Client Profile: Lauterbach, Inc

1111 Main Street #115
Vancouver, WA 98660

Contact:
sales_us@lauterbach.com

LauterbachFeatured Product: The TRACE32-ICD in-circuit debugger supports a range of on-chip debug interfaces. The debugger’s hardware is universal and enables you to connect to different target processors by simply changing the debug cable. The PowerDebug USB 3.0 can be upgraded with the PowerProbe or the PowerIntergrator to a logic analyzer.

Product Features: The TRACE 32-ICD JTAG debugger has a 5,000-KBps download rate. It features easy high-level Assembler debugging and an interface to all industry-standard compilers. The debugger enables fast download of code to target, OS awareness debugging, and flash programming. It displays internal and external peripherals at a logical level and includes support for hardware breakpoints and trigger (if supported by chip), multicore debugging (SMP and AMP), C and C++, and all common NOR and NAND flash devices.

For more information, visit www.lauterbach.com/bdmusb3.html.

High-Speed Laser Range Finder Board with IMU

Integrated

The NavRanger-OEM

The NavRanger-OEM combines a 20,000 samples per second laser range finder with a nine-axis inertial measurement unit (IMU) on a single 3“ × 6“ (7.7 × 15.3 cm) circuit board. The board features I/O resources and processing capability for application-specific control solutions.

The NavRanger‘s laser range finder measures the time of flight of a short light pulse from an IR laser. The time to digital converter has a 65-ps resolution (i.e., approximately 1 cm). The Class 1M laser has a 10-ns pulse width, a 0.8 mW average power, and a 9° × 25° divergence without optics. The detector comprises an avalanche photo diode with a two-point variable-gain amplifier and variable threshold digitizer. These features enable a 10-cm × 10-cm piece of white paper to be detected at 30 m with a laser collimator and 25-mm receiver optics.

The range finder includes I/O to build a robot or scan a solution. The wide range 9-to-28-V input supply voltage enables operation in 12- and 24-V battery environments. The NavRanger‘s IMU is an InvenSense nine-axis MPU-9150, which combines an accelerometer, a gyroscope, and a magnetometer on one chip. A 32-bit Freescale ColdFire MCF52255 microcontroller provides the processing the power and additional I/O. USB and CAN buses provide the board’s high-speed interfaces. The board also has connectors and power to mount a Digi International XBee wireless module and a TTL GPS.

The board comes with embedded software and a client application that runs on a Windows PC or Mac OS X. It also includes modifiable source code for the embedded and client applications. The NavRanger-OEM costs $495.

Integrated Knowledge Systems, Inc.
www.iknowsystems.com

Turn Your Android Device into an Application Tool

A few years ago, the Android Open Accessory initiative was announced with the aim of making it easier for hardware manufacturers to create accessories that work with every Android device. Future Technology Devices International (FTDI) joined the initiative and last year introduced the FTD311D multi-interface Android host IC. The goal was to enable engineers and designers to make effective use of tablets and smartphones with the Android OS, according to Circuit Cellar columnist Jeff Bachiochi.

The FTD311D “provides an instant bridge from an Android USB port(B) to peripheral hardware over general purpose input-out (GPIO), UART, PWM, I2C Master, SPI Slave, or SPI Master interfaces,” Bachiochi says.

In the magazine’s December issue Bachiochi takes a comprehensive look at the USB Android host IC and how it works. By the end of his article, readers will have learned quite a bit about how to use FTDI’s apps and the FT311D chip to turn an Android device into their own I/0 tool.

Bachiochi used the SPI Master demo to read key presses and set LED states on this SPI slave 16-key touch panel.

Bachiochi used the SPI Master demo to read key presses and set LED states on this SPI slave 16-key touch panel.

Here is how Bachiochi describes the FT311D and its advantages:

The FT311D is a full-speed USB host targeted at providing access to peripheral hardware from a USB port on an Android device. While an Android device can be a USB host, many are mobile devices with limited power. For now, these On-The-Go (OTG) ports will be USB devices only (i.e., they can only connect to a USB host as a USB device).

Since the USB host is responsible for supplying power to a USB peripheral device, it would be bad design practice to enable a USB peripheral to drain an Android mobile device’s energy. Consequently, the FT311D takes on the task of USB host, eliminating any draw on the Android device’s battery.

All Android devices from V3.1 (Honeycomb) support the Android Open Accessory Mode (AOAM). The AOAM is the complete reverse of the conventional USB interconnect. This game-changing approach to attaching peripherals enables three key advantages. First, there is no need to develop special drivers for the hardware; second, it is unnecessary to root devices to alter permissions for loading drivers; and third, the peripheral provides the power to use the port, which ensures the mobile device battery is not quickly drained by the external hardware being attached.

Since the FT311D handles the entire USB host protocol, USB-specific firmware programming isn’t required. As the host, the FT311D must inquire whether the connected device supports the AOAM. If so, it will operate as an Open Accessory Mode device with one USB BULK IN endpoint and one USB BULK OUT endpoint (as well as the control endpoint.) This interface will be a full-speed (12-Mbps) USB enabling data transfer in and out.

The AOAM USB host has a set of string descriptors the Android OS is capable of reading. These strings are (user) associated with an Android OS application. The Android then uses these strings to automatically start the application when the hardware is connected. The FT311D is configured for one of its multiple interfaces via configuration inputs at power-up. Each configuration will supply the Android device with a unique set of string descriptors, therefore enabling different applications to run, depending on its setup.

The FT311D’s configuration determines whether each application will have access to several user interface APIs that are specific to each configuration.

The article goes on to examine the various interfaces in detail and to describe a number of demo projects, including a multimeter.

Many of Bachiochi's projects use printable ASCII text commands and replies. This enables a serial terminal to become a handy user I/O device. This current probe circuit outputs its measurements in ASCII-printable text.

Many of Bachiochi’s projects use printable ASCII text commands and replies. This enables a serial terminal to become a handy user I/O device. This current probe circuit outputs its measurements in ASCII-printable text.

Multimeters are great tools. They have portability that enables them to be brought to wherever a measurement must be made. An Android device has this same ability. Since applications can be written for these devices, they make a great portable application tool. Until the AOAM’s release, there was no way for these devices to be connected to any external circuitry and used as an effective tool.

I think FTDI has bridged this gap nicely. It provided a great interface chip that can be added to any circuit that will enable an Android device to serve as an effective user I/O device. I’ve used the chip to quickly interface with some technology to discover its potential or just test its abilities. But I’m sure you are already thinking about the other potential uses for this connection.

Bachiochi is curious to hear from readers about their own ideas.

If you think the AOAM has future potential, but you want to know what’s involved with writing Android applications for a specific purpose, send me an e-mail and I’ll add this to my list of future projects!

You can e-mail Bachiochi at jeff.bachiochi@imaginethatnow.com or post your comment here.

 

6DoF Robotic Arm

GlobalSpecialties

The R680 Banshi Robotic Arm

The R680 Banshi Robotic Arm is an affordable robot designed for educators and hobbyists. It can help users learn the basics of electronics, mechanics, and programming. The Banshi is controlled by an ATmega64 microcontroller that is programmable via open-source tools in C.

The robot includes many example programs that can be easily downloaded to the robot using the supplied USB interface and the RobotLoader software. You can also use the free open-source WinAVR software to write your own custom programs.

The robot can be controlled with the included keyboard or RACS software. The software can record and play back the Banshi’s movements. You can use I/Os and the flexible I2C bus system to add extra modules that enable the robot to react to its environment.

GlobalSpecialties-kit

The Banshi Robot kit

The Banshi Robot comes unassembled as a kit with included assembly tools. The robot’s additional features include six degrees of freedom (6DoF), a 12-V power supply, an I2C bus, a USB interface, and a complete 72-page manual.

The Banshi Robotic Arm costs $199.

Global Specialties
http://globalspecialties.com

Small, Self-Contained GNSS Receiver

TM Series GNSS modules are self-contained, high-performance global navigation satellite system (GNSS) receivers designed for navigation, asset tracking, and positioning applications. Based on the MediaTek chipset, the receivers can simultaneously acquire and track several satellite constellations, including the US GPS, Europe’s GALILEO, Russia’s GLONASS, and Japan’s QZSS.

LinxThe 10-mm × 10-mm receivers are capable of better than 2.5-m position accuracy. Hybrid ephemeris prediction can be used to achieve less than 15-s cold start times. The receiver can operate down to 3 V and has a 20-mA low tracking current. To save power, the TM Series GNSS modules have built-in receiver duty cycling that can be configured to periodically turn off. This feature, combined with the module’s low power consumption, helps maximize battery life in battery-powered systems.

The receiver modules are easy to integrate, since they don’t require software setup or configuration to power up and output position data. The TM Series GNSS receivers use a standard UART serial interface to send and receive NMEA messages in ASCII format. A serial command set can be used to configure optional features. Using a USB or RS-232 converter chip, the modules’ UART can be directly connected to a microcontroller or a PC’s UART.

The GPS Master Development System connects a TM Series Evaluation Module to a prototyping board with a color display that shows coordinates, a speedometer, and a compass for mobile evaluation. A USB interface enables simple viewing of satellite data and Internet mapping and custom software application development.
Contact Linx Technologies for pricing.

Linx Technologies
www.linxtechnologies.com