Tiny MCU-Based Development Platform Hosts Dual USB Ports

Segger Microcontroller has introduced emPower-USB-Host, a compact low-cost development board. With two USB host ports, many applications using USB peripherals can be realized with little effort. Precompiled applications for barcode and smartcard readers, as well as POS displays, LTE sticks and USB to LAN adapters are available for download, including complete projects for Embedded Studio with source code of these applications. The applications are using Segger’s emUSB-Host software API, which makes accessing the different types of USB devices easy.
emPower-USB-Host uses the emLoad bootloader, pre-loaded into the flash of the MCU, to easily change applications in seconds using a USB flash drive. Development of custom applications is also supported. The board has a debug connector, providing full access to the NXP LPC54605J512 MCU with its Cortex-M4 core. Schematics and PCB layout of the board are available under a Creative Commons license. This way, the hardware can be used as a blueprint for custom devices using two USB host ports.

Segger Microcontroller | www.segger.com

Rugged PC/104 SBC Sports Dual Core Bay Trail SoC

Versalogic has announced “SandCat”, a low-cost rugged new PC/104-Plus SBC. Based on Intel’s dual-core Bay Trail SoC, SandCat is an entry level PC/104-Plus SBC that provides a cost optimized performance level and I/O capability. The SandCat is designed and tested for industrial temperature (-40° to +85°C) operation and meets MIL-STD-202G specifications to withstand high impact and vibration. Latching connectors and fanless operation provide additional benefits in harsh environments.

SandCat’s I/O connectivity includes a Gigabit Ethernet port with network boot capability, four USB 2.0 ports, two serial ports (RS-232/422/485), I2C, and eight digital I/O lines. A SATA 3 Gbit/s interface supports high-capacity rotating or solid-state drives. A Mini PCIe socket with mSATA capability provides flexible solid-state drive (SSD) options.

The board’s SandCat’s Mini PCIe socket allows easy on-board expansion with plug-in Wi-Fi modems, GPS receivers, and other mini cards such as MIL-STD-1553, Ethernet and analog. For stacking expansion using industry-standard add-on boards, the SandCat supports PC/104-Plus expansion, including ISA and PCI based modules. The on-board expansion site provides plug-in access to a wide variety of expansion modules from numerous vendors, all with bolt-down ruggedness.

Like other Versalogic products, the SandCat is designed for long-term availability (10+ year typical production lifecycle). Customization services to help customers create unique solutions are available for the SandCat, even in low OEM quantities. Customization options include conformal coating, revision locks, custom labeling, customized testing and screening.

The SandCat single board computer, part number VL-EPM-39EBK, is in stock at both Versa;ogic and Digi-Key. OEM quantity pricing starts at $370.

Versalogic | www.versalogic.com

IoT Door Security System Uses Wi-Fi

Control Via App or Web

Discover how these Cornell students built an Internet-connected door security system with wireless monitoring and control through web and mobile applications. The article discusses the interfacing of a Microchip PIC32 MCU with the Internet, and the application of IoT to a door security system.

By Norman Chen, Ram Vellanki and Giacomo Di Liberto

The idea for an Internet of Things (IoT) door security system came from our desire to grant people remote access to and control over their security system. Connecting the system with the Internet not only improves safety by enabling users to monitor a given entryway remotely, but also allows the system to transmit information about the traffic of the door to the Internet. With these motivations, we designed our system using a Microchip Technology PIC32 microcontroller (MCU) and an Espressif ESP8266 Wi-Fi module to interface a door sensor with the Internet, which gives the user full control over the system via mobile and web applications.

The entire system works in the following way. To start, the PIC32 tells the Wi-Fi module to establish a connection to a TCP socket, which provides fast and reliable communication with the security system’s web server. Once a connection has been established, the PIC32 enters a loop to analyze the distance sensor reading to detect motion in the door. Upon any detection of motion, the PIC32 commands the Wi-Fi module to signal the event to the web server. Each motion detection is saved in memory, and simultaneously the data are sent to the website, which graphs the number of motion detections per unit time. If the security system was armed at the time of motion detection, then the PIC32 will sound the alarm via a piezoelectric speaker from CUI. The alarm system is disarmed at default, so each motion detection is logged in the web application but no sound is played. From both the web and mobile application, the user can arm, disarm and sound the alarm immediately in the case of an emergency.

DESIGN

The PIC32 acts as the hub of the whole system. As shown in Figure 1, each piece of hardware is connected to the MCU, as it detects motion by analyzing distance sensor readings, generates sound for the piezoelectric speaker and commands the Wi-Fi module for actions that pertain to the web server. The distance sensor used in our system is rated to accurately measure distances of only 10 to 80 cm [1]. That’s because motion detection requires us only to measure large changes in distances instead of exact distances, the sensor was sufficient for our needs.

Figure 1
The schematic of the security system. Note that the door sensor runs on 5  V, whereas the rest of the components run on 3.3 V

In our design, the sensor is facing down from the top of the doorway, so the nearest object to the sensor is the floor at idle times, when there is no movement through the door. For an average height of a door, about 200 cm, the sensor outputs a miniscule amount of voltage of less than 0.5 V. If a human of average height, about 160 cm, passes through the doorway, then according to the datasheet [1], the distance sensor will output a sudden spike of about 1.5 V. The code on the PIC32 constantly analyzes the distance sensor readings for such spikes, and interprets an increase and subsequent decrease in voltage as motion through the door. The alarm sound is generated by having the PIC32 repeatedly output a 1,500 Hz wave to the piezoelectric speaker through a DAC. We used the DMA feature on the PIC32 for playing the alarm sound, to allow the MCU to signal the alarm without using an interrupt-service-routine. The alarm sound output therefore, did not interfere with motion detection and receiving commands from the web server.

The Wi-Fi module we used to connect the PIC32 to the Internet is the ESP8266, which has several variations on the market. We chose model number ESP8266-01 for its low cost and small form factor. This model was not breadboard-compatible, but we designed a mount for the device so that it could be plugged into the breadboard without the need for header wires. Figure 2 shows how the device is attached to the breadboard, along with how the rest of the system is connected.

Figure 2
The full system is wired up on a breadboard. The door sensor is at the bottom of the photo, and is attached facing down from the top of a doorway when in use. The device at the top of the figure is the PIC32 MCU mounted on a development board.

The module can boot into two different modes, programming or normal, by configuring the GPIO pins during startup. To boot into programming mode, GPIO0 must be pulled to low, while GPIO2 must be pulled high. To boot into normal mode, both GPIO0 and GPIO2 must be pulled high. Programming mode is used for flashing new firmware onto the device, whereas normal mode enables AT commands over UART on the ESP8266. Because we only needed to enable the AT commands on the module, we kept GPIO0 and GPIO2 floating, which safely and consistently booted the module into normal mode.

SENDING COMMANDS

Before interfacing the PIC32 with the Wi-Fi module, we used a USB-to-TTL serial cable to connect the module to a computer, and tested the functionality of its AT commands by sending it commands from a serial terminal. …

Read the full article in the December 341 issue of Circuit Cellar

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Industrial Mini-ITX Board Pumps up with Coffee Lake

By Eric Brown

Commell’s “LV-67X” Mini-ITX board runs on 8th Gen “Coffee Lake” processors, with up to 32GB DDR4, 3x SATA, triple 4K displays, USB 3.1, and PCIe x16 and mini-PCIe expansion. The LV-67X, which shares some of the layout and feature set of its Intel Apollo Lake based LV-67U board, is the first industrial Mini-ITX board we’ve seen with Intel’s 8th Gen Coffee Lake CPUs. (Going forward, we’ll likely use the caffeinated nickname rather than “8th Gen” because Intel also applies the 8th Gen tag to the transitional and similarly 14nm Kaby Lake-G chips as well as the new, 10nm Cannon Lake processors.)


LV-67X
(click image to enlarge)
The LV-67X is called an industrial board, and it provides a relatively wide 0 to 60°C range and a smattering of industrial I/O. However, it has a full-height profile and bridges the gap to consumer applications. The board supports video gaming, virtual reality, medical devices, imaging, machine vision, and digital signage. The product page lists only Windows drivers, but the manual notes that the board also supports Linux.

The 170 x 170mm SBC supports Coffee Lake Core, Celeron, and Pentium CPUs that work with the FCLGA1151 socket (the full name for LGA1151). The board ships with Intel Q370 chipset, one of Intel’s 300-series I/O chips announced with Coffee Lake that supports USB 3.1 Gen2 and extensive PCIe lanes.

No specific models were mentioned, but the SBC is said to support Coffee Lake chips with up to six cores running at up to 4.7GHz Turbo, with Intel 9th-gen graphics and up to 12MB cache. That would be the profile for the top-of-the-line Core i7-8700K, a hexa-core chip with 12 threads and a 95W TDP.

The LV-67X can load up to 32GB of speedy, 2666MHz DDR4 RAM via dual sockets. It provides 2x GbE ports, 3x SATA III interfaces, a full-size mini-PCIe slot with mSATA support, and another half-size mini-PCIe slot accompanied by a SIM card slot. There’s also a PCIe x16 interface.


 
LV-67X block diagram (left) and detail view
(click images to enlarge)

The description of the USB feature set varies depending on the citation, but Commell has clarified matters for us in an email. There are 6x USB 3.1 interfaces, 4x of which are coastline ports. There are also 4x USB 2.0 internal interfaces.

One key difference between earlier Core-based boards is that the LV-67X taps Coffee Lake’s ability to power three independent 4K displays. The board accomplishes this hat trick with coastline HDMI and DVI-I ports and an optional DisplayPort, as well as onboard VGA and 18/24-bit, dual-channel LVDS interfaces. If you don’t want the DisplayPort, you can instead get additional VGA and LVDS connections.

The LV-67X is further equipped with 4x RS232/422/485 or RS-232 interfaces, depending on conflicting citations, with an option to add two RS232/422/485 DB9 ports. Other features include 3x audio jacks (Realtek ALC262), 8-bit DIO, and LPC, SMBus, and PS/2 interfaces. You also get a watchdog, RTC with battery, and 24-pin ATX and 4-pin, 12V inputs.

Further information

No pricing or availability information was provided for the LV-67X. More information may be found on Commell’s announcement and product pages.

This article originally appeared on LinuxGizmos.com on August 17..

Commell | www.commell.com.tw

Raspberry Pi’s PoE HAT Ships for $20, Tosses in a Free Fan

By Eric Brown

Raspberry Pi Trading has launched a $20 Power-over-Ethernet HAT board for the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ that delivers up to 15W and ships with a small fan. The Power-over-Ethernet HAT that was promised with the release of the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ SBC has arrived. The $20, 802.3af-compliant “Raspberry Pi PoE HAT” allows delivery of up to 15W over the RPi 3 B+’s USB-based GbE port without reducing the port’s up to 300Mbps bandwidth.


 
Raspberry Pi PoE HAT alone (left) and fitted on Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+
(click images to enlarge)

We’ve seen an increase in the use of PoE in embedded equipment over the last year, perhaps due to the growth in IoT applications in which embedded gear must be placed in remote locations. It’s cheaper and easier to run Ethernet cable to a remote device than to extend electrical lines.

With the help of the RPi 3 B+’s improved PXE boot function, which enables network booting, “you can now dispense with not only the power supply but also the SD Card, making deployment even cheaper for a Raspberry Pi based system in your factory or workplace,” writes Roger Thornton in the Raspberry Pi blog announcement.

The Raspberry Pi PoE HAT features a fully isolated switched-mode power supply with 37-57V DC, Class 2 input and 5V/2.5A DC output. The HAT connects to both the 40-pin header and a new PoE-specific 4-pin header introduced with the B+ located near the USB ports. To enable PoE, you need power sourcing equipment, which is either “provided by your network switch or with power injectors on an Ethernet cable,” writes Thornton.


 
Raspberry Pi PoE HAT with RPi 3 B+ (left) and close-up of 4-pin header on B+ between the USB ports and the 40-pin GPIO header
(click images to enlarge)

The PoE HAT ships with a 25 x 25mm brushless fan for cooling the Broadcom SoC. This does not appear to be due to any additional heat generated by PoE. Instead: “We see the product as a useful component for people building systems that may be in tougher environments,” writes Thornton.

The fan is connected via I2C and controlled with an Atmel MCU chip. This setup turns on the fan automatically when the SBC hits a certain temperature threshold, a trick that requires the latest sudo rpi-update firmware.

You can add another HAT board on top of the fan with the help of some pass-through headers for the 40-pin GPIO and the 4-way header to expose the pins on the other side of the PoE HAT. Raspberry Pi Trading recommends the 2×20 pin header from Pimoroni and 4-way risers from RS and element14.

The Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ won LinuxGizmos’ reader survey of 116 Linux/Android hacker boards. The community-backed SBC builds upon the RPi 3 Model B design with a faster, up to 1.4GHz quad-core Broadcom SoC, as well as faster Ethernet (GbE). You also get various power management improvements and faster dual-band 802.11ac and Bluetooth 4.2, which comes in a pre-certified, shielded module.

Further information

The Raspberry Pi PoE HAT is available now for $20 at a variety of resellers. The blog announcement may be found here. The product page with links to resellers is here.

This article originally appeared on LinuxGizmos.com on August 25.

Raspberry Pi Foundation | www.raspberrypi.org

SMARC 2.0 Module Serves up NXP i.MX8 Processor

Congatec has announced the conga-SMX8, the company’s first SMARC 2.0 Computer-on-Module based on the 64-bit NXP i.MX8 multi-core Arm processor family. The Arm Cortex-A53/A72 based conga-SMX8 provides high-performance multi-core computing along with extended graphics capabilities for up to three independent 1080p displays or a single 4K screen. Further benefits of this native industrial-grade platform include hardware-based real-time and hypervisor support along with broad scalability as well as resistance against harsh environments and extended temperature ranges. The SMARC 2.0 module is designed to meet the recent performance and feature set needs for low power embedded, industrial and IoT as well as new mobility sector.The new SMARC 2.0 modules with NXP i.MX8 processors, hardware based virtualization and resource partitioning are well suited for a wide range of stationary and mobile industrial applications including real-time robotics and motion controls. Since the modules are qualified for the extended ambient temperature range from -40°C to +85°C, they can also be used in fleet systems for commercial vehicles or infotainment applications in cabs, buses and trains as well as new electric and autonomous vehicles.

The new conga-SMX8 modules feature up to 8 cores (2x A72 + 4x A53 + 2x M4F), up to 8 GByte of LPDDR4 MLC or pseudo SLC memory and up to 64 GByte of non-volatile memory on the module. The extraordinary interface set includes 2x GbE including optional IEEE1588 compliant precision clock synchronization, up to 6x USB including 1x USB 3.1, up to 2x PCIe Gen 3.0, 1x SATA 3.0, 2x CAN bus, 4x UART as well as an optional onboard Wi Fi/Bluetooth module with Wi-Fi 802.11 b/g/n and BLE.

Up to 3 displays can be connected via HDMI 2.0 with HDCP 2.2, 2x LVDS and 1x eDP 1.4. For video cameras, the modules support 2 MIPI CSI-2 video inputs. The new NXP i.MX8 based SMARC 2.0 modules come as application-ready super components including U-Boot and complete Board Support Packages for Linux, Yocto and Android.

Congatec | www.congatec.com

Compact Apollo-Lake Box PC Targets Mobile Comms

MEN Micro has announced its BC51M box PC based on the Intel Atom E3900 series, optionally with two or four cores, up to 1.6 GHz. The fanless and maintenance-free device is used in graphics and memory intensive applications in trains, buses or commercial vehicles and, thanks to its numerous communication interfaces, is highly variable.

With 8 GB DDR3 SDRAM memory, a rear accessible SD card, an integrated eMMC memory and an optional SATA HDD/SSD, the box PC has the necessary storage capacity for entertainment servers or video surveillance systems.  The BC51M was designed for mobile use in trains, buses or commercial vehicles and takes over wireless on-board functions such as Internet on board, positioning via GNSS, entertainment or predictive maintenance.

The box PC supports up to two DisplayPort interfaces with a maximum resolution of 4K, as well as two Gigabit Ethernet interfaces, one USB 2.0, one HD audio and two variable connections for serial I/O, CAN bus, MVB or IBIS. Two PCI Express Mini Card slots and two micro-SIM slots provide flexibility in implementing mobile service standards up to 4G LTE or WLAN. The system is designed for fanless operation at temperatures from -40°C to +85°C. Thanks to the integrated 30 W/24 VDC wide-range power supply, the box PC complies with the railway standard EN 50155 and ISO 7637-2 for road vehicles.

  • Intel Atom E3900 Series
  • Up to 8 GB DDR3 DRAM, ECC
  • 32 GB eMMC
  • 2 DisplayPorts, each up to 4096 x 2160 pixels
  • 2 Gigabit Ethernet, 1 USB 2.0
  • 2 slots for IBIS, GPS, RS232, RS485, RS422
  • WLAN, 4G LTE, GNSS via PCI Express Mini Cards
  • -40°C to +85°C operating temperature, fanless
  • Complies with EN 50155 and ISO 7637-2

MEN Micro | www.menmicro.com

Pico-ITX and 3.5-inch SBCs Feature Dual-Core i.MX6 SoCs

IBASE Technology has announced two SBCs, both powered by an NXP i.MX 6Dual Cortex-A9 1.0GHz high performance processor. The IBR115 2.5-inch SBC and the IBR117 3.5-inch SBC are designed for use in applications in the automation, smart building, transportation and medical markets.
IBR115 and IBR117 are highly scalable SBCs with extended operating temperature support of -40°C to 85°C and an optional heatsink. Supporting 1 GB DDR3 memory on board, the boards provide a number of interfaces for HDMI and single LVDS display interface, 4 GB eMMC, Micro SD, COM, GPIO, USB, USB-OTG, Gbit Ethernet and a M.2 Key-E interface. These embedded I/Os provide connection to peripherals such as WiFi, Bluetooth, GPS, storage, displays, and camera sensors for use in a variety of application environment while consuming low levels of power.

Both models ship with BSPs for Yocto Project 2.0 Linux and Android 6.0. They both run on dual-core, 1 GHz i.MX6 SoCs, but the IBR115 uses the DualLite while the IBR117 has a Dual with a slightly more advanced Vivante GPU.

IBR115/IBR117 Features:

  • With NXP Cortex-A9, i.MX 6Dual-Lite (IBR115) / i.MX 6Dual (IBR117) 1GHz processor
  • Supports HDMI and Dual-channel LVDS interface
  • Supports 1 GB DDR3, 4 GB eMMC and Micro SD (IBR115) / SD (IBR117) socket for expansion
  • Embedded I/O as COM, GPIO, USB, USB-OTG, audio and Ethernet
  • 2 Key-E (2230) and Mini PCI-E w/ SIM socket (IBR117) for wireless connectivity
  • OpenGL ES 2.0 for 3D BitBlt for 2D and OpenVG 1.1
  • Wide-range operating temperature from -40°C to 85°C

IBASE Technology | www.ibase.com.tw

Cavium Octeon-Based SBCs Provide Networking Solution

Gateworks has announced the release of the Newport GW6400 SBC, featuring the Cavium Octeon TX Dual/Quad Core ARM processor running up to 1.5 GHz. The GW6400 is the latest Newport family member with an extensive list of features, including five Gigabit Ethernet ports and two SFP fiber ports. The GW6400 comes in two standard stocking models, the Dual Core GW6400 and the fully loaded Quad Core GW6404 (shown)..

The GW6400 and GW6404 are members of the Gateworks 6th generation Newport family of single board computers targeted for a wide range of indoor and outdoor networking applications. The SBCs feature the Cavium OcteonTX ARMv8 SoC processor, up to five Gigabit Ethernet ports, and four Mini-PCIe expansion sockets for supporting 802.11abgn/ac wireless radios, LTE/4G/3G CDMA/GSM cellular modems, mSATA drives and other PCI Express peripherals. A wide-range DC input power supply provides up to 15 W to the Mini-PCIe sockets for supporting the latest high-power radios and up to 10 W to the USB 2.0/3.0 jacks for powering external devices. Power is applied through a barrel jack or an Ethernet jack with either 802.3at or Passive Power over Ethernet. The GW6400 does not have SFP Ports loaded.

Gateworks | www.gateworks.com

Fault Protection Solution Defends High-Speed USB Ports

With the MAX22505 ±40 V high-speed USB fault protector from Maxim Integrated Products, system designers can now eliminate USB port damage from all faults, including ground potential differences, up to ±40 V without the tradeoffs required by competing solutions. It protects data and power lines from industrial equipment powered at 24 VAC and 40 VDC, while also reducing solution size by more than 50% for industrial voltage applications.
Industrial environments continue striving to reduce solution footprint to increase productivity and throughput while demanding system robustness and increased uptime. As a result, there has been a trend to adopt USB vs. RS-232 on automation equipment due to a much smaller connector size. As industrial environments adopt USB to provide faster communication for applications such as real-time diagnostics, programming/service ports on programmable logic controllers (PLCs), or supporting camera vision systems, USB ports require fault protection from overvoltage and ground differences while balancing the need to support high-speed data rates up to 480 Mbps.

Damage to both the host and device side can occur in these systems, requiring a unique solution that achieves high levels of fault protection. Existing USB fault protection solutions on the market today compromise either USB operating speed or voltage/current limit protection on a device’s data and power lines. Consequently, current solutions on the market are costlier and incapable of providing fault protection at high-speed USB performance.

The MAX22505 answers this market need as a solution that combines high-speed USB fault protection (480Mbps) for industrial voltages, while being flexible enough to support either host or device applications including USB On-The-Go (OTG). It protects equipment from overvoltage or negative voltage on power and data lines, as well as ground potential differences between devices. It reduces solution size by more than 50% compared to competing solutions and ensures robust communications in harsh environments cost-effectively in a simpler design. Housed in a 24-pin 4mm x 4mm TQFN package, it operates over the -40°C to +105°C temperature range. Applications include building automation, industrial PCs, PLCs and diagnostic USB ports.

The MAX22505 is available at Maxim’s website for $2.24 (1000-up, FOB USA); also available with select authorized distributors The MAX22505EVKIT# evaluation kits are available for $110

Maxim Integrated | www.maximintegrated.com

Module Combines Isolated Data Comms and Power in One Device

Murata Power Solutions has announced the introduction of the NMUSB2022PMC, a surface mount powered data isolator module that conveniently provides dual port USB data and power isolation from a single upstream port. When used in conjunction with a USB host, a single NMUSB202PMC module counts as two USB hubs for cascaded applications and provides full 5V/500mA power to each downstream port. 250 VRMS reinforced isolation provides safety, immunity to EMI and breaking of ground loops.

The is NMUSB2022PMC is fully compliant with USB 2.0 specification, which enables hassle-free, “plug and play” operation with any USB-compatible device. It can do automatic switching between full-speed (12 Mbps) and low speed (1.5 Mbps) operation. Operating temperature ranges from -40°C to +85°C.

The device enables USB isolation function with a single SMT component. Users may power any USB compatible device from the NMUSB module. The data isolation function included with the DC-DC module adds value and convenience to the user and also eases system approval for medical systems safety certifications. Applications include industrial control for isolating sensors and medical environments, where USB is becoming common for low cost sensing and communication but isolation is necessary for safety and noise immunity. It is also well suited for harsh environment data communication and sensor communications.

Murata Power Solutions | www.murata-ps.com

Intel Coffee Lake H-Series Debut Processors Debut in Congatec and Seco Modules

By Eric Brown

Intel has rolled out new H-, M-, U- and T-series Intel Core and Xeon chips, expanding its line of 14 nm fabricated, 8th Gen Core Kaby Lake Refresh processors, code-named “Coffee Lake.” Of special interest are four new dual- and quad-core U-series chips with up to 2.7 GHz clock rates and 28 W TDPs, as well as four quad- and hexa-core H-series Core i5 and i7 processors and a pair of hexa-core M-series Xeon chips, all with 45 W TDP (total dissipated power).

Congatec Conga-TS370 (top) and Seco COMe-C08-BT6 (bottom) (click images to enlarge)

The hexa-core Core i7-8850H, quad-core Core i5-8400H, and hexa-core Xeon E-2176M are appearing in a pair of 125 mm x 95 mm COM Express Basic Type 6 announced by Congatec and Seco. Both the Conga-TS370 and Seco’s COMe-C08-BT6 are available with Linux or Windows 10, and support 0 to 60°C temperatures (see farther below).

Intel’s 8th Gen M- and H-series processors (click image to enlarge)

Intel launched its first round of 8th-Gen Kaby Lake Refresh “Coffee Lake” chips back in September. This fourth generation of its 14 nm fabricated Core chips — following Broadwell, Skylake, and Kaby Lake — offers relatively modest performance and power efficiency improvements.Like most of AMD’s new Ryzen Embedded V1000 SoCs, most of the Coffee Lake processors are double threaded, so four cores give you eight threads and six cores give you 12. The exception is a line of standard, desktop-oriented T-series chips with 35 W TDPs. The T-series models are all single-threaded except the top-of-the-line, hexa-core Core i7-8700T, clocked to 2.4 GHz /4.0 GHz.

Intel’s latest batch of U-series (top) and new T-series CPUs (bottom)
(click images to enlarge)

The latest batch of U-series processors give you more speed, but higher 28 W TDPs than the original batch. The initial U-series chips, which were used in recent Linux-based laptops from System76 and ZaReason, provide slightly faster quad- instead of dual-core designs with the same price and 15 W TDP as 7th-Gen “Kaby Lake” models. The first round of Coffee Lake chips also included some high-end models tuned to gaming, as well as the first hexa-core Core i5 and first quad-core Core i3 models.

Also today, Intel unveiled a new line of 300-series I/O chipsets that are based on the upcoming Cannon Lake PCH. The lineup includes a Q370 model that supports up to 6x USB 3.1 Gen2 ports, up to 24x PCIe 3.0 lanes, and Intel Wireless-AC for faster 802.11ac.

Intel’s original line of 8th Gen CPUs (top) and new 300-series I/O chipsets (bottom) (click images to enlarge)Intel added to the Coffee Lake parade with some gaming focused G-series chips that use a Radeon Vega GPU from rival AMD. The Core i7-8809G, which can be overclocked, as well as the fixed rate Core i7-8705G, are available in Intel NUC mini-PCs.Today’s media coverage emphasized Intel’s first mobile version of its gaming-oriented Core i9 design. The hexa-core Core i9-8950HK CPU uses thermal velocity boost” technology to jump from 2.9 GHz to 4.8 GHz.

The related H- and M-series processors used by Seco and Congatec include the Core i7-8850H, the fastest of the two hexa-core Core i7 models with 2. 6GHz /4.3 GHz performance. The i7-8850H offers a 9MB Intel Smart Cache and supports “partial” overclocking. The Core i5-8400H is the fastest of the two quad-core i5 models, with 2.5 GHz /4.2 GHz performance and an 8MB cache. The hexa-core, 2.7 GH z/4.4 GHz Xeon E-2176M with 12 MB cache is the slower of the two Xeon M-series chips. (The turbo speeds can only be achieved by one core at a time.)

All the models used by Congatec and Seco offer 45W TDPs and support Intel Optane memory and Intel VPro technology. As with other Coffee Lake processors, there are software patches to protect against Meltdown and Spectre vulnerabilities. However, a hardware fix will await the 10nm Cannon Lake generation.

The three models used by the Conga-TS370 and COMe-C08-BT6 modules are the:

  • Intel Core i7-8850H (6x 12-thread 14nm Coffee Lake cores at 2.6 GHz /4.3 GHz); 9 MB Cache, 45W TDP (35W cTDP)
  • Intel Core i5-8400H 4x 8-thread 14 nm Coffee Lake cores at 2.5 GHz /4.2 GHz); 8 MB Cache, 45W TDP (35W cTDP)
  • Intel Xeon E-2176M, 8850H (6x 12-thread 14 nm Coffee Lake cores at 2.7 GHz /4.4 GHz); 9 MB Cache, 45 W TDP (35W cTDP)

Intel claims that the six-core H-series and M-series modules offer between 45 to 50 percent more multi-thread and 15 to 25 percent more single-thread performance compared to 7th Gen “Kaby Lake” Core processors. The built-in Intel Gen9 LP graphics can manage up to 3x independent displays at once, with a resolution up to 4096 x 2304 at 60 Hz, 24 bpp. There’s support for DirectX 12 and OpenGL 4.5, as well as an H.265 / HEVC hardware transcoder.

Conga-TS370

Like Congatec’s 6th Gen Skylake based Conga-TS170 and 7th Gen Kaby Lake powered Conga-TS175, the Conga-TS370 uses the COM Express Type 6 Basic form factor. All common Linux operating systems, as well as the 64-bit versions of Microsoft Windows 10 and Windows 10 IoT are supported.

 

Conga-TS370 block diagram
(click image to enlarge)

The module offers up to 10-year availability, and targets applications including “high performance embedded and mobile systems, industrial and medical workstations, storage servers and cloud workstations, as well as media transcoding and edge computing cores,” says Congatec.Thanks to the Coffee Lake-H chips, the module supports Intel Optane memory, as well as Intel Software Guard extensions, Trusted Execution Engine, and Intel Platform Trust Technology. The Core processors use the new Intel PCH-H QM370 Series I/O chipset while the Xeon is paired with a CM246 Series controller.

You can load up to 32GB of  DDR4-2666 memory via dual sockets with optional ECC. There are 4x SATA III interfaces, as well as an Intel i219-LM GbE controller with AMT 12.0 support. Expansion features include a PEG x16 Gen3 interface and 8x PCIe Gen 3.0 lanes.

The integrated Intel UHD630 graphics supports up to three independent 4K displays via HDMI 1.4a, eDP 1.4, and DisplayPort 1.2. Dual-channel LVDS is also available as an alternative to eDP, and for the first time, you can switch between eDP to LVDS by software alone, says Congatec.

The highlighted feature enabled by Coffee Lake-H is its support for up to 4x USB 3.1 Gen 2 ports, which operate at up to 10 Gbps. The module also includes 8x USB 2.0 interfaces.

The Conga-TS370 is further equipped with LPC, I2C, SMBus, GPIO, SDIO, and dual UARTs. There’s also an HD Audio interface, TPM 2.0, and ACPI 4.0 with battery support. The Congatec Board Controller provides features including watchdog, non-volatile user storage, and backlight control.

Support services are available, along with a range of accessories and standardized or customized carrier boards and systems. A Conga-Teva2 carrier is in the works but is not yet documented.

COMe-C08-BT6

Seco’s COMe-C08-BT6 module, which follows it similarly Type 6, 6th Gen Skylake based COMe-B09-BT6, is designed for applications including gaming, signage, infotainment, HMI, biomedical devices, Industry 4.0, automation, and telco. There’s support for 64-bit Linux and Windows 10.

 

COMe-C08-BT6
(click image to enlarge)

Not surprisingly, the feature set is very similar to that of the Conga-TS370. You get up to 3 2GB of DDR4-2666 with ECC, 4x SATA 3.0 channels, and an Intel i219-LM GbE controller.The COMe-C08-BT6 has the same triple display and 4K support as the Congatec model. In this case you get DP, HDMI, and DVI DDI interfaces, as well as a choice of eDP, LVDS, or LVDS + VGA interfaces. HD Audio is also available.

Like the Conga-TS370, there are 4x USB 3.1 Gen 2 interfaces, 8x USB 2.0 links, a PEG x16 Gen3 interface, and 8x PCIe Gen 3.0 lanes. Other features include 2x UARTs, as well as SPI, I2C, SMBus, LPC, and GPIO. You also get a watchdog, optional TPM 2.0, thermal and fan management signals, and 12 V or optional 5 V DC input.

CCOMe-965 carrier (top) and block diagram (bottom)
(click images to enlarge)The COMe-C08-BT6 is available with Seco’s CCOMe-965 Mini-ITX carrier board, which also supports other Seco Type 6 modules such as the COMe-B09-BT6 and Ryzen V1000 based COMe-B75-CT6. There’s also a Cross Platform Development Kit that includes the CCOMe-965, along with HDMI and DisplayPort cables, and is said to support ARM-based Type 6 COMs in addition to x86.

CCOMe-C30 carrier (top) and block diagram (bottom)
(click images to enlarge)One final development option is an upcoming, 3.5-inch form factor CCOMe-C30 board that features a DP++ port, 2x mini-DP++ ports, and LVDS and eDP connections. The 146 mm x 102 mm board has dual M.2 sockets, dual GbE ports, and SATA and microSD slots. You also get 2x USB 3.0 and 2x USB 2.0 ports, plus 4x serial headers, among other features.Further information

No pricing or availability information was provided for the Congatec Conga-TS370 or Seco COMe-C08-BT6 Type 6 modules. More on Congatec’s Conga-TS370 module may be found in the Conga-TS370 announcement and product pages.

More on Seco’s COMe-C08-BT6 may be found on the COMe-C08-BT6 product page.

Intel’s latest Intel Coffee Lake processors should start shipping in volume by the end of the month. More information may be found on Intel’s 8th Gen Intel Core announcement page.

This article originally appeared on LinuxGizmos.com on April 3.

Congatec | www.congtatec.com

Seco | www.seco.com

Commell Launches its First ARM-Based Pico-ITX

By Eric Brown

Commell has announced the LP-150, a Rockchip RK3128 based Pico-ITX SBC that appears to be its first ARM-based embedded board of any kind. The 100 mm x 72 mm LP-150 is the only ARM-based SBC out of the many dozens of mostly Intel-based boards listed on Commell’s SBC page.

Shipping with Android 4.4.4, but also supporting Linux, the LP-150 is intended primarily for imaging, machine vision and digital signage applications. Other Commell Pico-ITX SBCs include its Intel Braswell based LP-176.

Commell LP-150

Rockchip’s quad-core, Cortex-A7 RK3128 hasn’t seen as much uptake in the embedded world as the quad -A17 RK3288, which is found on hacker boards such as the Firefly-RK3288 Reload or the high-end, hexa-core RK3399, which has appeared on numerous recent products such as OpenEmbed’s em3399 module or Aaeon’s RICO-3399 PICO-ITX SBC. The only RK3128-based SBC we can recall is the open spec Firefly-FirePrime S.

The LP-150 SBC has a fairly modest feature set, with only 512 MB DDR3. Yet, it offers a few features you don’t typically find on x86 Pico-ITX SBCs like eMMC storage (8GB) and built-in Wi-Fi. Media features include an HDMI 1.4 port limited to HD resolution and an LVDS interface with capacitive touchscreen support. You also get CVBS inputs and outputs and audio I/O headers.

The LP-150 is further equipped with a GbE port and USB 2.0 host and OTG ports. There is also an RTC with battery, and a smattering of RS-232, UART, and GPIO interfaces.

Specifications listed for the Commell LP-150 include:

  • Processor — Rockchip RK3128 (4x Cortex-A7 @ 1.3 GHz); Mali-400 MP2 GPU with OpenGL ES1.1 and 2.0, OpenVG1.1
  • Memory — 512 MB DDR3
  • Storage — 8 GB eMMC; microSD slot
  • Display:
    • HDMI 1.4 port for up to 1080p
    • Single-channel 18/24-bit LVDS for up to 1280 x 720 displays or up to 1024 x 600 cap. touchscreens
    • LCD/LVDS panel and inverter connectors
    • CVBS in/out
  • Wireless — Wi-Fi with SMA antenna
  • Networking — Gigabit Ethernet port (RTL8211E)
  • Other I/O:
    • USB 2.0 host port with support for 4-port hub
    • USB 2.0 OTG port
    • 2x RS232 interfaces
    • 3x UART
    • Audio line-out, mic-in headers (Rockchip codec)
    • GPIO header
  • Other features — Power, recovery, reset buttons; RTC with lithium battery; LED
  • Operating temperature — 0 to 70°C
  • Power — DC input 5 V
  • Dimensions — 100 mm x 72 mm (Pico-ITX)
  • Operating system — Android 4.4.4; Linux also supported

Further information

No pricing or availability information was provided for the LP-150. More information may be found on Commell’s LP-150 product page.

Commell |  www.commell.com.tw

This article originally appeared on LinuxGizmos.com on March 6.

Rugged COM Express Module Sports AMD V1000

MEN Micro has announced the CB71C, a rugged COM Express module for rail, public transportation and industry applications like data acquisition, infotainment, transcoding and live 3D. It is 100% compatible with COM Express Type 6 pin-out and conforms to the VITA 59 standard, which specifies robust mechanics to ensure reliable operation even under the harshest environmental conditions.

The CB71C is based on AMD’s V1000 APU family. It is equipped with a Radeon Vega next-generation 3D graphics engine with up to 11 compute units, and supports up to 4 displays with a resolution of up to 4k without the need for additional graphics hardware. With up to four high-performance processor cores, the CB71C is also suitable for virtualization. Based on the Rugged COM Express standard, the CB71C is embedded in a closed aluminum frame, which ensures optimum EMC protection and efficient conduction cooling supporting a temperature range of -40°C to +85°C. To withstand serious shock and vibration, only soldered components are used.

The CB71C can be equipped with a wide range of long-term available processors with scalable performance, all supporting ECC. Passive cooling is possible with low-power versions. The CB71C can also be equipped with up to 32 GB of directly soldered DDR4 main memory and a 16 GB eMMC. Available high-speed interfaces include PCI Express 3.0 links, DDI (DP, eDP, HDMI), SATA 3.0, Gbit Ethernet and USB 3.0.

The board features an advanced board management controller with monitoring functions for safety-relevant applications. In addition, the CB71C has a Trusted Platform Module and supports hardware memory encryption, providing protection against both physical and inter-VM storage attacks. This is essential for security-critical applications such as payment and ticketing terminals, fleet management or monitoring.

MEN Micro | www.menmicro.com

SBC Serves Up MX6 ARM Cortex-A9 Processor

Versalogic has announced a new line of production-ready, ARM-based embedded computers starting with the Tetra. The Tetra is a power-efficient, quad-core SBC. Featuring a quad-core i.MX6 Cortex-A9 32-bit processor, a Tetra typically consumes about 4 W of power when operating (not idle). It is ready for off-the-shelf deployment into demanding industrial applications requiring rugged, long-life, power-efficient, industrial temperature rated (-40° to +85°C) solutions.

Unlike many ARM-based modules, Versalogic’s new line of ARM-based EPC (Embedded Processing Card) products are complete board-level computers. They do not require carrier cards, companion boards, connector break-out boards or other add-ons to function. For ease of mounting, and future upgrades, Versalogic’s ARM products are designed around the size and mounting points of COM Express products. Unlike proprietary-format ARM products, Versalogic ARM boards provide a standardized mounting pattern now, and simplified upgrading in the future.

The Tetra is COM Express Basic size (125 x 95 mm) and offers a variety of I/O options for rugged, industrial applications. The three quad-core Tetra models feature a wide (8 to 17-volt) power input, making it ideal for 12-volt automotive applications. Many applications that require lower power or lower heat dissipation still need very high levels of reliability. Versalogic’s 10+ year formal life-extension program ensures long production cycles free from expensive changes and upgrades that come from short, disposable lifecycles.

A variety of on-board I/O includes a Gigabit Ethernet port with network boot capability, HDMI and LVDS video outputs, and two USB 2.0 Ports. Serial I/O (RS-232) and a SATA II interface or mSATA, support high-capacity rotating or solid-state drives. CAN Bus, I2C and SPI are also included along with a 6-axis e-compass, and MIPI camera input. The on-board Mini PCIe socket provides flexible expansion using plug-in Wi-Fi modems, GPS receivers, Ethernet, Firewire, and other mini cards.

Designed and tested for Industrial temperature (-40° to +85°C ) operation, Versalogic’s rugged Tetra meets MIL-STD 202G specifications to withstand high impact and vibration. It is engineered and validated to excel in unforgiving environments. Each component is carefully selected to ensure reliable operation in the field.

The Tetra, part number VL-EPC-2700, is in stock at both Versalogic Corp. and Digi-Key Corp. OEM quantity pricing starts at $318.

Versalogic| www.versalogic.com