Engineer’s Transformable Workspace

No two workspaces or circuit cellars are alike. And that’s what makes studying these submissions so fascinating. Each space reflects the worker’s interests, needs, and personality.

Succasunna, NJ-based Mike Sydor’s penchant for “hacking” isn’t relegated solely to electronics. His entire workspace is actually a hack designed for both hardware and software projects. It’s an excellent example of what you can do with a little creativity and planning!

When the front is open, Mike can tackle hardware projects (Source: Mike Sydor)

We love the “transformer” theme that runs through the entire space. Simply put, the compact space is easily rearranged to serve Mike’s various needs:

  • When the front is closed, Mike can work on the “soft arts” of coding, diagramming, and design planning.
  • When the front is open, Mike has easy access to essential tools such as an oscilloscope, isolation transformer, and solder station.
  • A KVM switch enables Mike move back and forth between Linux and Windows

    Mike simply closes the front when he shifts from hardware mode to software mode (Source: Mike Sydor)

Another interesting point to note is that Mike can detach the shelf/drawer so the workspace can fit through a door if necessary. Great idea! Now he can take the workspace with him if he ever moves.

Submitted by Mike Sydor:

Here is my workspace for your consideration.  It is basically a custom, drop-front workspace on wheels so that I can move it easily to reconfigure the equipment or otherwise get to all the gear.  It has two configurations.  The ‘software’ setting (front closed) where I can focus on the code, design docs, etc.  The shelf can also hold a midi keyboard for music ‘hacking.’  There is a drawer in that shelf for miscellaneous items.  With the front open, you have a nice workspace for assembly and debugging, you can still access the drawer, and you can access all of the gear.  Everything is self-contained – only a single power and network cable are ‘on the floor.’  The shelf/drawer assembly detaches for moving day – otherwise it is too wide to fit through a standard door opening.  I also only use three wheels.  This makes a tripod, which is stable on any surface.  I live in an older home – no level floors! – so mobility does not compromise stability and I don’t have to shim one side or the other to keep it from wobbling.   The mass of all the gear keeps the bench stable.  The monitors are mounted on a custom stand so that they can be positioned, via swing arms and are otherwise stable when you need to move the bench around.  I use a KVM switch with multiple computers (windows, Linux) and have a set of cables so that I can plug in a project computer and use the same monitors and keyboard.  All the computers are on the same switch for optimal Ethernet performance.  I build kits, prototype circuits for sensor conditioning and muck around with micro-controllers, as well as fix/hack your various consumer electronics.  Cheers, Mike Sydor.

All the good stuff in one place! Power, a solder station, a scope, and more! (Source: Mike Sydor)

Do you want to share images of your workspace, hackspace, or “circuit cellar”? Send us your images and info about your space.

Birmingham-Based Electronics Design Nook

Steve Karg of Birmingham, AL, recently submitted info about his well-planned, cost-conscious design nook where he builds lighting control products, develops software, tests and debugs his projects, and more. The workspace is compact yet intelligently stocked with essentials such as a laptop, a scope, a toaster, a magnifier, a labelled parts bin, an AC source, and more.

Karg writes:

Here is a photo of my electronics workspace in my cellar. I use the toaster oven for soldering surface mount parts to printed circuit boards, the scope and meters for the usual diagnostics and validation, the AC source for developing line voltage dimming and switching lighting control products, the laptop for developing software including the open source BACnet Stack and Wireshark, and the light tent for deriving dimming curves for various lamps.  I bought the chairs and lab bench at a Martin-Marietta yard sale in Colorado, and they moved 3 times with me to Pennsylvania, Georgia, and now Alabama. I found the Metcal soldering iron in a dumpster in Maryland near an office building.—Steve Karg, Birmingham, AL

Steve Karg’s circut cellar in Birmingham, AL

In addition to placing his essential tools within reach, Karg did a few things we think every designer should consider when planning his or her workspace.

One, Karg neatly labelled the parts box located on the right side of the shelf above his workbench. Label now and you’ll thank yourself later.

Two, Karg has deep, sturdy, wall-mounted shelves above his workbench. As you can see, they’re capable of holding fairly large bins and boxes. They aren’t flimsy 8″ deep shelves intended for displaying lightweight curios or paperback books. If you’re planning a workspace, consider following Karg’s lead by installing sturdy shelving capable of holding everything from electronic equipment to every copy of Circuit Cellar since 1988.

Three, we applaud Karg’s magnification and lighting equipment. A cellar can be dark place, especially if it is completely underground and isn’t a “walkout” (or “daylight basement”) with a windowed door. Many basements have only a few small hopper windows that enable daylight and fresh air to get inside. In such spaces, darkness and shadows can be problematic for electrical engineers and electronics DIYers working on small projects. Without a properly placed light or lighting system, your body can overshadow your work. Good luck trying taking a close look at a board or attempting to repair a PCB trace without proper lighting. It’s clear Karg has proper lighting in mind. As you can see, he has plenty of lamps and light sources at his disposal.

And finally, kudos to Karg for purchasing the bench at a yard sale and staying with the discarded soldering iron he found in a dumpster. We all know the saying: “If ain’t broke, don’t fix it.” We agree, except when what’s broke is mounted on your circuit board, of course!

Do you want to share images of your workspace, hackspace, or “circuit cellar” with the world? Click here to email us your images and workspace info.

Navy Engineer’s Innovation Space

When electrical engineer Bill Porter isn’t working on unmanned systems projects for the Navy, he spends a great deal of engineering time at his workspace in Panama City Beach, FL. Bill submitted the interesting images that follow (along with several others) for an interview we plan to run an upcoming issue of Circuit Cellar magazine. Once we saw his workspace images, we knew we had to feature it on our site as soon as possible.

The workspace of a true innovator (Source: Bill Porter)

The workspace of a true innovator (Source: Bill Porter)

Check out Bill working on a project. He told us: “I am a hardware guy. I love to fire up my favorite PCB CAD software just to get an idea out of my head and on the screen.”

Bill is self-proclaimed "hardware guy"

Bill is self-proclaimed “hardware guy” (Source: Bill Porter)

Interesting the sorts of things Bill designs? Check out his wedding-related projects.

Pretty unique proposal, right? (Source: Bill Porter)

Pretty unique proposal, right? (Source: Bill Porter)

This is just one of the many electrical engineering-related items developed for his wedding (Source: Bill Porter)

This is just one of the many electrical engineering-related items developed for his wedding (Source: Bill Porter)

You’ll be able to learn more about his innovations in a future issue of Circuit Cellar magazine.

Share your space! Circuit Cellar is interested in finding as many workspaces as possible and sharing them with the world. Email our editors to submit photos and information about your workspace. Write “workspace” in the subject line of the email, and include info such as where you’re located (city, country), the projects you build in your space, your tech interests, your occupation, and more. If you have an interesting space, we might feature it on CircuitCellar.com!

A Rat’s Nest-Less Workspace: Clean with Plenty of Screens

Two sorts of things we love to see in an electronics workspace: cleanliness and multiple monitors! San Antonio, TX-based Jorge Amodio’s L-shaped modular desk is great setup that gives him easy access to his projects, test equipment, and computers. The wires to all of his equipment are intelligently placed behind and below the workspace. Hence, no rat’s nest of wires! He doesn’t need to work on top of cords and peripherals like, well, a few of us do here in our office. We like how he “sectioned” his space to provide maximum multitasking capability. The setup enables him to move easily from doing R&D work to emailing to grabbing his iPhone without any more effort than a slide of his chair. Very nice.

Jorge Amodio’s workspace (Source: J. Amodio)

Submitted by Jorge Amodio, independent consultant and principal engineer (Serious Integrated, Inc.), San Antonio, TX, USA

“For the past few years I’ve been working on R&D of intelligent graphic/touch display modules for HMI (Human Machine Interface) and control panels, with embedded networking for ‘Internet of Things’ applications.” – Jorge Amodio

Jorge perform R&D with handy test equipment an arm’s length away (Source: J. Amodio)

A closer look at Jorge’s project space (Source: J. Amodio)

Jorge has easy access to his other monitors and iPhone (Source: J. Amodio)

Do you want to share images of your workspace, hackspace, or “circuit cellar”? Send your images and space info to editor at circuitcellar dotcom.

Dutch Designer’s “Comfort Zone”

Check out this amusing workspace submission from Henk Stegeman who lives and works in The Netherlands (which is widely referred to as the land of Elektor). We especially like his Dutch-orange power strips, which stand out in relation to the muted grey, white, and black colors of his IT equipment and furniture. StegemanWorkspace

Some might call the space busy. Others might say it’s cramped. Stegeman referred to it his “comfort zone.” He must move and shift a lot of objects before he starts to design. But, hey, whatever works, right?

Hi,

Attached you picture of my workspace.
Where ? (you might ask.)
I just move the keyboard aside.
To where ?
Euuh… (good question)

Regards

Henk
The Netherlands

Visit Circuit Cellar‘s Workspace page for more write-ups and photos of engineering workbenches and tools from around the world!

Want to share your space? Email our editorial team pics and info about your spaces!