Verizon Certifies Several Telit LTE Modules

Telit has announced that Verizon has certified several of its LTE products. The seven modules are part of Telit’s portfolio of LTE Cat M1, Cat 1, Cat 4 and Cat 11 products, with the LE910-SV V2 and LE910B1-NA modules that also supports Verizon’s Voice over LTE (VoLTE) technology. The modules are now available for operation on Verizon’s 4G LTE network. The following modules are included: ME910C1-NV LTE Cat M1 module, LE910-NA V2 LTE Cat 4 module, LE910-SV V2 LTE Cat 4 VoLTE module, LE910B1-NA LTE Cat 1 VoLTE module, ME866A1-NV LTE Cat M1 module, LE866-SV1 LTE Cat 1 module and LM940 LTE Cat 11 mini PCIe module.
The ME910C1-NV, LE910-SV V2 and LE910-NA V2 modules are members of Telit’s xE910 family (shown). And the LE866-SV1, one its xE866 family, is one of the smallest cellular modules in the market.  Any of the modules can be applied as drop-in replacements in existing devices based on the families’ modules for 2G, 3G and the various categories of LTE. With Telit’s design-once-use-anywhere philosophy, developers can cut costs and development time by simply designing for the xE910 or xE866 LGA common form factors, giving them the freedom to deploy technologies best suited for the application’s environment.

Integrators and providers looking for lower costs, more security and extended product lifecycles now have more options with Telit’s Verizon-certified LTE and VoLTE modules. Telit’s certified modules may be used by its customers in segments like telematics, home and business security, person and asset tracking, wellness monitoring for the elderly and convalescent, smart home and smart buildings.

The LM940 module boasts a power-efficient platform and is the ideal solution for commercial and enterprise applications in the network appliance and router industry, such as branch office connectivity, LTE failover, digital signage, kiosks, pop-up stores, vehicle routers, construction sites and more. This module includes Linux and Windows driver support.

Telit | www.telit.com

July Circuit Cellar: Sneak Preview

The July issue of Circuit Cellar magazine is coming soon. And we’ve rustled up a great herd of embedded electronics articles for you to enjoy.

Not a Circuit Cellar subscriber?  Don’t be left out! Sign up today:

 

Here’s a sneak preview of July 2018 Circuit Cellar:

TECHNOLOGIES FOR THE INTERNET-OF-THINGS

Wireless Standards and Solutions for IoT  
One of the critical enabling technologies making the Internet-of-Things possible is the set of well-established wireless standards that allow movement of data to and from low-power edge devices. Here, Circuit Cellar’s Editor-in-Chief, Jeff Child, looks at key wireless standards and solutions playing a role in IoT.

Product Focus: IoT Device Modules
The rapidly growing IoT phenomenon is driving demand for highly integrated modules designed to interface with IoT devices. This Product Focus section updates readers on this technology trend and provides a product album of representative IoT interface modules.

TOOLS AND TECHNIQUES AT THE DESIGN PHASE

EMC Analysis During PCB Layout
If your electronic product design fails EMC compliance testing for its target market, that product can’t be sold. That’s why EMC analysis is such an important step. In his article, Mentor Graphics’ Craig Armenti shows how implementing EMC analysis during the design phase provides an opportunity to avoid failing EMC compliance testing after fabrication.

Extreme Low-Power Design
Wearable consumer devices, IoT sensors and handheld systems are just a few of the applications that strive for extreme low-power consumption. Beyond just battery-driven designs, today’s system developers want no-battery solutions and even energy harvesting. Circuit Cellar’s Editor-in-Chief, Jeff Child, dives into the latest technology trends and product developments in extreme low power.

Op Amp Design Techniques
Op amps can play useful roles in circuit designs linking the real analog world to microcontrollers. Stuart Ball shares techniques for using op amps and related devices like comparators to optimize your designs and improve precision.

Wire Wrapping Revisited
Wire wrapping may seem old fashioned, but this tried and true technology can solve some tricky problems that arise when you try to interconnect different kinds of modules like Arduino, Raspberry Pi and so on. Wolfgang Matthes steps through how to best employ wire wrapping for this purpose and provides application examples.

DEEP DIVES ON MOTOR CONTROL AND MONITORING

BLDC Fan Current
Today’s small fans and blowers depend on brushless DC (BLDC) motor technology for their operation. In this article, Ed Nisley explains how these seemingly simple devices are actually quite complex when you measure them in action. He makes some measurements on the motor inside a tangential blower and explores how the data relates to the basic physics of moving air.

Electronic Speed Control (Part 1)
An Electronic Speed Controller (ESC) is an important device in motor control designs, especially in the world of radio-controlled (RC) model vehicles. In Part 1, Jeff Bachiochi lays the groundwork by discussing the evolution of brushed motors to brushless motors. He then explores in detail the role ESC devices play in RC vehicle motors.

MCU-Based Motor Condition Monitoring
Thanks to advances in microcontrollers and sensors, it’s now possible to electronically monitor aspects of a motor’s condition, like current consumption, pressure and vibration. In this article, Texas Instrument’s Amit Ashara steps through how to best use the resources on an MCU to preform condition monitoring on motors. He looks at the signal chain, connectivity issues and A-D conversion.

AND MORE FROM OUR EXPERT COLUMNISTS

Verifying Code Readout Protection Claims
How do you verify the security of microcontrollers? MCU manufacturers often make big claims, but sometimes it is in your best interest to verify them yourself. In this article, Colin O’Flynn discusses a few threats against code readout and looks at verifying some of those claimed levels.

Thermoelectric Cooling (Part 1)
When his thermoelectric water color died prematurely, George Novacek was curious whether it was a defective unit or a design problem. With that in mind, he decided to create a test chamber using some electronics combined with components salvaged from the water cooler. His tests provide some interesting insights into thermoelectric cooling.

 

Cypress and Semtech Team up on Integrated LoRaWAN Solution

Cypress Semiconductor has announced it has collaborated with Semtech on a compact, two-chip LoRaWAN-based module deployed by Onethinx. The highly-integrated Onethinx module is ideal for smart city applications that integrate multiple sensors and are in harsh radio environments. Using Cypress’ PSoC 6 microcontroller’s (MCU) hardware-based Secure Element functionality and Semtech’s LoRa devices and wireless radio frequency technology (LoRa Technology), the solution enables a multi-layer security architecture that isolates trust anchors for highly protected device-to-cloud connectivity.

In addition, the PSoC 6 MCU’s integrated Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) connectivity provides a simple, low-power, out-of-band control channel. The PSoC 6 device is the industry’s lowest power, most flexible Arm Cortex-M dual-core MCU with a power slope as low as 22-μA/MHz active power for the Cortex-M4 core. The device is a natural fit with Semtech’s latest LoRa radio chip family, which offers 50% power savings in receive mode and 20% longer range over previous-generation devices.

Security is a primary concern for many smart city applications. The Onethinx module utilizes the integrated Secure Element functionality in the PSoC 6 MCU to give each LoRaWAN-based device a secret identity to securely boot, on-board, and deliver data to the cloud application. Using its mutual authentication capabilities, the PSoC 6 MCU-based, LoRa-equipped device can also receive authenticated over-the-air firmware updates.

Key provisioning and management services are provided by IoT security provider and member of the Bosch group, ESCRYPT, for a complete end-to-end, secure LoRaWAN solution. The module, offered by Cypress partner Onethinx, connects to Bosch Sensortec’s Cross Domain Development Kit (XDK) for Micro-Electromechanical Systems (MEMS) sensors and to the provisioning system from ESCRYPT to securely connect.

Cypress Semiconductor | www.cypress.com

Semtech | www.semtech.com

1 W AC-DC Supplies Feature Ultra-Compact Packages

CUI’s Power Group today has announced the addition of two models to its PBO family of ultra-compact AC-DC power supplies. Outputting 1 W of continuous power, the open frame PBO-1 and PBO-1-B series are housed in vertical and right-angle SIP packages, respectively. The vertical PBO-1 series measures as small as 35 mm x 11 mm x 18 mm (1.38″ x 0.43″ x 0.71″), while the low profile, right-angle PBO-1-B series measures as small as 35 mm x 18 mm x 11 mm (1.38″ x 0.71″ x 0.43″), making them well-suited for industrial systems, automation equipment, security, telecommunications and smart home devices where limited board real-estate is a factor.
These high density power supplies feature wide input voltage ranges from 85 to 305 Vac or 70 VDC to 430 VDC for high voltage DC-DC applications. The PBO-1 and PBO-1-B come available with single output voltages of 5 V, 9 V, 12 V, 15 V, and 24 V DC and offer 3,000 VAC input to output isolation. Both series also offer a wide operating temperature range from -40°C to +85°C at full load as well as over current and continuous short circuit protections with auto recovery.

All models further feature class II construction, carry UL 60950-1 safety approvals, and bear the CE safety mark. The PBO-1 and PBO-1-B series are available immediately with prices starting at $4.74 per unit at 100 pieces through distribution.

CUI | www.cui.com

Microsoft Unveils Secure MCU Platform with a Linux-Based OS

By Eric Brown

Microsoft has announced an “Azure Sphere” blueprint for for hybrid Cortex-A/Cortex-M SoCs that run a Linux-based Azure Sphere OS and include end-to-end Microsoft security technologies and a cloud service. Products based on a MediaTek MT3620 Azure Sphere chip are due by year’s end.

Just when Google has begun to experiment with leaving Linux behind with its Fuchsia OS —new Fuchsia details emerged late last week— long-time Linux foe Microsoft unveiled an IoT platform that embraces Linux. At RSA 2018, Microsoft Research announced a project called Azure Sphere that it bills as a new class of Azure Sphere microcontrollers that run “a custom Linux kernel” combined with Microsoft security technologies. Initial products are due by the end of the year aimed at industries including whitegoods, agriculture, energy and infrastructure.

Based on the flagship, Azure Sphere based MediaTek MT3620 SoC, which will ship in volume later this year, this is not a new class of MCUs, but rather a fairly standard Cortex-A7 based SoC with a pair of Cortex-M4 MCUs backed up by end to end security. It’s unclear if future Azure Sphere compliant SoCs will feature different combinations of Cortex-A and Cortex-M, but this is clearly an on Arm IP based design. Arm “worked closely with us to incorporate their Cortex-A application processors into Azure Sphere MCUs,” says Microsoft. 

Azure Sphere OS architecture (click images to enlarge)

Major chipmakers have signed up to build Azure Sphere system-on-chips including Nordic, NXP, Qualcomm, ST Micro, Silicon Labs, Toshiba, and more (see image below). The software giant has sweetened the pot by “licensing our silicon security technologies to them royalty-free.”

Azure Sphere SoCs “combine both real-time and application processors with built-in Microsoft security technology and connectivity,” says Microsoft. “Each chip includes custom silicon security technology from Microsoft, inspired by 15 years of experience and learnings from Xbox.”

The design “combines the versatility and power of a Cortex-A processor with the low overhead and real-time guarantees of a Cortex-M class processor,” says Microsoft. The MCU includes a Microsoft Pluton Security Subsystem that “creates a hardware root of trust, stores private keys, and executes complex cryptographic operations.”

The IoT oriented Azure Sphere OS provides additional Microsoft security and a security monitor in addition to the Linux kernel. The platform will ship with Visual Studio development tools, and a dev kit will ship in mid-2018.

Azure Sphere security features (click image to enlarge)

The third component is an Azure Sphere Security Service, a turnkey, cloud-based platform. The service brokers trust for device-to-device and device-to-cloud communication through certificate-based authentication. The service also detects “emerging security threats across the entire Azure Sphere ecosystem through online failure reporting, and renewing security through software updates,” says Microsoft.

Azure Sphere eco-system conceptual diagram (top) and list of silicon partners (bottom)

In many ways, Azure Sphere is similar to Samsung’s Artik line of IoT modules, which incorporate super-secure SoCs that are supported by end-to-end security controlled by the Artik Cloud. One difference is that the Artik modules are either Cortex-A applications processors or Cortex-M or -R MCUs, which are designed to be deployed in heterogeneous product designs, rather than a hybrid SoC like the MediaTek MT3620.Hybrid, Linux-driven Cortex-A/Cortex-M SoCs have become common in recent years, led by NXP’s Cortex-A7 based i.MX7 and -A53-based i.MX8, as well as many others including the -A7 based Renesas RZ/N1D and Marvell IAP220.

MediaTek MT3620

The MediaTek MT3620 “was designed in close cooperation with Microsoft for its Azure Sphere Secure IoT Platform,” says MediaTek in its announcement. Its 500MHz Cortex-A7 core is accompanied by large L1 and L2 caches and integrated SRAM. Dual Cortex-M4F chips support peripherals including 5x UART/I2C/SPI, 2x I2S, 8x ADC, up to 12 PWM counters, and up to 72x GPIO.

The Cortex-M4F cores are primarily devoted to real-time I/O processing, “but can also be used for general purpose computation and control,” says MediaTek. They “may run any end-user-provided operating system or run a ‘bare metal app’ with no operating system.”

In addition, the MT3620 features an isolated security subsystem with its own Arm Cortex-M4F core that handles secure boot and secure system operation. A separate Andes N9 32-bit RISC core supports 1×1 dual-band 802.11a/b/g/n WiFi.

The security features and WiFi networking are “isolated from, and run independently of, end user applications,” says MediaTek. “Only hardware features supported by the Azure Sphere Secure IoT Platform are available to MT3620 end-users. As such, security features and Wi-Fi are only accessible via defined APIs and are robust to programming errors in end-user applications regardless of whether these applications run on the Cortex-A7 or the user-accessible Cortex-M4F cores.” MediaTek adds that a development environment is avaialble based on the gcc compiler, and includes a Visual Studio extension, “allowing this application to be developed in C.”

Microsoft learns to love LinuxIn recent years, we’ve seen Microsoft has increasingly softened its long-time anti-Linux stance by adding Linux support to its Azure service and targeting Windows 10 IoT at the Raspberry Pi, among other experiments. Microsoft is an active contributor to Linux, and has even open-sourced some technologies.

It wasn’t always so. For years, Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer took turns deriding Linux and open source while warning about the threat they posed to the tech industry. In 2007, Microsoft fought back against the growth of embedded Linux at the expense of Windows CE and Windows Mobile by suing companies that used embedded Linux, claiming that some of the open source components were based on proprietary Microsoft technologies. By 2009, a Microsoft exec openly acknowledged the threat of embedded Linux and open source software.

That same year, Microsoft was accused of using its marketing muscle to convince PC partners to stop providing Linux as an optional install on netbooks. In 2011, Windows 8 came out with a new UEFI system intended to stop users from replacing Windows with Linux on major PC platforms.


Azure Sphere promo video

Further information

Azure Sphere is available as a developer preview to selected partners. The MediaTek MT3620 will be the first Azure Sphere MCU, and products based on it should arrive by the end of the year. More information may be found in Microsoft’s Azure Sphere announcement and product page.

Microsoft | www.microsoft.com

This article originally appeared on LinuxGizmos.com on April 16.

And check out this follow up story also from LinuxGizmos.com :
Why Microsoft chose Linux for Azure Sphere

 

Preventing IoT Edge Device Vulnerabilities

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Security issues around IoT edge devices are rarely mentioned in the literature. However, the projected billions of IoT edge devices out in the wild makes for a vast attack surface. Should hardware designers be concerned about security for IoT edge devices? And, is it worth the effort and cost to ensure security at this level? We explore internal design vulnerabilities and 3rd-party attacks on IoT edge devices in this paper in order to answer that question.

Get your copy – here

DC-DC Converter Family Targets Modern Railway Systems

Vicor has released its next generation of DCMs with a family of wide input range (43 V to 154 V input) 3623 (36 mm x 23mm) ChiPs with power levels up to 240 W and 93% efficiency, targeted at new rail transportation and infrastructure applications. Modern rail infrastructure requires a wide range of DC-DC converters to power a variety of new services for both freight and commuter markets.

Commuter rail systems require mobile office communication capabilities with the infotainment capabilities of home. Freight rail systems require monitoring and control capabilities to assure the safe and timely delivery of all goods onboard. While both commuter and freight systems demand reliable and high-performance power systems for the necessary safety and security measures (onboard and at station.)
The DCM is an isolated, regulated DC-DC converter module that can operate from an unregulated, wide range input to generate an isolated DC output. These new ChiP DCMs simplify power system designs by supporting multiple input voltage ranges in a single ChiP. With efficiencies up to 93% in a ChiP package less than 1.5 in2, these DCMs offer engineers leading density and efficiency.

Vicor | www.vicorpower.com

Partner Program to Focus on Security

Microchip Technology has also established a Security Design Partner Program for connecting developers with third-party partners that can enhance and expedite secure designs. Along with the program, the company has also released its ATECC608A CryptoAuthentication device, a secure element that allows developers to add hardware-based security to their designs.

Microchip 38318249941_bf38a56692_zAccording to Microchip, the foundation of secured communication is the ability to create, protect and authenticate a device’s unique and trusted identity. By keeping a device’s private keys isolated from the system in a secured area, coupled with its industry-leading cryptography practices, the ATECC608A provides a high level of security that can be used in nearly any type of design. The ATECC608A includes the Federal Information Processing Standard (FIPS)-compliant Random Number Generator (RNG) that generates unique keys that comply with the latest requirements from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), providing an easier path to a whole-system FIPS certification.

Other features include:

  • Boot validation capabilities for small systems: New commands facilitate the signature validation and digest computation of the host microcontroller firmware for systems with small MCUs, such as an ARM Cortex-M0+ based device, as well as for more robust embedded systems.
  • Trusted authentication for LoRa nodes: The AES-128 engine also makes security deployments for LoRa infrastructures possible by enabling authentication of trusted nodes within a network.
  •  Fast cryptography processing: The hardware-based integrated Elliptical Curve Cryptography (ECC) algorithms create smaller keys and establish a certificate-based root of trust more quickly and securely than other implementation approaches that rely on legacy methods.
  •  Tamper-resistant protections: Anti-tampering techniques protect keys from physical attacks and attempted intrusions after deployment. These techniques allow the system to preserve a secured and trusted identity.
  •  Trusted in-manufacturing provisioning: Companies can use Microchip’s secured manufacturing facilities to safely provision their keys and certificates, eliminating the risk of exposure during manufacturing.

In addition to providing hardware security solutions, customers have access to Microchip’s Security Design Partner Program. These industry-leading companies, including Amazon Web Services (AWS) and Google Cloud Platform, provide complementary cloud-driven security models and infrastructure. Other partners are well-versed in implementing Microchip’s security devices and libraries. Whether designers are looking to secure an Internet of Things (IoT) application or add authentication capabilities for consumables, such as cartridges or accessories, the expertise of the Security Design Partners can reduce both development cost and time to market.

For rapid prototyping of secure solutions, designers can use the new CryptoAuth Xplained Pro evaluation and development kit (ATCryptoAuth-XPRO-B) which is an add-on board, compatible with any Microchip Xplained or Xplained Pro evaluation board. The ATECC608A is available for $0.56 each in 10,000 unit quantities. The ATCryptoAuth-XPRO-B add-on development board is available for $10.00 each.

Microchip Technology | www.microchip.com

MCU Vendors Embrace Amazon FreeRTOS

In a flurry of announcements concurrent with Amazon’s release of its new Amazon FreeRTOS operating system, microcontroller vendors are touting their collaborative efforts to support the OS. Amazon FreeRTOS extends the FreeRTOS kernel, a popular open source RTOS for microcontrollers, and includes software libraries for security, connectivity and updateability. Here’s a selection of announcements from the MCU community:

Microchip PIC32MZEF MCUs Support Amazon FreeRTOS
curiosityMicrochip Technology has expanded its collaboration with Amazon Web Services (AWS) to support cloud-connected embedded systems from the node to the cloud. Microchip’s PIC32MZ EF series of microcontrollers now support Amazon FreeRTOS.

STMicro Adds Amazon FreeRTOS to its IoT MCU Tool Suit
STMicroelectronics has announced its collaboration with Amazon Web Services (AWS) on Amazon FreeRTOS, the latest addition to the AWS Internet of Things (IoT) solution.

 

NXP MCU IoT Card with Wi-Fi Supports Amazon FreeRTOS
OM40007-LPC54018-IoT-ModuleNXP Semiconductors has introduced the LPC54018 MCU-based IoT module with onboard Wi-Fi and support for the new Amazon FreeRTOS on Amazon Web Services (AWS), offering developers universal connections to AWS.

 

TI SimpleLink™ MCU platform now supports new Amazon FreeRTOS (PRNewsfoto/Texas Instruments Incorporated)

TI Integrates SimpleLink MCU Platform with Amazon FreeRTOS
Texas Instruments (TI) has announced the integration of the new Amazon FreeRTOS into the SimpleLink microcontroller platform.

Renesas IoT Sandbox Supports RX65N MCU

Renesas Electronics America has expanded its Renesas IoT Sandbox lineup with the new RX65N Wi-Fi Cloud Connectivity Kit. The RX65N Wi-Fi Cloud Connectivity Kit provides an easy-to-use platform for connecting to the cloud, evaluating IoT solutions and creating IoT applications through cloud services and real-time workflows. The RX65N Wi-Fi Cloud Connectivity Kit integrates the high-performance Renesas RX65N microcontroller (MCU) and Medium One’s Smart Proximity demo with the data intelligence featured in Renesas IoT Sandbox.

RX65N_IoT_Sandbox_Wifi_Kit_UnpackedThe Renesas IoT Sandbox provides a fast path from IoT concept to prototype. It enables personalized data intelligence for system developers working with the Renesas SynergyTM Platform, the Renesas RL78 Family and RX Family of MCUs, and the Renesas RZ Family of microprocessors. The new RX65N Wi-Fi Cloud Connectivity Kit is based on the Renesas RX65N Group of MCUs, which is part of the high-performance RX600 Series of MCUs.

The new kit features the Smart Proximity demo implemented by Medium One. System developers can use workflows to extract data from the Ultrasonic Range Finder Sensor and then transmit distance data and duration length for objects close to the sensor to provide intelligence on end-user engagement with the objects. For instance, when deployed in retail environments, business owners can leverage the data to determine when and for how long shoppers view specific merchandise, providing greater insight on shoppers’ selection behaviors.

Developers can sign up for a Renesas IoT Sandbox account at www.renesas.com/iotsandbox. The data intelligence developer area is ready for immediate prototyping use. The RX65N Wi-Fi Connectivity Kit is available for order at Amazon for $59 per kit.

Renesas Electronics | www.renesas.com

NXP MCU IoT Card with Wi-Fi Supports Amazon FreeRTOS

NXP Semiconductors has introduced the LPC54018 MCU-based IoT module with onboard Wi-Fi and support for newly launched Amazon FreeRTOS on Amazon Web Services (AWS), offering developers universal connections to AWS. Amazon FreeRTOS provides tools for users to quickly and easily deploy an MCU-based connected device and develop an IoT application without having to worry about the complexity of scaling across millions of devices. Once connected, IoT device applications can take advantage of the capabilities of the cloud or continue processing data locally with AWS Greengrass.

Amazon FreeRTOS enables security-strong orchestration with the edge-cluster to further leverage low latencies in edge computing configurations, which extends AWS Greengrass core devices’ reach to the nodes. Distributed and autonomous computing architectures become possible through the consistent interface provided between the nodes and their gateways, in both online and offline scenario.

OM40007-LPC54018-IoT-ModuleNXP’s IoT module, co-developed with Embedded Artists and based on the LPC54018 MCU, offers unlimited memory extensibility, a root of trust built on the embedded SRAM physical unclonable functions (PUF) and on-chip cryptographic accelerators. Together, LPC and Amazon FreeRTOS, with easy-to-use software libraries, bring multiple layers of network transport security, simplify cloud on-boarding and over-the-air device management.

NXP enables node-to-cloud AWS connectivity with its LPC54018-based IoT module available on Amazon.com and EmbeddedArtists.com at $35 direct to consumers.

NXP Semiconductors | www.nxp.com

Microchip PIC32MZEF MCUs Support Amazon FreeRTOS

Microchip Technology has expanded its collaboration with Amazon Web Services (AWS) to support cloud-connected embedded systems from the node to the cloud. Supporting Amazon Greengrass, Amazon FreeRTOS and AWS Internet of Things (IoT), Microchip provides all the components, tools, software and support needed to rapidly develop secure cloud-connected systems.

Microchip’s PIC32MZ EF series of microcontrollers now support Amazon FreeRTOS, an operating system that makes compact low-powered edge devices easy to program, deploy, secure and maintain. These high-performance MCUs incorporate industry-leading connectivity options, ample Flash memory, rich peripherals and a robust toolchain which empower embedded designers to rapidly build complex applications. Amazon FreeRTOS includes software libraries which make it easy to securely deploy over-the-air updates as well as the ability to connect devices locally to AWS Greengrass or directly to the cloud, providing a variety of data processing location options.

For systems requiring data collection and analysis at a local level, developers can use Microchip’s SAMA5D2 series of microprocessors with integrated AWS Greengrass software. This will enable systems to run local compute, messaging, data caching and sync capabilities for connected devices in a secure way. This type of execution provides improved event response, conserves bandwidth and enables more cost-effective cloud computing. The SAMA5D2 devices, also available in System-in-Package (SiP) variants, offer full Amazon Greengrass compatibility in a low-power, small form factor MPU targeted at industrial and long-life gateway and concentrator applications. Additionally, the integrated security features and extended temperature range allows these MPUs to be deployed in physically insecure and harsh environments.

In any cloud-connected design, security and ease of use are vital pieces of the puzzle. Microchip’s ATECC608A CryptoAuthentication device enables enhanced system security as well as easy-to-use registration. The secure element provides a unique, trusted and protected identity to each device that can be securely authenticated to protect a brand’s intellectual property and revenue. In addition to enhancing system security, the ATECC608A allows AWS customers to instantly connect to the cloud through the device’s Just-in-Time-Registration (JITR) powered by AWS IoT.

curiosityMicrochip has an extensive toolchain for rapid and reliable development. The Curiosity PIC32MZ EF development board (shown), to kick-start Amazon FreeRTOS-based designs, is a fully integrated 32-bit development platform which also includes two mikroBUS expansion sockets, enabling designers to easily add additional capabilities, such as Wi-Fi with the WINC1510 click board, to their designs. The SAMA5D2 Xplained Ultra board, which can be used for AWS Greengrass designs, is a fast prototyping and evaluation platform for the SAMA5D2 series of MPUs. Additionally, the CryptoAuth Xplained Pro evaluation and development kit is an add-on board for rapid prototyping of secure solutions on AWS IoT and is compatible with any Microchip Xplained or XplainedPro evaluation boards. AWS is also a part of Microchip’s Design Partner Program which provides technical expertise and cost-effective solutions in a timely manner.

PIC32MZ EF MCUs are available starting at $5.48 each in 10,000 unit quantities. The PIC32MZ EF Curiosity board (DM320104) is available for $47.99 each. SAMA5D2 MPUs are available starting at $4.42 each in 10,000 unit quantities. The SAMA5D2 Xplained Ultra board (ATSAMA5D2C-XULT) is available for $150 each. ATECC608A secure elements are available starting at $0.56 each in 10,000 unit quantities. The CryptoAuth Xplained Pro evaluation and development kit (ATCryptoAuth-XPRO-B) is available for $10 each.

Microchip Technology | www.microchip.com

STMicro Adds Amazon FreeRTOS to its IoT MCU Tool Suite

STMicroelectronics has announced its collaboration with Amazon Web Services (AWS) on Amazon FreeRTOS, the latest addition to the AWS Internet of Things (IoT) solution. Amazon FreeRTOS provides everything one needs to easily and securely deploy microcontroller-based connected devices and develop an IoT application without having to worry about the complexity of scaling across millions of devices. Once connected, IoT device applications can take advantage of all of the capabilities the cloud has to offer or continue processing data locally with AWS Greengrass.

ST’s collaboration with AWS speeds designers’ efforts to create easily connectable IoT nodes with the combination of ST’s semiconductor building blocks and Amazon FreeRTOS, which extends the leading free and open-source real-time operating-system kernel for embedded devices (FreeRTOS) with the appropriate libraries for local networking, cloud connectivity, security, and remote software updates.

For the STM32, ST’s family of 32-bit Arm Cortex-M microcontrollers, the modular and interoperable IoT development platform spans state-of-the-art semiconductor components, ready-to-use development boards, free software tools and common application examples. At the official release of Amazon FreeRTOS, a version of the OS and libraries were immediately made available to run on the ultra-low-power STM32L4 series of microcontrollers.

The starter kit for Amazon FreeRTOS is ST’s B-L475E-IOT01A Discovery kit for IoT node, a fully integrated development board that exploits low-power communication, multiway sensing, and a raft of features provided by the STM32L4 series microcontroller to enable a wide range of IoT-capable applications. The Discovery kit’s support for Arduino Uno V3 and PMOD connectivity ensures unlimited expansion capabilities with a large choice of specialized add-on boards.

STMicroelectronics | www.st.com

TI Integrates SimpleLink MCU Platform with Amazon FreeRTOS

Texas Instruments (TI) has announced the integration of the new Amazon FreeRTOS into the SimpleLink microcontroller platform. Amazon Web Services (AWS) has worked with TI in the development of an integrated hardware and software solution that enables developers to quickly establish a connection to AWS IoT service out-of-the-box and immediately begin system development.

TI SimpleLink™ MCU platform now supports new Amazon FreeRTOS (PRNewsfoto/Texas Instruments Incorporated)

TI’s SimpleLink Wi-Fi CC3220SF wireless MCU LaunchPad development kit, which now supports Amazon FreeRTOS, offers embedded security features such as secure storage, cloning protection, secure bootloader and networking security. Developers can now take advantage of these security features to help them protect cloud-connected IoT devices from theft of intellectual property (IP) and data or other risks.

TI offers a broad portfolio of building blocks for IoT nodes and gateways spanning wired and wireless connectivity, microcontrollers, processors, sensing technology, power management and analog solutions, along with a community of cloud service providers, such as AWS, to help developers get connected to the cloud faster.

The SimpleLink MCU platform from Texas Instruments is a single development environment that delivers flexible hardware, software and tool options for customers developing Internet of Things (IoT) applications. With a single software architecture, modular development kits and free software tools for every point in the design life cycle, the SimpleLink MCU ecosystem allows 100 percent code reuse across the portfolio of microcontrollers, which supports a wide range of connectivity standards and technologies including RS-485, Bluetooth low energy, Wi-Fi, Sub-1 GHz, 6LoWPAN, Ethernet, RF4CE and proprietary radio frequencies. SimpleLink MCUs help manufacturers easily develop and seamlessly reuse resources to expand their portfolio of connected products.

Texas Instruments | www.ti.com

MCU Leverages New ARM Security Scheme

STMicroelectronics supports ARM’s new Platform Security Architecture (PSA) in ST’s STM32H7 high-performing microcontrollers. People and organizations are increasingly dependent on connected electronic devices to manage time, monitor health, handle social interactions, consume or deliver services, maximize productivity, and many other activities. Preventing unauthorized interactions with these devices is essential to protecting identity, personal information, physical assets, and intellectual property. As device manufacturers must always innovate to beat new and inventive hacking exploits, PSA helps them implement state-of-the-art security cost-effectively in small, resource-constrained devices.

en.STM32H7_Support_Arm_Security_T3989S_bigST’s STM32H7 MCU devices integrate hardware-based security features including a True Random-Number Generator (TRNG) and advanced cryptographic processor, which will simplify protecting embedded applications and global IoT systems against attacks like eavesdropping, spoofing, or man-in-the-middle interception. In addition, secure firmware loading facilities help OEMs ensure their products can be programmed safely and securely, even off-site at a contract manufacturer or programming house.

To enable secure loading, security keys and software services already on-board the MCU permit OEMs to provide manufacturing partners with already-encrypted firmware, making intercepting, copying, or tampering with the code impossible. This enables programming and authenticating the device to establish the root-of-trust mechanism needed for the device to be connected to the end-user’s network and remotely updated over the air (OTA) to apply security patches or feature upgrades throughout the lifetime of the device.

A member of the STM32H7 series supporting the PSA, the STM32H753 MCU with ARM’s highest-performing embedded core (Cortex-M7) delivers a record performance of 2020 CoreMark/856 DMIPS running at 400MHz, executing code from embedded Flash memory. Additional innovations and features implemented by ST further boost performance. These include the Chrom-ART Accelerator for fast and efficient graphical user-interfaces, a hardware JPEG codec that allows high-speed image manipulation, highly efficient Direct Memory Access (DMA) controllers, up to 2 MB of on-chip dual-bank Flash memory with read-while-write capability, and the L1 cache allowing full-speed interaction with off-chip memory.

Multiple power domains allow developers to minimize the energy consumed by their applications, while plentiful I/Os, communication interfaces, and audio and analog peripherals can address a wide range of entertainment, remote-monitoring and control applications. The STM32H753 is in production now, priced $8.90 for orders or 10,000 pieces.

STMicroelectronics | www.st.com