COMSOL Multiphysics 5.0 and the Application Builder

COMSOL recently announced the availability of Multiphysics 5.0 and Application Builder, with which “the power and accuracy of COMSOL Multiphysics is now accessible to everyone through the use of applications.”

Image made using COMSOL Multiphysics and is provided courtesy of COMSOL

Image made using COMSOL Multiphysics and is provided courtesy of COMSOL

According to COMSOL, Version 5.0 includes severral numerous enhancements to the existing Multiphysics software. The COMSOL Multiphysics product suite includes “25 application-specific modules for simulating any physics in the electrical, mechanical, fluid, and chemical disciplines.”

  • Multiphysics – Predefined multiphysics couplings, including Joule Heating with Thermal Expansion; Induction, Microwave, and Laser Heating; Thermal Stress; Thermoelectric and Piezoelectric Effect; and more.
  • Geometry and Mesh – You can create geometry from an imported mesh and call geometry subsequences using a linked subsequence.
  • Optimization and Multipurpose – The Particle Tracing Module includes accumulation of particles, erosion, and etch features. Multianalysis optimization was added as well.
  • Studies and Solvers – Improvements were made for the simulation of CAD assemblies, support for extra dimensions, and the ability to sweep over sets of materials and user-defined functions. Improved probe-while-solving and more.
  • Materials and Functions – Materials can now be copied, pasted, duplicated, dragged, and dropped. Link to Global Materials using a Material Link when the same material is used in multiple components.
  • Mechanical – Model geometrically nonlinear beams, nonlinear elastic materials, and elasticity in joints using the products for modeling structural mechanics.
  • Fluid – Create automatic pipe connections to 3-D flow domains in the Pipe Flow Module. The CFD Module is expanded with two new algebraic turbulence models, as well as turbulent fans and grilles.
  • Electrical – The AC/DC Module, RF Module, and Wave Optics Module now contain a frequency- and material-controlled auto mesh suggestion that offers the easy, one-click meshing of infinite elements and periodic conditions. The Plasma Module now contains interfaces for modeling equilibrium discharges.
  • Chemical – The Chemical Reaction Engineering Module now contains a new Chemistry interface that can be used as a Material node for chemical reactions.

Source: COMSOL

 

One Professor and Two Orderly Labs

Professor Wolfgang Matthes has taught microcontroller design, computer architecture, and electronics (both digital and analog) at the University of Applied Sciences in Dortmund, Germany, since 1992. He has developed peripheral subsystems for mainframe computers and conducted research related to special-purpose and universal computer architectures for the past 25 years.

When asked to share a description and images of his workspace with Circuit Cellar, he stressed that there are two labs to consider: the one at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts and the other in his home basement.

Here is what he had to say about the two labs and their equipment:

In both labs, rather conventional equipment is used. My regular duties are essentially concerned  with basic student education and hands-on training. Obviously, one does not need top-notch equipment for such comparatively humble purposes.

Student workplaces in the Dortmund lab are equipped for basic training in analog electronics.

Student workplaces in the Dortmund lab are equipped for basic training in analog electronics.

In adjacent rooms at the Dortmund lab, students pursue their own projects, working with soldering irons, screwdrivers, drills,  and other tools. Hence, these rooms are  occasionally called the blacksmith’s shop. Here two such workplaces are shown.

In adjacent rooms at the Dortmund lab, students pursue their own projects, working with soldering irons, screwdrivers, drills, and other tools. Hence, these rooms are occasionally called “the blacksmith’s shop.” Two such workstations are shown.

Oscilloscopes, function generators, multimeters, and power supplies are of an intermediate price range. I am fond of analog scopes, because they don’t lie. I wonder why neither well-established suppliers nor entrepreneurs see a business opportunity in offering quality analog scopes, something that could be likened to Rolex watches or Leica analog cameras.

The orderly lab at home is shown here.

The orderly lab in Matthes’s home is shown here.

Matthes prefers to build his  projects so that they are mechanically sturdy. So his lab is equipped appropriately.

Matthes prefers to build mechanically sturdy projects. So his lab is appropriately equipped.

Matthes, whose research interests include advanced computer architecture and embedded systems design, pursues a variety of projects in his workspace. He describes some of what goes on in his lab:

The projects comprise microcontroller hardware and software, analog and digital circuitry, and personal computers.

Personal computer projects are concerned with embedded systems, hardware add-ons, interfaces, and equipment for troubleshooting. For writing software, I prefer PowerBASIC. Those compilers generate executables, which run efficiently and show a small footprint. Besides, they allow for directly accessing the Windows API and switching to Assembler coding, if necessary.

Microcontroller software is done in Assembler and, if required, in C or BASIC (BASCOM). As the programming language of the toughest of the tough, Assembler comes second after wire [i.e., the soldering iron].

My research interests are directed at computer architecture, instruction sets, hardware, and interfaces between hardware and software. To pursue appropriate projects, programming at the machine level is mandatory. In student education, introductory courses begin with the basics of computer architecture and machine-level programming. However, Assembler programming is only taught at a level that is deemed necessary to understand the inner workings of the machine and to write small time-critical routines. The more sophisticated application programming is usually done in C.

Real work is shown here at the digital analog computer—bring-up and debugging of the master controller board. Each of the six microcontrollers is connected to a general-purpose human-interface module.

A digital analog computer in Matthes’s home lab works on master controller board bring-up and debugging. Each of the six microcontrollers is connected to a general-purpose human-interface module.

Additional photos of Matthes’s workspace and his embedded electronics and micrcontroller projects are available at his new website.

 

 

 

Quartus II Software Arria 10 Edition v14.0

Altera Corp. has released Quartus II software Arria 10 edition v14.0, which is an advanced 20-nm FPGA and SoC design environment. Quartus II software delivers fast compile times and enables high performance for 20-nm FPGA and SoC designs. You can further accelerate Arria 10 FPGA and SoC design cycles by using the range of 20-nm-optimized IP cores included in the latest software release.

Altera’s 20-nm design tools feature advanced algorithms. The Quartus II software Arria 10 edition v14.0 provides on average notably fast compile times. This productivity advantage enables you to shorten design iterations and rapidly close timing on 20-nm design.

Included in the latest software release is a full complement of 20-nm-optimized IP cores to enable faster design cycles. The IP portfolio includes standard protocol and memory interfaces, DSP and SoC IP cores. Altera also optimized its popular IP cores for Arria 10 FPGAs and SoCs, which include 100G Ethernet, 300G Interlaken, Interlaken Look-Aside, and PCI Express Gen3 IP. When implemented in Altera’s Arria 10 FPGAs and SoCs, these IP cores deliver the high performance.

The Quartus II software Arria 10 edition v14.0 is available now for download. The software is available as a subscription edition and includes a free 30-day trial. The annual software subscription is $2,995 for a node-locked PC license. Engineering samples of Arria 10 FPGAs are shipping today.

Source: Altera Corp.

Fast Quad IF DAC

ADI AD9144 16-bit 2.8 GSPS DAC - Fastest Quad IF DAC - High DynaThe AD9144 is a four-channel, 16-bit, 2.8-GSPS DAC that supports high data rates and ultra-wide signal bandwidth to enable wideband and multiband wireless applications. The DAC features 82-dBc spurious-free dynamic range (SFDR) and a 2.8-GSPS maximum sample rate, which permits multicarrier generation up to the Nyquist frequency.

With –164-dBm/Hz noise spectral density, the AD9144 enables higher dynamic range transmitters to be built. Its low SFDR and distortion design techniques provide high-quality synthesis of wideband signals from baseband to high intermediate frequencies. The DAC features a JESD204B eight-lane interface and low inherent latency of fewer than two DAC clock cycles. This simplifies hardware and software system design while permitting multichip synchronization.

The combination of programmable interpolation rate, high sample rates, and low power at 1.5 W provides flexibility when choosing DAC output frequencies. This is especially helpful in meeting four- to six-carrier Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) transmission specifications and other communications standards. For six-carrier GSM intermodulation distortion (IMD), the AD9144 operates at 77 dBc at 75-MHz IF. Operating with the on-chip phase-locked loop (PLL) at a 30-MHz DAC output frequency, the AD9144 delivers a 76-dB adjacent-channel leakage ratio (ACLR) for four-carrier Wideband Code Division Multiple Access (WCDMA) applications.

The AD9144 includes integrated interpolation filters with selectable interpolation factors. The dual DAC data interface supports word and byte load, enabling users to reduce input pins on lower data rates to save board space, power, and cost.

The DAC is supported by an evaluation board with an FPGA Mezzanine Card (FMC) connector, software, tools, a SPI controller, and reference designs. Analog Devices’s VisualAnalog software package combines a powerful set of simulation and data analysis tools with a user-friendly graphical interface that enables users to customize their input signal and data analysis.

The AD9144BCPZ DAC costs $80. The AD9144-EBZ and AD9144-FMC-EBZ FMC evaluation boards cost $495.

Analog Devices, Inc.
www.analog.com

Closed-Loop Module

CogiscanThe LCR Control Module is a fully integrated and closed-loop system designed to eliminate the risk of placing incorrect passive components on PCBs. Combined with the Offline Job Setup and/or Line Setup Control module, the LCR Control Module’s software is integrated with an electrical LCR meter. The system verifies that the measured values (e.g., inductance, capacitance, resistance) are within the tolerances specified for the component. This electrical verification can be done at any time prior to mounting the reel on the placement machine.

Contact Cogiscan for pricing.

Cogiscan, Inc.
www.cogiscan.com