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October Circuit Cellar: A Sneak Preview

The October issue of Circuit Cellar magazine is on the launch pad, ready to deliver a selection of excellent embedded electronics articles covering trends, technology and design.

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Here’s a sneak preview of October Circuit Cellar:

TECHNOLOGY FOR DRONES / ROBOTIC HAND

Commercial Drone Design Solutions Take Flight: Chips, Boards and Platforms
The control, camera and comms electronics inside today’s drones have to pack in an ambitious amount of functionality. Circuit Cellar Chief Editor Jeff Child explores the latest Oct 327 Coverand greatest chip and module solutions serving today’s commercial and consumer drone designs.

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Building a Robot Hand: With Servos and Electromyography
Learn how three Cornell University students developed a robotic hand. The system captures impulses generated by muscle contractions and then filters and feeds those signals to a microcontroller which controls finger movement.

 

CAN’T STOP THE SIGNAL

Signal Chain Tech Pushes Bandwidth Barriers: ADCs, FPGAs and DACs
FPGAs and D-A converters are key  technologies making up a signal chain. Here, Circuit Cellar Chief Editor Jeff Child steps through the state-of-the-art options available for crafting efficient, highly-integrated signal-centric systems.

Antenna Performance Measurement Made Easy: Covering the Basics
If you’re doing any kind of wireless communications design, chances are you’re including an antenna. Columnist Robert Lacoste shows how the task of measuring an antenna’s performance is less costly and exotic than you’d think.

MONITORING GEAR WITH MICROCONTROLLER BRAINS

Gas Monitoring and Sensing (Part 1): Fun with Fragrant Analysis
Columnist Jeff Bachiochi covers the background issues surrounding gas monitoring and sensing. Then he describes how he uses sensors, A/D conversion and Arduino technologies to do oxygen measurement.

Logger Device Tracks Amp Hours (Part 1): Measuring Home Electricity
Setting out to monitor and log electricity usage in his house, Bill Wachsmann built an amp-hour logger using a microcontroller and a clamp on ammeter.

KEEPING THE LEGACY ALIVE

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Emulating Legacy Interfaces: Do it with Microcontrollers
There’s a number of important legacy interface technologies—like ISA and PCI—that are no longer supported by the mainstream computing industry. In his article Wolfgang Matthes examines ways to use microcontrollers  to emulate the bus signals of legacy interconnect schemes.

Building a Retro TV Remote : PIC MCU-Based Design
Dev Gualtieri embarks on building a retro-style TV remote, based on a Microchip PIC microcontroller. He outlines the phototransistor, battery and software designs he made along the way.

AND MORE FROM OUR EXPERT COLUMNISTS:

Get in the Loop on Positive Feedback: New Value in an Old Concept
Positive feedback loops are an important element of modern circuitry such as crystal oscillators, PLLs and other devices. Here, George Novacek goes deep into the math and circuit analysis of positive feedback and how it’s used in electronics.

Build an Embedded Systems Consulting Company (Part 6): Trade-Offs of Fixed-Price Contracts
Continuing his “Building an Embedded Systems Consulting Company” article series, this month Bob Japenga explores the nature of contracts and how fixed price contracts can be an effective, albeit dangerous tool in marketing.


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Note: We’ve made the October 2017 issue of Circuit Cellar available as a free sample issue. In it, you’ll find a rich variety of the kinds of articles and information that exemplify a typical issue of the current magazine.


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Circuit Cellar's editorial team comprises professional engineers, technical editors, and digital media specialists. You can reach the Editorial Department at [email protected], @circuitcellar, and facebook.com/circuitcellar