Real-Time Trailer Monitoring System

Dean Boman, a retired electrical engineer and spacecraft communications systems designer, noticed a problem during vacations towing the family’s RV trailer—tire blowouts.

“In every case, there were very subtle changes in the trailer handling in the minutes prior to the blowouts, but the changes were subtle enough to go unnoticed,” he says in his article appearing in January’s Circuit Cellar magazine.

So Boman, whose retirement hobbies include embedded system design, built the trailer monitoring system (TMS), which monitors the vibration of each trailer tire, displays the

Figure 1—The Trailer Monitoring System consists of the display unit and a remote data unit (RDU) mounted in the trailer. The top bar graph shows the right rear axle vibration level and the lower bar graph is for left rear axle. Numbers on the right are the axle temperatures. The vertical bar to the right of the bar graph is the driver-selected vibration audio alarm threshold. Placing the toggle switch in the other position  displays the front axle data.

Photo 1 —The Trailer Monitoring System consists of the display unit and a remote data unit (RDU) mounted in the trailer. The top bar graph shows the right rear axle vibration level and the lower bar graph is for left rear axle. Numbers on the right are the axle temperatures. The vertical bar to the right of the bar graph is the driver-selected vibration audio alarm threshold. Placing the toggle switch in the other position displays the front axle data.

information to the driver, and sounds an alarm if tire vibration or heat exceeds a certain threshold. The alarm feature gives the driver time to pull over before a dangerous or damaging blowout occurs.

Boman’s article describes the overall layout and operation of his system.

“The TMS consists of accelerometers mounted on each tire’s axles to convert the gravitational (g) level vibration into an analog voltage. Each axle also contains a temperature sensor to measure the axle temperature, which is used to detect bearing or brake problems. Our trailer uses the Dexter Torflex suspension system with four independent axles supporting four tires. Therefore, a total of four accelerometers and four temperature sensors were required.

“Each tire’s vibration and temperature data is processed by a remote data unit (RDU) that is mounted in the trailer. This unit formats the data into RS-232 packets, which it sends to the display unit, which is mounted in the tow vehicle.”

Photo 1 shows the display unit. Figure 1 is the complete system’s block diagram.

Figure 1—This block diagram shows the remote data unit accepting data from the accelerometers and temperature sensors and sending the data to the display unit, which is located in the tow vehicle for the driver display.

Figure 1—This block diagram shows the remote data unit accepting data from the accelerometers and temperature sensors and sending the data to the display unit, which is located in the tow vehicle for the driver display.

The remote data unit’s (RDU’s) hardware design includes a custom PCB with a Microchip Technology PIC18F2620 processor, a power supply, an RS-232 interface, temperature sensor interfaces, and accelerometers. Photo 2 shows the final board assembly. A 78L05 linear regulator implements the power supply, and the RS-232 interface utilizes a Maxim Integrated MAX232. The RDU’s custom software design is written in C with the Microchip MPLAB integrated development environment (IDE).

The remote data unit’s board assembly is shown.

Photo 2—The remote data unit’s board assembly is shown.

The display unit’s hardware includes a Microchip Technology PIC18F2620 processor, a power supply, a user-control interface, an LCD interface, and an RS-232 data interface (see Figure 1). Boman chose a Hantronix HDM16216H-4 16 × 2 LCD, which is inexpensive and offers a simple parallel interface. Photo 3 shows the full assembly.

The display unit’s completed assembly is shown with the enclosure opened. The board on top is the LCD’s rear view. The board on bottom is the display unit board.

Photo 3—The display unit’s completed assembly is shown with the enclosure opened. The board on top is the LCD’s rear view. The board on bottom is the display unit board.

Boman used the Microchip MPLAB IDE to write the display unit’s software in C.

“To generate the display image, the vibration data is first converted into an 11-element bar graph format and the temperature values are converted from Centigrade to Fahrenheit. Based on the toggle switch’s position, either the front or the rear axle data is written to the LCD screen,” Boman says.

“To implement the audio alarm function, the ADC is read to determine the driver-selected alarm level as provided by the potentiometer setting. If the vibration level for any of the four axles exceeds the driver-set level for more than 5 s, the audio alarm is sounded.

“The 5-s requirement prevents the alarm from sounding for bumps in the road, but enables vibration due to tread separation or tire bubbles to sound the alarm. The audio alarm is also sounded if any of the temperature reads exceed 160°F, which could indicate a possible bearing or brake failure.”

The comprehensive monitoring gives Boman peace of mind behind the wheel. “While the TMS cannot prevent tire problems, it does provide advance warning so the driver can take action to prevent serious damage or even an accident,” he says.

For more details about Boman’s project, including RDU and display unit schematics, check out the January issue.

PC-Programmable Temperature Controller

Oven Industries 5R7-388 temperature controller

Oven Industries 5R7-388 temperature controller

The 5R7-388 is a bidirectional temperature controller. It can be used in independent thermoelectric modules or in conjunction with auxiliary or supplemental resistive heaters for cooling and heating applications. The solid-state MOSFET output devices’ H-bridge configuration enables the bidirectional current flow through the thermoelectric modules.
The RoHS-compliant controller is PC programmable via an RS-232 communication port, so it can directly interface with a compatible PC. It features an easily accessible communications link that enables various operational mode configurations. The 5R7-388 can perform field-selectable parameters or data acquisition in a half duplex mode.

In accordance with RS-232 interface specifications, the controller accepts a communications cable length. Once the desired set parameters are established, the PC may be disconnected and the 5R7-388 becomes a unique, stand-alone controller. All parameter settings are retained in nonvolatile memory. The 5R7-388’s additional features include 36-VDC output using split supply, a PC-configurable alarm circuit, and P, I, D, or On/Off control.

Contact Oven Industries for pricing.

Oven Industries, Inc.
www.ovenind.com

Web-Based Remote I/O Control

The RIO-2010 is a web-based remote I/O control module. The Ethernet-ready module is equipped with eight relays, 16 photo-isolated digital inputs, and a 1-Wire interface for digital temperature sensor connection. The RIO-2010’s built-in web server enables you to access the I/O and use a standard web browser to remotely control the RIO-2010’s relay.

The RIO-2010 can be easily integrated into supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) and industrial automation systems using the standard Modbus TCP protocol. The I/O module also comes with RS-485 serial interface for applications requiring Modbus RTU/ASCII. Its built-in web server enables you to use standard web-editing tools and Ajax dynamic page technology to customize your webpage.

Contact Artila for pricing.

Artila Electronics Co., Ltd.
www.artila.com

Two-Channel CW Laser Diode Driver with an MCU Interface

The iC-HT laser diode driver enables microcontroller-based activation of laser diodes in Continuous Wave mode. With this device, laser diodes can be driven by the optical output power (using APC), the laser diode current (using ACC), or a full controller-based power control unit.

The maximum laser diode current per channel is 750 mA. Both channels can be switched in parallel for high laser diode currents of up to 1.5 A. A current limit can also be configured for each channel.

Internal operating points and voltages can be output through ADCs. The integrated temperature sensor enables the system temperature to be monitored and can also be used to analyze control circuit feedback. Logarithmic DACs enable optimum power regulation across a large dynamic range. Therefore, a variety of laser diodes can be used.

The relevant configuration is stored in two equivalent memory areas. Internal current limits, a supply-voltage monitor, channel-specific interrupt-switching inputs, and a watchdog safeguard the laser diodes’ operation through iC-HT.

The device can be also operated by pin configuration in place of the SPI or I2C interface, where external resistors define the APC performance targets. An external supply voltage can be controlled through current output device configuration overlay (DCO) to reduce the system power dissipation (e.g., in battery-operated devices or systems).

The iC-HT operates on 2.8 to 8 V and can drive both blue and green laser diodes. The diode driver has a –40°C-to-125°C operating temperature range and is housed in a 5-mm × 5-mm, 28-pin QFN package.

The iC-HT costs $13.20 in 1,000-unit quantities.

iC-Haus GmbH
www.ichaus.com

Accurate Measurement Power Analyzer

The PA4000 power analyzer provides accurate power measurements. It offers one to four input modules, built-in test modes, and standard PC interfaces.

The analyzer features innovative Spiral Shunt technology that enables you to lock onto complex signals. The Spiral Shunt design ensures stable, linear response over a range of input current levels, ambient temperatures, crest factors, and other variables. The spiral construction minimizes stray inductance (for optimum high-frequency performance) and provides high overload capability and improved thermal stability.

The PA4000’s additional features include 0.04% basic voltage and current accuracy, dual internal current shunts for optimal resolution, frequency detection algorithms for noisy waveform tracking, application-specific test modes to simplify setup. The analyzer  easily exports data to a USB flash drive or PC software. Harmonic analysis and communications ports are included as standard features.

Contact Tektronix for pricing.

Tektronix, Inc.
www.tek.com

Microcontroller-Based Heating System Monitor

Checking a heating system’s consumption is simple enough.

Heating system monitor

Determining a heating system’s output can be much more difficult, unless you have this nifty design. This Atmel ATmega microcontroller-based project enables you to measure heat output as well as control a circulation pump.

Heating bills often present unpleasant surprises. Despite your best efforts to economise on heating, they list tidy sums for electricity or gas consumption. In this article we describe a relatively easy way to check these values and monitor your consumption almost continuously. All you need in order to determine how much heat your system delivers is four temperature sensors, a bit of wiring, and a microcontroller. There’s no need to delve into the electrical or hydraulic components of your system or modify any of them.

A bit of theory
As many readers probably remember from their physics lessons, it’s easy to calculate the amount of heat transferred to a medium such as water. It is given by the product of the temperature change ΔT, the volume V of the medium, and the specific heat capacity CV of the medium. The power P, which is amount of energy transferred per unit time, is:

P= ΔT × CV × V // Δt

With a fluid medium, the term V // Δt can be interpreted as a volumetric flow Vt. This value can be calculated directly from the flow velocity v of the medium and the inner diameter r of the pipe. In a central heating system, the temperature difference ΔT is simply the difference between the supply (S) and return (R) temperatures. This yields the formula:

P = (TS – TR) × CV × v × pr2

The temperatures can easily be measured with suitable sensors. Flow transducers are available for measuring the flow velocity, but installing a flow transducer always requires drilling a hole in a pipe or opening up the piping to insert a fitting.

Measuring principle
Here we used a different method to determine the flow velocity. We make use of the fact that the supply and return temperatures always vary by at least one to two degrees due to the operation of the control system. If pairs of temperature sensors separated by a few metres are mounted on the supply and return lines, the flow velocity can be determined from the time offset of the variations measured by the two sensors…

As the water flows through the pipe with a speed of only a few metres per second, the temperature at sensor position S2 rises somewhat later than the temperature at sensor position S, which is closer to the boiler.

An ATmega microcontroller constantly acquires temperature data from the two sensors. The time delay between the signals from a pair of sensors is determined by a correlation algorithm in the signal processing software, which shifts the signal waveforms from the two supply line sensors relative to each other until they virtually overlap.The temperature signals from the sensors on the return line are correlated in the same manner, and ideally the time offsets obtained for the supply and return lines should be the same.

To increase the sensitivity of the system, the return line sensor signals are applied to the inputs of a differential amplifier, and the resulting difference signal is amplified. This difference signal is also logged as a function of time. The area under the curve of the difference signal is a measure of the time offset of the temperature variations…

Hot water please
If the heating system is also used to supply hot water for domestic use, additional pipes are used for this purpose. For this reason, the PCB designed by the author includes inputs for additional temperature sensors. It also has a switched output for driving a relay that can control a circulation pump.

Under certain conditions, controlling the circulation pump can save you a lot of money and significantly reduce CO2 emissions. This is because some systems have constant hot water circulation so users can draw hot water from the tap immediately. This costs electricity to power the pump, and energy is also lost through the pipe walls. This can be remedied by the author’s circuit, which switches on the circulation pump for only a short time after the hot water tap is opened. This is detected by the temperature difference between the hot water and cold water supply lines…

Circuit description
The easiest way to understand the schematic diagram is to follow the signal path. It starts at the temperature sensors connected to the circuit board, which are NTC silicon devices.

Heating system monitor schematic

Their resistance varies by around 0.7–0.8% per degree K change in temperature. For example, the resistance of a KT110 sensor is approximately 1.7 kΩ at 5 °C and approximately 2.8 kΩ at 70 °C.

The sensor for supply temperature S forms a voltage divider with resistor R37. This is followed by a simple low-pass filter formed by R36 and C20, which filters out induced AC hum. U4a amplifies the sensor signal by a factor of approximately 8. The TL2264 used here is a rail-to-rail opamp, so the output voltage can assume almost any value within the supply voltage range. This increases the absolute measurement accuracy, since the full output signal amplitude is used. U4a naturally needs a reference voltage on its inverting input. This is provided by the combination of R20, R26 and R27. U5b acts as an impedance converter to minimise the load on the voltage divider…

Thermal power

PC connection
The circuit does not have its own display unit, but instead delivers its readings to a PC via an RS485 bus. Its functions can also be controlled from the PC. IC U8 looks after signal level conversion between the TTL transmit and receive lines of the ATmega microcontroller’s integrated UART and the differential RS485 bus. As the bus protocol allows several connected (peer) devices to transmit data on the bus, transmit mode must be selected actively via pin 3. Jumper JP3 must be fitted if the circuit is connected to the end of the RS485 bus. This causes the bus to be terminated in 120 Ω, which matches the characteristic impedance of a twisted-pair line…

[Via Elektor-Projects.com]

The Basics of Thermocouples

Whether you’re looking to build a temperature-sensing device or you need to add sensing capabilities to a larger system, you should familiarize yourself with thermocouples and understand how to design thermocouple interfaces. Bob Perrin covered these topics and more in 1999 Circuit Cellar Online article , “The Basics of Thermocouples.” The article appears below in its entirety.

A mathematician, a physicist, and an engineer were at lunch. The bartender asked the three gentlemen, “what is this pi I hear so much about?”

The mathematician replied, “pi is the ratio of a circle’s circumference to its diameter.”

The physicist answered, “pi is 3.14159265359.”

The engineer looked up, flatly stated, “Oh, pi’s about three,” then promptly went back to doodling on the back of his napkin.

The point is not that engineers are sloppy, careless, or socially inept. The point is that we are eminently practical. We are solvers of problems in a non-ideal world. This means we must be able to apply concepts to real problems and know when certain effects are negligible in our application.

For example, when designing first- or second-order filters, 3 is often a close enough approximation for pi, given the tolerance and temperature dependence of affordable components.

But, before we can run off and make gross approximations, we must understand the physical principles involved in the system we’re designing. One topic that seems to suffer from gross approximations without a firm understanding of the issues involved is temperature measurement with thermocouples.

Thermocouples are simple temperature sensors consisting of two wires made from dissimilar alloys. These devices are simple in construction and easy to use. But, like any electronic component, they require a certain amount of explanation. The intent of this paper is to present and explain how to use thermocouples and how to design thermocouple interfaces.

A TAIL OF TWO METALS

Figure 1a shows a thermocouple. One junction is designated the hot junction. The other junction is designated as the cold or reference junction. The current developed in the loop is proportional to the difference in temperature between the hot and cold junctions. Thermocouples measure differences in temperature, not absolute temperature.

Figure 1a: Two wires are all that are required to form a thermocouple.

To understand why a current is formed, we must revert to physics. Unfortunately, I’m not a physicist, so this explanation may bend a concept or two, but I’ll proceed nonetheless.

Consider a homogenous metallic wire. If heat is applied at one end, the electrons at that end become more energetic. They absorb energy and move out of their normal energy states and into higher ones. Some will be liberated from their atoms entirely. These newly freed highly energetic electrons move toward the cool end of the wire. As these electrons speed down the wire, they transfer their energy to other atoms. This is how energy (heat) is transferred from the hot end to the cool end of the wire.

As these electrons build up at the cool end of the wire, they experience an electrostatic repulsion. The not-so-energetic electrons at the cool end move toward the hot end of the wire, which is how charge neutrality is maintained in the conductor.

The electrons moving from the cold end toward the hot end move slower than the energetic electrons moving from the hot end move toward the cool end. But, on a macroscopic level, a charge balance is maintained.

When two dissimilar metals are used to form a thermocouple loop, as in Figure 1a, the difference in the two metal’s affinity for electrons enables a current to develop when a temperature differential is set up between the two junctions.

As electrons move from the cold junction to the hot junction, these not-so-energetic electrons are able to move easier in one metal than the other. The electrons that are moving from the hot end to the cold end have already absorbed a lot of energy, and are free to move almost equally well in both wires. This is why an electric current is developed in the loop.

I may have missed some finer points of the physics, but I think I hit the highlights. If anyone can offer a more in-depth or detailed explanation, please e-mail me. One of the best things about writing for a technical audience is learning from my readers.

BREAKING THE LOOP

If you use thermocouples, you must insert a measurement device in the loop to acquire information about the temperature difference between the hot and cold junctions. Figure 1b shows a typical setup. The thermocouple wires are brought to a terminal block and an electric circuit measures the open circuit voltage.

Figure 1b: To use a thermocouple, you must have a measurement system.

When the thermocouple wires are connected to the terminal block, an additional pair of thermocouples is formed (one at each screw terminal). This is true if the screw-terminals are a different alloy from the thermocouple wires. Figure 1c shows an alternate representation of Figure 1b. Junction 2 and junction 3 are undesired artifacts of the connection to the measurement circuitry. These two junctions are commonly called parasitic thermocouples.

Figure 1c: The act of connecting a measurement system made of copper introduces two parasitic thermocouples.

In a physical circuit, parasitic thermocouples are formed at every solder joint, connector, and even every internal IC bond wire. If it weren’t for something called the Law of Intermediate Metals, these parasitic junctions would cause us endless trouble.

The Law of Intermediate Metals states that a third metal may be inserted into a thermocouple system without affecting the system if, and only if, the junctions with the third metal are kept isothermal (at the same temperature).

In Figure 1c, if junction 2 and junction 3 are at the same temperature, they will have no effect on the current in the loop. The voltage seen by the voltmeter in Figure 1b will be proportional to the difference in temperature between Junction 1 and Junctions 2 and 3.

Junction 1 is the hot junction. The isothermal terminal block is effectively removed electrically from the circuit, so the temperature of the cold junction is the temperature of the terminal block.

MEASURING TEMPERATURE

Thermocouples produce a voltage (or loop current) that is proportional to the difference in temperature between the hot junction and the reference junction. If you want to know the absolute temperature at the hot junction, you must know the absolute temperature of the reference junction.

There are three ways to find out the temperature of the reference junction. The simplest method is to measure the temperature at the reference junction with a thermistor or semiconductor temperature sensor such as Analog Devices’ TMP03/04. Then, in software, add the measured thermocouple temperature (the difference between the hot junction and the reference junction) to the measured temperature of the reference junction. This calculation will yield the absolute temperature of the hot junction.

The second method involves holding the reference junction at a fixed and known temperature. An ice bath, or an ice slushy, is one of the most common methods used in laboratory settings. Figure 2 shows how this is accomplished.

Figure 2: By inserting a short pigtail of Metal A onto the terminal block where Metal B would normally connect, we move the cold junction.

Alternately, we could have omitted the pigtail of Metal A and just immersed the terminal block in the ice. This would work fine, but it would be much messier than the method shown in Figure 2.

Sometimes, the temperature of the cold junction (terminal block) in Figure 1c is allowed to float to ambient. Then ambient is assumed to be “about 25°C,” or some other “close enough” temperature. This method is usually found in systems where knowing the temperature of the hot junction is not overly critical.

The third method used to nail down the cold junction temperature is to use a cold junction compensation IC such as the Analog Devices AD594 or Linear Technology LT1025. This method sort of combines the first two methods.

These ICs have a temperature sensor in them that detects the temperature of the cold junction. This is presumably the same temperature as the circuit board on which the IC is mounted. The IC then produces a voltage that is proportional to the voltage produced by a thermocouple with its hot junction at ambient and its cold junction at 0°C. This voltage is added to the EMF produced by the thermocouple. The net effect is the same as if the cold junction were physically held at 0°C.

The act of knowing (or approximating) the cold junction temperature and taking this information in to account in the overall measurement is referred to as cold junction compensation. The three techniques I discussed are each methods of cold junction compensation.

The ice bath is probably the most accurate method. An ice slushy can maintain a uniformity of about 0.1°C without much difficulty. I’ve read that an ice bath can maintain a uniformity of 0.01°C, but I’ve never been able to achieve that level of uniformity. Ice baths are physically awkward and therefore usually impractical for industrial measurements.

The off-the-shelf cold junction compensation ICs can be expensive and generally are only accurate to a few degrees Celsius, but many systems use these devices.

Using a thermistor, or even the PN junction on a diode or BJT, to measure the cold junction temperature can be fairly inexpensive and quite accurate. The most common difficulty encountered with this system is calibration. Prudent positioning of the sensor near, or on the terminal block is important.

If the terminal block is to be used as the cold junction (see Figure 1b), the terminal block must be kept isothermal. In practice, keeping the terminal block truly isothermal is almost impossible. So, compromises must be made. This is the stock and trade of engineers. Knowing what is isothermal “enough” for your application is the trick.

Lots of money can be wasted on precision electronics if the terminal block’s screw terminals are allowed to develop a significant thermal gradient. This condition generally happens when power components are placed near the terminal blocks. You must pay careful attention to keeping the temperature stable around the terminal blocks.

There are two broad classes of temperature-measurement applications. The first class involves measuring absolute temperature. For example, you may want to know the temperature of the inside of an oven relative to a standard temperature scale (like the Celsius scale). This type of application requires that you know precisely the absolute temperature of the reference junction.

The second type of measurement involves measuring differences in temperature. For example, in a microcalorimeter, you may want to measure the temperature of the system, then start some chemical reaction and measure the temperature as the reaction proceeds. The information of value is the difference between first measurement and the subsequent ones.

Systems that measure temperature differences are generally easier to construct because control or precise measurement of the reference junction isn’t required. What is required is that the reference junction remain at a constant temperature while the two measurements occur. Whether the reference junction is at 25.0°C or 30.0°C isn’t relevant because the subtraction of consecutive measurements will remove the reference junction temperature from the computed answer.

You can use thermocouples to make precise differential temperature measurements, but you must ensure the terminal block forming the cold junction is “close enough” to isothermal. You must also ensure that the cold junction has enough thermal mass so it will not change temperature over the time you have between measurements.

PRACTICAL MATTERS

Thermocouples are given a letter designation that indicates the materials they are fabricated from. This letter designation is called the thermocouples “type.” Table 1 shows the common thermocouples available and their usable temperature ranges.

Table 1: There are a wide variety of industry-standard alloy combinations that form standard thermocouples. The most commonly used are J, K, T, and E.

Each thermocouple type will produce a different open-circuit voltage (Seebeck voltage) for a given set of temperature conditions. None of these devices are linear over a full range of temperatures. There are standard tables available that tabulate Seebeck voltages as a function of temperature.[1] There are also standard polynomial models available for thermocouples.

Thermocouples produce a small Seebeck voltage. For example, a type K thermocouple produces about 40 µV per degree Celsius when both junctions are near room temperature. The most sensitive of the thermocouples, type E, produces about 60 µV per degree Celsius when both junctions are near room temperature.

In many applications, the range of temperatures being measured is sufficiently small that the Seebeck voltage is assumed to be linear over the range of interest. This eliminates the need for lookup tables or polynomial computation in the system. Often the loss of absolute accuracy is negligible, but this tradeoff is one the design engineer must weigh carefully.

CIRCUITS

When designing a thermocouple interface, there are only a few pieces of information you need to know:

  • what type of thermocouple will be used
  • what is the full range of temperatures the hot junction will be exposed to
  • what is the full range of temperatures the cold junction will be exposed to
  • what is the temperature resolution required for your application
  • does your system require galvanic isolation
  • what type of cold junction compensation will be used

If the answer to the last question requires the analog addition of a voltage from a commercial cold junction compensation IC, then the manufacturer of the IC will probably supply you with an adequate reference design. If you plan to do the cold-junction compensation either physically (by an ice bath) or in software (by measuring the cold junction’s temperature with another device), then you must build or buy a data-acquisition system.

Galvanic isolation is an important feature in many industrial applications. Because thermocouples are really just long loops of wire, they will often pick up high levels of common-mode noise. In some applications, the thermocouples may be bonded to equipment that is at line voltage (or higher).

In this case, galvanic isolation is required to keep high-voltage AC out of your data acquisition system. This type of isolation is usually accomplished in one of two ways—using either an opto-isolator or a transformer. Both systems require the thermocouple signal conditioner to allow its ground to float with respect to earth ground. Figure 3a and 3b outlines these schemes.

Figure 3: Galvanic isolation to a few thousand volts is easy (but a little expensive) using opto-isolation (a) and inexpensive (but a bit more challenging) using a VFC and a transformer (b).

Because the focus of this article is on the interface to the thermocouple, I’ll have to leave the details of implementing galvanic isolation to another article.

Given the tiny voltage levels produced by a thermocouple, the designer of the signal-conditioning module should focus carefully on noise rejection. Using the common-mode rejection (CMR) characteristics of a differential amplifier is a good place to start. Figure 4 shows a simple yet effective thermocouple interface

Figure 4: The common-mode filter and common-mode rejection characteristics pay off in thermocouple amplifiers.

The monolithic instrumentation amplifier (in-amp) is a $2–$5 part (depending on grade and manufacturer). These are usually 8-pin DIP or SOIC devices. In-amps are simple differential amplifiers. The gain is set with a single external resistor. The input impedance of an in-amp is typically 10 gigaohms.

Certainly you can use op-amps, or even discrete parts to build a signal conditioner. However, all the active components on a monolithic in-amp are on the same dice and are kept more-or-less isothermal. This means in-amp characteristics behave nicely over temperature. Good CMR, controllable gain, small size, and high input impedance make in-amps perfect as the heart of a thermocouple conditioning circuit.

Temperature tends to change relatively slowly. So, if you find your system has noise, you can usually install supplementary low-pass filters. These can be implemented in hardware or software. In many systems, it’s not uncommon to take 128 measurements over 1 s and then average the results. Digital filters are big cost reducers in production systems.

Another problem often faced when designing thermocouple circuits is nulling amplifier offset. You can null the amplifier offset in a variety of ways [2], but my favorite is by chopping the input. Figure 5 shows how this process can be accomplished.

Figure 5: An input chopper like a CD4052 is all that is necessary to null signal conditioner offsets.

Thermocouples have such small signal levels, gains on the order of 1000 V/V are not uncommon, which means an op-amp or in-amp with a voltage offset of even 1 mV will have an offset at the output on the order of volts.

The chopper in Figure 5 allows the microcontroller to reverse the polarity of the thermocouple. To null the circuit, the microcontroller will take two measurements then subtract them.

First, set the chopper so the ADC measures GAIN (Vsensor + Voffset). Second, set the chopper so the ADC measures GAIN (–Vsensor + Voffset).

Subtract the second measurement from the first and divide by two. The result is GAIN*Vsensor. As you can see, this is exactly the quantity we are interested in. The in-amp’s offset has been removed from the measurement.

CLOSING TIME

In 1821, Thomas J. Seebeck discovered that if a junction of two dissimilar metals is heated, a voltage is produced. This voltage has since been dubbed the Seebeck voltage.

Thermocouples are found in everything from industrial furnaces to medical devices. At first glance, thermocouples may seem fraught with mystery. They are not. After all, how can a device that’s built from two wires and has been around for 180 years be all that tough to figure out?

When designing with thermocouples, just keep these four concepts in mind and the project will go much smoother. First, thermocouples produce a voltage that is proportional to the difference in temperature between the hot junction and the reference junction.

Second, because thermocouples measure relative temperature differences, cold junction compensation is required if the system is to report absolute temperatures. Cold-junction compensation simply means knowing the absolute temperature of the cold junction and adjusting the reparted temperature value accordingly.

The third thing to remember is that thermocouples have a small Seebeck voltage coefficient, typically on the order of tens of microvolts per degree Celsius. And last, thermocouples are non-linear across their temperature range. Linearization, if needed, is best done in software.

Armed with these concepts, the circuits in this article, and a bit of time, you should have a good start on being able to design a thermocouple into your next project.

Bob Perrin has designed instrumentation for agronomy, soil physics, and water activity research. He has also designed embedded controllers for a variety of other applications.

REFERENCES

[1] www.omega.com/pdf/temperature/z/zsection.asp

[2] B.Perrin, “Practical Analog Design,” Circuit Cellar, #94, May 1998.

SOURCES

AD594, TMP03/04
Analog Devices
www.analog.com

INA118
Texas Instruments (Burr-Brown Corp.)
www.ti.com/ww/analog/index.html

LT1025
Linear Technology
www.linear-tech.com

This article was originally published in Circuit Cellar Online in 1999. Posted with permission. Circuit Cellar and CircuitCellar.com are Elektor International Media publications.