79-GHz CMOS Radar Sensor Chips for Automotive Applications

Infineon Technologies recently announced at the Imec Technology Forum in Brussels (ITF Brussels 2016) it is cooperating with Imec to develop integrated CMOS-based, 79-GHz sensor chips for automotive radar applications. According to the announcement, Infineon and Imec expect functional samples to be available in Q3 2016. A complete radar system demonstrator is slated for early 2017.

There are usually up to three radar systems built into vehicles equipped with driver assistance functions. In the future, fully automated cars will be equipped with up to 10 radar systems and 10 additional sensor systems using camera or lidar technologies.

Source: Infineon Technologies

OEM Controller for Fiber Optic Emergency Stop and Signaling Sensors

Micronor’s MR380-0 OEM Controller provides a low-cost, turn-key solution for OEM manufacturers and control system providers integrating any of the Micronor MR38X series ZapFREE Fiber Optic Signaling Sensors into their design. The sensor range includes Emergency Stop, E-Actuator, U-Beam, Key Switch, Push Button, Foot Switch, and Microswitch sensors.MICRONOR_MICROSWITCH_1500X1000P

The OEM Controller contains a stable transmitter and a sensitive optical receiver that operates over a Duplex LC multimode fiber optic link. The transmitter sends a constant light level via the transmit fiber that is interrupted when the fiber optic switch activates or the sensor beam is broken. The system is compatible with either OM1 (62.5 µm/125 µm) or OM2/OM3 (50 µm/125 µm) multimode fiber to distances up to 1.5 km. The Controller operates over a wide 5 to 24 VDC range and provides a Digital Logic as well as Open-Collector Output for activating external relays.

The MR380 ZapFREE Signaling Sensor System outperform electromechanical and electronics-based switches and sensors, specifically where EMI immunity, high voltage isolation, inherent safety, MRI compatibility, or operation over long distance is required. Applications include medical and MRI, transportation, and more.

For ATEX applications and hazardous locations, the Signaling Sensors are classified simple mechanical devices and can be installed in any manner of explosive atmosphere—mines, gas and dust. The Controller outputs inherently safe, optical radiation and is approved for EPL Mb/Gb/Gc/Db/Dc applications.

For Functional Safety applications, depending on sensor type, the controller defaults to the emergency state when: the optical path is blocked, in case of a broken fiber, a fiber is disconnected, or loss of power to the controller link.

In small quantities, the MR380-0 OEM Controller is $250 and MR38X Sensors can range $350 to $495, with a typical lead time of stock to two weeks. Discounts are available for OEM applications. Special engineered versions are available for MRI applications, radiation, and vacuum environments.

Source: Micronor

3-D Image Sensor Chips for Virtual Reality

Infineon Technologies AG and pmdtechnologies gmbh recently announced the development of REAL3 3-D image sensor chips for virtual and augmented reality applications, spatial measurement, photo effects, and more. The new sensors have improved optical sensitivity and power comsumption in comparison to the previous version.REAL3_Infineon
Features and specs:

  • Specifically designed for mobile devices, where most applications only need a resolution of 38,000 pixels.
  • Small sensor chip area
  • Each sensor chip features microlenses
  • The chips operate with infrared light and use the time-of-flight (ToF) measuring principle

The IRS1125C will be available in volume as of first quarter of 2016. The IRS1645C and IRS1615C are slated for the second quarter of 2016.

Source: Infineon Technologies

New Low-Power Smart Sensor Wireless Platform for IoT Devices

Dialog Semiconductor recently announced that it is collaborating with Bosch Sensortec to develop a low-power smart sensor platform for Internet of Things (IoT) devices. The 12-DOF smart sensor reference platform is intended for gesture recognition in wearable computing devices and immersive gaming, including augmented reality and 3-D indoor mapping and navigation.DS008_bosch-Dialog

The platform comprises Dialog’s DA14580 Bluetooth Smart SoC with three low-power Bosch Sensortecsensors: the BMM150 (for three-axis geo-magnetic field measurement), the BME280 (pressure, humidity, and temperature sensor), and the siz-axis BMI160 (a combination of a three-axis accelerometer and three-axis gyroscope in one chip). The resulting 14 × 14 mm2 unit draws less than 500 µA from a 3-V coin cell when updating and transferring all 12 × 16 bits of data wirelessly to a smartphone.

 

The 2.5 × 2.5 × 0.5 mm DA14580 SmartBond SoC integrates a Bluetooth Smart radio with an ARM Cortex-M0 application processor and intelligent power management. It more than doubles the battery life of an application-enabled smartphone accessory, wearable device, or computer peripheral in comparison with other solutions. The DA14580 includes a variety of analog and digital interfaces and features less than 15 mW power consumption in active mode and 600-nA standby current.

Bosch Sensortec’s BMI160 six-axis Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) integrates a 16 bit, three-axis, low-g accelerometer and an ultra-low power three-axis gyroscope within a single package. When the accelerometer and gyroscope are in full operation mode, the typical current consumption is 950 µA.

The BMM150 integrates a compact three-axis geo-magnetic field sensor using Bosch Sensortec’s high performance FlipCore technology. The BME280 Integrated Environmental Unit combines sensors for barometric pressure, humidity, and temperature measurement. Its altitude measurement function is a key requirement in applications such as indoor navigation with floor tracking.

Source: Dialog Semiconductor

Sensor Interface Connects Multiple Sensors to MCUs or FPGAs

Exar Corp. has announced the XR10910, a new sensor interface analog front end (AFE) for the calibration of sensor outputs. The XR10910 features an onboard 16:1 differential multiplexer, offset correction DAC, programmable gain instrumentation amplifier, and voltage reference. In addition, it provides 14-bit signal path linearity and is designed to connect multiple bridge sensors to a microcontroller or FPGA with an embedded ADC.EX041_Exar

Operating from from 2.7- to 5-V supplies, the XR10910 has a wide digital supply range of 1.8 to 5 V. It typically consumes 457 µA of supply current and offers a sleep mode for reducing the supply current to 45 µA.

The XR10910 is available in a 6 mm × 6 mm QFN package. Pricing starts at $8.10 each for 1,000-piece quantities.

Source: Exar Corp.

High-Side Current/Power Sensor

Microchip Technology recently introduced the PAC1921, a high-side current sensor with both a digital output, as well as a configurable analog output that can present power, current or voltage over the single output pin. Simultaneously, all power related output values are also available over the 2-Wire digital bus, which is compatible with I2C. The PAC1921 is available in a 10-lead 3 × 3 mm VDFN package. It was designed with the 2-Wire bus to maximize data and diagnostic reporting, while having the analog output to minimize data latency. The analog output can also be adjusted for use with 3-, 2-, 1.5-, or 1-V microcontroller inputs.Microchip PAC1921 Eval

The PAC1921 is ideal for networking, power-distribution, power-supply, computing and industrial-automation applications that cannot allow for latency when performing high-speed power management. A 39-bit accumulation register and 128 times gain configuration make this device ideal for both heavy and light system-load power measurement, from 0 to 32 V. It has the ability to integrate more than two seconds of power-consumption data. Additionally, the PAC1921 has a READ/INT pin for host control of the measurement period; and this pin can be used to synchronize readings of multiple devices.

The PAC1921 is supported by Microchip’s $64.99 PAC1921 High-Side Power and Current Monitor Evaluation Board (ADM00592). The PAC1921 is available for sampling and volume production, in a 10-lead 3 × 3 mm VDFN package, starting at $1.18 each in 5,000-unit quantities.

Source: Microchip Technology

Liquid Flow Sensor Wins Innovation Prize

Sensirion recently won the DeviceMed OEM-Components innovation prize at the Compamed 2014 exhibition. The disposable liquid flow sensor LD20-2000T for medical devices features an integrated thermal sensor element in a microchip. The pinhead-sized device is based on Sensirion’s CMOSens technology.sensirionliquidflowsensor

The LD20-2000T disposable liquid flow sensor provides liquid flow measurement capability from inside medical tubing (e.g., a catheter) in a low-cost sensor, suitable for disposable applications. As a result, you can measure drug delivery from an infusion set, an infusion pump, or other medical device in real time.

A microchip inside the disposable sensor measures the flow inside a fluidic channel. Accurate (~5%) flow rates from 0 to 420 ml/h and beyond can be measured. Inert medical-grade wetted materials ensure sterile operation with no contamination of the fluid. The straight, open flow channel with no moving parts provides high reliability. Using Sensirion’s CMOSens technology, the fully calibrated signal is processed and linearized on the 7.4 mm2 chip.

Source: Sensirion

New 8-Bit PICs for Sensor Applications

Microchip Technology recently expanded it’s PIC12/16LF155X 8-bit microcontroller family with the PIC16LF1554 and PIC16LF1559 (PIC16LF1554/9), which are targeted toward a variety of sensor applications. The PIC16LF1554/9 features two independent 10-bit, 100,000 samples per second ADCs with hardware Capacitive Voltage Divider (CVD) support for capacitive touch sensing.

Source: Microchip Techno

Source: Microchip Techno

Watch a short video:

The PIC16LF1554 MCUs are available now for sampling and production in 14-pin PDIP, TSSOP, SOIC, and 16-pin QFN (4 x 4 x .9 mm) packages. The PIC16LF1559 MCUs are available for sampling and production in 20-pin PDIP, SSOP, and QFN (4 x 4 x .9 mm) packages. Pricing starts at $0.63 each, in 10,000-unit quantities.

Source: Microchip Technology

High-Performance 4- to 20-mA Output Ultrasonic Sensor

MaxBotix’s new 4-20HR-MaxSonar-WR sensors are high-accuracy ultrasonic sensors featuring a 4- to 20-mA output. Each sensor is an affordable IP67-rated drop-in replacement for use with existing PLC/process control systems. The sensors reject outside noise sources and feature speed-of-sound temperature compensation.

Source: MaxBotix

Source: MaxBotix

The 4-20HR-MaxSonar-WR sensors provide range information from 50 to 500 cm and have a 1.6-mm resolution, an operational temperature range from –40° to 65°C (–40° to 149°F), real-time automatic calibration, a 200,000-plus hours MTBF, an operational voltage range from 12 to 32 V, and a low 20- to 40-mA average current requirement. The sensors function well with multiple sensors in the same location and they are RoHS- and CE-compliant.

A six-pin screw terminal header is included to simplify system connections for quick installation in applications such as: tank level measurement, tide/water level monitoring, solar/battery powered applications, industrial automation and outdoor vehicle detection.

The 4-20HR-MaxSonar-WR sensors (and previous IP67 MaxBotix sensors) are manufactured in a variety of packages for easy mounting in existing fittings. The sensors are available in M30x1.5, 1″ BSPP, 1″ NPTS, and 0.75″ NPTS PVC pipe fittings.

Pricing starts at $199.95 each and $134.37 in 100-unit quantities.

Source: MaxBotix, Inc.

Ultra-Compact Ultrasonic Sensor Series

MaxbotixThe UCXL-MaxSonar-WR series of sensors are flexible, OEM-customizable products that can be integrated into a system with MaxBotix’s horns or flush-mounted into an existing housing. Mounting design recommendations are provided through MaxBotix’s 3-D CAD models (available in multiple formats) to facilitate your design process. The sensor layout offers four conveniently placed mounting holes for design flexibility.

The rugged, high performance sensors are individually calibrated and feature a 1-cm resolution, an operational temperature range from –40˚C to 70˚C, real-time automatic calibration (voltage, humidity, and ambient noise), 200,000+ h mean time between failures (MTBF), and an operational 3-to-5.5-V voltage range with a low 3.4-mA average current requirement.

Contact MaxBotix for pricing.

MaxBotix, Inc.
www.maxbotix.com

MCU-Based Experimental Glider with GPS Receiver

When Jens Altenburg found a design for a compass-controlled glider in a 1930s paperback, he was inspired to make his own self-controlled model aircraft (see Photo 1)

Photo 1: This is the cover of an old paperback with the description of the compass-controlled glider. The model aircraft had a so-called “canard” configuration―a very modern design concept. Some highly sophisticated fighter planes are based on the same principle. (Photo used with permission of Ravensburger.)

Photo 1: This is the cover of an old paperback with the description of the compass-controlled glider. The model aircraft had a so-called “canard” configuration―a very modern design concept. Some highly sophisticated fighter planes are based on the same principle. (Photo used with permission of Ravensburger.)

His excellent article about his high-altitude, low-cost (HALO) experimental glider appears in Circuit Cellar’s April issue. The MCU-based glider includes a micro-GPs receiver and sensors and can climb to a preprogrammed altitude and find its way back home to a given coordinate.

Altenburg, a professor at the University of Applied Sciences Bingen in Germany, added more than a few twists to the 80-year-old plan. An essential design tool was the Reflex-XTR flight simulation software he used to trim his 3-D glider plan and conduct simulated flights.

Jens also researched other early autopilots, including the one used by the Fiesler Fi 103R German V-1 flying bomb. Known as buzz bombs during World War II, these rough predecessors of the cruise missile were launched against London after D-Day. Fortunately, they were vulnerable to anti-aircraft fire, but their autopilots were nonetheless mechanical engineering masterpieces (see Figure 1)

“Equipped with a compass, a single-axis gyro, and a barometric pressure sensor, the Fiesler Fi 103R German V-1 flying bomb flew without additional control,” Altenburg says. “The compass monitored the flying direction in general, the barometer controlled the altitude, and the gyro responded to short-duration disturbances (e.g., wind gusts).”

Figure 1: These are the main components of the Fieseler Fi 103R German V-1 flying bomb. The flight controller was designed as a mechanical computer with a magnetic compass and barometric pressure sensor for input. Short-time disturbances were damped with the main gyro (gimbal mounted) and two auxiliary gyros (fixed in one axis). The “mechanical” computer was pneumatically powered. The propeller log on top of the bomb measured the distance to the target.

Figure 1: These are the main components of the Fieseler Fi 103R German V-1 flying bomb. The flight controller was designed as a mechanical computer with a magnetic compass and barometric pressure sensor for input. Short-time disturbances were damped with the main gyro (gimbal mounted) and two auxiliary gyros (fixed in one axis). The “mechanical” computer was pneumatically powered. The propeller log on top of the bomb measured the distance to the target.

Altenburg adapted some of the V-1’s ideas into the flight control system for his 21st century autopilot glider. “All the Fi 103R board system’s electromechanical components received an electronic counterpart,” he says. “I replaced the mechanical gyros, the barometer, and the magnetic compass with MEMS. But it’s 2014, so I extended the electronics with a telemetry system and a GPS sensor.” (See Figure 2)

Figure 2: This is the flight controller’s block structure. The main function blocks are GPS, CPU, and power. GPS data is processed as a control signal for the servomotor.

Figure 2: This is the flight controller’s block structure. The main function blocks are GPS, CPU, and power. GPS data is processed as a control signal for the servomotor.

His article includes a detailed description of his glider’s flight-controller hardware, including the following:

Highly sophisticated electronics are always more sensitive to noise, power loss, and so forth. As discussed in the first sections of this article, a glider can be controlled by only a magnetic compass, some coils, and a battery. What else had to be done?

I divided the electronic system into different boards. The main board contains only the CPU and the GPS sensor. I thought that would be sufficient for basic functions. The magnetic and pressure sensor can be connected in case of extra missions. The telemetry unit is also a separate PCB.

Figure 3 shows the main board. Power is provided by a CR2032 lithium coin-cell battery. Two low-dropout linear regulators support the hardware with 1.8 and 2.7 V. The 1.8-V line is only for the GPS sensor. The second power supply provides the CPU with a stable voltage. The 2.7 V is the lowest voltage for the CPU’s internal ADC.

It is extremely important for the entire system to save power. Consequently, the servomotor has a separate power switch (Q1). As long as rudder movement isn’t necessary, the servomotor is powered off. The servomotor’s gear has enough drag to hold the rudder position without electrical power. The servomotor’s control signal is exactly the same as usually needed. It has a 1.1-to-2.1-ms pulse time range with about a 20-ms period. Two connectors (JP9 and JP10) are available for the extension boards (compass and telemetry)..

I used an STMicroelectronics LSM303DLM, which is a sensor module with a three-axis magnetometer and three-axis accelerometer. The sensor is connected by an I2C bus. The Bosch Sensortec BMP085 pressure sensor uses the same bus.

For telemetry, I applied an AXSEM AX5043 IC, which is a complete, narrow-band transceiver for multiple standards. The IC has an excellent link budget, which is the difference between output power in Transmit mode and input sensitivity in Receive mode. The higher the budget, the longer the transmission distance.

The AX5043 is also optimized for battery-powered applications. For modest demands, a standard crystal (X1, 16-MHz) is used for clock generation. In case of higher requirements, a temperature-compensated crystal oscillator (TCXO) is recommended.

The main board’s hardware with a CPU and a GPS sensor is shown. A CR2032 lithium coin-cell battery supplies the power. Two regulators provide 1.8  and 2.7 V for the GPS and the CPU. The main outputs are the servomotor’s signal and power switch.

Figure 3: The main board’s hardware with a CPU and a GPS sensor is shown. A CR2032 lithium coin-cell battery supplies the power. Two regulators provide 1.8 and 2.7 V for the GPS and the CPU. The main outputs are the servomotor’s signal and power switch.

Altenburg’s article also walks readers through the mathematical calculations needed to provide longitude, latitude, and course data to support navigation and the CPU’s most important sensor— the u-blox Fastrax UC430 GPS. He also discusses his experience using the Renesas Electronics R5F100AA microcontroller to equip the prototype board. (Altenburg’s glider won honorable mention in the 2012 Renesas RL78 Green Energy Challenge, see Photos 2 and 3).

The full article is in the April issue, now available for download by members or single-issue purchase.

One of the final steps is mounting the servomotor for rudder control. Thin cords connect the servomotor horn and the rudder. Two metal springs balance mechanical tolerances.

Photo 2: One of the final steps is mounting the servomotor for rudder control. Thin cords connect the servomotor horn and the rudder. Two metal springs balance mechanical tolerances.

Photo 2: This is the well-equipped high-altitude low-cost (HALO) experimental glider.

Photo 3: This is the well-equipped high-altitude low-cost (HALO) experimental glider.

The Future of Small Radar Technology

Directing the limited resources of Fighter Command to intercept a fleet of Luftwaffe bombers en route to London or accurately engaging the Imperial Navy at 18,000 yards in the dead of night. This was our grandfather’s radar, the technology that evened the odds in World War II.

This is the combat information center aboard a World War II destroyer with two radar displays.

This is the combat information center aboard a World War II destroyer with two radar displays.

Today there is an insatiable demand for short-range sensors (i.e., small radar technology)—from autonomous vehicles to gaming consoles and consumer devices. State-of-the-art sensors that can provide full 3-D mapping of a small-target scenes include laser radar and time-of-flight (ToF) cameras. Less expensive and less accurate acoustic and infrared devices sense proximity and coarse angle of arrival. The one sensor often overlooked by the both the DIY and professional designer is radar.

However, some are beginning to apply small radar technology to solve the world’s problems. Here are specific examples:

Autonomous vehicles: In 2007, the General Motors and Carnegie Mellon University Tartan Racing team won the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Urban Challenge, where autonomous vehicles had to drive through a city in the shortest possible time period. Numerous small radar devices aided in their real-time decision making. Small radar devices will be a key enabling technology for autonomous vehicles—from self-driving automobiles to unmanned aerial drones.

Consumer products: Recently, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) researchers developed a radar sensor for gaming systems, shown to be capable of detecting gestures and other complex movements inside a room and through interior walls. Expect small radar devices to play a key role in enabling user interface on gaming consoles to smartphones.

The Internet of Things (IoT): Fybr is a technology company that uses small radar sensors to detect the presence of parked automobiles, creating the most accurate parking detection system in the world for smart cities to manage parking and traffic congestion in real time. Small radar sensors will enable the IoT by providing accurate intelligence to data aggregators.

Automotive: Small radar devices are found in mid- to high-priced automobiles in automated cruise control, blind-spot detection, and parking aids. Small radar devices will soon play a key role in automatic braking, obstacle-avoidance systems, and eventually self-driving automobiles, greatly increasing passenger safety.

Through-Wall Imaging: Advances in small radar have numerous possible military applications, including recent MIT work on through-wall imaging of human targets through solid concrete walls. Expect more military uses of small radar technology.

What is taking so long? A tremendous knowledge gap exists between writing the application and emitting, then detecting, scattered microwave fields and understanding the result. Radar was originally developed by physicists who had a deep understanding of electromagnetics and were interested in the theory of microwave propagation and scattering. They created everything from scratch, from antennas to specialized vacuum tubes.

Microwave tube development, for example, required a working knowledge of particle physics. Due to this legacy, radar textbooks are often intensely theoretical. Furthermore, microwave components were very expensive—handmade and gold-plated. Radar was primarily developed by governments and the military, which made high-dollar investments for national security.

Small radar devices such as the RFBeam Microwave K-LC1a radio transceiver cost less than $10 when purchased in quantity.

Small radar devices such as the RFBeam Microwave K-LC1a radio transceiver cost less than $10 when purchased in quantity.

It’s time we make radar a viable option for DIY projects and consumer devices by developing low-cost, easy-to-use, capable technology and bridging the knowledge gap!
Today you can buy small radar sensors for less than $10. Couple this with learning practical radar processing methods, and you can solve a critical sensing problem for your project.

Learn by doing. I created the MIT short-course “Build a Small Radar Sensor,” where students learn about radar by building a device from scratch. Those interested can take the online course for free through MIT Opencourseware or enroll in the five-day MIT Professional Education course.

Dive deeper. My soon-to-be published multimedia book, Small and Short-Range Radar Systems, explains the principles and building of numerous small radar devices and then demonstrates them so readers at all levels can create their own radar devices or learn how to use data from off-the-shelf radar sensors.

This is just the beginning. Soon small radar sensors will be everywhere.

Using Arduino for Prototypes (EE Tip #121)

Arduino is an open-source development kit with a cult following. Open source means the software and hardware design files are available for free download. This begs the question of how the Arduino team can turn a profit, and the answer is the trademark and reputation of the Arduino name and symbol.

Arduino Uno PosterWhile there are now many Arduino clones, the original Arduino boards still outperform most. Arduino is very useful for prototyping. A recent example in my own work is adding a gyroscope sensor to a project. First, I purchased a gyroscope board from Pololu for a small amount. I plugged it into an Arduino breadboard shield purchased from eBay for roughly $5, and wired up the four pins: VCC (3.3 V), GND, SCL, and SDA. Pololu’s website has a link to some demo firmware and I downloaded this from GitHub. The library folders were extracted and renamed according to the instructions and then the example was run. The Arduino serial monitor then showed the gyroscope data in real-time, and the entire process took no more than 30 minutes.

Editor’s note: This EE Tip was written by Fergus Dixon of Sydney, Australia. Dixon runs Electronic System Design, a website set up to promote easy to use and inexpensive development kits. The Arduino Uno pictured above is a small portion of a full Arduino blueprint poster available for free download here.

Build an Inexpensive Wireless Water Alarm

The best DIY electrical engineering projects are effective, simple, and inexpensive. Devlin Gualtieri’s design of a wireless water alarm, which he describes in Circuit Cellar’s February issue, meets all those requirements.

Like most homeowners, Gualtieri has discovered water leaks in his northern New Jersey home after the damage has already started.

“In all cases, an early warning about water on the floor would have prevented a lot of the resulting damage,” he says.

You can certainly buy water alarm systems that will alert you to everything from a leak in a well-water storage tank to moisture from a cracked boiler. But they typically work with proprietary and expensive home-alarm systems that also charge a monthly “monitoring” fee.

“As an advocate of free and open-source software, it’s not surprising that I object to such schemes,” Gualtieri says.

In February’s Circuit Cellar magazine, now available for membership download or single-issue purchase, Gualtieri describes his battery-operated water alarm. The system, which includes a number of wireless units that signal a single receiver, includes a wireless receiver, audible alarm, and battery monitor to indicate low power.

Photo 1: An interdigital water detection sensor is shown. Alternate rows are lengths of AWG 22 copper wire, which is either bare or has its insulation removed. The sensor is shown mounted to the bottom of the box containing the water alarm circuitry. I attached it with double-stick foam tape, but silicone adhesive should also work.

Photo 1: An interdigital water detection sensor is shown. Alternate rows are lengths of AWG 22 copper wire, which is either bare or has its insulation removed. The sensor is shown mounted to the bottom of the box containing the water alarm circuitry. I attached it with double-stick foam tape, but silicone adhesive should also work.

Because water conducts electricity, Gualtieri sensors are DIY interdigital electrodes that can lie flat on a surface to detect the first presence of water. And their design couldn’t be easier.

“You can simply wind two parallel coils of 22 AWG wire on a perforated board about 2″ by 4”, he says. (See Photo 1.)

He also shares a number of design “tricks,” including one he used to make his low-battery alert work:

“A battery monitor is an important feature of any battery-powered alarm circuit. The Microchip Technology PIC12F675 microcontroller I used in my alarm circuit has 10-bit ADCs that can be optionally assigned to the I/O pins. However, the problem is that the reference voltage for this conversion comes from the battery itself. As the battery drains from 100% downward, so does the voltage reference, so no voltage change would be registered.

Figure 1: This is the portion of the water alarm circuit used for the battery monitor. The series diodes offer a 1.33-V total  drop, which offers a reference voltage so the ADC can see changes in the battery voltage.

Figure 1: This is the portion of the water alarm circuit used for the battery monitor. The series diodes offer a 1.33-V total drop, which offers a reference voltage so the ADC can see changes in the battery voltage.

“I used a simple mathematical trick to enable battery monitoring. Figure 1 shows a portion of the schematic diagram. As you can see, the analog input pin connects to an output pin, which is at the battery voltage when it’s high through a series connection of four small signal diodes (1N4148). The 1-MΩ resistor in series with the diodes limits their current to a few microamps when the output pin is energized. At such low current, the voltage drop across each diode is about 0.35 V. An actual measurement showed the total voltage drop across the four diodes to be 1.33 V.

“This voltage actually presents a new reference value for my analog conversion. The analog conversion now provides the following digital values:

EQ1Table 1 shows the digital values as a function of battery voltage. The nominal voltage of three alkaline cells is 4.75 V. The nominal voltage of three lithium cells is 5.4 V. The PIC12F675 functions from approximately 2 to 6.5 V, but the wireless transmitter needs as much voltage as possible to generate a reliable signal. I arbitrarily coded the battery alarm at 685, or a little above 4 V. That way, there’s still enough power to energize the wireless transmitter at a useful power level.”

Table 1
Battery Voltage ADC Value
5 751
4.75 737
4.5 721
4.24 704
4 683
3.75 661

 

Gaultieri’s wireless transmitter, utilizing lower-frequency bands, is also straightforward.

Photo 2 shows one of the transmitter modules I used in my system,” he says. “The round device is a surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonator. It just takes a few components to transform this into a low-power transmitter operable over a wide supply voltage range, up to 12 V. The companion receiver module is also shown. My alarm has a 916.5-MHz operating frequency, but 433 MHz is a more popular alarm frequency with many similar modules.”

These transmitter and receiver modules are used in the water alarm. The modules operate at 916.5 MHz, but 433 MHz is a more common alarm frequency with similar modules. The scale is inches.

Photo 2: These transmitter and receiver modules are used in the water alarm. The modules operate at 916.5 MHz, but 433 MHz is a more common alarm frequency with similar modules. The scale is inches.

Gualtieri goes on to describe the alarm circuitry (see Photo 3) and receiver circuit (see Photo 4.)

For more details on this easy and affordable early-warning water alarm, check out the February issue.

Photo 3: This is the water alarm’s interior. The transmitter module with its antenna can be seen in the upper right. The battery holder was harvested from a $1 LED flashlight. The box is 2.25“ × 3.5“, excluding the tabs.

Photo 3: This is the water alarm’s interior. The transmitter module with its antenna can be seen in the upper right. The battery holder was harvested from a $1 LED flashlight. The box is 2.25“ × 3.5“, excluding the tabs.

Photo 4: Here is my receiver circuit. One connector was used to monitor the signal strength voltage during development. The other connector feeds an input on a home alarm system. The short antenna reveals its 916.5-MHz operating frequency. Modules with a 433-MHz frequency will have a longer antenna.

Photo 4: Here is my receiver circuit. One connector was used to monitor the signal strength voltage during development. The other connector feeds an input on a home alarm system. The short antenna reveals its 916.5-MHz operating frequency. Modules with a 433-MHz frequency will have a longer antenna.

 

Q&A: Scott Garman, Technical Evangelist

Scott Garman is more than just a Linux software engineer. He is also heavily involved with the Yocto Project, an open-source collaboration that provides tools for the embedded Linux industry. In 2013, Scott helped Intel launch the MinnowBoard, the company’s first open-hardware SBC. —Nan Price, Associate Editor

Scott Garman

Scott Garman

NAN: Describe your current position at Intel. What types of projects have you developed?

SCOTT: I’ve worked at Intel’s Open Source Technology Center for just about four years. I began as an embedded Linux software engineer working on the Yocto Project and within the last year, I moved into a technical evangelism role representing Intel’s involvement with the MinnowBoard.

Before working at Intel, my background was in developing audio products based on embedded Linux for both consumer and industrial markets. I also started my career as a Linux system administrator in academic computing for a particle physics group.

Scott was involved with an Intel MinnowBoard robotics and computer vision demo, which took place at LinuxCon Japan in May 2013.

Scott was involved with an Intel MinnowBoard robotics and computer vision demo, which took place at LinuxCon Japan in May 2013.

I’m definitely a generalist when it comes to working with Linux. I tend to bounce around between things that don’t always get the attention they need, whether it is security, developer training, or community outreach.

More specifically, I’ve developed and maintained parallel computing clusters, created sound-level management systems used at concert stadiums, worked on multi-room home audio media servers and touchscreen control systems, dug into the dark areas of the Autotools and embedded Linux build systems, and developed fun conference demos involving robotics and computer vision. I feel very fortunate to be involved with embedded Linux at this point in history—these are very exciting times!

Scott is shown working on an Intel MinnowBoard demo, which was built around an OWI Robotic Arm.

Scott is shown working on an Intel MinnowBoard demo, which was built around an OWI Robotic Arm.

NAN: Can you tell us a little more about your involvement with the Yocto Project (www.yoctoproject.org)?

SCOTT: The Yocto Project is an effort to reduce the amount of fragmentation in the embedded Linux industry. It is centered on the OpenEmbedded build system, which offers a tremendous amount of flexibility in how you can create embedded Linux distros. It gives you the ability to customize nearly every policy of your embedded Linux system, such as which compiler optimizations you want or which binary package format you need to use. Its killer feature is a layer-based architecture that makes it easy to reuse your code to develop embedded applications that can run on multiple hardware platforms by just swapping out the board support package (BSP) layer and issuing a rebuild command.

New releases of the build system come out twice a year, in April and October.

Here, the OWI Robotic Arm is being assembled.

Here, the OWI Robotic Arm is being assembled.

I’ve maintained various user space recipes (i.e., software components) within OpenEmbedded (e.g., sudo, openssh, etc.). I’ve also made various improvements to our emulation environment, which enables you to run QEMU and test your Linux images without having to install it on hardware.

I created the first version of a security tracking system to monitor Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE) reports that are relevant to recipes we maintain. I also developed training materials for new developers getting started with the Yocto Project, including a very popular introductory screencast “Getting Started with the Yocto Project—New Developer Screencast Tutorial

NAN: Intel recently introduced the MinnowBoard SBC. Describe the board’s components and uses.

SCOTT: The MinnowBoard is based on Intel’s Queens Bay platform, which pairs a Tunnel Creek Atom CPU (the E640 running at 1 GHz) with the Topcliff Platform controller hub. The board has 1 GB of RAM and includes PCI Express, which powers our SATA disk support and gigabit Ethernet. It’s an SBC that’s well suited for embedded applications that can use that extra CPU and especially I/O performance.

Scott doesn’t have a dedicated workbench or garage. He says he tends to just clear off his desk, lay down some cardboard, and work on things such as the Trippy RGB Waves Kit, which is shown.

Scott doesn’t have a dedicated workbench or garage. He says he tends to just clear off his desk, lay down some cardboard, and work on things such as the Trippy RGB Waves Kit, which is shown.

The MinnowBoard also has the embedded bus standards you’d expect, including GPIO, I2C, SPI, and even CAN (used in automotive applications) support. We have an expansion connector on the board where we route these buses, as well as two lanes of PCI Express for custom high-speed I/O expansion.

There are countless things you can do with MinnowBoard, but I’ve found it is especially well suited for projects where you want to combine embedded hardware with computing applications that benefit from higher performance (e.g., robots that use computer vision, as a central hub for home automation projects, networked video streaming appliances, etc.).

And of course it’s open hardware, which means the schematics, Gerber files, and other design files are available under a Creative Commons license. This makes it attractive for companies that want to customize the board for a commercial product; educational environments, where students can learn how boards like this are designed; or for those who want an open environment to interface their hardware projects.

I created a MinnowBoard embedded Linux board demo involving an OWI Robotic Arm. You can watch a YouTube video to see how it works.

NAN: What compelled Intel to make the MinnowBoard open hardware?

SCOTT: The main motivation for the MinnowBoard was to create an affordable Atom-based development platform for the Yocto Project. We also felt it was a great opportunity to try to release the board’s design as open hardware. It was exciting to be part of this, because the MinnowBoard is the first Atom-based embedded board to be released as open hardware and reach the market in volume.

Open hardware enables our customers to take the design and build on it in ways we couldn’t anticipate. It’s a concept that is gaining traction within Intel, as can be seen with the announcement of Intel’s open-hardware Galileo project.

NAN: What types of personal projects are you working on?

SCOTT: I’ve recently gone on an electronics kit-building binge. Just getting some practice again with my soldering iron with a well-paced project is a meditative and restorative activity for me.

Scott’s Blinky POV Kit is shown. “I don’t know what I’d do without my PanaVise Jr. [vise] and some alligator clips,” he said.

Scott’s Blinky POV Kit is shown. “I don’t know what I’d do without my PanaVise Jr. [vise] and some alligator clips,” he said.

I worked on one project, the Trippy RGB Waves Kit, which includes an RGB LED and is controlled by a microcontroller. It also has an IR sensor that is intended to detect when you wave your hand over it. This can be used to trigger some behavior of the RGB LED (e.g., cycling the colors). Another project, the Blinky POV Kit, is a row of LEDs that can be programmed to create simple text or logos when you wave the device around, using image persistence.

Below is a completed JeeNode v6 Kit Scott built one weekend.

Below is a completed JeeNode v6 Kit Scott built one weekend.

My current project is to add some wireless sensors around my home, including temperature sensors and a homebrew security system to monitor when doors get opened using 915-MHz JeeNodes. The JeeNode is a microcontroller paired with a low-power RF transceiver, which is useful for home-automation projects and sensor networks. Of course the central server for collating and reporting sensor data will be a MinnowBoard.

NAN: Tell us about your involvement in the Portland, OR, open-source developer community.

SCOTT: Portland has an amazing community of open-source developers. There is an especially strong community of web application developers, but more people are hacking on hardware nowadays, too. It’s a very social community and we have multiple nights per week where you can show up at a bar and hack on things with people.

This photo was taken in the Open Source Bridge hacker lounge, where people socialize and collaborate on projects. Here someone brought a brainwave-control game. The players are wearing electroencephalography (EEG) readers, which are strapped to their heads. The goal of the game is to use biofeedback to move the floating ball to your opponent’s side of the board.

This photo was taken in the Open Source Bridge hacker lounge, where people socialize and collaborate on projects. Here someone brought a brainwave-control game. The players are wearing electroencephalography (EEG) readers, which are strapped to their heads. The goal of the game is to use biofeedback to move the floating ball to your opponent’s side of the board.

I’d say it’s a novelty if I wasn’t so used to it already—walking into a bar or coffee shop and joining a cluster of friendly people, all with their laptops open. We have coworking spaces, such as Collective Agency, and hackerspaces, such as BrainSilo and Flux (a hackerspace focused on creating a welcoming space for women).

Take a look at Calagator to catch a glimpse of all the open-source and entrepreneurial activity going on in Portland. There are often multiple events going on every night of the week. Calagator itself is a Ruby on Rails application that was frequently developed at the bar gatherings I referred to earlier. We also have technical conferences ranging from the professional OSCON to the more grassroots and intimate Open Source Bridge.

I would unequivocally state that moving to Portland was one of the best things I did for developing a career working with open-source technologies, and in my case, on open-source projects.