Connected Padlock Uses U-Blox BLE and Cellular Modules

U‑blox has announced their collaboration with India‑based Play Inc. on a connected GPS padlock for industrial applications. The lock, which doubles as a location tracker, features a U‑blox M8 GNSS receiver, MAX‑M8Q, and uses the u‑blox CellLocate service to extend positioning to indoor locations. U‑blox Bluetooth low energy with NINA‑B112, and 2G, 3G and 4G U‑blox cellular communication modules, including some that are ATEX certified, enable communication between users and the lock.
According to the company, In many industrial settings, locks are an unwelcome bottleneck. They typically require the physical presence of a person with a key to open them, they need to be checked periodically for signs of tampering, and when they are forced open, owners typically find out too late. Play Inc’s i‑Lock combines physical toughness and wireless technology to address these challenges. Offering a variety of access methods, including physical keys and keyless approaches using remote GPRS and SMS passwords as well as Bluetooth low energy or cloud‑based communication via mobile device apps, the i‑Lock lets plant managers or other customers flexibly grant authorization to access the goods that are under lock. And in the event that the padlock is forcefully opened, they are immediately alerted via a server or, optionally, SMS texting.

In addition to securing mobile and stationary goods, the lock’s GNSS receiver lets users track goods in transit. The i‑Lock supports a variety of tracking modes to optimize power consumption for increased autonomy. Location‑awareness further enables geofence restricted applications, in which the i‑Lock can only be open if it is within predefined geographical bounds—for example a petroleum filling station.

The security lock was designed to endure both physical attempts of tampering and cyberattacks. Its fiberglass reinforced enclosure withstands temperatures from -20 to +80 degrees C. The lock features Super Admin, Admin, and User access levels, 128-bit AES encryption, user‑configurable passwords, and a secure protocol to ensure data‑transmission accuracy.

The i‑Lock will be presented at The IoT Solutions Congress Barcelona on October 16‑18, 2018.

U-blox | www.u-blox.com

November Circuit Cellar: Sneak Preview

The November issue of Circuit Cellar magazine is coming soon. Clear your decks for a new stack of in-depth embedded electronics articles prepared for you to enjoy.

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Here’s a sneak preview of November 2018 Circuit Cellar:

SOLUTIONS FOR SYSTEM DESIGNS

3D Printing for Embedded Systems
Although 3D printing for prototyping has existed for decades, it’s only in recent years that it’s become a mainstream tool for embedded systems development. Today the ease of use of these systems has reached new levels and the types of materials that can be used continues to expand. This article by Circuit Cellar’s Editor-in-Chief, Jeff Child looks at the technology and products available today that enable 3D printing for embedded systems.

Add GPS to Your Embedded System
We certainly depend on GPS technology a lot these days, and technology advances have brought fairly powerful GPS functionally into our pockets. Today’s miniaturization of GPS receivers enables you to purchase an inexpensive but capable GPS module that you can add to your embedded system designs. In this article, Stuart Ball shows how to do this and take advantage of the GPS functionality.

FCL for Servo Drives
Servo drives are a key part of many factory automation systems. Improving their precision and speed requires attention to fast-current loops and related functions. In his article, Texas Instruments’ Ramesh Ramamoorthy gives an overview of the functional behavior of the servo loops using fast current loop algorithms in terms of bandwidth and phase margin.

FOCUS ON ANALOG AND POWER

Analog and Mixed-Signal ICs
Analog and mixed-signal ICs play important roles in a variety of applications. These applications depend heavily on all kinds of interfacing between real-world analog signals and the digital realm of processing and control. Circuit Cellar’s Editor-in-Chief, Jeff Child, dives into the latest technology trends and product developments in analog and mixed-signal chips.

Sleeping Electronics
Many of today’s electronic devices are never truly “off.” Even when a device is in sleep mode, it draws some amount of power—and drains batteries. Could this power drain be reduced? In this project article, Jeff Bachiochi addresses this question by looking at more efficient ways to for a system to “play dead” and regulate power.

BUILDING CONNECTED SYSTEMS FOR THE IoT EDGE

Easing into the IoT Cloud (Part 1)
There’s a lot of advantages for the control/monitoring of devices to communicate indirectly with the user interface for those devices—using some form of “always-on” server. When this server is something beyond one in your home, it’s called the “cloud.” Today it’s not that difficult to use an external cloud service to act as the “middleman” in your system design. In this article, Brian Millier looks at the technologies and services available today enabling you to ease in to the IoT cloud.

Sensors at the Intelligent IoT Edge
A new breed of intelligent sensors has emerged aimed squarely at IoT edge subsystems. In this article, Mentor Graphics’ Greg Lebsack explores what defines a sensor as intelligent and steps through the unique design flow issues that surround these kinds of devices.

FUN AND INTERESTING PROJECT ARTICLES

MCU-Based Project Enhances Dance Game
Microcontrollers are perfect for systems that need to process analog signals such as audio and do real-time digital control in conjunction with those signals. Along just those lines, learn how two Cornell students Michael Solomentsev and Drew Dunne recreated the classic arcade game “Dance Dance Revolution” using a Microchip Technology PIC32 MCU. Their version performs wavelet transforms to detect beats from an audio signal to synthesize dance move instructions in real-time without preprocessing.

Building an Autopilot Robot (Part 2)
In part 1 of this two-part article series, Pedro Bertoleti laid the groundwork for his autopiloted four-wheeled robot project by exploring the concept of speed estimation and speed control. In part 2, he dives into the actual building of the robot. The project provides insight to the control and sensing functions of autonomous electrical vehicles.

… AND MORE FROM OUR EXPERT COLUMNISTS

Embedded System Security: Live from Las Vegas
This month Colin O’Flynn summarizes a few interesting presentations from the Black Hat conference in Las Vegas. He walks you through some attacks on bitcoin wallets, x86 backdoors and side channel analysis work—these and other interesting presentations from Black Hat.

Highly Accelerated Product Testing
It’s a fact of life that every electronic system eventually fails. Manufacturers use various methods to weed out most of the initial failures before shipping their product. In this article, George Novacek discusses engineering attempts to bring some predictability into the reliability and life expectancy of electronic systems. In particular, he focuses on Highly Accelerated Lifetime Testing (HALT) and Highly Accelerated Stress Screening (HASS).

Security Takes Center Stage for MCUs

Enabling Secure IoT

Embedded systems face security challenges unlike those in the IT realm. To meet those needs, microcontroller vendors continue to add ever-more sophisticated security features to their devices—both on their own and via partnerships with security specialists.

By Jeff Child, Editor-in-Chief

For embedded systems, there is no one piece of technology that can take on all the security responsibilities of a system on their own. Indeed, everything from application software to firmware to data storage has a role to play in security. That said, microcontollers have been trending toward assuming a central role in embedded security. One driving factor for this is the Internet-of-Things (IoT). As the IoT era moves into full gear, all kinds of devices are getting more connected. And because MCUs are a key component in those connected systems, MCUs have evolved in recent years to include more robust security features on chip.

That trend has continued over the last 12 months, with the leading MCU vendors ramping up those embedded security capabilities in a variety of ways—some on their own and some by teaming up with hardware and software security specialists.

Built for IoT Security

Exemplifying these trends, Microchip Technology in June released its SAM L10 and SAM L11 MCU families (Figure 1). The devices were designed to address the increasing risks of exposing intellectual property (IP) and sensitive information in IoT-based embedded systems. The MCU families are based on the Arm Cortex-M23 core, with the SAM L11 featuring Arm TrustZone for Armv8-M, a programmable environment that provides hardware isolation between certified libraries, IP and application code. Security features on the MCUs include tamper resistance, secure boot and secure key storage. These, combined with TrustZone technology, protect applications from both remote and physical attacks.

Figure 1
The SAM L10 and SAM L11 MCU families provide TrustZone for Armv8-M hardware isolation between certified libraries, IP and application code. The MCUs also feature tamper resistance, secure boot and secure key storage.

In addition to TrustZone technology, the SAM L11 security features include an on-board cryptographic module supporting Advanced Encryption Standard (AES), Galois Counter Mode (GCM) and Secure Hash Algorithm (SHA). The secure boot and secure key storage with tamper detection capabilities establish a hardware root of trust. It also offers a secure bootloader for secure firmware upgrades.

Microchip has partnered with Trustonic, a member of Microchip’s Security Design Partner Program, to offer a comprehensive security solution framework that simplifies implementation of security and enables customers to introduce end products faster. Microchip has also partnered with Secure Thingz and Data I/O Corporation to offer secure provisioning services for SAM L11 customers that have a proven security framework.

Wireless MCU

Likewise focusing on IoT security, NXP Semiconductor in February announced its K32W0x wireless MCU platform. According to NXP, it’s the first single-chip device with a dual-core architecture and embedded multi-protocol radio. It provides a solution for miniaturizing sophisticated applications that typically require a larger, more costly two-chip solution. Examples include consumer devices such as wearables, smart door locks, thermostats and other smart home devices.

The K32W0x embeds a dual-core architecture comprised of an Arm Cortex-M4 core for high performance application processing and a Cortex-M0+ core for low-power connectivity and sensor processing. Memory on chip includes 1.25 MB of flash and 384 KB of SRAM. Its multi-protocol radio supports Bluetooth 5 and IEEE 802.15.4 including the Thread IP-based mesh networking stack and the Zigbee 3.0 mesh networking stack.

Figure 2
Security features of the K32W0x MCU include a cryptographic sub-system that has a dedicated core, dedicated instruction and data memory for encryption, signing and hashing algorithms including AES, DES, SHA, RSA and ECC.

Features of the K32W0x’s security system include a cryptographic sub-system that has a dedicated core, dedicated instruction and data memory for encryption, signing and hashing algorithms including AES, DES, SHA, RSA and ECC. Secure key management is provided for storing and protecting sensitive security keys (Figure 2). Support is enabled for erasing the cryptographic sub-system memory, including security keys, upon sensing a security breach or physical tamper event. The device has a Resource Domain Controller for access control, system memory protection and peripheral isolation. Built-in secure boot and secure over-the-air programming is supported to assure only authorized and authenticated code runs in the device.

To extend the on-chip security features of the K32W0x MCU platform, NXP has collaborated with B-Secur, an expert in biometric authentication, to develop a system that uses an individual’s unique heart pattern (electrocardiogram/ECG) to validate identity, making systems more secure than using an individual’s fingerprint or voice.

IP Boosts Security

For its part, Renesas Electronics addressed the IoT security challenge late last year when it expanded its RX65N/RX651 Group MCU lineup.  …

Read the full article in the October 339 issue of Circuit Cellar

Don’t miss out on upcoming issues of Circuit Cellar. Subscribe today!

Note: We’ve made the October 2017 issue of Circuit Cellar available as a free sample issue. In it, you’ll find a rich variety of the kinds of articles and information that exemplify a typical issue of the current magazine.

Preventing IoT Edge Device Vulnerabilities

FREE White Paper –
Security issues around IoT edge devices are rarely mentioned in the literature. However, the projected billions of IoT edge devices out in the wild makes for a vast attack surface. Should hardware designers be concerned about security for IoT edge devices? And, is it worth the effort and cost to ensure security at this level? We explore internal design vulnerabilities and 3rd-party attacks on IoT edge devices in this paper in order to answer that question.

Get your copy – here

Compact MCU Offers Enhanced Security Features

Maxim Integrated Products has announced the MAX32558 “DeepCover” family of secure microcontrollers that provide advanced cryptography, secure key storage and tamper detection in a 50% smaller package. As electronic products become smaller and increasingly connected, there is a growing threat to sensitive information and privacy, requiring manufacturers to keep security top of mind when designing their devices. While designers should prevent security breaches at the device level, they often struggle with the tradeoff of enhanced security with minimized board space, as well as the cost of design complexity and meeting time to market goals.
The MAX32558 DeepCover Arm Cortex-M3 flash-based secure microcontroller solves these challenges by delivering strong security in a small footprint while simplifying design integration and speeding time to market. It integrates several security features into a small package, including secure key storage, a secure bootloader, active tamper detection and secure cryptographic engines. It also supports multiple communications channels such as USB, serial peripheral interface (SPI), universal asynchronous receiver-transmitter (UART) and I2C, making it ideal for a wide range of applications. Maxim’s long-standing reputation and experience in payment terminal certifications as well as its established support and technology can help streamline the certification process for customers, reducing the process up to 6 months’ time (rather than the typical 12 to 18 months).

Security:Features:

  • Shields sensitive data by providing the most secure key storage available
  • Offers secure bootloader, active tamper detection and secure cryptographic engines
  • Compliant with Federal Information Processing Standard (FIPS) 140-2 L3&4 certification

Compared to a secure authenticator, the MAX32558 provides 30x more general-purpose input/output (GPIO) in the same PCB footprint (4.34 mm x 4.34 mm) wafer-level package (WLP). The closest competitor, meanwhile, offers a device with similar features but in a much larger package (8 mm x 9 mm ball-grid array 121 (BGA121)). The devices reduces footprint by embedding a number of security features to address point-of-sale Payment Card Industry (PCI) pin transaction security (PTS) requirements, as well as several analog interfaces. It provides 512 KB of internal flash and 96 KB of internal SRAM

Easy design integration is enabled by a complete software framework including real-time operating system (RTOS) integration and code examples in evaluation kit. Code can be easily ported from one device to another as it shares the same API software library as the rest of the product family. A pre-certified Europay, Mastercard and Visa (EMV)-L1 stack for smartcard interface is provided. Extensive documentation and code is provided for managing the device lifecycle, such as secure firmware signing and device personalization. The MAX32558 is available at Maxim’s website for $3.80 (1,000-up).

Maxim Integrated | www.maximintegrated.com

September Circuit Cellar: Sneak Preview

The September issue of Circuit Cellar magazine is coming soon. Clear your decks for a new stack of in-depth embedded electronics articles prepared for you to enjoy.

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Here’s a sneak preview of September 2018 Circuit Cellar:

MOTORS, MOTION CONTROL AND MORE

Motion Control for Robotics
Motion control technology for robotic systems continues to advance, as chip- and board-level solutions evolve to meet new demands. These involve a blending of precise analog technologies to control position, torque and speed with signal processing to enable accurate, real-time motor control. Here, Circuit Cellar’s Editor-in-Chief, Jeff Child, looks the latest technology and product advances in motion control for robotics.

Electronic Speed Control (Part 3)
Radio-controlled drones are one among many applications that depend on the use of an Electronic Speed Controller (ESC) as part of its motor control design. After observing the operation of a number of ESC modules, in this part Jeff Bachiochi focuses in more closely on the interaction of the ESC with the BLDC motor.

BUILDING CONNECTED SYSTEMS

Product Focus: IoT Gateways
IoT gateways are a smart choice to facilitate bidirectional communication between IoT field devices and the cloud. Gateways also provide local processing and storage capabilities for offline services as well as near real-time management and control of edge devices. This Product Focus section updates readers on these technology trends and provides a product gallery of representative IoT gateways.

Wireless Weather Station
Integrating wireless technologies into embedded systems has become much easier these days. In this project article, Raul Alvarez Torrico describes his home-made wireless weather station that monitors ambient temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and wind direction, using Arduino and a pair of cheap Amplitude Shift Keying (ASK) radio modules.

FOCUS ON ANALOG AND POWER TECHNOLOGY

Frequency Modulated DDS
Prompted by a reader’s query, Ed became aware that you can no longer get crystal oscillator modules tuned to specific frequencies. With that in mind, Ed set out to build a “Channel Element” replacement around a Teensy 3.6 board and a DDS module. In this article, Ed Nisley explains how the Teensy’s 32-bit datapath and 180 MHz CPU clock affect the DDS frequency calculations. He then explores some detailed timings.

Power Supplies / Batteries
Sometimes power decisions are left as an afterthought in system designs. But your choice of power supply or battery strategy can have a major impact on your system’s capabilities. Circuit Cellar’s Editor-in-Chief, Jeff Child, dives into the latest technology trends and product developments in power supplies and batteries.

Murphy’s Laws in the DSP World (Part 3)
Unpredictable issues crop up when you move from the real world of analog signals and enter the world of digital signal processing (DSP). In Part 3 of this article series, Mike Smith and Mai Tanaka focuses on strategies for how to—or how to try to—avoid Murphy’s Laws when doing DSP.

SYSTEM DESIGN ISSUES IN VIDEO AND IMAGING

Virtual Emulation for Drones
Drone system designers are integrating high-definition video and other features into their SoCs. Verifying the video capture circuitry, data collection components and UHD-4K streaming video capabilities found in drones is not trivial. In his article, Mentor’s Richard Pugh explains why drone verification is a natural fit for hardware emulation because emulation is very efficient at handling large amounts of streamed data.

LIDAR 3D Imaging on a Budget
Demand is on the rise for 3D image data for use in a variety of applications, from autonomous cars to military base security. That has spurred research into high precision LIDAR systems capable of creating extremely clear 3D images to meet this demand. Learn how Cornell student Chris Graef leveraged inexpensive LIDAR sensors to build a 3D imaging system all within a budget of around $200.

AND MORE FROM OUR EXPERT COLUMNISTS

Velocity and Speed Sensors
Automatic systems require real-life physical attributes to be measured and converted to electrical quantities ready for electronic processing. Velocity is one such attribute. In this article, George Novacek steps through the math, science and technology behind measuring velocity and the sensors used for such measurements.

Recreating the LPC Code Protection Bypass
Microcontroller fuse bits are used to protect code from being read out. How well do they work in practice? Some of them have been recently broken. In this article Colin O’Flynn takes you through the details of such an attack to help you understand the realistic threat model.

MCUs Bring Enhanced Security to IoT Systems

Microchip has announced its SAM L10 and SAM L11 MCU families addressing the growing need for security in IoT applications. The new MCU families are based on the Arm Cortex-M23 core, with the SAM L11 featuring Arm TrustZone for Armv8-M, a programmable environment that provides hardware isolation between certified libraries, IP and application code. Security features on the MCUs include tamper resistance, secure boot and secure key storage. These, combined with TrustZone technology, protect applications from both remote and physical attacks.

In addition to TrustZone technology, the SAM L11 security features include an on-board cryptographic module supporting Advanced Encryption Standard (AES), Galois Counter Mode (GCM) and Secure Hash Algorithm (SHA). The secure boot and secure key storage with tamper detection capabilities establish a hardware root of trust. It also offers secure bootloader for secure firmware upgrades.

Microchip has partnered with Trustonic, a member of Microchip’s Security Design Partner Program, to offer a comprehensive security solution framework that simplifies implementation of security and enables customers to introduce end products faster. Microchip has also partnered with Secure Thingz and Data I/O Corporation to offer secure provisioning services for SAM L11 customers that have a proven security framework.

Both MCU families offer Microchip’s latest-generation Peripheral Touch Controller (PTC) for capacitive touch capabilities. Designers can easily add touch interfaces that provide an impressively smooth and efficient user experience in the presence of moisture and noise while maintaining low power consumption. The touch interface makes the devices ideal for a myriad of automotive, appliance, medical and consumer Human Machine Interface (HMI) applications.

The SAM L10 and SAM L11 Xplained Pro Evaluation Kits are available to kick-start development. All SAM L10/L11 MCUs are supported by the Atmel Studio 7 Integrated Development Environment (IDE), IAR Embedded Workbench, Arm Keil MDK as well as Atmel START, a free online tool to configure peripherals and software that accelerates development. START also supports TrustZone technology to configure and deploy secure applications. A power debugger and data analyzer tool are available to monitor and analyze power consumption in real time and fine tune the consumption numbers on the fly to meet application needs. Microchip’s QTouch Modular Library, 2D Touch Surface Library and QTouch Configurator are also available to simplify touch development.

Devices in the SAM L10 series are available starting at $1.09 (10,000s). Devices in the SAM L11 series are available starting at $1.22 (10,000s).

Microchip Technology | www.microchip.com

Verifying Code Readout Protection Claims

Think Like an Attacker

How do you verify the security of microcontrollers? MCU manufacturers often make big claims, but sometimes it is in your best interest to verify them yourself. In this article, Colin discusses a few threats against code readout and looks at verifying some of those claimed levels.

By Colin O’Flynn

You’ve got your latest and greatest IoT toaster designed, and you’re looking to move forward with production. But one thing concerns you: How do you know this stellar code isn’t going to be cloned as soon as you release it to the market?

You turn to the firmware protection features of your chosen microcontroller, but how good is it? This article can’t hope to answer that question in general, rather it will instead give you a short example of how to help answer that question for any specific microcontroller.

In particular, it will teach you to “think like an attacker” when reading through datasheets. Look for small loopholes that could have big consequences, and you will have a much better time navigating the landscape of potential attacks.

Know What’s Out There

One of the most important things is to keep an eye out for new and interesting attacks against these devices. In my January 2018 article (Circuit Cellar 330) I described how there is a published attack against some of the NXP LPC devices, which makes it very easy to unlock them. You can see the presentation entitled “Breaking Code Read Protection on the NXP LPC-family Microcontrollers” by Chris Gerlinsky which describes this attack. Another recent one is an attack against STMicroelectronics’ STM32F0 devices entitled “Shedding Too Much Light on a Microcontroller’s Firmware Protection” by Johannes Obermaier and Stefan Tatschner. That one is a little more limited, but still has some interesting information regarding potential security attacks.

I’m hoping to distill some of these attacks down into common problems, which will help you close a few loopholes before someone rips off your IoT toaster design. At least now if it fails in the marketplace you have no one to blame but yourself.
To give you something concrete to read (and for me to reference), I’ve chosen to use the ST STM32F303 series because it’s a device I’ve been using myself lately. I’m not going to be revealing any unknown vulnerabilities—so if you’re reading this from your office at  STMicroelectronics, no need to sweat. It also has some pretty common configuration options, so makes for a nice reference you can apply to a range of other devices.

ST Read Protection (RDP)

The first step when you are looking at a new device should be to very carefully inspect the security or debug lock protection portion of the datasheet. They will typically go into a fair amount of detail around how the protection mechanism works.
The STM32F3 Reference Manual (RM0316) has this split into two sections. Section 5, entitled “Option byte description” provides information about how the flags are stored in flash. Section 4.3 entitled “Memory Protection” details how this is actually used to protect the code in your device.

Table 1
This excerpt from the datasheet shows how the flash memory read protection levels are defined for the STM32F3 device.

The two important pieces of information for us are replicated in Table 1 and
Table 2. They are the flash memory protection levels, and the associated access allowed at each level. The RDP byte is a special “option byte”, which is the value of a specific location in flash memory. Note the scheme they have chosen uses two bytes, where one is always programmed to be the complement of the other byte. This is presumably used for error checking, and if a byte is not matched with a complement, an error flag is set.

Table 2
Code protection levels 1 and 2 have differing protection abilities. This excerpt from the datasheet shows where flash memory can be read/written/executed from.

Right away you should notice that this scheme does not fall victim to the same problem as the LPC attack I talked about before. In particular the LPC attack exploited the fact a fault or glitch could corrupt the flag value, which caused the CPU to disable the protection.

With the STM32F303, these invalid levels will all map to Protection Level 1. This protection level does not allow external flash access, which “should” be a good sign. The highest protection level also claims to be impossible to remove, but if we could corrupt the value of the option bytes in memory we could downgrade from Protection Level 2 to Protection Level 1. In fact, this “downgrade” is exactly what was presented by Obermaier & Tatschner. The downgrade used a chip decapsulation and light to flip the bits, which is relatively invasive. Other fault attacks (such as voltage or EM) might work but would require investigation before assuming that. Such temporary fault attacks would require the value is read and latched.

But as a good designer, you should assume such faults could be made possible. In this case it would be possible to “downgrade” the device from Protection Level 2 to Protection Level 1. So, what happens if an attacker performed this downgrade? That takes us into the second part of this article. …

Read the full article in the July 336 issue of Circuit Cellar

Don’t miss out on upcoming issues of Circuit Cellar. Subscribe today!

Note: We’ve made the October 2017 issue of Circuit Cellar available as a free sample issue. In it, you’ll find a rich variety of the kinds of articles and information that exemplify a typical issue of the current magazine.

August Circuit Cellar: Sneak Preview

The August issue of Circuit Cellar magazine is coming soon. Be on the lookout for a whole shipload of top-notch embedded electronics articles for you to enjoy.

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Here’s a sneak preview of August 2018 Circuit Cellar:

FPGAs REDEFINE THE DEFINITION OF “SYSTEM”

FPGA System Design
Long gone now are the days when FPGAs were thought of as simple programmable circuitry for interfacing and glue logic. Today, FPGAs are powerful system chips with on-chip processors, signal processing functionality and rich offerings or high-speed connectivity. Here, Circuit Cellar’s Editor-in-Chief, Jeff Child, looks at the latest technology and trends in FPGA system design.

Managing FPGA Design Complexity
Modern FPGAs can contain millions of logic gates and thousands of embedded DSP processors allowing FPGA hardware designers to create extremely sophisticated and complex application-specific hardware functions. In this article, Pentek’s Bob Sgandurra explores how today’s FPGA technology has revamped the roles of both hardware and software engineers as well as how dealing with on-chip IP adds new layers of complexity.

HIGH-INTEGRATION AT THE CHIP-
AND BOARD-LEVEL

Product Focus: Small and Tiny Embedded Boards
An amazing amount of computing functionality can be squeezed on to a small form factor board these days. These company—and even tiny—board-level products meet the needs of applications where extremely low SWaP (size, weight and power) beats all other demands. This Product Focus section updates readers on this technology trend and provides a product album of representative small and tiny embedded boards.

Microcontrollers and Processors
Today’s crop of microcontrollers and embedded processors provide a rich continuum of features, functions and capabilities. It’s hard to tell anymore where the dividing line is, especially when a lot of them use the same CPU cores. Circuit Cellar’s Editor-in-Chief, Jeff Child, delves into the technology and product trends of MCUs and embedded processors.

CAN’T STOP THE SIGNAL

Murphy’s Laws in the DSP World (Part 2)
Many unexpected issues come into play when you move from the real world of analog signals and enter the world of digital signal processing (DSP). Part 2 of this article series by Michael Smith, Mai Tanaka and Ehsan Shahrabi Farahani charges forward introducing “Murphy’s Laws of DSP” #7, #8 and #9 and looks at the spectral analysis of DSP signals.

Signature Analyzer Uses NXP MCU
Doing a signature analysis of a signal used to require an oscilloscope to display your results. In this article, Brian Millier shows how you can build a free-standing tester that uses mostly just the internal peripherals of an NXP ARM microcontroller. He described how the tester operates and how he implemented it using a Teensy 3.5 development module and an intelligent 4.3-inch TFT touch-screen display.

Pitfalls of Filtering Pulsed Signals
Filtering pulsed signals can be a tricky prospect. Using a recent customer implementation as an example, Robert Lacoste highlights various alternative approaches and describes the key concepts involved. Simulation results are provided to help readers understand what’s going on.

PROJECT-BASED STORIES WITH ALL THE DETAILS

Electronic Speed Control (Part 2)
In Part 1, Jeff Bachiochi discussed the mechanical differences between DC brushed and brushless DC (BLDC) motors. This time he dives into basics of an Electronic Speed Controller’s operations and its circuitry. And all this is illustrated via his ESC-based project that uses a Microchip PIC MCU.

Build an Audio Response Light Display
Light shows have been a part of entertainment situations seemingly forever, but the technology has evolved over time. These light shows have their origin in the primitive “light organs” of the 1960s in which each spectral band had its own color that pulsed in intensity with audio amplitudes within its range of frequencies. In this article, Devlin Gualtieri discusses his circuit design that implements a light organ using today’s IC and LED technologies.

AND MORE FROM OUR EXPERT COLUMNISTS

Internet of Things Security (Part 4)
In this next part of his article series on IoT security, Bob Japenga looks at how checklists and the common criteria framework can help us create more secure IoT devices. He covers how to create a list of security assets and to establish threat checklists that identify all the threats to your security assets.

Thermoelectric Cooling (Part 2)
In Part 1 George Novacek described how he built a test chamber using some electronics combined with components salvaged from his thermoelectric water cooler. To confirm his test results, he purchased another thermoelectric cooler and repeated the tests. In Part 2 he covers the results of these tests along with some theoretical performance calculations.

Verizon Certifies Several Telit LTE Modules

Telit has announced that Verizon has certified several of its LTE products. The seven modules are part of Telit’s portfolio of LTE Cat M1, Cat 1, Cat 4 and Cat 11 products, with the LE910-SV V2 and LE910B1-NA modules that also supports Verizon’s Voice over LTE (VoLTE) technology. The modules are now available for operation on Verizon’s 4G LTE network. The following modules are included: ME910C1-NV LTE Cat M1 module, LE910-NA V2 LTE Cat 4 module, LE910-SV V2 LTE Cat 4 VoLTE module, LE910B1-NA LTE Cat 1 VoLTE module, ME866A1-NV LTE Cat M1 module, LE866-SV1 LTE Cat 1 module and LM940 LTE Cat 11 mini PCIe module.
The ME910C1-NV, LE910-SV V2 and LE910-NA V2 modules are members of Telit’s xE910 family (shown). And the LE866-SV1, one its xE866 family, is one of the smallest cellular modules in the market.  Any of the modules can be applied as drop-in replacements in existing devices based on the families’ modules for 2G, 3G and the various categories of LTE. With Telit’s design-once-use-anywhere philosophy, developers can cut costs and development time by simply designing for the xE910 or xE866 LGA common form factors, giving them the freedom to deploy technologies best suited for the application’s environment.

Integrators and providers looking for lower costs, more security and extended product lifecycles now have more options with Telit’s Verizon-certified LTE and VoLTE modules. Telit’s certified modules may be used by its customers in segments like telematics, home and business security, person and asset tracking, wellness monitoring for the elderly and convalescent, smart home and smart buildings.

The LM940 module boasts a power-efficient platform and is the ideal solution for commercial and enterprise applications in the network appliance and router industry, such as branch office connectivity, LTE failover, digital signage, kiosks, pop-up stores, vehicle routers, construction sites and more. This module includes Linux and Windows driver support.

Telit | www.telit.com

Cypress and Semtech Team up on Integrated LoRaWAN Solution

Cypress Semiconductor has announced it has collaborated with Semtech on a compact, two-chip LoRaWAN-based module deployed by Onethinx. The highly-integrated Onethinx module is ideal for smart city applications that integrate multiple sensors and are in harsh radio environments. Using Cypress’ PSoC 6 microcontroller’s (MCU) hardware-based Secure Element functionality and Semtech’s LoRa devices and wireless radio frequency technology (LoRa Technology), the solution enables a multi-layer security architecture that isolates trust anchors for highly protected device-to-cloud connectivity.

In addition, the PSoC 6 MCU’s integrated Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) connectivity provides a simple, low-power, out-of-band control channel. The PSoC 6 device is the industry’s lowest power, most flexible Arm Cortex-M dual-core MCU with a power slope as low as 22-μA/MHz active power for the Cortex-M4 core. The device is a natural fit with Semtech’s latest LoRa radio chip family, which offers 50% power savings in receive mode and 20% longer range over previous-generation devices.

Security is a primary concern for many smart city applications. The Onethinx module utilizes the integrated Secure Element functionality in the PSoC 6 MCU to give each LoRaWAN-based device a secret identity to securely boot, on-board, and deliver data to the cloud application. Using its mutual authentication capabilities, the PSoC 6 MCU-based, LoRa-equipped device can also receive authenticated over-the-air firmware updates.

Key provisioning and management services are provided by IoT security provider and member of the Bosch group, ESCRYPT, for a complete end-to-end, secure LoRaWAN solution. The module, offered by Cypress partner Onethinx, connects to Bosch Sensortec’s Cross Domain Development Kit (XDK) for Micro-Electromechanical Systems (MEMS) sensors and to the provisioning system from ESCRYPT to securely connect.

Cypress Semiconductor | www.cypress.com

Semtech | www.semtech.com

July Circuit Cellar: Sneak Preview

The July issue of Circuit Cellar magazine is coming soon. And we’ve rustled up a great herd of embedded electronics articles for you to enjoy.

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Here’s a sneak preview of July 2018 Circuit Cellar:

TECHNOLOGIES FOR THE INTERNET-OF-THINGS

Wireless Standards and Solutions for IoT  
One of the critical enabling technologies making the Internet-of-Things possible is the set of well-established wireless standards that allow movement of data to and from low-power edge devices. Here, Circuit Cellar’s Editor-in-Chief, Jeff Child, looks at key wireless standards and solutions playing a role in IoT.

Product Focus: IoT Device Modules
The rapidly growing IoT phenomenon is driving demand for highly integrated modules designed to interface with IoT devices. This Product Focus section updates readers on this technology trend and provides a product album of representative IoT interface modules.

TOOLS AND TECHNIQUES AT THE DESIGN PHASE

EMC Analysis During PCB Layout
If your electronic product design fails EMC compliance testing for its target market, that product can’t be sold. That’s why EMC analysis is such an important step. In his article, Mentor Graphics’ Craig Armenti shows how implementing EMC analysis during the design phase provides an opportunity to avoid failing EMC compliance testing after fabrication.

Extreme Low-Power Design
Wearable consumer devices, IoT sensors and handheld systems are just a few of the applications that strive for extreme low-power consumption. Beyond just battery-driven designs, today’s system developers want no-battery solutions and even energy harvesting. Circuit Cellar’s Editor-in-Chief, Jeff Child, dives into the latest technology trends and product developments in extreme low power.

Op Amp Design Techniques
Op amps can play useful roles in circuit designs linking the real analog world to microcontrollers. Stuart Ball shares techniques for using op amps and related devices like comparators to optimize your designs and improve precision.

Wire Wrapping Revisited
Wire wrapping may seem old fashioned, but this tried and true technology can solve some tricky problems that arise when you try to interconnect different kinds of modules like Arduino, Raspberry Pi and so on. Wolfgang Matthes steps through how to best employ wire wrapping for this purpose and provides application examples.

DEEP DIVES ON MOTOR CONTROL AND MONITORING

BLDC Fan Current
Today’s small fans and blowers depend on brushless DC (BLDC) motor technology for their operation. In this article, Ed Nisley explains how these seemingly simple devices are actually quite complex when you measure them in action. He makes some measurements on the motor inside a tangential blower and explores how the data relates to the basic physics of moving air.

Electronic Speed Control (Part 1)
An Electronic Speed Controller (ESC) is an important device in motor control designs, especially in the world of radio-controlled (RC) model vehicles. In Part 1, Jeff Bachiochi lays the groundwork by discussing the evolution of brushed motors to brushless motors. He then explores in detail the role ESC devices play in RC vehicle motors.

MCU-Based Motor Condition Monitoring
Thanks to advances in microcontrollers and sensors, it’s now possible to electronically monitor aspects of a motor’s condition, like current consumption, pressure and vibration. In this article, Texas Instrument’s Amit Ashara steps through how to best use the resources on an MCU to preform condition monitoring on motors. He looks at the signal chain, connectivity issues and A-D conversion.

AND MORE FROM OUR EXPERT COLUMNISTS

Verifying Code Readout Protection Claims
How do you verify the security of microcontrollers? MCU manufacturers often make big claims, but sometimes it is in your best interest to verify them yourself. In this article, Colin O’Flynn discusses a few threats against code readout and looks at verifying some of those claimed levels.

Thermoelectric Cooling (Part 1)
When his thermoelectric water color died prematurely, George Novacek was curious whether it was a defective unit or a design problem. With that in mind, he decided to create a test chamber using some electronics combined with components salvaged from the water cooler. His tests provide some interesting insights into thermoelectric cooling.

 

1 W AC-DC Supplies Feature Ultra-Compact Packages

CUI’s Power Group today has announced the addition of two models to its PBO family of ultra-compact AC-DC power supplies. Outputting 1 W of continuous power, the open frame PBO-1 and PBO-1-B series are housed in vertical and right-angle SIP packages, respectively. The vertical PBO-1 series measures as small as 35 mm x 11 mm x 18 mm (1.38″ x 0.43″ x 0.71″), while the low profile, right-angle PBO-1-B series measures as small as 35 mm x 18 mm x 11 mm (1.38″ x 0.71″ x 0.43″), making them well-suited for industrial systems, automation equipment, security, telecommunications and smart home devices where limited board real-estate is a factor.
These high density power supplies feature wide input voltage ranges from 85 to 305 Vac or 70 VDC to 430 VDC for high voltage DC-DC applications. The PBO-1 and PBO-1-B come available with single output voltages of 5 V, 9 V, 12 V, 15 V, and 24 V DC and offer 3,000 VAC input to output isolation. Both series also offer a wide operating temperature range from -40°C to +85°C at full load as well as over current and continuous short circuit protections with auto recovery.

All models further feature class II construction, carry UL 60950-1 safety approvals, and bear the CE safety mark. The PBO-1 and PBO-1-B series are available immediately with prices starting at $4.74 per unit at 100 pieces through distribution.

CUI | www.cui.com

Microsoft Unveils Secure MCU Platform with a Linux-Based OS

By Eric Brown

Microsoft has announced an “Azure Sphere” blueprint for for hybrid Cortex-A/Cortex-M SoCs that run a Linux-based Azure Sphere OS and include end-to-end Microsoft security technologies and a cloud service. Products based on a MediaTek MT3620 Azure Sphere chip are due by year’s end.

Just when Google has begun to experiment with leaving Linux behind with its Fuchsia OS —new Fuchsia details emerged late last week— long-time Linux foe Microsoft unveiled an IoT platform that embraces Linux. At RSA 2018, Microsoft Research announced a project called Azure Sphere that it bills as a new class of Azure Sphere microcontrollers that run “a custom Linux kernel” combined with Microsoft security technologies. Initial products are due by the end of the year aimed at industries including whitegoods, agriculture, energy and infrastructure.

Based on the flagship, Azure Sphere based MediaTek MT3620 SoC, which will ship in volume later this year, this is not a new class of MCUs, but rather a fairly standard Cortex-A7 based SoC with a pair of Cortex-M4 MCUs backed up by end to end security. It’s unclear if future Azure Sphere compliant SoCs will feature different combinations of Cortex-A and Cortex-M, but this is clearly an on Arm IP based design. Arm “worked closely with us to incorporate their Cortex-A application processors into Azure Sphere MCUs,” says Microsoft. 

Azure Sphere OS architecture (click images to enlarge)

Major chipmakers have signed up to build Azure Sphere system-on-chips including Nordic, NXP, Qualcomm, ST Micro, Silicon Labs, Toshiba, and more (see image below). The software giant has sweetened the pot by “licensing our silicon security technologies to them royalty-free.”

Azure Sphere SoCs “combine both real-time and application processors with built-in Microsoft security technology and connectivity,” says Microsoft. “Each chip includes custom silicon security technology from Microsoft, inspired by 15 years of experience and learnings from Xbox.”

The design “combines the versatility and power of a Cortex-A processor with the low overhead and real-time guarantees of a Cortex-M class processor,” says Microsoft. The MCU includes a Microsoft Pluton Security Subsystem that “creates a hardware root of trust, stores private keys, and executes complex cryptographic operations.”

The IoT oriented Azure Sphere OS provides additional Microsoft security and a security monitor in addition to the Linux kernel. The platform will ship with Visual Studio development tools, and a dev kit will ship in mid-2018.

Azure Sphere security features (click image to enlarge)

The third component is an Azure Sphere Security Service, a turnkey, cloud-based platform. The service brokers trust for device-to-device and device-to-cloud communication through certificate-based authentication. The service also detects “emerging security threats across the entire Azure Sphere ecosystem through online failure reporting, and renewing security through software updates,” says Microsoft.

Azure Sphere eco-system conceptual diagram (top) and list of silicon partners (bottom)

In many ways, Azure Sphere is similar to Samsung’s Artik line of IoT modules, which incorporate super-secure SoCs that are supported by end-to-end security controlled by the Artik Cloud. One difference is that the Artik modules are either Cortex-A applications processors or Cortex-M or -R MCUs, which are designed to be deployed in heterogeneous product designs, rather than a hybrid SoC like the MediaTek MT3620.Hybrid, Linux-driven Cortex-A/Cortex-M SoCs have become common in recent years, led by NXP’s Cortex-A7 based i.MX7 and -A53-based i.MX8, as well as many others including the -A7 based Renesas RZ/N1D and Marvell IAP220.

MediaTek MT3620

The MediaTek MT3620 “was designed in close cooperation with Microsoft for its Azure Sphere Secure IoT Platform,” says MediaTek in its announcement. Its 500MHz Cortex-A7 core is accompanied by large L1 and L2 caches and integrated SRAM. Dual Cortex-M4F chips support peripherals including 5x UART/I2C/SPI, 2x I2S, 8x ADC, up to 12 PWM counters, and up to 72x GPIO.

The Cortex-M4F cores are primarily devoted to real-time I/O processing, “but can also be used for general purpose computation and control,” says MediaTek. They “may run any end-user-provided operating system or run a ‘bare metal app’ with no operating system.”

In addition, the MT3620 features an isolated security subsystem with its own Arm Cortex-M4F core that handles secure boot and secure system operation. A separate Andes N9 32-bit RISC core supports 1×1 dual-band 802.11a/b/g/n WiFi.

The security features and WiFi networking are “isolated from, and run independently of, end user applications,” says MediaTek. “Only hardware features supported by the Azure Sphere Secure IoT Platform are available to MT3620 end-users. As such, security features and Wi-Fi are only accessible via defined APIs and are robust to programming errors in end-user applications regardless of whether these applications run on the Cortex-A7 or the user-accessible Cortex-M4F cores.” MediaTek adds that a development environment is avaialble based on the gcc compiler, and includes a Visual Studio extension, “allowing this application to be developed in C.”

Microsoft learns to love LinuxIn recent years, we’ve seen Microsoft has increasingly softened its long-time anti-Linux stance by adding Linux support to its Azure service and targeting Windows 10 IoT at the Raspberry Pi, among other experiments. Microsoft is an active contributor to Linux, and has even open-sourced some technologies.

It wasn’t always so. For years, Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer took turns deriding Linux and open source while warning about the threat they posed to the tech industry. In 2007, Microsoft fought back against the growth of embedded Linux at the expense of Windows CE and Windows Mobile by suing companies that used embedded Linux, claiming that some of the open source components were based on proprietary Microsoft technologies. By 2009, a Microsoft exec openly acknowledged the threat of embedded Linux and open source software.

That same year, Microsoft was accused of using its marketing muscle to convince PC partners to stop providing Linux as an optional install on netbooks. In 2011, Windows 8 came out with a new UEFI system intended to stop users from replacing Windows with Linux on major PC platforms.


Azure Sphere promo video

Further information

Azure Sphere is available as a developer preview to selected partners. The MediaTek MT3620 will be the first Azure Sphere MCU, and products based on it should arrive by the end of the year. More information may be found in Microsoft’s Azure Sphere announcement and product page.

Microsoft | www.microsoft.com

This article originally appeared on LinuxGizmos.com on April 16.

And check out this follow up story also from LinuxGizmos.com :
Why Microsoft chose Linux for Azure Sphere

 

DC-DC Converter Family Targets Modern Railway Systems

Vicor has released its next generation of DCMs with a family of wide input range (43 V to 154 V input) 3623 (36 mm x 23mm) ChiPs with power levels up to 240 W and 93% efficiency, targeted at new rail transportation and infrastructure applications. Modern rail infrastructure requires a wide range of DC-DC converters to power a variety of new services for both freight and commuter markets.

Commuter rail systems require mobile office communication capabilities with the infotainment capabilities of home. Freight rail systems require monitoring and control capabilities to assure the safe and timely delivery of all goods onboard. While both commuter and freight systems demand reliable and high-performance power systems for the necessary safety and security measures (onboard and at station.)
The DCM is an isolated, regulated DC-DC converter module that can operate from an unregulated, wide range input to generate an isolated DC output. These new ChiP DCMs simplify power system designs by supporting multiple input voltage ranges in a single ChiP. With efficiencies up to 93% in a ChiP package less than 1.5 in2, these DCMs offer engineers leading density and efficiency.

Vicor | www.vicorpower.com