Resources Workspaces

Engineer’s Transformable Workspace

No two workspaces or circuit cellars are alike. And that’s what makes studying these submissions so fascinating. Each space reflects the worker’s interests, needs, and personality.

Succasunna, NJ-based Mike Sydor’s penchant for “hacking” isn’t relegated solely to electronics. His entire workspace is actually a hack designed for both hardware and software projects. It’s an excellent example of what you can do with a little creativity and planning!

When the front is open, Mike can tackle hardware projects (Source: Mike Sydor)

We love the “transformer” theme that runs through the entire space. Simply put, the compact space is easily rearranged to serve Mike’s various needs:

  • When the front is closed, Mike can work on the “soft arts” of coding, diagramming, and design planning.
  • When the front is open, Mike has easy access to essential tools such as an oscilloscope, isolation transformer, and solder station.
  • A KVM switch enables Mike move back and forth between Linux and Windows

    Mike simply closes the front when he shifts from hardware mode to software mode (Source: Mike Sydor)

Another interesting point to note is that Mike can detach the shelf/drawer so the workspace can fit through a door if necessary. Great idea! Now he can take the workspace with him if he ever moves.

Submitted by Mike Sydor:

Here is my workspace for your consideration.  It is basically a custom, drop-front workspace on wheels so that I can move it easily to reconfigure the equipment or otherwise get to all the gear.  It has two configurations.  The ‘software’ setting (front closed) where I can focus on the code, design docs, etc.  The shelf can also hold a midi keyboard for music ‘hacking.’  There is a drawer in that shelf for miscellaneous items.  With the front open, you have a nice workspace for assembly and debugging, you can still access the drawer, and you can access all of the gear.  Everything is self-contained – only a single power and network cable are ‘on the floor.’  The shelf/drawer assembly detaches for moving day – otherwise it is too wide to fit through a standard door opening.  I also only use three wheels.  This makes a tripod, which is stable on any surface.  I live in an older home – no level floors! – so mobility does not compromise stability and I don’t have to shim one side or the other to keep it from wobbling.   The mass of all the gear keeps the bench stable.  The monitors are mounted on a custom stand so that they can be positioned, via swing arms and are otherwise stable when you need to move the bench around.  I use a KVM switch with multiple computers (windows, Linux) and have a set of cables so that I can plug in a project computer and use the same monitors and keyboard.  All the computers are on the same switch for optimal Ethernet performance.  I build kits, prototype circuits for sensor conditioning and muck around with micro-controllers, as well as fix/hack your various consumer electronics.  Cheers, Mike Sydor.

All the good stuff in one place! Power, a solder station, a scope, and more! (Source: Mike Sydor)

Do you want to share images of your workspace, hackspace, or “circuit cellar”? Send us your images and info about your space.


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