LTE, LTE-M, NB-IoT Antenna Serves Embedded Surface-Mount Needs

Linx Technologies, has introduced its Splatch SP610 surface-mount embedded antenna for LTE cellular applications, including LTE-M (Cat-M1) and NB-IoT cellular Internet of Things (IoT) uses. Measuring a compact 10 mm by 40 mm and just 2.8 mm high, the surface-mount SP610 antenna achieves high performance in the more challenging 700 MHz bands as well as common higher-frequency bands.  Like all of Linx’s Splatch antennas, the SP610 is designed to accommodate close proximity effects from interferers such as other solution components or the human body. This combination of small size and robust performance makes it especially well-suited for cellular IoT applications.

The SP610 targets North American cellular carriers for all LTE applications with excellent performance in the 700 MHz frequency bands favored by Verizon, AT&T and T-Mobile, while providing strong performance in 800 MHz, 900 MHz and > 1 GHz bands used by carriers, worldwide. Additionally, the SP610 provides full band support for LTE-M and NB-IoT applications which use sub-1 GHz frequencies to achieve longer range, and often use frequency band edges to avoid other cellular traffic.

The SP610 is available today in tape and reel packaging via Linx Technologies’ distributor and manufacturer representative networks.

Linx Technologies | www.linxtechnologies.com

October Circuit Cellar: Sneak Preview

The October issue of Circuit Cellar magazine is out next week! Smart Home technologies, Smart Farming, antenna arrays, rugged SBCs and COMs—this 84-page publication gathers up a great selection of embedded electronics articles for your reading pleasure.

Not a Circuit Cellar subscriber?  Don’t be left out! Sign up today:

 

Here’s a sneak preview of October 2019 Circuit Cellar:

TECHNOLOGIES FOR A CONNECTED WORLD

Smart Home Technologies
By Jeff Child
The evolution of Smart Homes is about more than pure convenience. Smart Home technologies are leveraging IoT concepts to improve energy efficiency and security, thanks to intelligent, connected devices. The topic encompasses things like power-saving motor control systems, predictive maintenance, cloud-based voice assistance, remote monitoring and more. In this article, Circuit Cellar Chief Editor Jeff Child examines the MCU and analog ICs that are serving the needs Smart Home system developers.

MQ Telemetry Transport
By Jeff Bachiochi
Better known by the acronym MQTT, this lightweight messaging protocol is designed to minimize network bandwidth and device resource requirements. In this article, Jeff sets out to use MQTT via a cloud setup that he can do locally. For this, he turns to Eclipse Mosquitto, an open source message broker that implements the MQTT protocol. Jeff steps through the nitty gritty details of his implementation.

LoRa (Part 1)
By Bob Japenga
In this new article series, Bob discusses LoRa—the Long Range spread spectrum modulation technique that promises to solve a number of the key issues in fulfilling the wireless IoT requirements. In Part 1, Bob starts with an introduction to LoRa, looking at what it is, what are its limitations and how those limitations affect how we use this technology.

Smart Farming Device Gives Plants a Voice
By Andrei Florian
Smart Farming has many aspects, and among these the agriculture side. In this project article, Andrei discusses SmartAgro, a device that combines field autonomy with ease of use, allowing farmers to give their plants a “voice.” It lets you visualize the temperature, soil humidity, UV radiation and more wherever you are, in real time and take action when it is most needed—whether that means turning on an irrigation system or preparing for cultivation.

 
RESOURCES FOR ENGINEERS

Product Focus: Rugged SBCs
By Jeff Child
Single board computers are used in such a broad sweep of applications—some that must operate in harsh environmental conditions. Rugged SBCs offer a variety of attributes to serve such needs, including extended temperature range, high shock and vibration resilience and even high humidity protection. This Product Focus section updates readers on this technology trend and provides a product album of representative rugged SBCs.

An Intro to Antenna Arrays
By Robert Lacoste
As an expert in RF technology, Robert has deep knowledge about antennas. And in this era of IoT, his expertise more relevant than ever. That’s because every wireless device has some kind of antenna and these antennas are often the root cause of engineering headaches. With that in mind, in this article Robert discusses the math, technology and design issues that are basic to antenna arrays.

Using Digital Potentiometers
By Stuart Ball
A digital potentiometer probably can’t be considered the most glamorous of electronic components. But it is easy to use and versatile. In this article, Stuart digs into the uses, advantages and disadvantages of the digital potentiometer, including how they contrast to mechanical potentiometers.

Semiconductor Fundamentals (Part 2)
By George Novacek
In Part 1 George examined the basic structures that make semiconductors work. But a lot more needs to be said about diodes, which are a key element of semiconductors. In Part 2, George dives deeper, this time looking at the current flow, depletion layer and electron physics that are involved in diode operations. He covers various types of diodes and the details of their operations.

A Hardware Random Number Generator
By Devlin Gualtieri
Men first walked on the Moon fifty years ago. On the same week as that historic event, Dev divided his time between watching the event on television and building a unique desktop novelty circuit, a random digit generator. This circuit used a Nixie tube for display and a handful of TTL integrated circuits to implement a linear feedback shift register. In this article, Dev updates his original design using the CMOS digital circuits available today and a 7-segment LED display. He also presents an improved version that uses a Microchip PIC MCU.


MICRCONTROLLERS DO IT ALL

Application-Specific MCUs
By Jeff Child
In contrast to microprocessors, microcontrollers tend to be used for specific applications. But even among MCUs, there’s distinct difference between general purpose MCUs and MCUs that are designed for very specific application segments, or even sub-segments. Circuit Cellar Chief Editor Jeff Child examines this class of MCUs that target everything from factory automation to appliance control.

The Laser Harp
By Alex Hatzis
Normally, you’d think that taking the strings out of a harp would be a downgrade. But in this article, Cornell student Alex Hatzis presents a system that does just that—replacing the harp strings with red lasers. Phototransistors are used to detect when the beams are intercepted by a person’s hand playing the harp, and some convincing real-time sound synthesis helps to create a new, high tech instrument.

 

 

 

October Circuit Cellar: A Sneak Preview

The October issue of Circuit Cellar magazine is on the launch pad, ready to deliver a selection of excellent embedded electronics articles covering trends, technology and design.

Not a Circuit Cellar subscriber?  Don’t be left out! Sign up today:

 

Here’s a sneak preview of October Circuit Cellar:

TECHNOLOGY FOR DRONES / ROBOTIC HAND

Commercial Drone Design Solutions Take Flight: Chips, Boards and Platforms
The control, camera and comms electronics inside today’s drones have to pack in an ambitious amount of functionality. Circuit Cellar Chief Editor Jeff Child explores the latest Oct 327 Coverand greatest chip and module solutions serving today’s commercial and consumer drone designs.

Building a Robot Hand: With Servos and Electromyography
Learn how three Cornell University students developed a robotic hand. The system captures impulses generated by muscle contractions and then filters and feeds those signals to a microcontroller which controls finger movement.

 

CAN’T STOP THE SIGNAL

Signal Chain Tech Pushes Bandwidth Barriers: ADCs, FPGAs and DACs
FPGAs and D-A converters are key  technologies making up a signal chain. Here, Circuit Cellar Chief Editor Jeff Child steps through the state-of-the-art options available for crafting efficient, highly-integrated signal-centric systems.

Antenna Performance Measurement Made Easy: Covering the Basics
If you’re doing any kind of wireless communications design, chances are you’re including an antenna. Columnist Robert Lacoste shows how the task of measuring an antenna’s performance is less costly and exotic than you’d think.

MONITORING GEAR WITH MICROCONTROLLER BRAINS

Gas Monitoring and Sensing (Part 1): Fun with Fragrant Analysis
Columnist Jeff Bachiochi covers the background issues surrounding gas monitoring and sensing. Then he describes how he uses sensors, A/D conversion and Arduino technologies to do oxygen measurement.

Logger Device Tracks Amp Hours (Part 1): Measuring Home Electricity
Setting out to monitor and log electricity usage in his house, Bill Wachsmann built an amp-hour logger using a microcontroller and a clamp on ammeter.

KEEPING THE LEGACY ALIVE

Emulating Legacy Interfaces: Do it with Microcontrollers
There’s a number of important legacy interface technologies—like ISA and PCI—that are no longer supported by the mainstream computing industry. In his article Wolfgang Matthes examines ways to use microcontrollers  to emulate the bus signals of legacy interconnect schemes.

Building a Retro TV Remote : PIC MCU-Based Design
Dev Gualtieri embarks on building a retro-style TV remote, based on a Microchip PIC microcontroller. He outlines the phototransistor, battery and software designs he made along the way.

AND MORE FROM OUR EXPERT COLUMNISTS:

Get in the Loop on Positive Feedback: New Value in an Old Concept
Positive feedback loops are an important element of modern circuitry such as crystal oscillators, PLLs and other devices. Here, George Novacek goes deep into the math and circuit analysis of positive feedback and how it’s used in electronics.

Build an Embedded Systems Consulting Company (Part 6): Trade-Offs of Fixed-Price Contracts
Continuing his “Building an Embedded Systems Consulting Company” article series, this month Bob Japenga explores the nature of contracts and how fixed price contracts can be an effective, albeit dangerous tool in marketing.

Low-Power Remote-Control Transceivers

LinxThe TT Series remote-control transceiver is designed for bidirectional, long-range, remote-control applications. The module includes an optimized frequency-hopping spread spectrum (FHSS) RF transceiver and an integrated remote-control transcoder.

The FHSS is capable of reaching more than 2 miles in typical line-of-sight environments with 0-dB gain antennas. An amplified version increases the output power from 12.5 to 23.5 dBm, boosting the range to more than 8 miles in line-of-sight environments with 0-dB antennas.

The TT Series transceiver features best-in-class receive sensitivity (up to −111 dBm) and low power consumption (only 19.2 mA in receive mode and 36 mA in transmit mode at 12.5 dBm). The initial version operates in the 902-to-928-Hz frequency band for North and South America.

The transceiver is housed in a compact reflow-compatible surface-mount technology (SMT) package. It doesn’t require any external RF components except an antenna, which simplifies integration and reduces assembly costs.

Programming is not required for basic operation. The transceiver’s primary settings are hardware-selectable, which eliminates the need for an external microcontroller or other digital interface. Eight status lines can be set up in any combination of inputs and outputs to transfer button or contact states. A selectable acknowledgement indicates that the transmission was successfully received. For advanced features, a UART interface provides optional software configuration.

A simple pairing operation configures two modules to operate together. A single button press on each side causes the modules to automatically swap their 32-bit addresses and store them in nonvolatile memory. It can be configured to automatically send an acknowledgement to the transmitting unit either after receiving a command or with external circuitry when an action has taken place. An optional external processor can send two data bytes with the acknowledgement.

The TT Series transceiver module is available as part of Linx Technologies’s master development system that comes with two development boards for benchmarking and prototyping. Each board is populated with a transceiver, two remote-control development boards, and programming boards. The system also includes antennas, a daughterboard with a USB interface, demonstration software, extra modules, and connectors.

Contact Linx Technologies for pricing.

Linx Technologies
www.linxtechnologies.com