6DoF Robotic Arm

GlobalSpecialties

The R680 Banshi Robotic Arm

The R680 Banshi Robotic Arm is an affordable robot designed for educators and hobbyists. It can help users learn the basics of electronics, mechanics, and programming. The Banshi is controlled by an ATmega64 microcontroller that is programmable via open-source tools in C.

The robot includes many example programs that can be easily downloaded to the robot using the supplied USB interface and the RobotLoader software. You can also use the free open-source WinAVR software to write your own custom programs.

The robot can be controlled with the included keyboard or RACS software. The software can record and play back the Banshi’s movements. You can use I/Os and the flexible I2C bus system to add extra modules that enable the robot to react to its environment.

GlobalSpecialties-kit

The Banshi Robot kit

The Banshi Robot comes unassembled as a kit with included assembly tools. The robot’s additional features include six degrees of freedom (6DoF), a 12-V power supply, an I2C bus, a USB interface, and a complete 72-page manual.

The Banshi Robotic Arm costs $199.

Global Specialties
http://globalspecialties.com

Small, Self-Contained GNSS Receiver

TM Series GNSS modules are self-contained, high-performance global navigation satellite system (GNSS) receivers designed for navigation, asset tracking, and positioning applications. Based on the MediaTek chipset, the receivers can simultaneously acquire and track several satellite constellations, including the US GPS, Europe’s GALILEO, Russia’s GLONASS, and Japan’s QZSS.

LinxThe 10-mm × 10-mm receivers are capable of better than 2.5-m position accuracy. Hybrid ephemeris prediction can be used to achieve less than 15-s cold start times. The receiver can operate down to 3 V and has a 20-mA low tracking current. To save power, the TM Series GNSS modules have built-in receiver duty cycling that can be configured to periodically turn off. This feature, combined with the module’s low power consumption, helps maximize battery life in battery-powered systems.

The receiver modules are easy to integrate, since they don’t require software setup or configuration to power up and output position data. The TM Series GNSS receivers use a standard UART serial interface to send and receive NMEA messages in ASCII format. A serial command set can be used to configure optional features. Using a USB or RS-232 converter chip, the modules’ UART can be directly connected to a microcontroller or a PC’s UART.

The GPS Master Development System connects a TM Series Evaluation Module to a prototyping board with a color display that shows coordinates, a speedometer, and a compass for mobile evaluation. A USB interface enables simple viewing of satellite data and Internet mapping and custom software application development.
Contact Linx Technologies for pricing.

Linx Technologies
www.linxtechnologies.com

Member Profile: Scott Weber

Scott Weber

Scott Weber

LOCATION:
Arlington, Texas, USA

MEMBER STATUS:
Scott said he started his Circuit Cellar subscription late in the last century. He chose the magazine because it had the right mix of MCU programming and electronics.

TECH INTERESTS:
He has always enjoyed mixing discrete electronic projects with MCUs. In the early 1980s, he built a MCU board based on an RCA CDP1802 with wirewrap and programmed it with eight switches and a load button.

Back in the 1990s, Scott purchased a Microchip Technology PICStart Plus. “I was thrilled at how powerful and comprehensive the chip and tools were compared to the i8085 and CDP1802 devices I tinkered with years before,” he said.

RECENT EMBEDDED TECH ACQUISITION:
Scott said he recently treated himself to a brand-new Fluke 77-IV multimeter.

CURRENT PROJECTS:
Scott is building devices that can communicate through USB to MS Windows programs. “I don’t have in mind any specific system to control, it is something to learn and have fun with,” he said. “This means learning not only an embedded USB software framework, but also Microsoft Windows device drivers.”

THOUGHTS ON THE FUTURE OF EMBEDDED TECH:
“Embedded devices are popping up everywhere—in places most people don’t even realize they are being used. It’s fun discovering where they are being applied. It is so much easier to change the microcode of an MCU or FPGA as the unit is coming off the assembly line than it is to rewire a complex circuit design,” Scott said.

“I also like Member Profile Joe Pfeiffer’s final comment in Circuit Cellar 276: Surface-mount and ASIC devices are making a ‘barrier to entry’ for the hobbyist. You can’t breadboard those things! I gotta learn a good way to make my own PCBs!”

Dual-Channel Waveform Generators

B&K Precision 4053 Waveform Generator

B&K Precision 4053 Waveform Generator

The 4050 Series is a new line of four dual-channel function/arbitrary waveform generators. The instruments can generate 5-to-50-MHz waveforms for applications requiring stable and precise sine, square, triangle, and pulse waveforms with modulation and arbitrary waveform capabilities.

All models provide a main output voltage that can be vary from 0 to 10 VPP into 50 Ω and a secondary output that can vary from 0 to 3 VPP into 50 Ω. The generators feature a 3.5” color LCD, a rotary control knob, and a numeric keypad with dedicated waveform keys and output buttons.

The 4050 Series provides users with 48 built-in arbitrary waveforms. Using the included waveform editing software via the standard USB interface on the rear, users can create and load up to 10 custom 16-kpt waveforms. For general-purpose interface bus (GPIB) connectivity, an optional USB-to-GPIB adapter is available.

The generators offer a variety of modulation schemes for modulated signal applications including amplitude and frequency modulation (AM/FM), double sideband amplitude modulation (DSB-AM), amplitude and frequency shift keying (ASK/FSK), phase modulation (PM), and pulse-width modulation (PWM). Additional standard features include a linear and logarithmic sweep function, a built-in counter, sync output, a trigger I/O terminal, and a USB host port on the front panel to save and recall instrument settings and waveforms. A standard external 10-MHz reference clock input is provided to synchronize the instrument to another generator.

The 4052 (5-MHz) costs $499, the 4053 (10 MHz) costs $599, the 4054 (25 MHz) costs $850, and the 4055 (50 MHz) costs $1,050. Note: B&K Precision is offering 10% off MSRP through November 30, 2013. See website for details.

B&K Precision Corp.
www.bkprecision.com

OEM Host Adapter Flash Memory

Total Phase Aaardvark USB-to-I2C Host Adapter

Total Phase Aardvark USB-to-I2C Host Adapter

The Aardvark OEM Adapter is based on Total Phase’s Aardvark I2C/SPI USB-to-I2C adapter, which is a flexible tool for system design and testing. The new adapter is available in an I2C or SPI configuration and includes the Total Phase API, which enables you to create custom application GUIs.

The Aardvark OEM Adapter and API are cross-platform compatible with various OSes, including Windows, Linux, and Mac OS X. In a production environment, you can use the API for automated testing or device programming.

Contact Total Phase for pricing.

Total Phase, Inc.
www.totalphase.com