Free IoT Security Platform Runs on OpenWrt Routers and the Raspberry Pi

By Eric Brown

At the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas, Minim announced a free spin-off of Minim, its cloud-managed Wi-Fi and security Software as a Service (SaaS) platform. Minim Labs is designed to work with a new open source software agent called Unum that runs on Raspbian and OpenWrt Linux devices. Optimized images are available for the OpenWrt-based Gli.Net GL-B1300 router and Raspberry Pi. The first 50 sign-ups will get the B1300 router for free (see below).


Minim Labs setup screen
(click image to enlarge)
The Minim Labs toolkit “secures and manages all connected devices in the home, such as the Google Home Hub, Sony Smart TV, and FreeRTOS devices,” providing “device fingerprinting, security scans, AI-powered recommendations, router management, analytics, and parental controls,” says Minim. By signing up to a Minim Labs account you receive a MAC address to register an Unum-enabled device.

The GitHub hosted Unum agent runs on the Linux router where it identifies connected devices and securely streams device telemetry to the Minim platform. Users can open a free Minim Labs account to register up to 10 Unum-enabled devices, offering access to Minim WiFi management apps and APIs. Alternately, you can use Unum with your own application server.

The GL-B1300 and Raspberry Pi builds are designed to walk “home network tinkerers” through the process of protecting devices with Unum and Minim Labs. More advanced developers can download a Unum SDK to modify the software for any OpenWrt-based router.

“By open sourcing our agent and giving technologists free access to our platform, we hope to build a global community that’ll contribute valuable product feedback and code,” stated Jeremy Hitchcock, Founder and CEO of Minim.

Gli.Net’s OpenWrt routers

Gli.Net’s GL-B1300 router runs OpenWrt on a quad-core, Cortex-A7 Qualcomm Atheros IPQ4028 SoC clocked to 717 MHz. The SoC is equipped with a DSP, 256MB RAM, 32 MB flash, and dual-band 802.11ac with 2×2 MIMO. The SoC and supports up to 5-port Ethernet routers abd provides Qualcomm TEE, Crypto Engine, and Secure Boot technologies.


 
GL-B1300 (left) and GL-AR750S
(click images to enlarge)
The GL-B1300 router has dual GbE ports, a WAN port, and a USB 3.0 port. The $89 price includes a 12V adapter and Ethernet cable.

The testimonial quote below says that the GL-AR750S Slate router, which is a CES 2019 Innovation Awards Honoree, will also support Unum and Minim Labs out of the box. The $70 GL-AR750S Slate runs on a MIPS-based, 775MHz Qualcomm QCA9563 processor and is equipped with 128MB RAM, 128MB NAND flash, and a microSD slot.

The Slate router provides 3x GbE ports and dual-band 802.11ac with dual external antennas. Other features include USB 2.0 and micro-USB power ports plus a UART and GPIO. The router supports WireGuard, OpenVPN, and Cloudflare DNS over TLS.


Gli.Net router comparison chart, including GL-B1300 and GL-AR750S
(click image to enlarge)
In addition to its routers, Gli.Net also sells the OpenWrt-on-Atheros/MIPS Domino Core computer-on-module. The Domino Core shipped in a Kickstarter launched Domino.IO IoT kit back in 2015.

“We are glad that Minim is going to launch open-source tools for DIY users and increase awareness of personal Internet security,” stated GL.iNet CTO Dr. Alfie Zhao. “This initiative shows shared value and vision with GL.iNet. We are happy to provide support for Minim tools on our GL-AR750S Slate router and GL-B1300 router, both of which have support to the latest OpenWrt.”

Further information

The free Minim Labs security platform is available for signup now, and the open source Unum agent is available for download. Minim is offering the first 50 Minim Labs signups with a free startup kit containing the GL-B1300 router. More information may be found at the Minim Labs product page.

This article originally appeared on LinuxGizmos.com on January 9.

Minim | www.minim.co

 

Secure Cellular Router Serves Industrial and Transportation Needs

Digi International has announced the Digi WR54, a rugged, secure, high-performance wireless router for complex mobile and industrial environments. With dual cellular interfaces, Digi WR54 provides immediate carrier failover for near-constant uptime and continuous connectivity, especially as vehicles move throughout a city or for locations with marginal cellular coverage. Together with a hardened milspec-certified design and built-in Digi TrustFence security framework, this LTE-Advanced router is designed specifically to meet the connectivity challenges inherent in multi-location, on-the-move conditions, from rail and public transit to trucking fleets and emergency vehicle applications.

LTE-Advanced technologies with carrier aggregation are pushing theoretical download speeds to 300 Mbps, and the next generation of cellular radios is capable of aggregating three or more channels for capabilities up to 600 Mbps. It’s expected that 5G deployments this year will push the demands for performance and edge computing even further. Digi WR54 provides an LTE-Advanced cellular module built on a platform that supports higher speeds to optimize bandwidth today while also being positioned for the future as network capabilities improve.

Multiple transit system use cases require rugged, reliable, high-speed connectivity solutions to carry mission-critical data and communications. Transit system integrators require connectivity for fleet tracking, logistics, engine and driver performance monitoring, fare collection and video monitoring; rail companies that are building in wayside data capabilities need constant visibility into complex systems; industrial corporations like utility companies need to monitor high-value assets.

The Digi WR54 architecture supports these performance requirements with not just the aforementioned LTE-Advanced cellular module, but four Gigabit Ethernet ports for wired systems and the latest 802.11 ac Wi-Fi which combine to support the needs of any user. Other key features include:

  • Dual-core 880 MHz MIPS processor: designed with this high-speed architecture, the Digi WR54 is future-built with a CPU capable of supporting higher network speeds and capabilities as infrastructure is updated to support them
  • SAE J1455, MILSTD-810G and IP-54 rated: tested and certified to withstand water, dust, heat, vibration and other environmental challenges suitable to transportation and many industrial applications
  • Optional dual-cellular radios for continuous connectivity between carriers: for users that cannot afford downtime, if the primary cellular carrier drops out, the Digi WR54 automatically and immediately switches over to the secondary carrier
  • Digi TrustFence: a device-security framework that simplifies the process of securing connected devices and adapts to new and evolving threats
  • Digi Remote Manager: with this Digi web-based management tool, users can simply manage their devices, receive alerts and monitor the health of their deployed devices

For users looking to add high-speed passenger Wi-Fi to mass transit systems, the recently launched Digi WR64 dual LTE-Advanced cellular and dual 802.11ac Wi-Fi router offers an all-in-one mobile communications solution for secure cellular connectivity between vehicles and a central operations center. It offers a flexible interface design with integrated Wi-Fi for client and access point connectivity along with USB, serial, a four-port wired Ethernet switch, GPS and Bluetooth in order to consolidate multiple transit or industrial applications into a single, consolidated router.

Digi International| www.digi.com

Nordic Semi’s BLE SoC Selected for Ultra Low Power IoT Module

Nordic Semiconductor has announced that Nanopower has selected Nordic’s nRF52832 Bluetooth Low Energy (Bluetooth LE) System-on-Chip (SoC) to provide the wireless connectivity for its nP-BLE52 module, designed for developers of IoT applications with highly restricted power budgets.

The nP-BLE52 module employs a proprietary power management IC—integrated alongside Nordic’s nRF52832 Wafer-Level Chip Scale Package (WL-CSP) SoC in a System-in-Package (SiP)—which enables it to cut power to the SoC, putting it in sleep mode, before waking it up a pre-set time and in the same state as before it was put to sleep. In doing so the SoC’s power consumption in sleep mode is reduced to 10 nA, making it well suited for IoT applications where battery life is critical by potentially increasing cell lifespan 10x.

In active mode, the nRF52832 SoC runs normally. The SoC has been engineered to minimize power consumption with features such as the 2.4GHz radio’s 5.5mA peak RX/TX currents and a fully-automatic power management system. Once the Nordic SoC has completed its tasks, it instructs the nP-BLE52 to put it to sleep and wake it up again at the pre-set time. The nP-BLE52 then stores the Nordics SoC’s state variables and waits until the nRF52832 SoC needs to be powered up again. On wake-up, the device uploads the previous state variables, allowing the Nordic SoC to be restored to the same operational state as before the power was cut. The SoC’s start-up is much more rapid than if it was activated from a non-powered mode.

The nP-BLE52 module also features a low power MCU which can be set to handle external sensors and actuators when the Nordic chip is switched off. In this state, the module still monitors sensors and buffer readings and can trigger wake-ups if these readings are above predetermined thresholds, while consuming less than 1 uA. The nP-BLE52 also integrates an embedded inertial measurement unit (IMU).

The module’s power management is controlled through a simple API, whereby the user can predetermine the duration of the Nordic SoC’s sleep mode, set the wake-up time and date parameters, and select pins for other on/off triggers.

The module offers IoT developers several advantages, either extending battery life and/or reducing the size of the battery required to power the application thereby reducing the end-product footprint. Longer battery life also reduces or eliminates battery swaps and enables the developer to better adjust for remaining useful battery life as the battery discharges. The module is suitable for any battery-powered device which is not required to be constantly active, for example asset tracking, remote monitoring, beacons, and some smart-home applications.

The nRF52832 WL-CSP SoC measures just 3.0 mm by 3.2mm while offering all the features of the conventionally-packaged chip. The nRF52832 is a powerful multiprotocol SoC ideally suited for Bluetooth LE and 2.4 GHz ultra low-power wireless applications. It combines an 64 MHz, 32-bit Arm Cortex M4F processor with a 2.4 GHz multiprotocol radio (supporting Bluetooth 5, ANT, and proprietary 2.4 GHz RF software) featuring -96dB RX sensitivity, with 512kB Flash memory and 64kB RAM.

The WL-CSP SoC is supplied with Nordic’s S132 SoftDevice, a Bluetooth 5-certifed RF software protocol stack for building advanced Bluetooth LE applications. The S132 SoftDevice features Central, Peripheral, Broadcaster, and Observer Bluetooth LE roles, supports up to twenty connections, and enables concurrent role operation. Nordic’s unique software architecture provides clear separation between the RF protocol software and the developer’s application code, easing product development.

Nordic Semiconductor | www.nordicsemi.com

February Circuit Cellar: Sneak Preview

The February issue of Circuit Cellar magazine is coming soon. We’ve raised up a bumper crop of in-depth embedded electronics articles just for you, and packed ’em into our 84-page magazine.

Not a Circuit Cellar subscriber?  Don’t be left out! Sign up today:

 

Here’s a sneak preview of February 2019 Circuit Cellar:

MCUs ARE EVERYWHERE, DOING EVERYTHING

Electronics for Automotive Infotainment
As automotive dashboard displays get more sophisticated, information and entertainment are merging into so-called infotainment systems. That’s driving a need for powerful MCU- and MPU-based solutions that support the connectivity, computing and interfacing needs particular to these system designs. In this article, Circuit Cellar’s Editor-in-Chief, Jeff Child, looks at the technology and trends feuling automotive infotainment.

Inductive Sensing with PSoC MCUs
Inductive sensing is shaping up to be the next big thing for touch technology. It’s suited for applications involving metal-over-touch situations in automotive, industrial and other similar systems. In his article, Nishant Mittal explores the science and technology of inductive sensing. He then describes a complete system design, along with firmware, for an inductive sensing solution based on Cypress Semiconductor’s PSoC microcontroller.

Build a Self-Correcting LED Clock
In North America, most radio-controlled clocks use WWVB’s transmissions to set the correct time. WWVB is a Colorado-based time signal radio station near. Learn how Cornell graduates Eldar Slobodyan and Jason Ben Nathan designed and built a prototype of a Digital WWVB Clock. The project’s main components include a Microchip PIC32 MCU, an external oscillator and a display.

WE’VE GOT THE POWER

Product Focus: ADCs and DACs
Analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) and digital-to-analog converters (DACs) are two of the key IC components that enable digital systems to interact with the real world. Makers of analog ICs are constantly evolving their DAC and ADC chips pushing the barriers of resolution and speeds. This new Product Focus section updates readers on this technology and provides a product album of representative ADC and DAC products.

Building a Generator Control System
Three phase electrical power is a critical technology for heavy machinery. Learn how US Coast Guard Academy students Kent Altobelli and Caleb Stewart built a physical generator set model capable of producing three phase electricity. The article steps through the power sensors, master controller and DC-DC conversion design choices they faced with this project.

EMBEDDED COMPUTING FOR YOUR SYSTEM DESIGN

Non-Standard Single Board Computers
Although standard-form factor embedded computers provide a lot of value, many applications demand that form take priority over function. That’s where non-standard boards shine. The majority of non-standard boards tend to be extremely compact, and well suited for size-constrained system designs. Circuit Cellar Chief Editor Jeff Child explores the latest technology trends and product developments in non-standard SBCs.

Thermal Management in machine learning
Artificial intelligence and machine learning continue to move toward center stage. But the powerful processing they require is tied to high power dissipation that results in a lot of heat to manage. In his article, Tom Gregory from 6SigmaET explores the alternatives available today with a special look at cooling Google’s Tensor Processor Unit 3.0 (TPUv3) which was designed with machine learning in mind.

… AND MORE FROM OUR EXPERT COLUMNISTS

Bluetooth Mesh (Part 1)
Wireless mesh networks are being widely deployed in a wide variety of settings. In this article, Bob Japenga begins his series on Bluetooth mesh. He starts with defining what a mesh network is, then looks at two alternatives available to you as embedded systems designers.

Implementing Time Technology
Many embedded systems need to make use of synchronized time information. In this article, Jeff Bachiochi explores the history of time measurement and how it’s led to NTP and other modern technologies for coordinating universal date and time. Using Arduino and the Espressif System’s ESP32, Jeff then goes through the steps needed to enable your embedded system to request, retrieve and display the synchronized date and time to a display.

Infrared Sensors
Infrared sensing technology has broad application ranging from motion detection in security systems to proximity switches in consumer devices. In this article, George Novacek looks at the science, technology and circuitry of infrared sensors. He also discusses the various types of infrared sensing technologies and how to use them.

The Art of Voltage Probing
Using the right tool for the right job is a basic tenant of electronics engineering. In this article, Robert Lacoste explores one of the most common tools on an engineer’s bench: oscilloscope probes, and in particular the voltage measurement probe. He looks and the different types of voltage probes as well as the techniques to use them effectively and safely.

IoT Wireless Sensor Nodes Target LPWAN Deployments

Advantech has released its WISE-4210 series of IoT wireless sensor products, including a wireless LPWAN-to-Ethernet AP and three wireless sensor nodes. The nodes include tthe WISE-4210-S231 internal temperature and humidity sensor (shown), WISE-4210-S251 sensor node with 6-channel digital input and a serial port and WISE-4210-S214 sensor node with 4-channel analog input and 4-channel digital input. The device-to-cloud total solution provided by this series of LPWAN products allows IT, OT, and cloud platform system developers to easily implement a private LPWAN, acquire field site data, and achieve seamless integration with both public cloud, such as Microsoft Azure and private enterprise clouds.

Based on proprietary LPWAN technology, the new WISE-4210 series products minimize frequency band interference, support a wider data transmission range, are compatible with lithium batteries, and enable cloud platform integration. By locking the sub-GHz frequency band, WISE-4210 series products significantly reduce susceptibility to interference for 2.4 GHz wireless communication technologies such as Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and Zigbee.

By supporting a network transmission distance of up to 5 km, the WISE-4210 series meets the requirements of large-scale interior environments such as data centers, factories and warehouses for collecting and applying a wide range of interior data. With LPWAN technology, only three 3.6 V lithium batteries are required to operate the WISE-4210 sensor nodes for up to five years, eliminating the need for additional wiring and frequent recharging. Additionally, the WISE-4210 series supports multiple transfer protocols, including MQTT, RESTful, Modbus/TCP and Modbus/RTU, for simple device-to-cloud connections.

The WISE-4210-S231 sensor node with built-in temperature and humidity sensor collects relevant data form factories, data centers or warehouse management without requiring the installation of additional sensors or gateways, making it ideal for indoor temperature and humidity control applications. Meanwhile, the WISE-4210-S251 sensor node, which provides 6-channel digital input and a single RS-485 port, and the WISE-4210-S214 sensor node, which provides four-channel analog input and 4-channel digital input, can be used to collect electricity meter, pressure gauge, thermometer, and power consumption data from factory facilities.

The three wireless nodes support direct data transmissions to SCADA and cloud platforms through a WISE-4210-AP, eliminating the need for a separate data conversion device. The WISE-4210-AP access point is capable of managing up to 64 nodes simultaneously, and thus can simplify overall infrastructure and save installation space.

Advantech | www.advantech.com

PSoC MCU Variant is Purpose-Built for IoT Edge Processing

Cypress Semiconductor is expanding its Internet of Things (IoT) solutions portfolio with a new member of its ultra-low-power PSoC 6 microcontroller (MCU) family. The new PSoC 6 MCU is purpose-built to address the growing needs for computing, connectivity and storage in IoT edge devices. The new MCUs include expanded embedded memory with 2 MB Flash and 1 MB SRAM to support compute-intensive algorithms, connectivity stacks and data logging.

At the same time, Cypress has announced two new development kits for the PSoC 6 family, enabling developers to immediately leverage the industry’s lowest power, most flexible dual-core MCU with hardware-based security—to prolong battery life, deliver efficient processing and sensing, and protect sensitive user data. PSoC 6 is empowering millions of IoT products today, providing the most secure and low-power processing available.
Developers can evaluate the new PSoC 6 MCUs with expanded embedded memory using Cypress’ new PSoC 6 Wi-Fi BT Prototyping Kit (CY8CPROTO-062-4343W) (shown). This $30 kit features peripheral modules including Cypress’ industry-leading CapSense capacitive-sensing technology, PDM-PCM microphones, and memory expansion modules, enabling quick evaluation and easy development. The kit is supported by Cypress’ ModusToolbox software suite that provides easy-to-use tools for application development in a familiar MCU integrated development environment (IDE).

To streamline development of products with Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) 5.0 connectivity, Cypress has introduced the PSoC 6 BLE Prototyping Kit (CY8CPROTO-063-BLE). This $20 kit features a fully-certified CYBLE-416045-02 BLE module—a turnkey solution that includes a PSoC 63 MCU, onboard crystal oscillators, trace antenna and passive components.

Cypress’ PSoC 6 MCUs are production qualified today and are in-stock at authorized distributors. The new PSoC 6 MCUs with expanded embedded memory are currently sampling and are expected to be in production in the first quarter of 2019. The PSoC 6 Wi-Fi BT Prototyping Kit (CY8CPROTO-062-4343W) is available for $30 and the PSoC 6 BLE Prototyping Kit (CY8CPROTO-063-BLE) is available for $20.

Cypress Semiconductor | www.cypress.com

January Circuit Cellar: Sneak Preview

Happy New Years! The January issue of Circuit Cellar magazine is coming soon. Don’t miss this 1st issue of Circuit Cellar 2019. Enjoy pages and pages of great, in-depth embedded electronics articles.

Not a Circuit Cellar subscriber?  Don’t be left out! Sign up today:

 

Here’s a sneak preview of January 2019 Circuit Cellar:

TRENDS & CHOICES IN EMBEDDED COMPUTING

Comms and Control for Drones
Consumer and commercial drones represent one of the most dynamic areas of embedded design today. Chip, board and system suppliers are offering improved ways for drones to do more processing on board the drone, while also providing solutions for implementing the control and communication subsystems in drones. This article by Circuit Cellar’s Editor-in-Chief Jeff Child looks at the technology and products available today that are advancing the capabilities of today’s drones.

Choosing an MPU/MCU for Industrial Design
By Microchip Technology’s Jacko Wilbrink
As MCU performance and functionality improve, the traditional boundaries between MCUs and microprocessor units (MPUs) have become less clear. In this article, Jacko examines the changing landscape in MPU vs. MCU capabilities, OS implications and the specifics of new SiP and SOM approaches for simplifying higher-performance computing requirements in industrial applications.

Product Focus: COM Express Boards
The COM Express architecture has found a solid and growing foothold in embedded systems. COM Express boards provide a complete computing core that can be upgraded when needed, leaving the application-specific I/O on the baseboard. This Product Focus section updates readers on this technology and provides a product album of representative COM Express products.

MICROCONTROLLERS ARE DOING EVERYTHING

Connecting USB to Simple MCUs
By Stuart Ball
Sometimes you want to connect a USB device such as a flash drive to a simple microcontroller. Problem is most MCUs cannot function as a USB host. In this article, Stuart steps through the technology and device choices that solve this challenge. He also puts the idea into action via a project that provides this functionality.

Vision System Enables Overlaid Images
By Daniel Edens and Elise Weir
In this project article, learn how these two Cornell students designed a system to overlay images from a visible light camera and an infrared camera. They use software running on a PIC32 MCU to interface the two types of cameras. The MCU does the computation to create the overlaid images, and displays them on an LCD screen.

DATA ACQUISITION AND MEASUREMENT

Data Acquisition Alternatives
By Jeff Child
While the fundamentals of data acquisition remain the same, its interfacing technology keeps evolving and changing. USB and PCI Express brought data acquisition off the rack, and onto the lab bench top. Today solutions are emerging that leverage Mini PCIe, Thunderbolt and remote web interfacing. Circuit Cellar’s Editor-in-Chief, Jeff Child, dives into the latest technology trends and product developments in data acquisition.

High-Side Current Sensing
By Jeff Bachiochi
Jeff says he likes being able to measure things—for example, being able to measure load current so he can predict how long a battery will last. With that in mind, he recently found a high-side current sensing device, Microchip’s EMC1701. In his article, Jeff takes you through the details of the device and how to make use of it in a battery-based system.

Power Analysis Capture with an MCU
By Colin O’Flynn
Low-cost microcontrollers integrate many powerful peripherals in them. You can even perform data capture directly to internal memory. In his article, Colin uses the ChipWhisperer-Nano as a case study in how you might use such features which would otherwise require external programmable logic.

TOOLS AND TECHNIQUES FOR EMBEDDED SYSTEM DESIGN

Easing into the IoT Cloud (Part 2)
By Brian Millier
In Part 1 of this article series Brian examined some of the technologies and services available today enabling you to ease into the IoT cloud. Now, in Part 2, he discusses the hardware features of the Particle IoT modules, as well as the circuitry and program code for the project. He also explores the integration of a Raspberry Pi solution with the Particle cloud infrastructure.

Hierarchical Menus for Touchscreens
By Aubrey Kagan
In his December article, Aubrey discussed his efforts to build a display subsystem and GUI for embedded use based on a Noritake touchscreen display. This time he shares how he created a menu system within the constraints of the Noritake graphical display system. He explains how he made good use of Microsoft Excel worksheets as a tool for developing the menu system.

Real Schematics (Part 2)
By George Novacek
The first part of this article series on the world of real schematics ended last month with wiring. At high frequencies PCBs suffer from the same parasitic effects as any other type of wiring. You can describe a transmission line as consisting of an infinite number of infinitesimal resistors, inductors and capacitors spread along its entire length. In this article George looks at real schematics from a transmission line perspective.

LoRa SiP Devices Provide Low Power IoT Node Solution

Microchip Technology has introduced a highly integrated LoRa System-in-Package (SiP) family with an ultra-low-power 32-bit MCU, sub-GHz RF LoRa transceiver and software stack. The SAM R34/35 SiPs come with certified reference designs and interoperability with major LoRaWAN gateway and network providers. The devices also provide the ultra-low power consumption in sleep modes, offering extended battery life in remote IoT nodes.

Most LoRa end devices remain in sleep mode for extended periods of time, only waking up occasionally to transmit small data packets. Powered by the ultra-low-power SAM L21 Arm Cortex-M0+ based MCU, the SAM R34 devices provide sleep modes as low as 790 nA to significantly reduce power consumption and extend battery life in end applications. Highly integrated in a compact 6 mm x 6 mm package, the SAM R34/35 family is well suited for a broad array of long-range, low-power IoT applications that require small form factor designs and multiple years of battery life.

In addition to ultra-low-power consumption, the simplified development process means developers can accelerate their designs by combining their application code with Microchip’s LoRaWAN stack and quickly prototype with the ATSAMR34-XPRO development board (DM320111), which is supported by the Atmel Studio 7 Software Development Kit (SDK). The development board is certified with the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), Industry Canada (IC) and Radio Equipment Directive (RED), providing developers with the confidence that their designs will meet government requirements across geographies.
LoRa technology is designed to enable low-power applications to communicate over longer ranges than Zigbee, Wi-Fi and Bluetooth using the LoRaWAN open protocol. Ideal for a range of applications such as smart cities, agricultural monitoring and supply chain tracking, LoRaWAN enables the creation of flexible IoT networks that can operate in both urban and rural environments. According to the LoRa Alliance, the number of LoRaWAN operators has doubled from 40 to 80 over the last 12 months, with more than 100 countries actively developing LoRaWAN networks.

The SAM R34/35 family is supported by Microchip’s LoRaWAN stack, as well as a certified and proven chip-down package that enables customers to accelerate the design of RF applications with reduced risk. With support for worldwide LoRaWAN operation from 862 to 1,020 MHz, developers can use a single part variant across geographies, simplifying the design process and reducing inventory burden. The SAM R34/35 family supports Class A and Class C end devices as well as proprietary point-to-point connections.

Microchip’s SAM R34/35 LoRa family is available in six device variants. SAM R34 devices in a 64-lead TFBGA package begin at $3.76 each in 10,000-unit quantities. SAM R35 devices are available without a USB interface starting at $3.66 each in 10,000-unit quantities.

Microchip Technology | www.microchip.com

IoT Door Security System Uses Wi-Fi

Control Via App or Web

Discover how these Cornell students built an Internet-connected door security system with wireless monitoring and control through web and mobile applications. The article discusses the interfacing of a Microchip PIC32 MCU with the Internet, and the application of IoT to a door security system.

By Norman Chen, Ram Vellanki and Giacomo Di Liberto

The idea for an Internet of Things (IoT) door security system came from our desire to grant people remote access to and control over their security system. Connecting the system with the Internet not only improves safety by enabling users to monitor a given entryway remotely, but also allows the system to transmit information about the traffic of the door to the Internet. With these motivations, we designed our system using a Microchip Technology PIC32 microcontroller (MCU) and an Espressif ESP8266 Wi-Fi module to interface a door sensor with the Internet, which gives the user full control over the system via mobile and web applications.

The entire system works in the following way. To start, the PIC32 tells the Wi-Fi module to establish a connection to a TCP socket, which provides fast and reliable communication with the security system’s web server. Once a connection has been established, the PIC32 enters a loop to analyze the distance sensor reading to detect motion in the door. Upon any detection of motion, the PIC32 commands the Wi-Fi module to signal the event to the web server. Each motion detection is saved in memory, and simultaneously the data are sent to the website, which graphs the number of motion detections per unit time. If the security system was armed at the time of motion detection, then the PIC32 will sound the alarm via a piezoelectric speaker from CUI. The alarm system is disarmed at default, so each motion detection is logged in the web application but no sound is played. From both the web and mobile application, the user can arm, disarm and sound the alarm immediately in the case of an emergency.

DESIGN

The PIC32 acts as the hub of the whole system. As shown in Figure 1, each piece of hardware is connected to the MCU, as it detects motion by analyzing distance sensor readings, generates sound for the piezoelectric speaker and commands the Wi-Fi module for actions that pertain to the web server. The distance sensor used in our system is rated to accurately measure distances of only 10 to 80 cm [1]. That’s because motion detection requires us only to measure large changes in distances instead of exact distances, the sensor was sufficient for our needs.

Figure 1
The schematic of the security system. Note that the door sensor runs on 5  V, whereas the rest of the components run on 3.3 V

In our design, the sensor is facing down from the top of the doorway, so the nearest object to the sensor is the floor at idle times, when there is no movement through the door. For an average height of a door, about 200 cm, the sensor outputs a miniscule amount of voltage of less than 0.5 V. If a human of average height, about 160 cm, passes through the doorway, then according to the datasheet [1], the distance sensor will output a sudden spike of about 1.5 V. The code on the PIC32 constantly analyzes the distance sensor readings for such spikes, and interprets an increase and subsequent decrease in voltage as motion through the door. The alarm sound is generated by having the PIC32 repeatedly output a 1,500 Hz wave to the piezoelectric speaker through a DAC. We used the DMA feature on the PIC32 for playing the alarm sound, to allow the MCU to signal the alarm without using an interrupt-service-routine. The alarm sound output therefore, did not interfere with motion detection and receiving commands from the web server.

The Wi-Fi module we used to connect the PIC32 to the Internet is the ESP8266, which has several variations on the market. We chose model number ESP8266-01 for its low cost and small form factor. This model was not breadboard-compatible, but we designed a mount for the device so that it could be plugged into the breadboard without the need for header wires. Figure 2 shows how the device is attached to the breadboard, along with how the rest of the system is connected.

Figure 2
The full system is wired up on a breadboard. The door sensor is at the bottom of the photo, and is attached facing down from the top of a doorway when in use. The device at the top of the figure is the PIC32 MCU mounted on a development board.

The module can boot into two different modes, programming or normal, by configuring the GPIO pins during startup. To boot into programming mode, GPIO0 must be pulled to low, while GPIO2 must be pulled high. To boot into normal mode, both GPIO0 and GPIO2 must be pulled high. Programming mode is used for flashing new firmware onto the device, whereas normal mode enables AT commands over UART on the ESP8266. Because we only needed to enable the AT commands on the module, we kept GPIO0 and GPIO2 floating, which safely and consistently booted the module into normal mode.

SENDING COMMANDS

Before interfacing the PIC32 with the Wi-Fi module, we used a USB-to-TTL serial cable to connect the module to a computer, and tested the functionality of its AT commands by sending it commands from a serial terminal. …

Read the full article in the December 341 issue of Circuit Cellar

Don’t miss out on upcoming issues of Circuit Cellar. Subscribe today!

Note: We’ve made the October 2017 issue of Circuit Cellar available as a free sample issue. In it, you’ll find a rich variety of the kinds of articles and information that exemplify a typical issue of the current magazine.

December Circuit Cellar: Sneak Preview

The December issue of Circuit Cellar magazine is coming soon. Don’t miss this last issue of Circuit Cellar in 2018. Pages and pages of great, in-depth embedded electronics articles prepared for you to enjoy.

Not a Circuit Cellar subscriber?  Don’t be left out! Sign up today:

 

Here’s a sneak preview of December 2018 Circuit Cellar:

AI, FPGAs and EMBEDDED SUPERCOMPUTING

Embedded Supercomputing
Gone are the days when supercomputing levels of processing required a huge, rack-based systems in an air-conditioned room. Today, embedded processors, FPGAs and GPUs are able to do AI and machine learning kinds of operation, enable new types of local decision making in embedded systems. In this article, Circuit Cellar’s Editor-in-Chief, Jeff Child, looks at these technology and trends driving embedded supercomputing.

Convolutional Neural Networks in FPGAs
Deep learning using convolutional neural networks (CNNs) can offer a robust solution across a wide range of applications and market segments. In this article written for Microsemi, Ted Marena illustrates that, while GPUs can be used to implement CNNs, a better approach, especially in edge applications, is to use FPGAs that are aligned with the application’s specific accuracy and performance requirements as well as the available size, cost and power budget.

NOT-TO-BE-OVERLOOKED ENGINEERING ISSUES AND CHOICES

DC-DC Converters
DC-DC conversion products must juggle a lot of masters to push the limits in power density, voltage range and advanced filtering. Issues like the need to accommodate multi-voltage electronics, operate at wide temperature ranges and serve distributed system requirements all add up to some daunting design challenges. This Product Focus section updates readers on these technology trends and provides a product gallery of representative DC-DC converters.

Real Schematics (Part 1)
Our magazine readers know that each issue of Circuit Cellar has several circuit schematics replete with lots of resistors, capacitors, inductors and wiring. But those passive components don’t behave as expected under all circumstances. In this article, George Novacek takes a deep look at the way these components behave with respect to their operating frequency.

Do you speak JTAG?
While most engineers have heard of JTAG or have even used JTAG, there’s some interesting background and capabilities that are so well know. Robert Lacoste examines the history of JTAG and looks at clever ways to use it, for example, using a cheap JTAG probe to toggle pins on your design, or to read the status of a given I/O without writing a single line of code.

PUTTING THE INTERNET-OF-THINGS TO WORK

Industrial IoT Systems
The Industrial Internet-of-Things (IIoT) is a segment of IoT technology where more severe conditions change the game. Rugged gateways and IIoT edge modules comprise these systems where the extreme temperatures and high vibrations of the factory floor make for a demanding environment. Here, Circuit Cellar’s Editor-in-Chief, Jeff Child, looks at key technology and product drives in the IIoT space.

Internet of Things Security (Part 6)
Continuing on with his article series on IoT security, this time Bob Japenga returns to his efforts to craft a checklist to help us create more secure IoT devices. This time he looks at developing a checklist to evaluate the threats to an IoT device.

Applying WebRTC to the IoT
Web Real-time Communications (WebRTC) is an open-source project created by Google that facilitates peer-to-peer communication directly in the web browser and through mobile applications using application programming interfaces. In her article, Callstats.io’s Allie Mellen shows how IoT device communication can be made easy by using WebRTC. With WebRTC, developers can easily enable devices to communicate securely and reliably through video, audio or data transfer.

WI-FI AND BLUETOOTH IN ACTION

IoT Door Security System Uses Wi-Fi
Learn how three Cornell students, Norman Chen, Ram Vellanki and Giacomo Di Liberto, built an Internet connected door security system that grants the user wireless monitoring and control over the system through a web and mobile application. The article discusses the interfacing of a Microchip PIC32 MCU with the Internet and the application of IoT to a door security system.

Self-Navigating Robots Use BLE
Navigating indoors is a difficult but interesting problem. Learn how these two Cornell students, Jane Du and Jacob Glueck, used Received Signal Strength Indicator (RSSI) of Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) 4.0 chips to enable wheeled, mobile robots to navigate towards a stationary base station. The robot detects its proximity to the station based on the strength of the signal and moves towards what it believes to be the signal source.

IN-DEPTH PROJECT ARTICLES WITH ALL THE DETAILS

Sun Tracking Project
Most solar panel arrays are either fixed-position, or have a limited field of movement. In this project article, Jeff Bachiochi set out to tackle the challenge of a sun tracking system that can move your solar array to wherever the sun is coming from. Jeff’s project is a closed-loop system using severs, opto encoders and the Microchip PIC18 microcontroller.

Designing a Display System for Embedded Use
In this project article, Aubrey Kagan takes us through the process of developing an embedded system user interface subsystem—including everything from display selection to GUI development to MCU control. For the project he chose a 7” Noritake GT800 LCD color display and a Cypress Semiconductor PSoC5LP MCU.

Variscite’s Latest DART Module Taps Headless i.MX6 ULZ

By Eric Brown

Variscite is spinning out yet another pin-compatible version of its 50 mm x 25 mm DART-6UL computer-on-module, this time loaded with NXP’s headless new i.MX6 ULZ variant of the single Cortex-A7 core i.MX6 UL. Due for a Q4 launch, the unnamed module lacks display or LAN support. It’s billed as “a native solution for headless Linux-based embedded products such as IoT devices and smart home sensors requiring low power, low size and rich connectivity options.”


DART-6UL with iMX6 ULZ 
(click image to enlarge)
The lack of display and LAN features mirrors the limitations of the i.MX6 ULZ, which NXP refers to as a “cost-effective Linux processor.” The headless, up to 900  MHz Cortex-A7 ULZ SoC offers most of the I/O of the of the i.MX6 UL/ULL, including ESAI, S/PDIF, and 3x I2S audio interfaces, but it lacks features such as the 2D Pixel acceleration engine and Ethernet controllers.


NXP i.MX6 ULZ block diagram
(click image to enlarge)
Last year, Variscite spun the Linux-ready DART-6UL into a faster, 696MHz v1.2 upgrade, which added the option of NXP’s power-efficient i.MX6 ULL SoC in addition to the i.MX6 UL. A few months later, it followed up with a DART-6UL-5G model that boasts an on-board, “certified” WiFi/Bluetooth module with dual-band, 2.4 GHz/ 5 GHz 802.11ac/a/b/g/n.


DART-6UL-5G (left) and DART-6UL v1.2
(click images to enlarge)
The upcoming i.MX6 ULZ based version, which we imagine Variscite will dub the DART-6ULZ, has the same Wi-Fi-ac module with Bluetooth 4.2 BLE. Like the latest versions of the other DART-6UL modules, the module can be clocked to 900 MHz.

The “cost effective” ULZ version differs in that it lacks the other models’ touch-enabled, 24-bit parallel RGB interface and dual 10/100 Ethernet controllers. Other subtracted features compared to earlier models include dual CAN, parallel camera, and “extra security features.”

The new module is also limited to a 0 to 85°C range instead of being available in 0 to 70°C or -40 to 85°C versions. The i.MX6 ULZ SoC itself has a slightly wider range of 0 to 95°C.

The pin compatible DART-6UL with iMX6 ULZ will offer the i.MX6 ULZ SoC with “optional security features,” which include TRNG, AES crypto engine, and secure boot. The 50 mm x 25mm module will ship with 512MB DDR3L, which was the previous maximum of the now up to 1 GB RAM DART-6UL. The storage range is similar, with a choice 512 MB NAND and up to 64 GB eMMC.

The DART-6UL with i.MX6 ULZ will support 2x USB 2.0 OTG host/device ports, audio in and out, and UART, I2C, SPI, PWM, and ADC interfaces. OS support is listed as “Linux Yocto, Linux Debian, Boot2QT.”

The ULZ version of the DART-6UL will support existing development kits, which are based on the VAR-6ULCustomBoard. This 100 mm x 70 mm x 20 mm carrier board offers a microSD slot, a USB host port, and micro-USB OTG and debug ports, as well as features that are inaccessible to the ULZ, including dual GbE, RGB, LVDS, CAN and camera interfaces.

This week Variscite announced another DART module based on another new NXP SoC. The DART-MX8M-Mini module taps a 14nm-fabricated i.MX8M Mini SoC variant of the i.MX8M with one to four 2GHz Cortex-A53 cores and a 400 MHz Cortex-M4, plus scaled down 1080p video via MIPI-DSI.

Further information

The DART-6UL with iMX6 ULZ will be available in the fourth quarter. The DART-6UL/ULL/ULZ product page notes that the lowest, volume-discounted price is $24, which likely pertains to the ULZ part. More information may be found in Variscite’s announcement.

This article originally appeared on LinuxGizmos.com on September 19.

Variscite | www.variscite.com

Pioneer Chooses Cypress Wi-Fi/ Bluetooth IC for Infotainment System

Cypress Semiconductor has announced that Pioneer has integrated Cypress’ Wi-Fi and Bluetooth Combo solution into its flagship in-dash navigation AV receiver. The solution enables passengers to display and use their smartphone’s apps on the receiver’s screen via Apple CarPlay or Android Auto, which provide the ability to use smartphone voice recognition to search for information or respond to text messages. The Cypress Wi-Fi and Bluetooth combo solution uses Real Simultaneous Dual Band (RSDB) technology so that Apple CarPlay and Android Auto can operate concurrently without degradation caused by switching back and forth between bands.
The Pioneer AVH-W8400NEX receiver uses Cypress’ CYW89359 combo solution, which includes an advanced coexistence engine that enables optimal performance for dual-band 2.4-GHz and 5-GHz 802.11ac Wi-Fi and dual-mode Bluetooth/Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) simultaneously for superior multimedia experiences. The CYW89359’s RSDB architecture enables two unique data streams to run at full throughput simultaneously by integrating two complete Wi-Fi subsystems into a single chip.

The CYW89359 is fully automotive qualified with AECQ-100 grade-3 validation and is being designed in by numerous top-tier car OEMs and automotive suppliers as a full in-vehicle connectivity solution, supporting infotainment and telematics applications such as smartphone screen-mirroring, content streaming and Bluetooth voice connectivity in car kits.

Cypress Semiconductor | www.cypress.com

IoT Platform Release Provides Improved Wireless Capabilities

Ayla Networks has announced new capabilities to its IoT platform that will further simplify the ability to gain business value from IoT. This new Ayla IoT platform release overcomes restrictions on choosing wireless modules to connect to the Ayla IoT cloud and streamlines the creation of enterprise applications that use IoT device data.

A new Ayla portable software agent significantly cuts the time needed to get to market with IoT initiatives, by allowing manufacturers to select essentially any cellular or Wi-Fi module and have it connect easily to the Ayla IoT cloud. For makers of IoT solutions and service providers, the Ayla IoT platform has added new application enablement capabilities that make it faster and easier to build both mobile and web-based enterprise applications that take advantage of IoT data.
To connect to an IoT cloud, devices use an embedded cellular or Wi-Fi module, comprising both a hardware chip and a software agent, that provides wireless cloud connectivity. Until now, IoT software agents had to be built and certified to work with a specific chip and module type, an expensive process that could take a year or more and involve significant certification overhead.

The new Ayla portable agent circumvents this problem by enabling connectivity to the Ayla IoT cloud from any cellular or Wi-Fi module—without the lengthy process of certifying a different software agent for each chip or module variation, and without having to generate source code to port the agent to a chosen module. As a result, IoT solution providers that want to connect to the Ayla IoT cloud are no longer restricted to a list of certified cellular or Wi-Fi modules; instead, they can take a bring-your-own (BYO) approach to IoT modules.

The Ayla portable agent includes source code, reference implementation, a porting guide, and a test suite for both cellular and Wi-Fi solutions. In addition, Ayla Networks can recommend development partners able to perform porting work for enterprises that lack in-house IoT firmware development expertise.

The Ayla Web Software Development Kit (SDK) reduces development cycles for applications that leverage IoT device data in conjunction with an enterprise’s other cloud or data integrations. A new product, the Ayla Web SDK makes it easy for developers to create business applications on top of the Ayla IoT platform. It provides pre-packaged functionality for user management, device monitoring, session management and rule-based access control (RBAC) management.

Ayla Networks | www.aylanetworks.com.

Cellular/Wi-Fi Gateway Targets In-Vehicle Intelligent Systems

Kontron has introduced the EvoTRAC G103 In-Vehicle Rugged Cellular and Wi-Fi Gateway that provides broad connectivity capabilities that enable a new range of in-vehicle management, remote access and cloud-based applications. Providing the mobile connectivity and onboard recording device storage needed for a new generation of more intelligent systems, the EvoTRAC G103 features a WiFi and 4G Advanced Pro+ LTE module, and includes 64 GB eMMC for onboard storage as well as optionalfixed storage capacity.

The EvoTRAC G103 is a flexible open-architecture building block platform that supports fast access to actionable information from its integrated dual Gigabit Ethernet and dual CAN bus interface that supports 2.0 A and B, along with two USB 2.0 interface. With the explosion of data generated by today’s commercial vehicles, implementing a robust gateway such as the EvoTRAC G103 offloads important information operators can use to keep drivers safe, lower fuel consumption and effectively manage maintenance costs.

Tested to survive extreme temperature (-40° C to +80° C) and other demanding on and off-road vehicle conditions (shock, vibration, humidity, salt fog), the EvoTRAC™ G103 Gateway leverages Kontron’s hardened Type 6 COMe E3845 COM Express® CPU module coupled with a ruggedized Carrier Board, all packaged in a natural convection, sealed IP67 enclosure. Extremely rugged and mechanically compact, this gateway is based on the efficient, low-power Intel Atom processor, and incorporates protection from water and dust ingress, as well as CISPR25 emissions and ISO 11452-2 susceptibility.

Kontron | www.kontron.com

Wireless Standards and Solutions for IoT

Protocol Choices Abound

One of the critical enabling technologies making the Internet-of-Things possible is the set of well-established wireless standards that allow movement of data to and from low-power edge devices. These standards are being implemented in a variety of chip- and module-based solutions.

By Jeff Child, Editor-in-Chief

Connecting the various nodes of an IoT implementation can involve a number of wired and wireless network technologies. It’s rare that an IoT system can be completely hardwired end to end. That means most IoT systems of any large scale depend on a variety of wireless technologies including everything from device-level technologies to Wi-Fi to cellular networking.

IoT system developers have a rich set of wireless standards to choose from. And these can be implemented from the gateway and the device side using a variety of wireless IoT solutions in both module and chip form. Some of these are available from the leading microcontroller vendors, but a growing number are IoT-specialist chip and module vendors. Many of today’s solutions combine multiple protocols on the same device, such as Wi-Fi and Bluetooth LE (BLE) for example. We’ll look at each of the major wireless standards appropriate to IoT, along with representative interface solutions for each.

LoRaWAN

Managed by the LoRa Alliance, the LoRaWAN specification is a Low Power, Wide Area (LPWA) networking protocol designed to wirelessly connect battery operated ‘things’ to the internet in regional, national or global networks. It meets key IoT requirements such as bi-directional communication, end-to-end security, mobility and localization services.

The networking architecture of LoRaWAN is deployed in a star-of-stars topology in which gateways relay messages between end devices and a central network server. Gateways are connected to the network server via standard IP connections and act as a transparent bridge, simply converting RF packets to IP packets and vice versa. The wireless communication takes advantage of the Long Range characteristics of the LoRa physical layer, allowing a single-hop link between the end-device and one or many gateways. All modes are capable of bi-directional communication, and support is included for multicast addressing groups to make efficient use of spectrum during tasks such as Firmware Over-The-Air (FOTA) upgrades or other mass distribution messages.

In a recent LoRaWAN product example, Cypress Semiconductor in June announced its teaming up with Semtech on a compact, two-chip LoRaWAN-based module deployed by Onethinx. The highly-integrated Onethinx module is well-suited for smart city applications that integrate multiple sensors and are in harsh radio environments (Figure 1). Using Cypress’ PSoC 6 MCU hardware-based Secure Element functionality and Semtech’s LoRa devices and wireless radio frequency technology (LoRa Technology), the solution enables a multi-layer security architecture that isolates trust anchors for highly protected device-to-cloud connectivity. In addition, the PSoC 6 MCU’s integrated Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) connectivity provides a simple, low-power, out-of-band control channel. Cypress claims the PSoC 6 device as the industry’s lowest power, most flexible Arm Cortex-M dual-core MCU with a power slope as low as 22-μA/MHz active power for the Cortex-M4 core. The device works well with Semtech’s latest LoRa radio chip family, which offers 50% power savings in receive mode and 20% longer range over previous-generation devices.

Figure 1
Using Cypress’ PSoC 6 MCU hardware-based Secure Element functionality and Semtech’s LoRa devices and wireless radio frequency technology (LoRa Technology), the Onethinx module enables a multi-layer security architecture that isolates trust anchors for highly protected device-to-cloud connectivity.

The Onethinx module uses the integrated Secure Element functionality in the PSoC 6 MCU to give each LoRaWAN-based device a secret identity to securely boot and deliver data to the cloud application. Using its mutual authentication capabilities, the PSoC 6 MCU-based, LoRa-equipped device can also receive authenticated over-the-air firmware updates. Key provisioning and management services are provided by IoT security provider and member of the Bosch group, ESCRYPT, for a complete end-to-end, secure LoRaWAN solution. The module, offered by Cypress partner Onethinx, connects to Bosch Sensortec’s Cross Domain Development Kit (XDK) for Micro-Electromechanical Systems (MEMS) sensors and to the provisioning system from ESCRYPT to securely connect.

Wi-Fi (802.11)

In systems where power is less of a constraint, the ubiquitous standard
Wi-Fi 802.11 is also a good method of IoT connectivity—whether leveraging off of existing Wi-Fi infrastructures or just using Wi-Fi hubs and routers in a purposed-built network implementation. As mentioned earlier, Wi-Fi is often available integrated with other wireless protocols such as Bluetooth. …

Read the full article in the July 336 issue of Circuit Cellar

Don’t miss out on upcoming issues of Circuit Cellar. Subscribe today!

Note: We’ve made the October 2017 issue of Circuit Cellar available as a free sample issue. In it, you’ll find a rich variety of the kinds of articles and information that exemplify a typical issue of the current magazine.