CC Blog Product News

Miniature 9.7 × 7.5 mm OCXO

IQD’s latest Oven-Controlled Crystal Oscillator (OCXO), the IQOV-71 series, is housed in four-pad plastic package with a fiber glass base. Despite it 9.7 × 7.5 mm size, it offers very low frequency stabilities down to ±10 ppb over an operating temperature range of –20° to 70°C or ±20 ppb over –40° to 85°C.IQD IQD0446-IQOV-71

The available standard frequencies include 10 MHz, 12.8 MHz, 19.2 MHz, 20 MHz, 24.576 MHz, 25 MHz, 30.72 MHz, 38.88 MHz, 40 MHz, 49.152 MHz, and 50 MHz, which will satisfy most applications. Other frequencies in the range of 5 to 50 MHz can be developed for commercially viable quantities. Power consumption is typically less than 1 W during the warm up phase, which only takes approximately 3 minutes, and less than 0.4 W once the device has reached steady state. Frequency aging is less than 2 ppb per day and a maximum of 3 ppm over a 10-year period.

The IQOV-71 offers either a standard HCMOS or Clipped sinewave output, with operating voltages specified at either 3.3 or 5 V. Low phase noise performance is assured with figures of –152 dBC/Hz at 10 kHz offset and only –153 dBc/Hz at 100 kHz from the carrier. The G-sensitivity is <2 ppb/G making the design suitable for applications such as military radios and airborn applications.

In order to maximize flexibility there is an option to specify external frequency adjustment by the application of a variable control voltage that allows for crystal ageing as well as changes in the circuit conditions. This variation is also extremely linear being less than 1% as against a more typical 5%.

This part is intended for a wide range of applications including picocells for the ever-increasing rage of wireless applications, satellite communication, broadcasting, microwave, and instrumentation, such as frequency counters and analyzers.

Source: IQD

— ADVERTISMENT—

Advertise Here


Don't miss out on upcoming issues of Circuit Cellar. Subscribe today!

 
 
Note: We’ve made the October 2017 issue of Circuit Cellar available as a free sample issue. In it, you’ll find a rich variety of the kinds of articles and information that exemplify a typical issue of the current magazine.


Would you like to write for Circuit Cellar? We are always accepting articles/posts from the technical community. Get in touch with us and let's discuss your ideas.

Become a Sponsor