A Look at Low-Noise Amplifiers

Maurizio Di Paolo Emilio, who has a PhD in Physics, is an Italian telecommunications engineer who works mainly as a software developer with a focus on data acquisition systems. Emilio has authored articles about electronic designs, data acquisition systems, power supplies, and photovoltaic systems. In this article, he provides an overview of what is generally available in low-noise amplifiers (LNAs) and some of the applications.

By Maurizio Di Paolo Emilio
An LNA, or preamplifier, is an electronic amplifier used to amplify sometimes very weak signals. To minimize signal power loss, it is usually located close to the signal source (antenna or sensor). An LNA is ideal for many applications including low-temperature measurements, optical detection, and audio engineering. This article presents LNA systems and ICs.

Signal amplifiers are electronic devices that can amplify a relatively small signal from a sensor (e.g., temperature sensors and magnetic-field sensors). The parameters that describe an amplifier’s quality are:

  • Gain: The ratio between output and input power or amplitude, usually measured in decibels
  • Bandwidth: The range of frequencies in which the amplifier works correctly
  • Noise: The noise level introduced in the amplification process
  • Slew rate: The maximum rate of voltage change per unit of time
  • Overshoot: The tendency of the output to swing beyond its final value before settling down

Feedback amplifiers combine the output and input so a negative feedback opposes the original signal (see Figure 1). Feedback in amplifiers provides better performance. In particular, it increases amplification stability, reduces distortion, and increases the amplifier’s bandwidth.

 Figure 1: A feedback amplifier model is shown here.


Figure 1: A feedback amplifier model is shown.

A preamplifier amplifies an analog signal, generally in the stage that precedes a higher-power amplifier.

IC LOW-NOISE PREAMPLIFIERS
Op-amps are widely used as AC amplifiers. Linear Technology’s LT1028 or LT1128 and Analog Devices’s ADA4898 or AD8597 are especially suitable ultra-low-noise amplifiers. The LT1128 is an ultra-low-noise, high-speed op-amp. Its main characteristics are:

  • Noise voltage: 0.85 nV/√Hz at 1 kHz
  • Bandwidth: 13 MHz
  • Slew rate: 5 V/µs
  • Offset voltage: 40 µV

Both the Linear Technology and Analog Devices amplifiers have voltage noise density at 1 kHz at around 1 nV/√Hz  and also offer excellent DC precision. Texas Instruments (TI)  offers some very low-noise amplifiers. They include the OPA211, which has 1.1 nV/√Hz  noise density at a  3.6 mA from 5 V supply current and the LME49990, which has very low distortion. Maxim Integrated offers the MAX9632 with noise below 1nV/√Hz.

The op-amp can be realized with a bipolar junction transistor (BJT), as in the case of the LT1128, or a MOSFET, which works at higher frequencies and with a higher input impedance and a lower energy consumption. The differential structure is used in applications where it is necessary to eliminate the undesired common components to the two inputs. Because of this, low-frequency and DC common-mode signals (e.g., thermal drift) are eliminated at the output. A differential gain can be defined as (Ad = A2 – A1) and a common-mode gain can be defined as (Ac = A1 + A2 = 2).

An important parameter is the common-mode rejection ratio (CMRR), which is the ratio of common-mode gain to the differential-mode gain. This parameter is used to measure the  differential amplifier’s performance.

Figure 2: The design of a simple preamplifier is shown. Its main components are the Linear Technology LT112 and the Interfet IF3602 junction field-effect transistor (JFET).

Figure 2: The design of a simple preamplifier is shown. Its main components are the Linear Technology LT1128 and the Interfet IF3602 junction field-effect transistor (JFET).

Figure 2 shows a simple preamplifier’s design with 0.8 nV/√Hz at 1 kHz background noise. Its main components are the LT1128 and the Interfet IF3602 junction field-effect transistor (JFET).  The IF3602 is a dual N-channel JFET used as stage for the op-amp’s input. Figure 3 shows the gain and Figure 4 shows the noise response.

Figure 3: The gain of a low-noise preamplifier.

Figure 3: The is a low-noise preamplifier’s gain.

 

Figure 4: The noise response of a low-noise preamplifier

Figure 4: A low-noise preamplifier’s noise response is shown.

LOW NOISE PREAMPLIFIER SYSTEMS
The Stanford Research Systems SR560 low-noise voltage preamplifier has a differential front end with 4nV/√Hz input noise and a 100-MΩ input impedance (see Photo 1a). Input offset nulling is accomplished by a front-panel potentiometer, which is accessible with a small screwdriver. In addition to the signal inputs, a rear-panel TTL blanking input enables you to quickly turn the instrument’s gain on and off (see Photo 1b).

Photo 1a:The Stanford Research Systems SR560 low-noise voltage preamplifier

Photo 1a: The Stanford Research Systems SR560 low-noise voltage preamplifier. (Photo courtesy of Stanford Research Systems)

Photo 1 b: A rear-panel TTL blanking input enables you to quickly turn the Stanford Research Systems SR560 gain on and off.

Photo 1b: A rear-panel TTL blanking input enables you to quickly turn the Stanford Research Systems SR560 gain on and off. (Photo courtesy of Stanford Research Systems)

The Picotest J2180A low-noise preamplifier provides a fixed 20-dB gain while converting a 1-MΩ input impedance to a 50-Ω output impedance and 0.1-Hz to 100-MHz bandwidth (see Photo 2). The preamplifier is used to improve the sensitivity of oscilloscopes, network analyzers, and spectrum analyzers while reducing the effective noise floor and spurious response.

Photo 2: The Picotest J2180A low-noise preamplifier is shown.

Photo 2: The Picotest J2180A low-noise preamplifier is shown. (Photo courtesy of picotest.com)

Signal Recovery’s Model 5113 is among the best low-noise preamplifier systems. Its principal characteristics are:

  • Single-ended or differential input modes
  • DC to 1-MHz frequency response
  • Optional low-pass, band-pass, or high-pass signal channel filtering
  • Sleep mode to eliminate digital noise
  • Optically isolated RS-232 control interface
  • Battery or line power

The 5113 (see Photo 3 and Figure 5) is used in applications as diverse as radio astronomy, audiometry, test and measurement, process control, and general-purpose signal amplification. It’s also ideally suited to work with a range of lock-in amplifiers.

Photo 3: This is the Signal Recovery Model 5113 low-noise pre-amplifier.

Photo 3: This is the Signal Recovery Model 5113 low-noise preamplifier. (Photo courtesy of Signal Recovery)

Figure 5: Noise contour figures are shown for the Signal Recovery Model 5113.

Figure 5: Noise contour figures are shown for the Signal Recovery Model 5113.

WRAPPING UP
This article briefly introduced low-noise amplifiers, in particular IC system designs utilized in simple or more complex systems such as the Signal Recovery Model 5113, which is a classic amplifier able to obtain different frequency bands with relative gain. A similar device is the SR560, which is a high-performance, low-noise preamplifier that is ideal for a wide variety of applications including low-temperature measurements, optical detection, and audio engineering.

Moreover, the Krohn-Hite custom Models 7000 and 7008 low-noise differential preamplifiers provide a high gain amplification to 1 MHz with an AC output derived from a very-low-noise FET instrumentation amplifier.

One common LNA amplifier is a satellite communications system. The ground station receiving antenna will connect to an LNA, which is needed because the received signal is weak. The received signal is usually a little above background noise. Satellites have limited power, so they use low-power transmitters.

Telecommunications engineer Maurizio Di Paolo Emilio was born in Pescara, Italy. Working mainly as a software developer with a focus on data acquisition systems, he helped design the thermal compensation system (TCS) for the optical system used in the Virgo Experiment (an experiment for detecting gravitational waves). Maurizio currently collaborates with researchers at the University of L’Aquila on X-ray technology. He also develops data acquisition hardware and software for industrial applications and manages technical training courses. To learn more about Maurizio and his expertise, read his essay on “The Future of Data Acquisition Technology.”

Accurate Measurement Power Analyzer

The PA4000 power analyzer provides accurate power measurements. It offers one to four input modules, built-in test modes, and standard PC interfaces.

The analyzer features innovative Spiral Shunt technology that enables you to lock onto complex signals. The Spiral Shunt design ensures stable, linear response over a range of input current levels, ambient temperatures, crest factors, and other variables. The spiral construction minimizes stray inductance (for optimum high-frequency performance) and provides high overload capability and improved thermal stability.

The PA4000’s additional features include 0.04% basic voltage and current accuracy, dual internal current shunts for optimal resolution, frequency detection algorithms for noisy waveform tracking, application-specific test modes to simplify setup. The analyzer  easily exports data to a USB flash drive or PC software. Harmonic analysis and communications ports are included as standard features.

Contact Tektronix for pricing.

Tektronix, Inc.
www.tek.com

New Products: May 2013

iC-Haus

iC-Haus iC-TW8

The iC-TW8 is a high-resolution signal processor designed to evaluate sine/cosine sensors. Its automatic functions help minimize angular errors and jitters. The processor can be used for initial, push-button calibration and to permanently adapt signal-path parameters during operation. The angular position is calculated at a programmable resolution of up to 65,536 increments per input cycle and output as an indexed incremental signal. A 32-bit word, which includes the counted cycles, is available through the SPI.

As an application-specific DSP, the iC-TW8 has two ADCs that simultaneously sample at a 250-ksps rate, fast CORDIC algorithms, special signal filters, and an analog front end with differential programmable gate amplifier (PGA) inputs that accepts typical magnetic sensor signals from 20 mVPP and up. Signal frequencies of up to 125 kHz enable high rotary and linear speeds for position measuring devices and are processed at a 24-µs constant latency period.

The device’s 12-bit measurement accuracy works with one button press. Measuring tools are not required. The iC-TW8 independently acquires information about the signal corrections needed for offset, amplitude, and phase errors and stores them in an external EEPROM.

The iC-TW8 has two configuration modes. Preset functions and interpolation factors can be retrieved through pins and the device can be calibrated with a button push. No programming is required for initial operation.

The device’s functions—including an AB output divider for fractional interpolation, an advanced signal filter to reduce jitter, a table to compensate for signal distortion, and configurable monitors for errors and signal quality—can be accessed when the serial interfaces are used. Typical applications include magnetic linear displacement measuring systems, optical linear scales, programmable magnetic/optical incremental encoders, high-resolution absolute/incremental angle sensors with on-axis, Hall scanning, and the general evaluation of sine/cosine signals (e.g., PC measuring cards for 1 VPP and 11 µAPP).

The iC-TW8 operates on a 3.1-to-5.5-V single-ended supply within a –40°C-to-125°C extended operating temperature range. It comes in a 48-pin QFN package that requires 7 mm × 7 mm of board space. A ready-to-operate demo board is  available for evaluation. An optional PC operating program, in other words, a GUI, can be connected with a USB adapter.

The iC-TW8 costs $7.69 in 1,000-unit quantities.

iC-Haus GmbH

www.ichaus.com


ULTRASOUND RECEIVERS

Analog Devices AD9675

The AD9675 and the AD9674 are the latest additions to Analog Devices’s octal ultrasound receiver portfolio. The devices and are pin compatible with the AD9670/AD9671.

The AD9675 is an eight-channel ultrasound analog front end (AFE) with an on-chip radio frequency (RF) decimator and Analog Devices’s JESD204B serial interface. It is designed for mid- to high-end portable and cart-based medical and industrial ultrasound systems. The device integrates eight channels of a low-noise amplifier, a variable-gain amplifier, an anti-aliasing filter, and a 14-bit ADC with a 125-MSPS sample rate and a 75-dB signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) performance for enhanced ultrasound image quality. The on-chip RF decimator enables the ADC to be oversampled, providing increased SNR for improved image quality while maintaining lower data I/O rates. The 5-Gbps JESD204B serial interface reduces ultrasound system I/O data routing.

The AD9674 offers similar functionality, but includes a standard low-voltage differential signaling (LVDS) interface. Both devices are available in a 144-ball, 10-mm × 10-mm ball grid array (BGA) package.

The AD9674 and the AD9675 cost $62 and $68, respectively.

Analog Devices, Inc.

www.analog.com


LOW-VOLTAGE DIGITAL OUTPUT HALL-EFFECT SENSORS

Melexis MLX92212

Melexis MLX92212

MLX92212 digital output Hall-effect sensors are AEC-Q100-qualified devices that deliver robust, automotive-level performance. The MLX92212LSE-AAA low-hysteresis bipolar latch and the MLX92212LSE-ABA high-hysteresis unipolar switch are optimized for 2.5-to-5.5-V operation. They pair well with many low-power microcontrollers in embedded systems. The sensor and specified microcontroller can share the same power rail. The sensors’ open-drain outputs enable simple connectivity with CMOS/TTL. They exhibit minimal magnetic switch point drift over temperature (up to 150°C) or lifetime and can withstand 8 kV electrostatic discharge.

The MLX92212LSE-AAA is designed for use with multipole ring magnets or alternating magnetic fields. It is well suited for brushless DC electric motor commutation, speed sensing, and magnetic encoder applications. Typical automotive uses include anti-trap/anti-pinch window lift controls, automatic door/hatch systems, and automatic power seat positioning. The MLX92212LSE-ABA enables the use of generic/weak magnets or larger air gaps. It can be used in simple magnetic proximity sensing and interlocks in covers/hatches or ferrous-vane interrupt sensors for precise position and timing applications.

Both MLX92212 devices utilize chopper-stabilized amplifiers with switched capacitors. The CMOS technology makes this technique possible and contributes to the sensors’ low current consumption and small chip size.

The MLX92212 sensors cost $0.35 each in 5,000-unit quantities and $0.30 in 10,000-unit quantities.

Melexis Microelectronic Integrated Systems

www.melexis.com


POWERFUL SPI ADAPTERS

Byte SPI Storm

Byte SPI Storm

The SPI Storm 50 and the SPI Storm 10 are the latest versions of Byte Paradigm’s SPI Storm serial protocol host adapter. The adapters support serial peripheral interface (SPI), Quad-SPI, and custom serial protocols in the same USB device.

The SPI Storm 50 and the SPI Storm 10 support serial protocols and master up to 50 and 10 MHz, respectively. The SPI Storm 10 features an 8-MB memory, while the higher-end devices are equipped with a 32-MB memory.

The SPI Storm adapters enable system engineers to access, communicate, and program their digital board and digital ICs, such as field-programmable gate array (FPGA), flash memories, application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC), and

system-on-a-chip (SoC). The SPI Storm 10 is well suited for engineering schools and universities because it is a flexible, all-around access device for hands-on digital electronics. The 50- and 100-MHz versions can be used in mid- and high-end testing and debugging for telecommunications, medical electronics, and digital imaging industries.

The SPI Storm 50 and the SPI Storm 10 cost $530 and $400, respectively.

Byte Paradigm

www.byteparadigm.com


ANALOG-BASED POWER MANAGEMENT CONTROLLER WITH INTEGRATED MCU

Microchip MCP19111

Microchip MCP19111

The MCP19111 digitally enhanced power analog controller is a new hybrid, digital and analog power-management device. In combination with the expanded MCP87xxx family of low-figure-of-merit (FOM) MOSFETs, it supports configurable, high-efficiency DC/DC power-conversion designs for many consumer and industrial applications.

The MCP19111 controller, which operates at 4.5 to 32 V, integrates an analog-based PWM controller with a fully functional flash-based microcontroller. This integration offers the flexibility of a digital solution with the speed, performance, and resolution of an analog-based controller.

The MCP19111 devices have integrated MOSFET drivers configured for synchronous, step-down applications. The MCP87018, MCP87030, MCP87090, and MCP87130 are 25-V-rated, 1.8-, 3-, 9-, and 13-mΩ logic-level MOSFETs that are specifically optimized for switched-mode-power-supply (SMPS) applications.

The MCP19111 evaluation board includes Microchip’s high-speed MOSFETs. This evaluation board includes standard firmware, which is user-configurable through an MPLAB X IDE graphical user interface (GUI) plug-in. The combined evaluation board, GUI, and firmware enable power-supply designers to configure and evaluate the MCP19111’s performance for their target applications.

The MCP19111 controllers cost $2.81 each and the MCP87018/030/090/130 MOSFETs cost $0.28 each, all in 5,000-unit quantities.

Microchip Technology, Inc.

www.microchip.com


ELASTOMER SOCKET FOR HIGH-SPEED QFP ICs

Ironwood SG-QFE-7011

Ironwood SG-QFE-7011

The SG-QFE-7011 is a high-performance QFP socket for 0.4-mm pitch, 128-pin QFPs. The socket is designed for a

1.6-mm × 14-mm × 14-mm package size with a 16-mm × 16-mm lead tip to tip. It operates at bandwidths up to 10 GHz with less than 1 dB of insertion loss and has a typical 20 mΩ per I/O contact resistance. The socket connects all pins with 10-GHz bandwidth on all connections. The small-footprint socket is mounted with supplied hardware on the target PCB. No soldering is required. The small footprint enables inductors, resistors, and decoupling capacitors to be placed close to the device for impedance tuning.

The SG-QFE-7011’s swivel lid has a compression screw that enables ICs to be quickly changed out. The socket features a floating compression plate to force down the QFP leads on to elastomer. A hard-stop feature is built into the compression mechanism.

The sockets are constructed with high-performance, low-inductance gold-plated embedded wire on elastomer as interconnect material between a device and a PCB. They feature a –35°C-to-100°C temperature range, a 0.15-nH pin self inductance, a 0.025-nH mutual inductance, a 0.01-pF capacitance to ground, and a 2-A per pin current capacity.

The SG-QFE-7011 costs $474.

Ironwood Electronics

www.ironwoodelectronics.com

Prevent Embedded Design Errors (CC 25th Anniversary Preview)

Attention, electrical engineers and programmers! Our upcoming 25th Anniversary Issue (available in early 2013) isn’t solely a look back at the history of this publication. Sure, we cover a bit of history. But the issue also features design tips, projects, interviews, and essays on topics ranging from user interface (UI) tips for designers to the future of small RAM devices, FPGAs, and 8-bit chips.

Circuit Cellar’s 25th Anniversary issue … coming in early 2013

Circuit Cellar columnist Robert Lacoste is one of the engineers whose essay will focus on present-day design tips. He explains that electrical engineering projects such as mixed-signal designs can be tedious, tricky, and exhausting. In his essay, Lacoste details 25 errors that once made will surely complicate (at best) or ruin (at worst) an embedded design project. Below are some examples and tips.

Thinking about bringing an electronics design to market? Lacoste highlights a common error many designers make.

Error 3: Not Anticipating Regulatory Constraints

Another common error is forgetting to plan for regulatory requirements from day one. Unless you’re working on a prototype that won’t ever leave your lab, there is a high probability that you will need to comply with some regulations. FCC and CE are the most common, but you’ll also find local regulations as well as product-class requirements for a broad range of products, from toys to safety devices to motor-based machines. (Refer to my article, “CE Marking in a Nutshell,” in Circuit Cellar 257 for more information.)

Let’s say you design a wireless gizmo with the U.S. market and later find that your customers want to use it in Europe. This means you lose years of work, as well as profits, because you overlooked your customers’ needs and the regulations in place in different locals.

When designing a wireless gizmo that will be used outside the U.S., having adequate information from the start will help you make good decisions. An example would be selecting a worldwide-enabled band like the ubiquitous 2.4 GHz. Similarly, don’t forget that EMC/ESD regulations require that nearly all inputs and outputs should be protected against surge transients. If you forget this, your beautiful, expensive prototype may not survive its first day at the test lab.

Watch out for errors

Here’s another common error that could derail a project. Lacoste writes:

Error 10: You Order Only One Set of Parts Before PCB Design

I love this one because I’ve done it plenty of times even though I knew the risk.

Let’s say you design your schematic, route your PCB, manufacture or order the PCB, and then order the parts to populate it. But soon thereafter you discover one of the following situations: You find that some of the required parts aren’t available. (Perhaps no distributor has them. Or maybe they’re available but you must make a minimum order of 10,000 parts and wait six months.) You learn the parts are tagged as obsolete by its manufacturer, which may not be known in advance especially if you are a small customer.

If you are serious about efficiency, you won’t have this problem because you’ll order the required parts for your prototypes in advance. But even then you might have the same issue when you need to order components for the first production batch. This one is tricky to solve, but only two solutions work. Either use only very common parts that are widely available from several sources or early on buy enough parts for a couple of years of production. Unfortunately, the latter is the only reasonable option for certain components like LCDs.

Ok, how about one more? You’ll have to check out the Anniversary Issue for the list of the other 22 errors and tips. Lacoste writes:

Error 12: You Forget About Crosstalk Between Digital and Analog Signals

Full analog designs are rare, so you have probably some noisy digital signals around your sensor input or other low-noise analog lines. Of course, you know that you must separate them as much as possible, but you can be sure that you will forget it more than once.

Let’s consider a real-world example. Some years ago, my company designed a high-tech Hi-Fi audio device. It included an on-board I2C bus linking a remote user interface. Do you know what happened? Of course, we got some audible glitches on the loudspeaker every time there was an I2C transfer. We redesigned the PCB—moving tracks and adding plenty of grounded copper pour and vias between sensitive lines and the problem was resolved. Of course we lost some weeks in between. We knew the risk, but underestimated it because nothing is as sensitive as a pair of ears. Check twice and always put guard-grounded planes between sensitive tracks and noisy ones.

Circuit Cellar’s Circuit Cellar 25th Anniversary Issue will be available in early 2013. Stay tuned for more updates on the issue’s content.

 

 

 

 

Great Plains Super Launch

Contributed by Mark Conner

The Great Plains Super Launch (GPSL) is an annual gathering of Amateur Radio high-altitude ballooning enthusiasts from the United States and Canada. The 2012 event was held in Omaha, Nebraska from June 7th to the 9th and was sponsored by Circuit Cellar and Elektor. Around 40 people from nine states and the Canadian province of Saskatchewan attended Friday’s conference and around 60 attended the balloon launches on Saturday.

Amateur Radio high-altitude ballooning (ARHAB) involves the launching, tracking, and recovery of balloon-borne scientific and electronic equipment. The Amateur Radio portion of ARHAB is used for transmitting and receiving location and other data from the balloon to chase teams on the ground. The balloon is usually a large latex weather balloon, though other types such as polyethylene can also be used. A GPS unit in the balloon payload calculates the location, course, speed, and altitude in real time, while other electronics, usually custom-built, handle conversion of the digital data into radio signals. These signals are then converted back to data by the chase teams’ receivers and computers. The balloon rises at about 1000 feet per minute until the balloon pops (if it’s latex) or a device releases the lifting gas (if it’s PE). Maximum altitudes are around 100,000 feet and the flight typically takes two to three hours.

Prepping for the launch – Photo courtesy of Mark Conner

On Thursday the 7th, the GPSL attendees visited the Strategic Air and Space Museum near Ashland, about 20 minutes southwest of Omaha. The museum features a large number of Cold War aircraft housed in two huge hangars, along with artifacts, interactive exhibits, and special events. The premiere aircraft exhibit is the Lockheed SR-71 Blackbird suspended from the ceiling in the museum’s atrium. A guided tour was provided by one of the museum’s volunteers and greatly enjoyed by all.

Friday featured the conference portion of the Super Launch. Presentations were given on stabilization techniques for in-flight video recordings, use of ballooning projects in education research, lightweight transmitters for tracking the balloon’s flight, and compressed gas safety. Bill Brown showed highlights from his years of involvement in ARHAB dating back to his first flights in 1987. The Edge of Space Sciences team presented on a May launch from Coors Field in Denver for “Weather and Science Day” prior to an afternoon Colorado Rockies game. Several thousand students witnessed the launch, which required meticulous planning and preparation.

EOSS ready for launch – Photo courtesy of Mark Conner

Saturday featured the launch of five balloons from a nearby high school early that morning. While the winds became gusty for the last two launches, all of the flights were successfully released into a brilliant sunny June sky. All five of the flights were recovered without damage in the corn and soybean fields of western Iowa between 10 and 25 miles from launch. The SABRE team from Saskatoon, Saskatchewan took the high flight award, reaching over 111,000 ft during their three-hour flight.

The view from one of the balloons. Image credit: “Project Traveler / Zack Clobes”.

The 2013 GPSL will be held in Pella, Iowa, on June 13-15. Watch the website superlaunch.org for additional information as the date approaches.