December Circuit Cellar: Sneak Preview

The December issue of Circuit Cellar magazine is coming soon. Don’t miss this last issue of Circuit Cellar in 2018. Pages and pages of great, in-depth embedded electronics articles prepared for you to enjoy.

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Here’s a sneak preview of December 2018 Circuit Cellar:

AI, FPGAs and EMBEDDED SUPERCOMPUTING

Embedded Supercomputing
Gone are the days when supercomputing levels of processing required a huge, rack-based systems in an air-conditioned room. Today, embedded processors, FPGAs and GPUs are able to do AI and machine learning kinds of operation, enable new types of local decision making in embedded systems. In this article, Circuit Cellar’s Editor-in-Chief, Jeff Child, looks at these technology and trends driving embedded supercomputing.

Convolutional Neural Networks in FPGAs
Deep learning using convolutional neural networks (CNNs) can offer a robust solution across a wide range of applications and market segments. In this article written for Microsemi, Ted Marena illustrates that, while GPUs can be used to implement CNNs, a better approach, especially in edge applications, is to use FPGAs that are aligned with the application’s specific accuracy and performance requirements as well as the available size, cost and power budget.

NOT-TO-BE-OVERLOOKED ENGINEERING ISSUES AND CHOICES

DC-DC Converters
DC-DC conversion products must juggle a lot of masters to push the limits in power density, voltage range and advanced filtering. Issues like the need to accommodate multi-voltage electronics, operate at wide temperature ranges and serve distributed system requirements all add up to some daunting design challenges. This Product Focus section updates readers on these technology trends and provides a product gallery of representative DC-DC converters.

Real Schematics (Part 1)
Our magazine readers know that each issue of Circuit Cellar has several circuit schematics replete with lots of resistors, capacitors, inductors and wiring. But those passive components don’t behave as expected under all circumstances. In this article, George Novacek takes a deep look at the way these components behave with respect to their operating frequency.

Do you speak JTAG?
While most engineers have heard of JTAG or have even used JTAG, there’s some interesting background and capabilities that are so well know. Robert Lacoste examines the history of JTAG and looks at clever ways to use it, for example, using a cheap JTAG probe to toggle pins on your design, or to read the status of a given I/O without writing a single line of code.

PUTTING THE INTERNET-OF-THINGS TO WORK

Industrial IoT Systems
The Industrial Internet-of-Things (IIoT) is a segment of IoT technology where more severe conditions change the game. Rugged gateways and IIoT edge modules comprise these systems where the extreme temperatures and high vibrations of the factory floor make for a demanding environment. Here, Circuit Cellar’s Editor-in-Chief, Jeff Child, looks at key technology and product drives in the IIoT space.

Internet of Things Security (Part 6)
Continuing on with his article series on IoT security, this time Bob Japenga returns to his efforts to craft a checklist to help us create more secure IoT devices. This time he looks at developing a checklist to evaluate the threats to an IoT device.

Applying WebRTC to the IoT
Web Real-time Communications (WebRTC) is an open-source project created by Google that facilitates peer-to-peer communication directly in the web browser and through mobile applications using application programming interfaces. In her article, Callstats.io’s Allie Mellen shows how IoT device communication can be made easy by using WebRTC. With WebRTC, developers can easily enable devices to communicate securely and reliably through video, audio or data transfer.

WI-FI AND BLUETOOTH IN ACTION

IoT Door Security System Uses Wi-Fi
Learn how three Cornell students, Norman Chen, Ram Vellanki and Giacomo Di Liberto, built an Internet connected door security system that grants the user wireless monitoring and control over the system through a web and mobile application. The article discusses the interfacing of a Microchip PIC32 MCU with the Internet and the application of IoT to a door security system.

Self-Navigating Robots Use BLE
Navigating indoors is a difficult but interesting problem. Learn how these two Cornell students, Jane Du and Jacob Glueck, used Received Signal Strength Indicator (RSSI) of Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) 4.0 chips to enable wheeled, mobile robots to navigate towards a stationary base station. The robot detects its proximity to the station based on the strength of the signal and moves towards what it believes to be the signal source.

IN-DEPTH PROJECT ARTICLES WITH ALL THE DETAILS

Sun Tracking Project
Most solar panel arrays are either fixed-position, or have a limited field of movement. In this project article, Jeff Bachiochi set out to tackle the challenge of a sun tracking system that can move your solar array to wherever the sun is coming from. Jeff’s project is a closed-loop system using severs, opto encoders and the Microchip PIC18 microcontroller.

Designing a Display System for Embedded Use
In this project article, Aubrey Kagan takes us through the process of developing an embedded system user interface subsystem—including everything from display selection to GUI development to MCU control. For the project he chose a 7” Noritake GT800 LCD color display and a Cypress Semiconductor PSoC5LP MCU.

Quad Core i3-Based Type 6 COM Express Board

ADLINK has announced the addition of the quad-core Intel Core i3-8100H processor to its recently released Express-CF COM Express Basic size Type 6 module based on the 8th Generation Intel Core i5/i7 and Xeon processors (formerly Coffee Lake). The Express-CF/CFE is the first COM Express COM.0 R3.0 Basic Size Type 6 module supporting the Hexa-core (6 cores) 64-bit 8th Generation Intel Core and Xeon processor (codename “Coffeelake-H”) with Mobile Intel QM370, HM370, CM246 chipset.

Whereas previous generations Intel Core i3 processors supported only dual cores with 3 MB cache, the Intel Core i3-8100H is the first in its class to support 4 CPU cores with 6 MB of cache. This major upgrade results in a more than 80% performance boost in MIPS (million instructions per second), and an almost doubling of memory/caching bandwidth, all at no significant cost increase compared to earlier generations. Intel Core i3 processors are widely recognized as the best valued processor and are therefore preferred in high-volume, cost-sensitive applications. They are popular choices in gaming, medical and industrial control.

These Hexa-core processors support up to 12 threads (Intel Hyper-Threading Technology) as well as an impressive turbo boost of up to 4.4 GHz. These combined features make the Express- CF/CFE well suited to customers who need uncompromising system performance and responsiveness in a long product life solution. The Express-CF/CFE has up to three SODIMM sockets supporting up to 48 GB of DDR4 memory (two on top by default, one on bottom by build option) while still fully complying with PICMG COM.0 mechanical specifications. Modules equipped with the Xeon processor and CM246 Chipset support both ECC and non-ECC SODIMMs.

Integrated Intel Generation 9 Graphics includes features such as OpenGL 4.5, DirectX 12/11, OpenCL 2.1/2.0/1.2, Intel Clear Video HD Technology, Advanced Scheduler 2.0, 1.0, XPDM support, and DirectX Video Acceleration (DXVA) support for full H.265/HEVC 10-bit, MPEG2 hardware codec. In addition, High Dynamic Range is supported for enhanced picture color and quality and digital content protection has been upgraded to HDCP 2.2.

Graphics outputs include LVDS and three DDI ports supporting HDMI/DVI/DisplayPort and eDP/VGA as a build option. The Express-CF/CFE is specifically designed for customers with high-performance processing graphics requirements who want to outsource the custom core logic of their systems for reduced development time. In addition to the onboard integrated graphics, a multiplexed PCIe x16 graphics bus is available for discrete graphics expansion.

Input/output features include eight PCIe Gen3 lanes that can be used for NVMe SSD and Intel Optane memory, allowing applications access to the highest speed storage solutions and include a single onboard Gbit Ethernet port, USB 3.0 ports and USB 2.0 ports, and SATA 6 Gb/s ports. Support is provided for SMBus and I2C. The module is equipped with SPI AMI EFI BIOS with CMOS backup, supporting embedded features such as remote console, hardware monitor and watchdog timer.

ADLINK Technology | www.adlinktech.com

Tiny, 4K Signage Player Runs on Cortex-A17 SoC

By Eric Brown

Advantech announced a fanless, USM-110 digital signage player with support for Android 6.0 and its WISE-PaaS/SignageCMS digital signage management software. The compact (156 mm x 110 mm x 27 mm) device follows earlier Advantech signage computers such as the slim-height, Intel Skylake based DS-081.

 
USM-110 (left) and mounting options
(click images to enlarge)
Advantech did not reveal the name of the quad-core, Cortex-A17 SoC, which is clocked to 1.6 GHz and accompanied by a Mali-T764. It sounds very close to the Rockchip RK3288, which is found on SBCs such as the Asus Tinker Board, although that SoC instead has a Mali T760 GPU. Other quad -A17 SoCs include the Zhaoxin ZX-2000 found on VIA Technologies’ ALTA DS 4K signage player.

The USM-110, which is also available in a less feature rich USM-110 Delight model, ships with 2GB DDR3L-1333, as well as a microSD slot. You get 16GB of eMMC on the standard version and 8 GB on the Delight. There’s also a GbE port and an M.2 slot with support for an optional WiFi module with antenna kit.

The USM-110 has two HDMI ports, both with locking ports: an HDMI 2.0 port with H.265-encoded, native 4K@60 (3840 x 2160) and a 1.4 port with 1080p resolution. The system enables dual simultaneous HD displays.


USM-110 and USM-110 Delight detail views
(click image to enlarge)
The Delight version lacks the 4K-ready HDMI port, as well as the standard model’s mini-PCIe slot, which is available with an optional 4G module with antenna kit. The Delight is also missing the standard version’s RS232/485/422 port, and it has only one USB 2.0 host port instead of four.

Otherwise, the two models are the same, with a micro-USB OTG port, audio jack, reset, dual LEDs, and a 12V/3A DC input. The 0.43 kg system has a 0 to 40°C range, and offers VESA, wall, desktop, pole, magnet, and DIN-rail mounting.

Advantech’s WISE-PaaS/SignageCMS digital signage management software, also referred to as UShop+ SignageCMS, supports remote, real-time management. It allows users to layout, schedule, and dispatch signage contents to the player over the Internet, enabling remote delivery of media and media content switching via interactive APIs. A WISE Agent framework for data acquisition supports RESTful API web services for accessing and controlling applications.

Further information

The USM-110 appears to be available now at an undisclosed price. More information may be found in Advantech’s USM-110 announcement and product page.

This article originally appeared on LinuxGizmos.com on September 6.

Advantech | www.advantech.com

Low-Profile Mini-ITX System Targets Signage

AAEON has released the ACS-1U01 Series, a range of turnkey solutions that capitalize on the strength of three of its bestselling SBCs. By enclosing the boards inside a tough 1U chassis, the unit provides a ready-to-go system for use in a variety of applications including digital signage as well as industrial automation, POS, medical equipment and transportation.

The three models—the ACS-1U01-BT4, ACS-1U01-H110B, and ACS-1U01-H81B—feature a tough, 44.45 mm-high chassis with a wallmount kit and 2.5” HDD tray. The low-profile, low-power-consumption systems have full Windows and Linux support, they can be expanded via full- and half-size Mini-Card slots, and heatsinks give them operating temperature ranges of 0°C to 50°C.

The ACS-1U01-BT4 houses AAEON’s EMB-BT4 motherboard, which can be fitted with either an Intel Atom J1900 or N2807 processor. The J1900 can be used with a pair of DDR3L SODIMM sockets for up to 8 GB dual-channel memory, while the N2807 can be used with a single DDR3L SODIMM socket. The board’s extensive I/O interface provides the system with a GbE LAN port, dual independent HDMI and VGA displays, a USB3.0 port, up to seven USB2.0, and up to six COM ports.

The ACS-1U01-H110B contains AAEON’s EMB-H110B, which is built to accommodate up to 65W 6th/7th Generation Intel Core i Series socket-type processors and supports up to 32GB dual-channel memory via a pair of DDR4 SODIMM sockets. Dual independent display is possible through two HDMI ports, or the option of DP connections. The system also features a GbE LAN port, four USB3.0 ports, four USB2.0 ports, and a COM port.

The ACS-1U01-H81B is built around AAEON’s EMB-H81B, which is designed for 4th Generation Intel Core i Series socket-type processors with TDPs of up to 65W. Two SODIMM sockets allow for up to 16GB dual-channel DDR3 memory, and HDMI, DP, and optional VGA ports enable dual independent display. The system has two GbE LAN ports, two USB3.0 ports and six USB2.0 ports.

AAEON | www.aaeon.com

Benchmarks for the IoT

Input Voltage

–Jeff Child, Editor-in-Chief

JeffHeadShot

I remember quite vividly back in 1997 when Marcus Levy founded the Embedded Microprocessor Benchmark Consortium, better known as EEMBC. It was big deal at the time because, while benchmarks where common in the consumer computing world of desktop/laptop processors, no one had ever crafted any serious benchmarks for embedded processors. I was an editor covering embedded systems technology at the time, and Marcus, as an editor with EDN Magazine back then, traveled in the same circles as I did. On both the editorial side and on the processor vendor side, he had enormous respect in the industry—making him an ideal person to spin up an effort like EEMBC.

Creating benchmarks for embedded processors was more complicated than for general purpose processors, but EEMBC was up the challenge. Fast forward to today, and EEEBC now boasts a rich list of performance benchmarks for the hardware and software used in a variety of applications including autonomous driving, mobile imaging, mobile devices and many others. In recent years, the group has taken on the complex challenge of developing benchmarks for the Internet-of-Things (IoT).

I recently had the chance to talk with EEMBC’s current president, Peter Torelli, about the consortium’s latest effort: its IoTMark-BLE benchmark. It’s part of the EEMBC’s IoTMark benchmarking suite for measuring the combined energy consumption of an edge node’s sensor interface, processor and radio interface. IoTMark-BLE focuses on Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) devices. In late September, EEMBC announced that the IoTMark-BLE benchmark is available for licensing.

The IoTMark-BLE benchmark profile models a real IoT edge node consisting of an I²C sensor and a BLE radio through sleep, advertise and connected-mode operation. The benchmark measures the energy required to power the edge node platform and to run the tests fed by the benchmark. At the center of the benchmark is the IoTConnect framework, a low-cost benchmarking harness used by multiple EEMBC benchmarks. The framework provides an external sensor emulator (the I/O Manager), a BLE gateway (the radio manager) and an Energy Monitor.

Benchmark users interact with the DUT via an interface with which they can set a number of tightly defined parameters, such as connection interval, I²C speed, BLE transmission power and more. Default values are provided to enable direct comparisons between DUTs, or users can change them to analyze a design’s sensitivity to each parameter. IoTMark-BLE’s IoTConnect framework supports microcontrollers (MCUs) and radio modules from any vendor, and it is compatible with any embedded OS, software stack or OEM hardware.

It makes sense that IoT benchmarks focus on power and energy use. IoT edge devices need to work in remote locations near the sensors they’re linked with. With that in mind, Peter Torelli says that the benchmark measures everything inside an IoT system-on-chip (SoC)—including the peripheral I/O reading from the I2C sensor, the transmit and receive amplifiers in the BLE radio—everything except the sensor itself. Torelli says it was important to not use intelligent sensors for the benchmark, the idea being that its important that the MCU’s role performing communication be part of the measurement. Interestingly, in developing the benchmark, it was found that even the software stacks on IoT SoCs have a big impact on performance. “Some are very efficient when they’re in advertise mode or in active mode, and then go to sleep,” says Torelli, “And there are others that remain active for much longer times and burn a lot of power.”

Shifting gears, I want to take moment to praise long time columnist and member of the Circuit Cellar family, Ed Nisley. Over 30 years ago, Steve Ciarcia asked Ed to write a regular column for the brand-new Circuit Cellar INK magazine. After an even 200 articles, Ed decided to make his September column his last. Thank you, Ed, for your many years of insightful, quality work in the pages of this magazine. You’ll be missed. Readers can follow Ed’s continuing series of shop notes, projects and curiosities on his blog at softsolder.com.

Let me welcome Brian Millier as our newest Circuit Cellar columnist—his column Pickup Up Mixed Signals begins this issue. Brian is no stranger to the magazine, penning over 50 guest features in the magazine since the mid-90s on a variety of topics including guitar amplifier electronics, IoT system design, LCDs and many others. I’m thrilled to have Brian joining our team. With his help, we promise to continue fulfilling Circuit Cellar’s role as the leading media platform aimed at inspiring the evolution of embedded system design.

This appears in the November 340 issue of Circuit Cellar magazine

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MCU Family Serves Up Ultra-Low Power Functionality

STMicroelectronics has released its STM32L0x0 Value Line microcontrollers that provide an additional, low-cost entry point to the STM32L0 series The MCUs embed the Arm Cortex -M0+ core. With up to 128 KB flash memory, 20 KB SRAM and 512 byte true embedded EEPROM on-chip the MCUs save external components to cut down on board space and BOM cost. In addition to price-sensitive and space-constrained consumer devices such as fitness trackers, computer or gaming accessories and remotes, the new STM32L0x0 Value Line MCUs are well suited for personal medical devices, industrial sensors, and IoT devices such as building controls, weather stations, smart locks, smoke detectors or fire alarms.
The devices leverage ST’s power-saving low-leakage process technology and device features such as a low-power UART, low-power timer, 41µA 10 ksample/s ADC and wake-up from power saving in as little as 5µs. Designers can use these devices to achieve goals such as extending battery runtime without sacrificing product features, increasing wireless mobility, or endowing devices like smart meters or IoT sensors with up to 10-year battery-life leveraging the ultra-frugal 670 nA power-down current with RTC and RAM retention.

The Keil MDK-ARM professional IDE supports STM32L0x0 devices free of charge, and the STM32CubeMX configuration-code generator provides easy-to-use design analysis including a power-consumption calculator. A compatible Nucleo-64 development board (NUCLEO-L010RB) with Hardware Abstraction Layer (HAL) library is already available, to facilitate fast project startup.

The STM32L0x0 Value Line comprises six new parts, giving a choice of 16- KB, 64- KB, or 128- KB of flash memory, 128-byte, 256-byte or 512-byte EEPROM, and various package options. In addition, pin-compatibility with the full STM32 family of more than 800 part numbers offering a wide variety of core performance and integrated features, allows design flexibility and future scalability, with the freedom to leverage existing investment in code, documentation and tools.

STM32L0x0 Value Line microcontrollers are in production now, priced from $0.44 with 16-KB of flash memory and 128-byte EEPROM, for orders of 10,000 pieces. The unit price starting at $0.32 is available for high-volume orders.

STMicroelectronics| www.st.com

Tuesday’s Newsletter: Microcontroller Watch

Coming to your inbox tomorrow: Circuit Cellar’s Microcontroller Watch newsletter. Tomorrow’s newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

Bonus: We’ve added Drawings for Free Stuff to our weekly newsletters. Make sure you’ve subscribed to the newsletter so you can participate.

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You’ll get your Microcontroller Watch newsletter issue tomorrow.

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Our weekly Circuit Cellar Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

IoT Technology Focus. (11/20) Covers what’s happening with Internet-of-Things (IoT) technology–-from devices to gateway networks to cloud architectures. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

Embedded Boards.(11/27) The focus here is on both standard and non-standard embedded computer boards that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up to production volumes.

Analog & Power. (12/4) This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op amps, batteries and more.

Linux-Powered Jetson Xavier Module Gains Third-Party Carriers

By Eric Brown

Connect Tech (CTI) has released two new developer options for Nvidia’s octa-core Jetson AGX Xavier computer-on-module, which is already supported by Nvidia’s innovative, $1,299 Jetson Xavier Developer Kit. Like the official dev kit, CTI’s 105 mm x 92 mm Rogue board is approximately the same size as the 105 mm x 87 mm x 16 mm Xavier, making it easier to use for robotics applications.


 
Rogue carrier with Xavier module (equipped with fan)
(click images to enlarge)
CTI also launched a Jetson AGX Xavier Mimic Adapter board that mediates between the Xavier and any CTI carrier for the Jetson TX1, TX2, and the latest industrial-focused version of the TX2 called the Jetson TX2i. These include the three TX2 boardsannounced in early 2017: the Cogswell carrier with GigE Vision, the Spacely carrier designed for cam-intensive Pixhawk drones, and the tiny, $99 Sprocket. CTI’s Jetson TX1 boards include the original Astro, as well as its later Orbitty and Elroy.

 
Jetson AGX Xavier Mimic Adapter with Xavier and Elroy carrier (left) and exploded view
(click images to enlarge)
The Jetson Xavier “enables a giant leap forward in capabilities for autonomous machines and edge devices,” says CTI. Nvidia claims the Xavier has greater than 10x the energy efficiency and more than 20x the performance of its predecessor, the Jetson TX2. The module — and the new CTI carriers — are available with a BSP with Nvidia’s Linux4Tegra stack. Nvidia also offers an AI-focused Isaac SDK.

The Xavier features 8x ARMv8.2 cores and a high-end, 512-core Nvidia Volta GPU with 64 tensor cores with 2x Nvidia Deep Learning Accelerator (DLA) — also called NVDLA — engines. The module is also equipped with a 7-way VLIW vision chip, as well as 16 GB 256-bit LPDDR4 RAM and 32GB eMMC 5.1.


Nvidia Drive AGX Xavier Developer Kit
(click image to enlarge)
Since the initial Xavier announcements, Nvidia has added AGX to the Jetson Xavier name. This is also applied to the automotive version, which was originally called the Drive PX Pegasus when it was announced in Nov. 2017. This Linux-driven development kit recently began shipping as part of the Nvidia Drive AGX Xavier Developer Kit, which supports a single Xavier module or else a Drive AGX Pegasus version with dual Xaviers and dual GPUs.

Rogue

CTI’s Rogue carrier board provides 2x GbE, 2x HDMI 1.4a, 3x USB 3.1, and a micro-USB OTG port. Other features include MIPI-CSI, deployable either as 6x x2 lanes or 4x x4 lanes, and expressed via a high-density camera connector breakout that mimics that of the official dev kit. CTI will offer a variety of rugged camera add-on expansion boards with options described as “up to 6x MIPI I-PEX, SerDes Inputs: GMSL or FPD-Link III, HDMI Inputs).”


 
Rogue, front and back
(click images to enlarge)

For storage, you get a microSD slot with UFS support, as well as 2x M.2 M-key slots that support NVMe modules. There’s also an M.2 E-key slot with PCIe and USB support that can load optional Wi-Fi/BT modules.

Other features include 2x CAN 2.0b ports, 2x UARTs, 4-bit level-shifted, 3.3 V GPIO, and single I2C and SPI headers. There’s a 9-19 V DC input that uses a positive locking Molex Mini-Fit Jr header. You also get an RTC with battery connector and power, reset, and recovery buttons and headers.

Mimic Adapter

The Jetson AGX Xavier Mimic Adapter has the same 105 x 92mm dimensions as the Rogue, but is a simpler adapter board that connects the Xavier to existing CTI Jetson carriers. It provides an Ethernet PHY and regulates and distributes power from the carrier to the Xavier.


 
Mimic Adapter, front and back
(click images to enlarge)

The Mimic Adapter expresses a wide variety of interfaces detailed on the product page, including USB 3.0, PCIe x4, SATA, MIPI-CSI, HDMI/DP/eDP, CAN, and more. Unlike the Rogue, it’s listed with an operating range: an industrial -40 to 85°C.

Further information

The Rogue carrier and Mimic Adapter for the Nvidia AGX Xavier are available now with undisclosed pricing. More information may be found in Connect Tech’’s Xavier carrier announcement, as well as its Rogue and Mimic Adapter product pages.

This article originally appeared on LinuxGizmos.com on October 17.

Connect Tech | www.connecttech.com

Module Meets Needs of Simple Bluetooth Low Energy Systems

Laird has announced its new Bluetooth 5 module series, designed to simplify the process of bringing wireless designs to market. The BL651 Series is the latest addition to Laird’s Nordic Semiconductor family of Bluetooth 5 offerings. Building on the success of the BL652 and BL654 series, the BL651 is a cost-effective solution for simple Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) applications that provides all the capabilities of the Nordic nRF52810 silicon in a small, fully certified module.

The BL651 leverages the benefits of Bluetooth 5 features, including higher data throughput and increased broadcasting capacity, in a tiny footprint. According to the company, the BL651 has been designed to allow a seamless hardware upgrade path to the more fully featured BL652 series if additional flash and RAM requirements are identified in the customer development process.

The BL651 series delivers the capabilities of the Nordic nRF52810 silicon in a small, fully certified module with simple soldering castellation for easy prototyping and mass production manufacturing. Designers can use the Nordic SDK and SoftDevice or Zephyr RTOS to build their BLE application. In addition, the BL651 series is 100% PCB footprint drop in compatible with the BL652 Series of modules, allowing flexibility to upscale designs if more flash/RAM or further feature sets are required during the design process.

In large factories Bluetooth sensor networks can easily span an entire campus and gather sensor data that can provide deep insights needed to maintain efficiency, productivity and security. The BL651 Series helps make these types of sensor networks easy to build, scale, and maintain.

Laird Connectivity | www.lairdtech.com

Rugged Nano-ITX SBC Boasts Security Encryption Hardware

WinSystems has announced its Nano-ITX form factor ITX-N-3900 board-level system. It provides a complete system that can be readily expanded and configured for diverse applications requiring an extended product life and high reliability under extreme operating temperatures. The 4.27-inch (120 mm) square footprint features an onboard Trusted Platform Module (TPM) 2.0-compliant chipset and four USB 3.1 host ports, along with a robust I/O set.

The ITX-N-3900 is SBC based on the Intel Atom E3900 Apollo Lake processor family. It uses less than 12 W for fanless applications and performs reliably in industrial operating temperatures ranging from -40º to +85ºC. It includes a SODIMM socket supporting up to 8 GB of DDR3L system memory, one high-speed SATA storage interface, microSD storage and one mSATA storage interface. It includes dual Ethernet, DisplayPort, an RS-232/485/422 serial channel, and expansion options via Mini-PCle and M.2 connectors. The ITX-N-3900 is designed for long-term availability and supports Linux, Windows 10 desktop, Windows 10 IoT, and other x86-compatible real-time operating systems (RTOS).

The Nano-ITX form factor product series upports not only extended product longevity, but the extended range of operating temperatures common in rugged environments. Enabling such flexible computing solutions is particularly appropriate for industrial IoT, energy management, medical, digital signage and other industrial embedded system applications.

WinSystems | www.winsystems.com

Connected Padlock Uses U-Blox BLE and Cellular Modules

U‑blox has announced their collaboration with India‑based Play Inc. on a connected GPS padlock for industrial applications. The lock, which doubles as a location tracker, features a U‑blox M8 GNSS receiver, MAX‑M8Q, and uses the u‑blox CellLocate service to extend positioning to indoor locations. U‑blox Bluetooth low energy with NINA‑B112, and 2G, 3G and 4G U‑blox cellular communication modules, including some that are ATEX certified, enable communication between users and the lock.
According to the company, In many industrial settings, locks are an unwelcome bottleneck. They typically require the physical presence of a person with a key to open them, they need to be checked periodically for signs of tampering, and when they are forced open, owners typically find out too late. Play Inc’s i‑Lock combines physical toughness and wireless technology to address these challenges. Offering a variety of access methods, including physical keys and keyless approaches using remote GPRS and SMS passwords as well as Bluetooth low energy or cloud‑based communication via mobile device apps, the i‑Lock lets plant managers or other customers flexibly grant authorization to access the goods that are under lock. And in the event that the padlock is forcefully opened, they are immediately alerted via a server or, optionally, SMS texting.

In addition to securing mobile and stationary goods, the lock’s GNSS receiver lets users track goods in transit. The i‑Lock supports a variety of tracking modes to optimize power consumption for increased autonomy. Location‑awareness further enables geofence restricted applications, in which the i‑Lock can only be open if it is within predefined geographical bounds—for example a petroleum filling station.

The security lock was designed to endure both physical attempts of tampering and cyberattacks. Its fiberglass reinforced enclosure withstands temperatures from -20 to +80 degrees C. The lock features Super Admin, Admin, and User access levels, 128-bit AES encryption, user‑configurable passwords, and a secure protocol to ensure data‑transmission accuracy.

The i‑Lock will be presented at The IoT Solutions Congress Barcelona on October 16‑18, 2018.

U-blox | www.u-blox.com

Full-Bridge 600V/3.5A Power Driver Features SiP Format

STMicroelectronics’ has released its PWD5F60 high-density power driver, the second in a new series of power-driver systems-in-package addressing high-voltage brushed DC and single-phase brushless motor applications. It integrates a 600V/3.5A single-phase MOSFET bridge with gate drivers, bootstrap diodes, protection features, and two comparators in a 15 mm x 7 mm outline. The thermally efficient system-in-package occupies 60% less board real-estate than discrete components, while boosting reliability and simplifying design and assembly.

As a single-phase full-bridge module, the PWD5F60 is tailored for driving brushed DC motors in applications such as industrial pumps and fans, blowers, domestic appliances, and factory-automation systems. It is particularly targeted at the appliances using single-phase brushless motors that guarantee high durability and efficiency at a reasonable cost. It is also cost-effective and convenient for use in power supply units.

With on-resistance of 1.3 8Ω, the PWD5F60’s integrated N-channel MOSFETs ensure high efficiency for handling medium-power loads. The gate drivers are optimized for reliable switching and low EMI (electromagnetic interference), while the integrated bootstrap diodes enable high-voltage startup with no need for external diodes and passive components to supply the high-side inputs.

Flexibility is assured by two embedded uncommitted comparators that allow an easy implementation of peak current control or over-current and over-temperature protection features. The peak-current control used in conjunction with positioning Hall-effect sensors allows to achieve a stand-alone controller with no need of a dedicated MCU and hence drastically reducing the cost of control electronics. Further flexible features include adjustable dead-time and the option to configure the MOSFETs as a single full bridge or two half bridges. Operating voltage range extends from 10 V to 20 V and inputs are compatible with 3.3 V-15 V control signals to ease interfacing with Hall sensors or a host microcontroller or DSP

Cross-conduction prevention and under-voltage lockout are already built-in to protect the device by preventing operation in low-efficiency or dangerous conditions. The PWD5F60 is in production and available now, packaged as a multi-island VFQFPN device, from $2.15 for orders of 1,000 pieces.

STMicroelectronics | www.st.com

Tuesday’s Newsletter: Analog & Power

Coming to your inbox tomorrow: Circuit Cellar’s Analog & Power newsletter. Tomorrow’s newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including ADCs, DACs, DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op amps, batteries and more.

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Our weekly Circuit Cellar Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

Microcontroller Watch. (12/11) This newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

IoT Technology Focus. (12/18) Covers what’s happening with Internet-of-Things (IoT) technology–-from devices to gateway networks to cloud architectures. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

Embedded Boards.(12/24) The focus here is on both standard and non-standard embedded computer boards that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up to production volumes.

COM Express Card Sports 3 GHz Core i3 Processor

Congatec has introduced a Computer-on-Module for the entry-level of high-end embedded computing based on Intel’s latest Core i3-8100H processor platform. The board’s fast 16 PCIe Gen 3.0 lanes make it suited for all new artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning applications requiring multiple GPUs for massive parallel processing.

The new conga-TS370 COM Express Basic Type 6 Computer-on-Module with quad-core Intel Core i3 8100H processor offers a 45 W TDP configurable to 35 W, supports 6 MB cache and provides up to 32 GB dual-channel DDR4 2400 memory. Compared to the preceding 7th generation of Intel Core processors, the improved memory bandwidth also helps to increase the graphics and GPGPU performance of the integrated new Intel UHD630 graphics, which additionally features an increased maximum dynamic frequency of up to 1.0 GHz for its 24 execution units. It supports up to three independent 4K displays with up to 60 Hz via DP 1.4, HDMI, eDP and LVDS.

Embedded system designers can now switch from eDP to LVDS purely by modifying the software without any hardware changes. The module further provides exceptionally high bandwidth I/Os including 4x USB 3.1 Gen 2 (10 Gbit/s), 8x USB 2.0 and 1x PEG and 8 PCIe Gen 3.0 lanes for powerful system extensions including Intel Optane memory. All common Linux operating systems as well as the 64-bit versions of Microsoft Windows 10 and Windows 10 IoT are supported. Congatec’s personal integration support rounds off the feature set. Additionally, Congatec also offers an extensive range of accessories and comprehensive technical services, which simplify the integration of new modules into customer-specific solutions.

Congatec | www.congatec.com

Firms Team for End-to-End, Open, Modular IoT Architecture

Eurotech has announced the availability of an end-to-end IoT architecture based on open standards, developed in collaboration with Cloudera and Red Hat. The new IoT architecture is an open, modular, multi-cloud architecture with security features organically built-in to enable scalable and more secure end-to-end device management and analytics from the edge to the cloud. It combines operational technology (OT), information technology (IT), data analytics and application integration.
The architecture has been built on top of key open source projects and innovations out of the Eclipse Foundation and Apache Foundation. By bridging OT and IT, this open source-based architecture can help address the main aspects of managing an IoT infrastructure including connectivity, configuration, and embedded application life cycle. The architecture can also aggregate real-time data streams from the edge, archive them, or route them towards enterprise IT systems and analytics.

With this solution, Eurotech, Red Hat and Cloudera are aiming to make it easier for organizations to roll out IoT use cases by providing a validated, modular, end-to-end IoT architecture built to be open, interoperable and cost effective.

Eurotech | www.eurotech.com