Nordic Semi’s Modules Selected for IoT Positioning Platform

Nordic Semiconductor has announced that its nRF9160 System-in-Package (SiP) LTE-M/NB-IoT cellular IoT modules and nRF52840 Bluetooth 5/Bluetooth Low Energy (Bluetooth LE) SoCs are being used in the turnkey “GEPS” indoor and outdoor IoT positioning platform developed by Swedish industrial IoT startup, H&D Wireless.

GEPS is a turnkey, application-as-a-service solution that is designed to bridge the information gap between physical assets and business systems. It requires no upfront investment in hardware or software, and instead employs small 59 mm x 52 mm x 23 mm battery-powered, industrial-grade IoT tags embedded with either a Nordic nRF9160 SiP or nRF52840 SoC to track key assets and equipment via cellular, GPS or Bluetooth wireless technology in real-time.

Each tag (depending on application) can be configured with a rechargeable or AA-size battery, and achieve a minimum one year and maximum 10-year battery life. Operating either standalone or in conjunction with leading business and AI systems, the ultimate aim is to boost key operational metrics such as efficiency, safety, security, throughput, responsiveness, and ultimately profits. All this data is displayed via cloud-based visual dashboards accessible from desktop PCs, tablets or smartphones.

In asset management applications, for example, H&D Wireless is finding that its customers are saving between 20-40% in operational costs due to a combination of better utilization of their assets and the ability to get rid of 30% of the assets previously required to perform the same job. Key target industries for the GEPS platform include logistics (e.g. asset and fleet management), construction (for example tools, people and equipment), and manufacturing industries (such as sub-assemblies).

At just 10 mm x 16 mm x 1 mm in size, the nRF9160 includes everything a cellular connection and IoT application needs beyond requiring just an external battery, SIM and antenna. To achieve this ultra-high integration Nordic partnered with Qorvo to make a “System-in-Package” (SiP) that more closely resembles an integrated chip than a module.

The SiP includes a powerful application processor (Arm Cortex M-33), GPS support, standard microcontroller peripherals, and enough chip-integrated memory to execute IoT applications with edge computing. Yet this is not achieved by sacrificing on-air performance: the nRF91 is capable of delivering class-leading output power (+23 dBm) and sensitivity – vital for its GPS functionality

Nordic’s nRF52840 multiprotocol SoC is Nordic’s most advanced ultra low power wireless solution. The SoC supports complex Bluetooth LE and other low-power wireless applications that were previously not possible with a single-chip solution. The nRF52840 is Bluetooth 5-, Thread 1.1-, and Zigbee PRO (R21) and Green Power proxy specification-certified and its Dynamic Multiprotocol feature uniquely supports concurrent wireless connectivity of the protocols. The SoC combines the Arm processor with a 2.4GHz multiprotocol radio. The chip supports all the features of Bluetooth 5 (including 4x the range or 2x the raw data bandwidth (2Mbps) compared with Bluetooth 4.2). Designed to address the inherent security challenges brought by the IoT, the nRF52840 SoC incorporates the Arm CryptoCell-310 cryptographic accelerator.

Nordic Semiconductor | www.nordicsemi.com

Arm-Based Industrial Panel PC is Designed for IoT Applications

Advantech has announced the TPC-71W, the new generation of its industrial panel PCs aimed at machine automation and web-terminal applications. TPC-71W is a cost-efficient, Arm-based industrial panel PC that features a 7” true-flat display with P-CAP multi-touch control and an NXP Arm Cortex-A9 i.MX 6 dual/quad-core processor to deliver high-performance computing. The system also features a serial port with a termination resistor that supports the CAN 2.0B protocol and offers a programmable bit rate of up to 1 Mb/s.

Equipped with the Google Chromium embedded web browser and support for various operating systems, including Android, Linux Yocto and Linux Ubuntu with QT GUI toolkits, TPC-71W allows system integrators to easily develop and deploy a wide range of industrial applications. The provision of wireless communication technologies, such as Bluetooth, Wi-Fi and NFC, via a mini PCIe interface simplifies networking and ensures connectivity for data transfers.

TPC-71W also features Power over Ethernet (PoE) functionality for powering devices via Ethernet, thereby eliminating the need to build a power infrastructure. Furthermore, the TPC-71W panel PC supports VESA and panel mounting for flexible and convenient installation. Compared to other similar products, TPC-71W is one of the most competitively priced rugged industrial panel PCs currently available on the market. Overall, this powerful, reliable, and cost-effective computing platform provides the ideal solution for IoT implementation and expansion.

Aimed at the industrial market, TPC-71W is a rugged yet compact, fanless panel PC equipped with an NXP® Arm® Cortex-A9 i.MX 6 dual/quad-core processor, 2 GB DDR3L RAM, and 8 GB eMMC storage to provide high-performance computing and improved efficiency for high-tier industrial applications. The 7” true-flat display with 16:9 aspect ratio features P-CAP multi-touch control for easy and intuitive operation. Moreover, to ensure reliable operation in harsh industrial environments, TPC-71W supports a wide operating temperature range (-20 ~ 60 °C/-4 ~ 140 °F) and is IP66 rated for protection from dust, oil, and water ingress.

TPC-71W supports various OS, including Android 6, Linux Yocto 2.1, and Linux Ubuntu 16.04 with QT GUI toolkits. Linux is an open-source OS specifically designed to assist system integrators with developing unique applications. The ability to support both Android and Linux eliminates software porting efforts and ensures easy deployment. Moreover, TPC-71W features the Google Chromium embedded web browser that simplifies programming and further facilitates application development.

To ensure connectivity for web-based management, TPC-71W offers Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, and NFC wireless communication capabilities via a mini PCIe interface. The inclusion of a serial port that supports industrial communication interfaces, such as RS-232/485 and the CAN 2.0B protocol, and a LAN port that supports speeds of up to 1000 Mbps (10/100/1000 Mbps) accelerates data transfer rates, while also enabling Wake-on-LAN functions. Furthermore, the TPC-71W panel PC can be equipped with optional PoE functionality for powering devices via Ethernet; this greatly streamlines installations and reduces overall equipment costs.

Key Features:

  • 7” WSVGA LCD with 16:9 aspect ratio and P-CAP multi-touch control
  • NXP Arm Cortex®[C1] -A9 i.MX 6 dual/quad-core processor
  • Up to 2 GB DDR3L RAM and 8 GB of eMMC storage onboard
  • 10/100/1000 Mbps LAN Optional PoE functionality for powering devices via Ethernet
  • Supports Linux Yocto, Linux Ubuntu, and Android OS

Advantech’s TPC-71W 7” industrial panel PC is available for order now.

Advantech | www.advantech.com

 

DENSO Taps Cypress’ Fail-Safe Flash for Car Cockpit Design

Cypress Semiconductor has announced that automotive supplier DENSO has selected Cypress’ Semper fail-safe storage for its next-generation digital automotive cockpit applications with advanced graphics. Based on an embedded Arm Cortex-M0 processing core, the Semper family is purpose-built for automotive environments.
The Cypress Semper family offers high density serial NOR Flash memory up to 4 Gbit and leverages the company’s proprietary MirrorBit process technology. The family also features EnduraFlex architecture, which achieves greater reliability and endurance. Semper fail-safe storage devices were the first in the industry to achieve the ISO 26262 automotive functional safety standard and are ASIL-B compliant, says Cypress.

According to Cypress, the Semper fail-safe storage products exceed automotive quality and functional safety requirements with ASIL-B compliance and are ready for use in ASIL-D systems. Cypress’ 512 Mb, 1 Gb and 2 Gb Semper devices are currently sampling.

Cypress Semiconductor | www.cypress.com

 

Fancy Filtering with the Teensy 3.6

Arm-ed for DSP

Signal filtering entails some tricky tradeoffs. A fast MCU that provides hardware-based floating-point capability eases some of those trade-offs. Here, Brian has used the Arm-based Teensy MCU modules to serve those needs. Here, Brian taps the Teensy 3.6 Arm MCU module to perform real-time audio FFT-convolution filtering.

By Brian Millier

Signal filtering can be done either with analog circuitry or digitally using a microcontroller (MCU) coupled with analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog converters. The strength of analog filters is that they can cover wide frequency ranges. If they are designed entirely with passive components, the range of signal amplitudes that can be handled is limited only by the voltage rating of the various capacitors that are used. Additionally, they don’t add much, if any, noise to the signal. However, a limitation of analog filters is that they can’t provide a sharp cut-off rate at their corner frequency (Fc), unless you cascade many filter sections and use close-tolerance components.

If you need high-performance filters, then digital filters might be the way to go. You can design very sharp low-pass, high-pass, notch and band-pass filters using digital techniques, if you use high-resolution ADC/DACs to convert the analog signal into the digital domain and (optionally) back to the analog domain. However, the MCU that you use must be fast and, in general, feature hardware-based floating-point operations. Two years ago, I discovered a line of Arm-based MCU modules that fill the bill nicely.

In Circuit Cellar issues 324 (July 2017) and 325 (August 2017), I described a digital guitar amplifier based upon the Teensy 3.2 Module, which contains an Arm Cortex-M4 MCU. The analog guitar signal was converted to a 16-bit digital signal for processing, and then back to an analog signal for power amplification, by an NXP Semiconductor SGTL5000 Codec contained on the PJRC Audio Shield. This project was made possible largely due to the extremely powerful Audio library provided by the manufacturer of the Teensy modules. This library consists of many audio functions, all of which operate using DMA transfers and interrupt service routines (that is, as a background task). The sampling is done at CD quality (44,100 samples/s at 16-bit resolution).

That project involved many different audio functions—some from the Teensy Audio Library, and some that I wrote myself. The filtering I used for the project was in the form of a 5-band parametric equalizer (EQ). This consists of five blocks of band-pass filters, each one centered on a specific frequency in the audible range. Such an EQ is basically a sophisticated “tone control” for the guitar signal. While most of the other guitar signal processing was done within the Teensy 3.2 MCU, using the Audio library, the 5-band parametric EQ was handled by a DSP block contained within the SGTL5000 Codec on the Teensy Audio Shield.

After finishing that project, I became interested in more sophisticated filtering algorithms that could be performed by the Arm MCU found on the Teensy modules. The Teensy Audio Library routines work with all the Arm-based MCUs in the Teensy module family (except the lowest-cost LC model). The Audio library contains three types of digital filters:

1) Biquad (low pass, high pass, band pass, notch)
2) FIR (up to 200 taps)
3) State-variable (Chamberlin)

The Biquad algorithm executes quickly, and its coefficients are easy to calculate on the fly, which makes it easy to change the filter bandwidth and Fc quickly. Finite impulse response (FIR) filters can provide much better filter characteristics, if you configure them with enough “taps”. However, as you increase the number of taps used, the execution time increases proportionately.

All the above filters use 16-bit, fixed-point math (Arm Cortex M4 DSP instructions using the Q15 data format). This is fast and reasonably accurate, but not enough to provide very sharp filter “skirts”. When you attempt to cascade several sections of such filters, you start to see the limitations in the precision of the fixed-point math.

The higher-end Teensy modules (Teensy 3.5 and 3.6) contain the more powerful Arm Cortex M4F core. These devices have hardware floating-point instructions, which basically allow you to do floating-point operations as quickly as you could do the 16-bit fixed-point operations with the DSP instructions available on Teensy 3.2’s Arm Cortex M4 MCU.

Figure 1
Top view of the Teensy 3.6 Arm MCU module. To the right is the on-board MicroSD socket, which accepts the MicroSD card containing the Cabinet Impulse Response file.

By using a Teensy 3.6 with hardware floating-point instructions, I figured that I could handle more sophisticated filtering algorithms. Another consideration was that the Teensy 3.6 MCU runs at 180 MHz, compared to the 72 MHz clock speed of the Teensy 3.2. Also, the Teensy 3.6 can be safely over-clocked at 240 MHz, compared to the 120 MHz maximum overclocked speed of the Teensy 3.2. Figure 1 shows the Teensy 3.6 module. Figure 2 shows the Audio Shield that I used. It contains the NXP SGTL5000 Codec device (A/D and D/A converters, mic preamplification, headphone driver and digital signal processing).

Figure 2
Top view of the Teensy Audio Shield. The two rows of 14 holes are fitted with header pins that plug directly into the Teensy 3.6 MCU module. All interconnections between the two boards are via these 28 pins.

CONVOLUTION FILTERING

Although I have used digital filters in FIR and Biquad configurations, prior to this project I wasn’t familiar with the term “convolution” filtering. As part of my music/recording hobby, I had encountered the term convolution regarding:

1) Guitar amplifier cabinet simulation
2) High-end, “space-accurate” reverberation processors

Convolution reverberation processors are not relevant to this discussion. However, guitar amplifier cabinet simulation is basically a fancy way of saying that you are simulating the exact frequency/phase response of a guitar amplifier and its loudspeaker(s), mounted in a specific cabinet, with the recording microphone oriented a specific way.

The “shape” of the frequency response curve of any given guitar amplifier/speaker combination will not be a “flat” response over the useful range of guitar notes. Instead it will consist of many small peaks and dips over the frequency range of interest. These “aberrations” provide the distinctive sound of interest to the musician. To some extent, one can simulate a given guitar amplifier/speaker by using a multiband parametric equalizer (EQ) and fiddling with it until it sounds the way you know the actual amplifier/speaker sounds. However, experts in the field learned that they could go one step further using the following method.

Rather than feeding an actual guitar signal into the amplifier/speaker cabinet, they feed it a short pulse, with rise/fall times as fast as possible. This short pulse is called a “finite-impulse signal.” The sound emitted by the speaker cabinet is then picked up by a professional-quality microphone, amplified, converted to digital form and stored in a file. This file represents the FIR of the guitar amplifier/speaker cabinet. I admit that I don’t have the best understanding of the mathematical “magic” involved here, but suffice it to say that all the frequency response “personality” of the guitar amplifier/speaker cabinet is contained in the finite-impulse-response (FIR) file that has been collected. The higher the sample rate used to record the impulse, the better the simulation, and the larger this FIR file will be.

Once you have this FIR file, you can use it to provide the coefficients needed for a digital FIR filter. If you pass your “raw” guitar signal through this FIR filter, it will be modified in virtually the same way that it would be if it were sent out to the specifically modeled guitar amplifier/speaker cabinet. Effectively, you can digitally record a “raw” guitar signal, which, when converted back to analog and listened to, will sound as if you were listening to it “live,” through the specific guitar amplifier/speaker that you have modeled. The FIR filter routine does what’s called a “convolution” of the guitar’s time-domain signal with the FIR array of coefficients—which is also time-domain data.

FOCUSING ON FIR

Once you absorb the idea behind this simulation technique, it becomes clear that you could implement a complex digital filter to reproduce almost any complex frequency response with this technique. I’m certain that mathematicians and electronics engineers in the communication field discovered and used this technique to design complex filters long before guitar players saw its usefulness. However, it was the guitar cabinet simulation concept that led me to investigate the FIR filtering technique more fully..  …

Read the full article in the May 346 issue of Circuit Cellar
(Full article word count: 6284 words; Figure count: 8 Figures.)

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May Circuit Cellar: Sneak Preview

The May issue of Circuit Cellar magazine is out next week!. We’ve been hard at work laying the foundation and nailing the beams together with a sturdy selection of  embedded electronics articles just for you. We’ll soon be inviting you inside this 84-page magazine.

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Here’s a sneak preview of May 2019 Circuit Cellar:

EMBEDDED COMPUTING AT WORK

Technologies for Digital Signage
Digital signage ranks among the most dynamic areas of today’s embedded computing space. Makers of digital signage players, board-level products and other technologies continue to roll out new solutions for implementing powerful digital signage systems. Circuit Cellar Chief Editor Jeff Child looks at the latest technology trends and product developments in digital signage.

PC/104 and PC/104 Family Boards
PC/104 has come a long way since its inception over 25 ago. With its roots in ISA-bus PC technology, PC/104 evolved through the era of PCI and PCI Express by spinning off its wider family of follow on versions including PC/104-Plus, PCI-104, PCIe/104 and PCI/104-Express. This Product Focus section updates readers on these technology trends and provides a product gallery of representative PC/104 and PC/104-family boards.

TOOLS & TECHNIQUES FOR EMBEDDED ENGINEERING

Code Analysis Tools
Today it’s not uncommon for embedded devices to have millions of lines of software code. Code analysis tools have kept pace with these demands making it easier for embedded developers to analyze, debug and verify complex embedded software. Circuit Cellar Chief Editor Jeff Child explores the latest technology trends and product developments in code analysis tools.

Transistor Basics
In this day and age of highly integrated ICs, what is the relevance of the lone, discrete transistor? It’s true that most embedded systems can be solved by chip level solutions. But electronic component vendors do still make and sell individual transistors because there’s still a market for them. In this article, Stuart Ball reviews some important basics about transistors and how you can use them in your embedded system design.

Pressure Sensors
Over the years, George Novacek has done articles examining numerous types of sensors that measure various physical aspects of our world. But one measurement type he’s not yet discussed in the past is pressure. Here, George looks at pressure sensors in the context of using them in an electronic monitoring or control system. The story looks at the math, physics and technology associated with pressure sensors.

MICROCONTROLLERS DO IT ALL

Robotic Arm Plays Beer Pong
Simulating human body motion is a key concept in robotics development. With that in mind, learn how these Cornell graduates Daniel Fayad, Justin Choi and Harrison Hyundong Chang accurately simulate the movement of a human arm on a small-sized robotic arm. The Microchip PIC32 MCU-based system enables the motion-controlled, 3-DoF robotic arm to take a user’s throwing motion as a reference to its own throw. In this way, they created a robotic arm that can throw a ping pong ball and thus play beer pong.

Fancy Filtering with the Teensy 3.6
Signal filtering entails some tricky tradeoffs. A fast MCU that provides hardware-based floating-point capability eases some of those tradeoffs. In the past, Brian Millier has used the Arm-based Teensy MCU modules to serve meet those needs. In this article, Brian taps the Teensy 3.6 Arm MCU module to perform real-time audio FFT-convolution filtering.

Real-Time Stock Monitoring Using an MCU
With today’s technology, even very simple microcontroller-based devices can fetch and display data from the Internet. Learn how Cornell graduates David Valley and Saelig Khatta built a system using that can track stock prices in real-time and display them conveniently on an LCD screen. For the design, they used an Espressif Systems ESP8266 Wi-Fi module controlled by a Microchip PIC32 MCU. Our fun little device fetches chosen stock prices in real-time and displays them on a screen.

… AND MORE FROM OUR EXPERT COLUMNISTS

Attacking USB Gear with EMFI
Many products use USB, but have you ever considered there may be a critical security vulnerability lurking in your USB stack? In this article, Colin O’Flynn walks you through on example product that could be broken using electromagnetic fault injection (EMFI) to perform this attack without even removing the device enclosure.

An Itty Bitty Education
There’s no doubt that we’re living in a golden age when it comes to easily available and affordable development kits for fun and education. With that in mind, Jeff Bachiochi shares his experiences programming and playing with the Itty Bitty Buggy from Microduino. Using the product, you can build combine LEGO-compatible building blocks into mobile robots controlled via Bluetooth using your cellphone.

SOMs based on RK3399 and PX30 SoCs target IoT

Arbor Technology has introduced a pair of System-on-Module (SOM) products both based on Rockchip SoCs, the RK3399-based SOM-RK391 and the Rockchip PX30-based SOM-RP301. Both modules run Ubuntu, Buildroot, or Android 9.0. Along with the pair of modules, the company has also released the PBA-9000-A, its SOM-Series, single pin-out design carrier board.

The Rockchip RK3399 SoC has been a favorite among high-end community backed Arm-based boards over the last couple years, and we’ve covered at least one every month over that period. Recent examples include Arbor’s own EmQ-RK390 Qsevenmodule, Geniatech’s DB9 SBC and Vamr’s 96Boards CE-compatible Rock960 Model C. In contrast, the SOM-RP301 appears to be the first module we’ve seen based on Rockchip’s low-power PX30 SoC.

SOM-RK391

Built around the Rockchip RK3399 hexa-core (2x Cortex-A72 + 4x Cortex-A53) SoC, the SOM-RK391 is designed for high-performance applications such as AI computing, edge computing and machine vision, according to Arbor.


SOM-RK391
For memory, the RK391 provides 2GB to 4GB of LPDDR4 DRAM and mass storage via 16GB eMMC flash plus support SD Card boot up. The Mali-T860MP4 GPU supports OpenGL ES1.1/2.0/3.0/3.1, OpenVG1.1, OpenCL and DX11. Display support includes eDP, MIPI DSI and HDMI. The compact 69.6 x 70 mm SOM supports extended operating temperatures from 10 to 70ºC.

The RK391 also provides WiFi /Bluetooth support including 2T2R 802.11 a/b/g/n/ac for WiFi and Bluetooth 5.0 with real simultaneous dual-band (RSDB). You also get 2x MIPI CSI RX camera interfaces with 13MP ISP. For I/O you get 4x USB 2.0, 2x USB 3.0 2 (Type C), 2x 2-wire UART ports and 2x 4-wire UART ports. There’s also support for RTC, 10-bit 1MS/s ADC, SDIO, DIO, GPIO, SPI and I2C.

SOM-RP301

The SOM-RP301 meanwhile is based on the Rockchip PX30 Quad-Core Cortex-A35 processor and measures a compact 70 x 50 mm. Arbor touts the board for its low power consumption, flexible thermal management, cost-efficiency and its suitability for IIoT applications. The combination of its hardware media decoder and processing power makes it a fit to implement in retail kiosks such as electronic restaurant menus, automated currency exchange machines, ticketing kiosks and so on, according to Arbor.



SOM-RP301
The SOM-RP301 offers provides 1GB to 4GB of LPDDR4DRAM and mass storage via 16GB eMMC flash plus support SD Card boot up. The Mali-T860MP4 GPU supports OpenGL ES1.1/2.0/3.0/3.1, OpenVG1.1, OpenCL and DX11. Display support includes LVDS and MIPI DSI, and those interfaces share the same pinout. Like the RK391, this modules also supports extended operating temperatures from 10 to 70ºC.

The RK391 also provides WiFi /Bluetooth support including 1x 802.11 a/b/g/n/ac for WiFi and Bluetooth 4.0. You also get 1x MIPI CSI RX camera interface with 8MP ISP. For I/O the RP301 provides the all the same ports as the RK391 as described above. Despite the fact that Arbor touts the RP301 as a low power solution, its datasheet currently says “TBD” for the board’s power consumption.

PBA-9000-A SOM Carrier Board

Arbor’s PBA-9000-A Carrier Board for its SOM-series features a single pin-out design that enables it to easily support future boards in the Arbor SOM-series CPU Board family. The PBA-9000-A’s I/O configuration supports all of the interfaces on the SOM-series boards.



PBA-9000-A SOM carrier board detail
(click image to enlarge)

Further information

More information on the three boards can be found on the announcement page. No pricing was provided. Links to datasheets for the SOM-RK391, SOM-RP301 and PBA-9000-A boards can be found on Arbor’s ARM-computing product page.

This article originally appeared on LinuxGizmos.com on April 8.

Arbor Technology | www.arbor-technology.com

Rugged IoT Gateways are Based on i.MX6 and Raspberry Pi

Kontron has announced two new industrial computers, the KBox A-330-RPI and KBox A-330-MX6, specifically designed for cost-sensitive control and gateway applications. The KBox A-330-RPI is based on the long-term available Raspberry Pi Compute Module CM3+ and can therefore use the huge software pool of the Raspberry Pi community. Equipped with a Broadcom BCM2837 Quad Core Arm processor, the KBox A-330-RPI is compatible with the established Raspberry Pi standards and has been enhanced with industrial features.

The new KBox A-330-MX6 differs from the KBox A-330-RPI primarily by the Dual Core i.MX6 processor from NXP, which is, like the Raspberry Pi Compute Module CM3+, long term available. In addition, the variant based on the NXP processor optionally offers additional industrial protocol stacks such as EtherCAT, PROFINET, Modbus and CANopen to enable customers to easily integrate control software.

Both KBox A-330 variants operate fanless and are designed for industrial control and gateway tasks in control cabinets due to their slim design and the possibility of DIN rail mounting. Two Fast Ethernet ports, RS232, RS485 or CAN and four I/O ports are available as interfaces. A powerful user interface can be operated during commissioning or in the target application via two USB channels and an HDMI connection.

With the KBox A-330 family Kontron offers an industrial grade platform that enables connection to various communication levels, serves as a gateway for IoT applications and can integrate sensors and actuators. As operating system Kontron offers Yocto Linux for the KBox A-330-MX6 and Raspbian for the KBox A-330-RPI. On a project basis, applications are realizable that include advanced security features such as secure authentication and data encryption that go beyond normal security requirements.

In conjunction with the modular IoT software framework SUSiEtec from Kontron’s sister company S&T Technologies, any applications and cloud solutions on the market—from sensors to edge computers to private or public clouds—can also be connected and supported to develop IoT applications or establish new business models.

Kontron | www.kontron.com

BLE Multicore MCUs Embed Arm Cortex M33 CPU

Dialog Semiconductor has announced its SmartBond DA1469x family of Bluetooth low energy SoCs, a range of multi-core MCUs for wireless connectivity. The devices’ three integrated cores have each been carefully chosen for their capabilities to sense, process and communicate between connected devices, says Dialog. To provide the devices’ processing power, the DA1469x product family is the first wireless MCU in production with a dedicated application processor based on the Arm Cortex-M33 CPU, according to Dialog.

The M33 is aimed at compute intensive applications, such as high-end fitness trackers, advanced smart home devices and virtual reality game controllers. The DA1469x devices have a new integrated radio that offers double the range compared to its predecessor together with an Arm Cortex-M0+ based software-programmable packet engine that implements protocols and provides full flexibility for wireless communication.

On the connectivity front, an emerging application is for manufacturers to deploy accurate positioning through the Angle of Arrival and Angle of Departure features of the newly introduced Bluetooth 5.1 standard. With its world-class radio front end performance and configurable protocol engine, the DA1469x complies with this new version of the standard and opens new opportunities for devices that require accurate indoor positioning such as building access and remote keyless entry systems.

To enhance the sensing functionality of the DA1469x, the M33 application processor and M0+ protocol engine is complemented with a Sensor Node Controller (SNC), which is based on a programmable micro-DSP that runs autonomously and independently processes data from the sensors connected to its digital and analog interfaces, waking the application processor only when needed. In addition to this power-saving feature, a state-of-the-art Power Management Unit (PMU) provides best-in-class power management by controlling the different processing cores and only activating them as needed.

The SoCs feature up to 144 DMIPS, 512 KB of RAM, memory protection, a floating-point unit, a dedicated crypto engine to enable end-to-end security and expandable memories, ensuring a wide range of advanced smart device applications can be implemented using the chipset family and supporting a range of key value-add interfaces to extend functionality even further.

The PMU also provides three regulated power rails and one LDO output to supply external system components, removing the requirement of a separate power management IC (PMIC). Additionally, the DA169x product family come equipped with a range of key value-add interfaces including a display driver, an audio interface, USB, a high-accuracy ADC, a haptic driver capable of driving both ERM and LRA motors as well as a programmable stepping motor controller.

Developers working with the DA1469x product family can make use of Dialog’s software development suite – SmartSnippets – which gives them the tools they need to develop best-in-class applications on the new MCUs. The DA1469x variants will start volume production in the first half of 2019. Samples and development kits are available now.

Dialog Semiconductor | www.dialog-semiconductor.com

 

i.MX 8M SoC-Based Solution Enables Immersive 3D Audio

NXP Semiconductors has announced its Immersiv3D audio solution for the smart home market. The solution combines NXP software on its i.MX 8M Mini applications processor and will support both Dolby Atmos and DTS:X immersive audio technologies in future devices that integrate the i.MX 8M Mini SoC. The i.MX 8M Mini also brings smart capabilities like voice control to a broader range of consumer devices including soundbars, smart speakers, and AV receivers with the option for adding additional speakers to distribute smart voice control and immersive audio throughout the home.

TVs and audio systems are becoming more advanced thanks in large part to the development of Dolby Atmos and DTS:X. Both technologies are a leap forward from surround sound and transport listeners with moving audio that fills the room and flows all around them. Listeners will feel like they’re inside the action as the sounds of people, places, thing, and music come alive with breathtaking realism. NXP’s Immersiv3D audio solution was designed to enable OEMs to bring to market affordable consumer audio devices capable of supporting Dolby Atmos and DTS:X in their next-generation devices.

Conventional design approaches to audio systems use Digital Signal Processors (DSPs) to deliver complex, controlled and low-latency audio processing to enable audio and video synchronization. But Traditional embedded systems have evolved over time, and today they are capable of processing the latest 3D audio formats, but audio systems need to be designed to take advantage of today’s advanced processor cores. In conjunction with the NXP i.MX 8M family of processors, the Immersiv3D audio solution introduces an advanced approach that features scalable audio processing integration into the SoC Arm cores. This approach eliminates the need for expensive discrete DSPs, and also once-proprietary DSP design foundations, to embrace licensable cores.

The solution delivers high-end audio features such as immersive multi-channel audio playback, natural language processing and voice capabilities to fit today’s digitally savvy connected consumer. The NXP Immersiv3D audio solution gives audio developers, designers and integrators a leap forward to add intelligence and Artificial Intelligence (AI) functionality while reducing cost. This includes development of enhancements like selective noise canceling where only certain sound elements are removed like car traffic or speech processing like changing speaker dialect or languages.

The solution introduces an easy-to-use, low-cost enablement for voice capability expansion. Audio systems built using NXP’s Immersiv3D with the i.MX 8M Mini applications processor will give consumers the flexibility to add different audio speakers, regardless of brand, to stream simultaneous and synchronized audio with voice control from their systems.

NXP showcased its i.MX applications processor family including Immersiv3D at the CES 2019 show.

NXP Semiconductors | www.nxp.com

Open-Spec, i.MX6 UL-Based SBC Boasts DAQ and Wireless Features

By Eric Brown

Technologic Systems has announced an engineering sampling program for a wireless- and data acquisition focused SBC with open specifications that runs Debian Linux on NXP’s low-power i.MX6 UL SoC. The -40°C to 85°C tolerant TS-7180 is designed for industrial applications such as industrial control automation and remote monitoring management, including unmanned control room, industrial automation, automatic asset management and asset tracking.


 
TS-7180, front and back
(click images to enlarge)
Like Technologic’s i.MX6-based TS-7970, the TS-7180 has a 122 mm x 112 mm footprint. Like its 119 x 94mm TS-7553-V2 SBC and sandwich-style, 75 mm x 55 mm TS-4100, it features the low power Cortex-A7 based i.MX6 UL, enabling the board to run at a typical 0.91 W.

Like the TS-4100, the new SBC includes an FPGA. On the TS-4100 this was described as a Lattice MachX02 FPGA with an open source, programmable ZPU soft core for controlling GPIO, SPI, I2C and daughtercards. Here, the manual mentions only that the unnamed FPGA enables the optional, 3x 16-bit wide quadrature counters, which are accessible via I2C registers. The “quadrature and edge-counter inputs provide access to” dual, optional tachometers, says Technologic.


 
TS-7180 (left) and block diagram
(click images to enlarge)
The quadrature counters and tachometers are part of a DAQ subsystem with screw terminal interfaces that is not available on its other i.MX6 UL boards. The digital acquisition features also include analog and digital inputs, DIO, and PWM.

Technologic boards typically have a lot of wireless options, but the TS-7180 goes even further by adding a cellular modem socket that supports either MultiTech or NimbeLink wireless modules. You also get Wi-Fi/BT, optional GPS, and a socket for Digi’s XBee modules, which include modems for RF, 802.15.4, DigiMesh, and more. There are also dual 10/100 Ethernet port with an optional Power-over-Ethernet daughtercard.


 
TS-7180 with cellular socket populated with NimbeLink wireless module (left) and with populated XBee socket
(click images to enlarge)
The TS-7180 ships with up to 1 GB RAM and 2 KB FRAM (Cypress 16 kbit FM25L16B), which “provides reliable data retention while eliminating the complexities, overhead, and system level reliability problems caused by EEPROM and other nonvolatile memories,” says Technologic. You also get a microSD slot and 4GB eMMC, which is “configurable as 2 GB pSLC mode for additional system integrity.”

The SBC provides a USB 2.0 host port, as well as micro-USB OTG and serial console ports. There’a also mention of a “coming soon” internal USB interface. Five serial interfaces, including TTL and RS485 ports, are available on screw terminals along with a CAN port.

Other features include an RTC and an optional enclosure and 9-axis IMU. The board runs on an 8-30V input with optional external power supply and Technologic’s TS-SILO SuperCap for 30 seconds of battery backup.

As usual, the board is backed up with open schematics and comprehensive documentation. If it wasn’t over our $200 limit, it would be included in our new catalog of 122 open-spec hacker boards. Two SKUs are available: a basic $315 model with 512MB RAM and a $381 model with 1GB RAM that adds GPS and IMU.

Specifications listed for the TS-7180 include:

  • Processor — NXP i.MX6UL (1x Cortex-A7 core @ up to 696MHz); FPGA
  • Memory/storage:
    • 512MB or 1GB DDR3 RAM
    • 2KB FRAM
    • 4GB MLC eMMC; opt. standard eMMC up to 64GB (special request)
    • MicroSD slot
  • Wireless:
    • 802.11b/g/n with antenna
    • Bluetooth 4.0 BLE
    • Cell modem socket (MultiTech or NimbeLink)
    • Optional GPS
    • XBee interface
  • Networking – 2x 10/100 Ethernet ports with optional PoE via daughtercard
  • Other I/O:
    • USB 2.0 host port
    • Micro-USB OTG port
    • Micro-USB serial console device port
    • 4x serial (1x TTL UART, 3x RS-232) via screw terminals
    • RS-485 (via screw terminal)
    • CAN (via screw terminal)
    • SPI, I2C headers
  • DAQ I/O:
    • 7x DIO (30 VDC tolerant) via screw terminal
    • 4x analog inputs (10V or 4-20 mA) via screw terminal
    • 4x digital inputs via screw terminal
    • PWM header
    • 2x optional quadrature counters
    • 2x Optional tachometers
  • Other features — battery backed RTC; temp. sensor; optional 9-axis accelerometer/gyro; TS-SILO Super Capacitor; optional enclosure
  • Power — 8-30 DC input; 0.91W typical consumption (0.59 min to 6.37 max); optional 24V external DIN-rail mountable “PS-MDR-20-24” power supply
  • Operating temperature — -40 to 85°C
  • Dimensions — 122 x 112mm
  • Operating system — Linux 4.1.15 kernel with Debian image

Further information

The TS-7180 is available in an engineering sampling program for $315 with 512 MB RAM or $381 model with 1GB RAM, GPS, and IMU. 100-unit pricing is $254 and $320. More information may be found in Technologic’s TS-7180 announcement and product page.

This article originally appeared on LinuxGizmos.com on January 4.

Technologic Systems | www.embeddedarm.com

 

Tool Revision Adds Arm Cortex-M Trace and Debug Support

Lauterbach has announced a new revision of their debug and trace probes for Cortex-M based devices. As Cortex-M processors are becoming clocked at greater and greater frequencies, the trace port clocks must also increase to keep pace and prevent loss of valuable data. To provide developers with a more future-proof solution to this perpetual cycle of increasing frequency, the new High-Speed Whisker cables are designed to work with trace clock frequencies of up to 200 MHz across trace ports ranging from 1-bit to 4-bits wide, giving a total trace port bandwidth of up to 200 MB/s.
With increased trace clock speeds comes an increased risk of signal misalignment when parallel trace pins are sampled. The High-Speed Whisker cable includes the innovative auto-focus technology that not only detects the trace port clock frequency but can also adjust the optimum sampling points of each pin to negate any alignment issues in the timing of the data signals. The points where each signal contains valid data, or data eyes, for each pin can be displayed in the TRACE32 PowerView software.

Detailed information about jitters, rising and falling edges is also displayed and users are provided with the capability of manually adjusting the sampling point of each signal. Once configured, these sampling points may be saved and recalled for future use of the tools on this target. The High-Speed Whisker cable will start shipping in January 2019 for TRACE32 µTrace and CombiProbe. Customers who purchased these units during 2018 may request a free upgrade.

Lauterbach | www.lauterbach.com

 

 

Easing into the IoT Cloud (Part 2)

Modules in Action

In Part 1 of this article series, Brian examined some of the technologies and services available today, enabling you to ease into the IoT cloud. Now, in Part 2, he discusses the hardware features of the Particle IoT modules, as well as the circuitry and program code for the project. He also explores the integration of a Raspberry Pi solution with the Particle cloud infrastructure.

By Brian Millier

After looking at broader aspects of easing into the IoT Cloud in Part 1, now it’s time to get into the hardware and software details. Let’s take a look at three of the Particle modules, shown in Figure 1. The P0 module contains the Cypress Semiconductor BCM43362 Wi-Fi chip and STMicroelectronics STM32F205RGY6 120 MHz Arm Cortex M3 microcontroller (MCU), in a small surface mount package. The Photon module contains this P0 module, plus a 3.3 V switch-mode power supply regulator, USB socket, mode switches and an RGB LED—all mounted on a 24-pin DIP package. The Electron module contains the U-blox SARA-U260/U270 3G cellular modem, the STM32F205RGT6 120  MHz Arm Cortex M3 MCU, a BQ24195 power management unit/battery charger, a Maxim Integrated battery gauge IC, plus the same mode switches and RGB LED contained on the Photon. It is mounted on a larger, 36-pin DIP module.

Figure 1
Shown here are three of the Particle IoT modules. The two on the left are Wi-Fi, and the one on the right is 3G Cellular.

The Photon and Electron share a common set of peripheral ports. These include 1x 12- bit ADC with up to 8 inputs, 2x 12-bit DACs, 2x  SPI, 1x I2C, 1x I2S, 1x CAN, 1x USB, 9x PWM, 1x UART and 18x GPIO.

The Electron module, having 12 more pins, has more of some of the above peripheral ports. Because the peripheral ports of both modules occupy many of the available pins, there will be fewer GPIO pins available if you use some the peripheral ports.
Particle provides libraries or high-level APIs for just about all the peripheral ports I’ve listed. The only peripheral port that I found was not supported was the I2S block. I2S is basically a high-speed bus dedicated to audio DACs/ADCs/Codecs. Due to the high speed, synchronous data transfers that I2S devices demand, such devices are generally not compatible with the real-time operating system (FreeRTOS) that the

Particle device runs under (unless you use DMA-based I2S).
Particle’s GPIO, I2C and SPI API’s are written to be compatible with their counterparts in Arduino. Because of that, third-party Arduino libraries that are available for many common peripheral chips/breakout modules will work with the Particle modules without further tweaking.

Both the Proton and Electron come with a tiny U.FL socket for an external antenna. In the Electron, a Taoglas external antenna is required and is provided. The Photon has a small PCB-mounted Wi-Fi chip antenna, but you can also use an external antenna if you are mounting the Photon in a case that doesn’t allow RF to penetrate. There is an Automatic RF mode, where the best signal from either the chip or external antenna is used.

The Electron module can draw around 2 A or more when communicating with a cell tower. This is more current than can be supplied if you were to plug the Electron into a PC’s USB port. Although you can get USB adapters that supply greater than 2 A, you wouldn’t be able to communicate with the Electron via USB, which would be handy during debugging. Particle wisely decided to include a Li-Po battery charger on-board and included a 2,000 mA-hours Li-Po battery with JST plug in the Electron kit. This assures the user that there will be enough power available to operate the cellular modem’s RF circuitry at full power.

As of this writing, the Particle 3G Electron (in the DIP package) is only available in an educational “kit” format, which includes the Electron module, antenna, LiPo battery, USB cable and a small protoboard. With all those support components included, it’s a good deal at $69. The E-Series SMT module, meant to be integrated into a commercial product, is more expensive ($79 in unit quantities), and doesn’t include any of the support components in the Electron kit.

PROJECT CIRCUIT DETAILS

The first Particle-based project I built was the over-temperature alarm that I described in Part 1 of this series. It also sends out an alert if the power fails. Figure 2 is a schematic of the circuit. I decided to use the Dallas Semiconductor (now Maxim Integrated) DS18S20 1-wire temperature measurement device. It is more expensive than a thermistor, but is accurate to within ± 0.5°C and doesn’t need any calibration procedure. The Particle library contains a “ds18x20” library that handles both the DS18B20 and the DS18S20 devices. These two devices differ in that each one outputs temperature at a different resolution, and the library handles this transparently. The DS18x20 can be operated in a 2-wire mode—signal and parasitic power on one wire, and ground on the other. However, timing constraints are less onerous if you use separate wires for the signal and power lines, and that is how I wired mine.

Figure 2
Schematic diagram of the project, using an Electron Cellular module.

I chose a small Nokia 5110 LCD display for the user interface. These are inexpensive, as they are pulled from or are surplus units from popular older Nokia cell phones. An Arduino-based Nokia 5110 library works with Particle devices. This can be found in the “Library” section of the Particle Web-based IDE. The 5110 LCD has a separate backlight pin, which can be driven by a PWM signal, to control the backlight LED’s brightness. I run the backlight with a PWM duty cycle of 25%, which is plenty bright and uses less power.

The user controls are as follows:

1) An SPDT switch acts as the Setpoint UP/DOWN adjustment.
2) A TEST pushbutton, when pressed, simulates an over-temperature condition and sends out the same message for test purposes.
3) A RESET pushbutton is connected to the Electron module’s *RST pin.
4) While not shown in my diagram, I later added a switch in series with the Li-Po battery’s positive wire, to disconnect the Li-Po completely. This allows the unit to be turned off when the USB power adapter is unplugged and this switch is shut off.
The LCD displays the current time, which is synchronized with the Particle cloud server, so it’s very accurate. It also displays the measured temperature and the Setpoint temperature. The fourth line of the display indicates the AC power status. Because the power status is only monitored once per minute, it will not report a momentary power-loss.

Read the full article in the January 342 issue of Circuit Cellar

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Tiny, Single-GbE Arm Networking SBC Runs Linux

By Eric Brown

Gateworks has spun a 100 mm x 35 mm, single-GbE “Newport GW6100” networking SBC, which follows a recent dual-GbE “GW6200” model. Both run Linux on a dual-core Cavium Octeon TX SoC and offer mini-PCIe expansion and -40 to 85°C support.

In Nov. 2017, when Gateworks unveiled its Newport family of Linux-driven, Octeon TX based SBCs with the 105 mm x 100 mm, dual GbE port Newport GW6300, it promised several more models in 2018. The 140 mm x 100 mm, 5-GbE port Newport GW6400 was announced in May along with a GW6404 sibling that swaps two of the GbE ports to SFP ports. Now, the company has launched the single-GbE port GW6100 model, which had been scheduled for a 2018 Q2 arrival. There was no announcement of the GW6100, which was discovered by CNXSoft, nor of the dual-port, 100 mm x 75 mm GW6200, which now has a product page (see farther below).

 
Newport GW6100 (left) and recent Newport GW6200
(click images to enlarge)
Like the other Newport SBCs, the new entries run OpenWrt or Ubuntu on Cavium’s networking focused Octeon TX SoC, which has Cortex-A53 like ”Thunder” cores. The embedded-oriented Octeon TX competes directly with NXP’s QorIQ line. Optimized to run multiple concurrent data and control planes simultaneously, the headless SoC integrates security architecture from Cavium’s Nitrox V security processors.

While the Newport GW6300 and GW6400 both offer a choice of dual- (800MHz) or quad-core (1.5GHz) Octeon TX configurations, the GW6100 and GW6200 are limited to the 800MHz dual-core models. Volume orders are required to switch to the quad-core SoC or make other customizations, including boosting the standard 1GB DDR4 to up to 4GB or the standard 8GB eMMC to up to 64GB.

The Newport GW6100 and GW6200 provide OpenWrt or Ubuntu Linux BSPs with U-Boot. A full development kit is available with a power supply, passive PoE injector, JTAG programmer, and cables.

Newport GW6100

The tiny new GW6100 offers 1GB DDR4, 8GB eMMC, and a GbE port with PoE support. You can also draw power from the USB Type-C port, and there’s a JTAG connection and an I/O connector. The latter offers serial, analog, and digital I/O, as well as I2C, SPI, and power.


Newport GW6100 front detail view
(click image to enlarge)
A single mini-PCIe slot accompanied by a nano-SIM slot supports third-party PCIe, USB 3.0, and mSATA cards. You can also choose from several Gateworks mini-PCIe options, including USB, DIO/analog I/O, microSD/USB/SIM, Femto, and IoT Radio (Sub-1GHz) modules.


GW6100 rear detail view
(click image to enlarge)
Like all the Newport SBCs, the GW6100 provides standard -40 to 85°C support. There’s an 8-60V DC jack in addition to the PoE, Type-C, and power header options. Other features include reverse power protection, programmable wake-up/shutdown, a watchdog, real-time clock, and more. A Ublox GNSS receiver is optional.


GW6100 block diagram
(click image to enlarge)

Specifications listed for the Newport GW6100 include:

  • Processor — Cavium Octeon TX (2x ARMv8 ThunderX cores @ 800MHz); networking and security extensions
  • Memory/storage:
    • 1GB DDR4
    • 8GB eMMC
    • mSATA (SATA III) via mini-PCIe
  • Networking — Gigabit Ethernet port with passive PoE 8-60V input
  • Other I/O:
    • USB 2.0 Type-C port with 1.5A, 7.5W power support
    • Application connector (serial I/O, digital I/O, analog, I2C, SPI, and power)
    • JTAG interface
  • Expansion — Mini-PCIe slot with 8W power for “PCIe, USB 3.0 or mSATA with USB 2.0”; Nano-SIM slot
  • Other features – Watchdog; RTC with battery; LED, tamper switch support; voltage and temp. monitor; serial config EEPROM; programmable fan controller with tach support; Optional Ublox ZOE-MQ8 GNSS GPS Receiver with PPS
  • Operating temperature — -40 to 85°C
  • Power:
    • 8-60V DC jack (or PoE or Type-C)
    • 0.13A @ 24VDC typical operating current
    • Voltage reverse protection
    • Programmable shut-down and wake-up
  • Dimensions — 100 x 35 x 21mm
  • Weight — 85 g
  • Operating system — OpenWrt or Ubuntu BSPs

Newport GW6200

The 100 x 75mm Newport GW6200 adds to the GW6100 feature set with a microSD slot, a second GbE port (both with PoE), plus a second mini-PCIe slot. In place of the Type-C port you get 2x USB 3.0 ports.

 
Newport GW6200 detail view (left) and block diagram
(click images to enlarge)
The CW6200 is further equipped with side-mounted connectors for SPI, DIO, I2C, and either 2x RS232 or a single RS232/422/485 interface. A CAN bus controller is optional.

Further information

The Newport GW6100 and Newport GW6200 appear to be available now at undisclosed prices. More information may be found on Gateworks’ Newport GW6100and Newport GW6200 product pages.

Gateworks | www.gateworks.com

Cypress Semi Teams with Arm for Secure IoT MCU Solution

Cypress Semiconductor has expanded its collaboration with Arm to provide management of IoT edge nodes. The solution integrates the Arm Pelion IoT Platform with Cypress’ low power, dual-core PSoC 6 microcontrollers (MCUs) and CYW4343W Wi-Fi and Bluetooth combo radios. PSoC 6 provides Arm v7-M hardware-based security that adheres to the highest level of device protection defined by the Arm Platform Security Architecture (PSA).
Cypress and Arm demonstrated hardware-secured onboarding and communication through the integration of the dual-core PSoC 6 MCU and Pelion IoT Platform in the Arm booth at Arm TechCon last month. In the demo, the PSoC 6 was running Arm’s PSA-defined Secure Partition Manager to be supported in Arm Mbed OS version 5.11 open-source embedded operating system, which will be available this December. Embedded systems developers can leverage the private key storage and hardware-accelerated cryptography in the PSoC 6 MCU for cryptographically-secured lifecycle management functions, such as over-the-air firmware updates, mutual authentication and device attestation and revocation. According to the company, Cypress is making a strategic push to integrate security into its compute, connect and store portfolio for the IoT.

The PSoC 6 architecture is built on ultra-low-power 40-nm process technology, and the MCUs feature low-power design techniques to extend battery life up to a full week for wearables. The dual-core Arm Cortex-M4 and Cortex-M0+ architecture lets designers optimize for power and performance simultaneously. Using its dual cores combined with configurable memory and peripheral protection units, the PSoC 6 MCU delivers the highest level of protection defined by the Platform Security Architecture (PSA) from Arm.

Designers can use the MCU’s software-defined peripherals to create custom analog front-ends (AFEs) or digital interfaces for innovative system components such as electronic-ink displays. The PSoC 6 MCU features the latest generation of Cypress’ industry-leading CapSense capacitive-sensing technology, enabling modern touch and gesture-based interfaces that are robust and reliable.

Cypress Semiconductor | www.cypress.com

MCU Family Serves Up Ultra-Low Power Functionality

STMicroelectronics has released its STM32L0x0 Value Line microcontrollers that provide an additional, low-cost entry point to the STM32L0 series The MCUs embed the Arm Cortex -M0+ core. With up to 128 KB flash memory, 20 KB SRAM and 512 byte true embedded EEPROM on-chip the MCUs save external components to cut down on board space and BOM cost. In addition to price-sensitive and space-constrained consumer devices such as fitness trackers, computer or gaming accessories and remotes, the new STM32L0x0 Value Line MCUs are well suited for personal medical devices, industrial sensors, and IoT devices such as building controls, weather stations, smart locks, smoke detectors or fire alarms.
The devices leverage ST’s power-saving low-leakage process technology and device features such as a low-power UART, low-power timer, 41µA 10 ksample/s ADC and wake-up from power saving in as little as 5µs. Designers can use these devices to achieve goals such as extending battery runtime without sacrificing product features, increasing wireless mobility, or endowing devices like smart meters or IoT sensors with up to 10-year battery-life leveraging the ultra-frugal 670 nA power-down current with RTC and RAM retention.

The Keil MDK-ARM professional IDE supports STM32L0x0 devices free of charge, and the STM32CubeMX configuration-code generator provides easy-to-use design analysis including a power-consumption calculator. A compatible Nucleo-64 development board (NUCLEO-L010RB) with Hardware Abstraction Layer (HAL) library is already available, to facilitate fast project startup.

The STM32L0x0 Value Line comprises six new parts, giving a choice of 16- KB, 64- KB, or 128- KB of flash memory, 128-byte, 256-byte or 512-byte EEPROM, and various package options. In addition, pin-compatibility with the full STM32 family of more than 800 part numbers offering a wide variety of core performance and integrated features, allows design flexibility and future scalability, with the freedom to leverage existing investment in code, documentation and tools.

STM32L0x0 Value Line microcontrollers are in production now, priced from $0.44 with 16-KB of flash memory and 128-byte EEPROM, for orders of 10,000 pieces. The unit price starting at $0.32 is available for high-volume orders.

STMicroelectronics| www.st.com