1000 Module Supports Four USB 3.1 Ports

By Eric Brown

Ibase has announced a COM Express Type 6 module equipped with AMD’s Ryzen Embedded V1000 system-on-chip. The announcement refers to the ET876 as a Compact module (95 x 95mm) like Ibase’s earlier, Intel 7th Gen “Kaby Lake” ET975, but the spec sheet and the photo indicate it’s a larger 125 x 95mm Basic module like Ibase’s 7th Gen ET970.


 
ET976, front and back
(click images to enlarge)

The ET976 follows other V1000-based COM Express Type 6 modules including Seco’s Compact COMe-B75-CT6, Kontron’s Compact COMe-cVR6, Advantech’s Basic SOM-5871, and MEN Micro’s Basic CB71C. The Kontron and MEN Micro modules also support the new stripped-down Ryzen Embedded R1000.

Ibase listed no OS support for the ET976, but all the other V1000-based modules either ship with Linux as the default or support Linux and Windows. The module supports the dual-core V1202B and the quad-core V1605B, V1807B, and V1807B SoCs at up to 3.8GHz. Applications include graphics-intensive devices used in industrial automation, medical imaging, transportation, gaming, payment systems, and ATM machines.

Claimed to be up to twice as fast as AMD’s earlier R-Series SoCs, the Ryzen Embedded V1000 competes with Intel’s similarly 14nm-fabricated Kaby Lake and Coffee Lake Core processors. The SoC offers up to four dual-threaded Zen CPU cores for 8x threads total, as well as high-end Radeon Vega 3 graphics with up to 11 compute units.



ET976 
(click image to enlarge)


The ET976 supports up to 8GB of DDR4, including ECC RAM. It integrates an Intel I210IT GbE controller a watchdog, hardware monitoring functionality, and support for TPM 2.0.

The announcement mentions triple independent displays, but the product page says there are only dual displays. In any case, they are enabled with 2x DDI and either an LVDS or optional eDP interface. No resolution was mentioned, but some of the other modules support 4K video.

This is the first V1000-based module we’ve seen with USB 3.1 support as opposed to USB 3.0. The ET976 expresses I/O including 4x USB 3.1, 8x USB 2.0, 2x SATA III, 2x UART, HD audio, and 4-in/4-out DIO. The module provides a single PEG x8 connection and 8x PCIe expansion interfaces, and there’s support for 0 to 60°C temperatures.

 
Further information

No pricing or availability information was provided for the ET976. More information may be found in Ibase’s ET976 announcement and product page.

This article originally appeared on LinuxGizmos.com on July 16.

Ibase | www.ibase.com.tw

Tuesday’s Newsletter: Microcontroller Watch

Coming to your inbox tomorrow: Circuit Cellar’s Microcontroller Watch newsletter. Tomorrow’s newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

Bonus: We’ve added Drawings for Free Stuff to our weekly newsletters. Make sure you’ve subscribed to the newsletter so you can participate.

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Our weekly Circuit Cellar Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

IoT Technology Focus. (8/20) Covers what’s happening with Internet-of-Things (IoT) technology–-from devices to gateway networks to cloud architectures. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

Embedded Boards.(8/27) The focus here is on both standard and non-standard embedded computer boards that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up to production volumes.

Analog & Power. (9/3) This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AC-DC converters, power supplies, op amps, batteries and more.

Arm-based SBC has PoE, Wi-Fi/BT and More

By Eric Brown

Gateworks’ headless “Ventana GW5910” SBC runs OpenWrt or Ubuntu on a dual-core i.MX6 and provides GbE with PoE, WiFi/BT, optional GPS, Sub-1 GHz, and 2.4 GHz radios, and dual mini-PCIe slots for further wireless expansion.

Freescale’s i.MX6 was ahead of its time when it launched in 2011, and in the NXP era it it has continued to hold on in the embedded Linux market far longer and with greater dominance than any other processor. It’s only a matter of time before i.MX6-focused embedded vendors like Gateworks move on to the i.MX8 or other SoCs, but in the meantime there’s something to be said for working with a consistent SoC and platform/software platform rather than starting from scratch every few years.

Gateworks has just added to its i.MX6 collection by posting a product page for a new member of its Linux-supported, i.MX6-driven Ventana SBC family. Like other Ventana boards, the headless, wireless-oriented Ventana GW5910 supports -40 to 85°C temperatures.


 
Ventana GW5910 and block diagram
(click images to enlarge)


The Ventana GW5910 has the same 100 x 70mm form factor as the Ventana GW5220. Other Ventana boards include the 140 x 100mm Ventana GW5400, 100 x 35mm Ventana GW5530, and 70 x 35mm Ventana GW5510. The complete family of Ventana boards are compared here.

This is the first Ventana board to offer built-in WiFi/BT, via a Laird Sterling module with 802.11b/g/n and Bluetooth 4.2 LE. There’s also an optional Ti CC1352P module with dual-band sub-1GHz and 2.4GHz RF support, enabling 802.15.4g wireless protocols like 6LoWPAN, Thread, and Zigbee. There’s also an option for a u-blox ZOE-M8 GNSS Receiver.

Like the Ventana GW5530, the Ventana GW5910 offers mini-PCIe expansion, and this time there are two slots instead of one. One of them supports mSATA storage and the other is accompanied by a nano-SIM slot with LTE support.

The 802.15.4g and GPS modules do not use the mini-PCIe slots, so you could conceivably have five different wireless technologies onboard at once, as well as a GbE port with both passive and active 802.3af Power-over-Ethernet support.

Like most of the Ventana boards, the GW5910 uses the dual Cortex-A9 version of NXP’s i.MX6. The board defaults to an OpenWrt BSP with U-Boot, and there’s also an Ubuntu BSP available. It lacks the Yocto, Debian, and Android support found on the other boards.


 
Ventana GW5910 detail views
(click images to enlarge)


The Ventana GW5910 ships with the usual 512MB DDR3 and 256MB flash, but you can bump those up to 2GB for volume customization orders. There’s also a microSD slot and connectors for 2x serial, SPI, and DIO. There are no USB or display ports, but you get JTAG, an accelerometer, an RTC with battery, an 8-60VDC input, and the Gateworks System Controller.

The Gateworks boards are extensively documented for both software and hardware. However, as noted in the CNXSoft post that alerted us to the GW5910, the software wiki has yet to post details specific to the SBC.

Specifications listed for the Ventana GW5910 SBC include:

  • Processor — NXP i.MX6 Dual (2x ARM Cortex-A9 cores @ 800MHz); Vivante GPU
  • Memory/storage:
    • 512MB DDR3-800 RAM (up to 2GB with volume customization)
    • 256MB flash (up to 2GB with volume customization)
    • MicroSD slot
  • Networking:
    • Gigabit Ethernet port with Passive or 802.3af (36-60VDC) PoE
    • 802.11b/g/n and Bluetooth 4.2 LE (Laird Sterling) with ant. connector
    • Optional Ti CC1352P module with dual-band sub-1GHz (+20dBm TX Power) and 2.4GHz RF, supporting 802.15.4g protocols like 6LoWPAN, Thread, Zigbee, Wi-Sun, BLE 5
    • Optional u-blox ZOE-M8 GNSS Receiver with GPS/Galileo/GLONASS/BeiDou (72-ch., -167dBm)
  • Other I/O:
    • 2x serial interfaces
    • DIO and SPI connectors
    • JTAG interface
  • Expansion:
    • 2x mini-PCIe Gen 2 slots (1x with PCIe/USB 2.0 and mSATA, 1x USB 2.0) with 16W power
    • Nano-SIM slot with LTE and CATM1 support
  • Other features:
    • 3-axis accelerometer/magnetometer
    • Gateworks System Controller with watchdog, etc.
    • RTC with coin cell battery holder
    • Optional dev kit with PoE injector, power adapter, JTAG-USB programmer, pre-loaded BSP, and Ventana Wire Terminal Breakout Adapter
  • Power — 8-60VDC; 3W ([email protected]) typical consumption; reverse voltage and transient protection
  • Operating temperature — -40 to 85°C; humidity resistance (20% to 90% non-condensing)
  • Dimensions — 100 x 70 x 21mm
  • Operating system — OpenWrt and Ubuntu BSPs with U-boot

 
Further information

The Ventana GW5910 appears to be available now at an undisclosed price. More information may be found on Gateworks’ Ventana GW5910 product page.

This article originally appeared on LinuxGizmos.com on July 10.

Gateworks | www.gateworks.com

Congatec Rolls Out Ten Modules Based on Coffee Lake H Processors

Congatec has announced 10 new COM Express Type 6 modules featuring the latest Intel embedded processor technology. The four Intel Xeon, three Intel Core, two Intel Celeron and one Intel Pentium processors are all based on the same Intel microarchitecture (codenamed Coffee Lake H). This enables Congatec to provide all 10 new processors on one COM Express module design: the conga-TS370. A total of 14 processor module variants are now available on this single microarchitecture, offering extremely wide scalability.

The spearhead in terms of computing power is the 45 W 6-core module with 2.8 GHz Intel Xeon E-2276ME processor. It provides the highest embedded computing performance with integrated high-performance processor graphics currently available worldwide, while the 2.4 GHz Intel Celeron G4930E processor module with 35 watts sets the new price-performance benchmark.

Particularly noteworthy are the two 6-core Congatec modules with a TDP of 25 W offered on Intel Xeon E-2276ML and Intel Core i7-9850HL processors. They enable developers to create completely passively cooled embedded edge computing systems that can run up to 12 standalone virtual machines in parallel thanks to hyperthreading. This allows operation even in fully sealed systems, under the harshest environmental conditions and with the highest IP protection. The same applies to the two quad-core modules with Intel Xeon E-2254ML or Intel Core i3-9100HL processor as well as the Intel Celeron G4932E processor-based module, all featuring a–partly configurable –TDP of 25 W.

Other applications besides embedded edge computing including classic high-end medical imaging systems and HMIs as well as high-end gaming, infotainment and digital signage systems that require best-in-class computing power and throughput on a single die in tandem with the Intel graphics technology.

Congatec | www.congatec.com

Tuesday’s Newsletter: Analog & Power

Coming to your inbox on Tuesday: Circuit Cellar’s Analog & Power newsletter. This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including ADCs, DACs, DC-DC converters, AC-DC converters, power supplies, op amps, batteries and more.

Bonus: We’ve added Drawings for Free Stuff to our weekly newsletters. Make sure you’ve subscribed to the newsletter so you can participate.

Already a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber? Great!
You’ll get your Analog & Power newsletter issue tomorrow.

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Our weekly Circuit Cellar Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

Microcontroller Watch. (8/13) This newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

IoT Technology Focus. (8/20) Covers what’s happening with Internet-of-Things (IoT) technology–-from devices to gateway networks to cloud architectures. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

Embedded Boards.(8/27) The focus here is on both standard and non-standard embedded computer boards that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up to production volumes.

Bonus Newsletter: PCB Design Tools

We have a BONUS newsletter for you this week: PCB Design Tools! The process of PCB design is always facing new complexities. Rules-based autorouting, chips with higher lead counts and higher speed interconnections are just a few of the challenges forcing PCB design software to keep pace. This newsletter updates you on the latest happenings in this area.

Bonus: We’ve added Drawings for Free Stuff to our weekly newsletters. Make sure you’ve subscribed to the newsletter so you can participate.

Already a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber? Great!
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Embedded Boards newsletter issue tomorrow.

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Our weekly Circuit Cellar Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

Analog & Power. (8/6) This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AC-DC converters, power supplies, op amps, batteries and more.

Microcontroller Watch (8/13) This newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

IoT Technology Focus. (8/20) Covers what’s happening with Internet-of-Things (IoT) technology–-from devices to gateway networks to cloud architectures. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

Embedded Boards.(8/27) The focus here is on both standard and non-standard embedded computer boards that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up to production volumes

PICMG to Develop COM Open Spec for Server-Level Edge Computing

PICMG has announced that it has recently formed the COM-HPC technical subcommittee. It is actively developing a new COM (Computer-On-Module) specification to meet the increasing requirements of edge computing applications. Well suited for a wide range of applications, PICMG’s popular COM Express has been adopted worldwide and is anticipated to grow and thrive over the next decade.

According to multiple research reports, the computer-on-module (COM) market is expanding rapidly and is expected to reach over $1 billion by 2022. The technical requirements to bring server-level computing to the edge have driven the need to create new open specifications to complement COM Express. PICMG members have long been at the forefront of designing and supplying edge computing solutions and are collaborating to meet the requirements of applications well into the future.

PICMG says the new COM specification under development is in parallel to existing COM Express efforts. This effort is intended to complement rather than be a replacement for COM Express The subcommittee will develop a next-generation COM standard and an accompanying Carrier Design Guide. The new specification is expected to support two different module types: one for high-performance computing, the other for embedded computing. Initial plans include incorporating a new high-speed connector able to support existing and future interfaces such as PCI Express Gen 5, and 100/200 Gbit Ethernet. The specification will target medium to high-performance server-class processors.

Key COM-HPC Goals:

  • Support for PCIe Gen 5.0 (32 Gb/s)
  • 64 PCIe Lanes
  • 25 Gbit Ethernet per signal pair to support 100 Gbit Ethernet
  • Update of other interfaces to latest technology levels

The goal is to have specifications ratified in early 2020. The team has elected Christian Eder of congatec as committee chair. Kontron’s Stefan Milnor is the technical editor and Dylan Lang of Samtec is the secretary.

“COM-HPC will become a very high-performance module specification,” said committee chair Christian Eder. “It is not a replacement for COM Express; it extends the computer modules to a completely new level. It will serve as a transition from Computer-On-Module to Server-On-Module.”

So far, this initiative includes twenty active member participating companies: ADLINK, Advantech, Amphenol, Bielefeld University, congatec, Elma, Emerson, ept, FASTWEL, HEITEC, Intel, Kontron, MEN Mikro, MSC Technologies, N.A.T., Samtec, SECO, TE Connectivity, Trenz Electronic and VersaLogic.

PICMG | www.picmg.org

 

Next Newsletter: Embedded Boards

Coming to your inbox tomorrow: Circuit Cellar’s Embedded Boards newsletter. Tomorrow’s newsletter content focuses on both standard and non-standard embedded computer boards that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up to production volumes.

Bonus: We’ve added Drawings for Free Stuff to our weekly newsletters. Make sure you’ve subscribed to the newsletter so you can participate.

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Embedded Boards newsletter issue tomorrow.

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Our weekly Circuit Cellar Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

July has a 5th Tuesday . That’s means we’re giving you an extra Newsletter: PCB Design! (7/30) The process of PCB design is always facing new complexities. Rules-based autorouting, chips with higher lead counts and higher speed interconnections are just a few of the challenges forcing PCB design software to keep pace. This newsletter updates you on the latest happenings in this area.

Analog & Power. (8/6) This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AC-DC converters, power supplies, op amps, batteries and more.

Microcontroller Watch (8/13) This newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

IoT Technology Focus. (8/20) Covers what’s happening with Internet-of-Things (IoT) technology–-from devices to gateway networks to cloud architectures. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

Updated COMe Board Sports 9th Gen Intel Processors, 128 GB RAM

Kontron is providing the its COMe-bCL6 COM Express basic Type 6 form factor (125 mm x 95 mm) board equipped with Intel 9th Gen processors. With up to four memory sockets it enables a maximum memory expansion of up to 128 GB. The board is available in different processor versions. All versions can be equipped with up to 128 GB non-ECC/ECC DDR4 memory.

The Intel Optane system accelerator ensures fast data transfer from and to high-capacity mass storage devices. NVMe SSD also supports what is currently the fastest storage technology in a very compact package. Thanks to USB 3.1 support with up to 10 Gbps and USB Type-C support, twice the bandwidth (compared to USB 3.0) can be achieved for fast data transfers.

The COMe-bCL6 is well suited as a successor for existing solutions, because it takes over their pin out and feature implementation. Typical applications include communication, digital signage, professional gaming and entertainment, medical imaging, surveillance and security, industrial edge or server applications, as well as industrial plant, machine and robot control, both at shop floor level and from the control room. The rugged variants of the COMe-bCL6 meet the particular demands of the defense, transportation and avionics sectors by offering an extended feature set and industrial temperature range from -40°C to +85°C.

The COMe-bCL6 supports the Kontron APPROTECT security solution based on Wibu-Systems CodeMeter. In addition, Kontron APPROTECT Licensing enables the realization of new business models such as pay-per-use or time-based test versions.

Kontron | www.kontron.com

3.5-Inch SBC Serves up Coffee Lake-H Processors

COMMELL has unveiled its LE-37M 3.5-inch SBC based on Intel 8th generation Coffee Lake-H Core processor family. The Coffee Lake-H 8th generation Intel Core i7/i5/i3 processors provides higher computing and graphics performance but at a similar power dissipation level to the previous 7th generation. The LE-37M SBC will be offered with two processor variants: LE-37M5 comprised of Core i5-8400H Max Turbo up to 4.2 GHz with 4 CPU cores, 8-thread and 45 W TDP, LE-37M7 comprise of Core i7-8850H Max Turbo up to 4.3 GHz with 6 CPU cores, 12-thread and 45 W TDP.

The LE-37M 3.5-inch SBC is designed for the 8th generation Intel Core H-series processors in the FCBGA1440 and accompany with Intel QM370 Chipset. DDR4 memory is supported up to a total of 32 GB (DDR4 SO-DIMM 2,666 MHz). The SBC is based on powerful Intel UHD Graphics that provides high-end media and graphics capabilities, allows triple independent display with 4k resolution each, and comes with hardware-based video encoding and decoding up to 4k. The LE-37M features VGA, LVDS, HDMI and one DisplayPort outputs to provide its advanced solutions for imaging, machine vision and infotainment applications, medical and gaming machine applications.

The SBC provides lots of features including high-speed data transfer interfaces such as 4 x USB3.1 Gen2 and 2 x SATAIII, equipped with dual Gbit Ethernet Intel I210 and I219-LM (iAMT 11.0 support), and comes with PS/2 port, 2 x RS232 and 2 x RS232/422/485, 4 x USB 2.0, Realtek High Definition Audio, 1 x SMBus, 1 x 8 bit GPIO, 1 x MiniPCIe (support mSATA), 1 x M.2 (Key E). The operating voltage of LE-37M is from 9 V to 35 V DC power supply.

COMMELL | www.commell.com.tw

LoRaWAN Gateway Offers a Choice of Orange Pi, Raspberry Pi or i.MX6 ULL

Moscow-based M2M IOT has launched a GW-01 LoRaWAN gateway built around an Orange Pi Zero H2+ SBC that supports outdoors installations. The GW-01 combines the Zero H2+ with an 8-channel LoRaWAN board based on the Semtech SX1301 LoRa concentrator.

The GW-01 is a modified version of the same board found on the company’s $95 GW-01 RPI add-on for the Raspberry Pi, as well as a $245, all-in-one GW-01 PoE gateway with Power-over-Ethernet support that runs on an i.MX6 ULL (see farther below). All three products ship with an open source Linux stack with LoRa gateway and packet-forwarder software pre-flashed on the board and posted on GitHub.


 
GW-01 with (left) and without the underlying Orange Pi Zero H2+
(click images to enlarge)

The new GW-01 gateway operates in the 868MHz or 915MHz LoRa frequencies and has -139 dBm sensitivity. The range is 2.5 kilometers when surrounded by buildings or up to 10 Km in open space. The 5V-powered GW-01 measures 80 х 50 х 20mm without the supplied antenna and can operate in 0 to 70°C temperatures.



GW-01 without the Orange Pi
(click image to enlarge)

The GW-01 runs OpenWrt or Armbian on the Orange Pi Zero H2+, a variant of the similarly open-spec, 48 x 46mm Orange Pi Zero with a slightly improved Allwinner H2+ instead of an H2. The H2+ SoC similarly provides 4x Cortex-A7 cores @ 1.2GHz and a Mali-400 MP2 GPU.


 
GW-01 gateway setup screen and Orange Pi Zero H2+
(click images to enlarge)

The Zero H2+ has only 256MB DDR3 RAM, and the only display interface is an AV-out header. There are also single USB 2.0 host, micro-USB OTG with 5V power input, and 10/100 Ethernet ports, as well as a microSD slot, WiFi, and a 26-pin header that supports early Raspberry Pi boards.

The Zero H2+ board on the GW-01 has 8MB serial flash instead of the usual 2MB in order to incorporate the 4.5MB OpenWrt image. The SBC has lower power consumption and a lower $8.50 price than any of the modern-era RPi boards.

For prototyping purposes, the gateway requires at least one LoRaWAN equipped end node and a web server. For the latter, M2M IOT recommends TheThingsNetwork or its own cloud.m2m-tele server.

GW-01 RPI and GW-01 PoE

The GW-01 RPI and GW-01 PoE have the same specs as the GW-01 except that the PoE model has a wider -35 to 70°C range. The GW-01 RPI requires any Raspberry Pi 2 or 3 board to operate.


 
GW-01 RPI board (left) and integrated with Raspberry Pi 3
(click images to enlarge)

The GW-01 PoE is a standalone product such as the GW-01, in this case, integrating an apparently homegrown SBC built around NXP’s power-sipping, single Cortex-A7 based i.MX6 ULL SoC. It has an Ethernet port with 48V PoE support for easier installation.

Like the GW-01, the RPI and PoE models have an 80 x 50mm footprint, and the SBC on the PoE model similarly adds 20mm on the vertical. They both ship with antennas. Like the GW-01, the PoE model runs on OpenWrt while the RPI shield uses Raspbian.


 
GW-01 PoE (left) and underyling i.MX6 ULL-based SBC
(click images to enlarge)

LoRa is a long-range, low-bandwidth wireless standard that can work in peer-to-peer fashion between low-cost, low-power LoRa nodes. LoRa nodes can also connect to the Internet via a LoRaWAN gateway.

Other LoRa gateway boards for the Raspberry Pi include Pi Supply’s IoT LoRa Gateway. We’ve also seen some LoRa ready gateways based on the i.MX6 UL, which is very similar to the i.MX6 ULL, such as Forlinx’s FCU1101.

 
Further information

The GW-01 is available now for $120 while the RPI and PoE models go for $95 and $245, respectively. More information may be found on the M2M IOT website and GitHub page, as well as the shopping pages for the GW-01GW-01 RPI, and GW-01 PoE.

This article originally appeared on LinuxGizmos.com on July 1.

M2M IOT | m2m-tele.com

Tuesday’s Newsletter: IoT Tech Focus

Coming to your inbox tomorrow: Circuit Cellar’s IoT Technology Focus newsletter. Tomorrow’s newsletter covers what’s happening with Internet-of-Things (IoT) technology–-from devices to gateway networks to cloud architectures. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

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Our weekly Circuit Cellar Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

Embedded Boards.(7/23) The focus here is on both standard and non-standard embedded computer boards that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up to production volumes.

Analog & Power. (8/6) This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AC-DC converters, power supplies, op amps, batteries and more.

July has a 5th Tuesday . That’s means we’re giving you an extra Newsletter: PCB Design! (7/30) The process of PCB design is always facing new complexities. Rules-based autorouting, chips with higher lead counts and higher speed interconnections are just a few of the challenges forcing PCB design software to keep pace. This newsletter updates you on the latest happenings in this area.

Microcontroller Watch (8/13) This newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

4-Channel Temp Measurement HAT Can be Stacked 8 High per Pi

By Eric Brown

Measurement Computing Corp. (MCC) has launched its third DAQ HAT for the Raspberry Pi, this time taking on temperature measurement. The $149 MCC 134 Thermocouple Measurement HAT follows its MCC 118 voltage measurement DAQ HAT with eight ±10 V inputs and sample rates up to 100 kS/s and its MCC 152 voltage output and digital I/O HAT with dual 0-5 V analog outputs at up to 5 kS/s and 8x configurable DIO.

 
MCC 134 with Raspberry Pi (left) and stacked MCC 134 boards
(click images to enlarge)
The MCC 134 lets you connect four differential thermocouples to the electrically isolated input channels to take temperature measurements. It supports thermocouple types J, K, R, S, T, N, E, and B, which are software selectable per channel, with the values updated at a minimum of one-second intervals.

The MCC 134 also offers open thermocouple detection so users can monitor for broken or disconnected thermocouples. Each channel type is selectable on a per-channel basis. The board provides a HAT-compatible 40-pin GPIO for easy installation. Other features include a 24-bit A/D converter, 3x cold-junction compensation (CJC) sensors, and linearization features.


MCC 134 block diagram
(click image to enlarge)
You can stack up to 8x MCC DAQ HATs per a single Raspberry Pi, mixing and matching the different boards to “configure multifunction, Pi-based solutions with analog input, output, and digital I/O,” says MCC. The MCC 134 has been tested with the Raspberry Pi 3 3B+, 3, 2, and A+ models.


MCC 134’s Python-based web server example
(click image to enlarge)
The MCC DAQ HATs are all controlled by the same open source Raspbian Linux stack with “easy-to-use” C/C++ and Python open source libraries and examples. API and hardware documentation are also provided.

Further information

The MCC 134 Thermocouple Measurement HAT is available now for $149. More information may be found on MCC’s MCC 134 product page.

This article originally appeared on LinuxGizmos.com on June 13.

Measurement Computing | www.mccdaq.com