Artisan’s Asylum

Artisan’s Asylum in Somerville, MA has the mission to promote and support the teaching, learning, and practicing of all varieties. Soumen Nandy is the Front Desk, General Volunteer, and Village Idiot of Artisan’s Asylum and she decided to tell us a little bit more about it.

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Photo courtesy of Artisan’s Asylum Facebook page

Location 10 Tyler St
Somerville, MA 02143
Members 400 active members
Website artisansasylum.com

Tell us about your meeting space!

We have around 40,000 sq. ft. that includes more than 150 studio spaces ranging from 50 sq. ft. to 200+ sq. ft. Our storage includes: lockers, 2 x 2 x 2 rack space, 40″ x 44″ pallets (up to 10′ tall), flexspace and studios. We have a truck-loading dock and a rail stop — yup, entire trains can pull up to our back doors for delivery. Can any other Maker Space say that? We also host a large roster of formal training courses in practical technologies, trades, crafts and arts, to help our members and the general community learn skills, and increase their awesomeness. (And not incidentally: become certified to safely use our gear.)

What are you working with?

Fully equipped wood, metal, machine, robotics, electronics, jewelry/glass shops, 12 sewing stations,  computer lab with all major professional modeling, CNC, and simulation packages (via direct partnerships with the respective companies). Multiple types of 3D printers, laser cutters, CNC routers, lathes, mills, etc. Too much more to list; if the Asylum doesn’t own/lease it, often a member, their business, or an institutional member can get it from you or get you access. And yet, it’s never enough.

Are there any tools your group really wants or needs?

Quite a few things, but it’s a delicate balance between sustainable operations, growth and space for member studios vs. facilities. We’ve spun off or attracted many companies, so the empty factory complex we moved into (until recently the worlds largest envelope factory) has almost completely filled up.

Does your group work with embedded tech (Arduino, Raspberry Pi, embedded security, MCU-based designs, etc.)?

Many of our members do. The group itself is too diverse to easily characterize.

What has your group been up to?

10464004_508974359203723_530424612314997460_n-artisanasylum-hexapod2

Hanging with a giant robot. (Courtesy of https://www.facebook.com/ProjectHexapod)

We’re not purely a technological space. We have artists, artisans, tradespesons, crafters, hobbyists, and technologists. I know of at least two-million dollar Kickstarters that launched from here. Hmmm… How about the 18-foot wide rideable-hexapod robot that’s nearing conclusion (we call it “Stompy“) or the 4′ x 8′ large format laser cutter that should be operational any day now? These are just some notably big projects, not necessarily our most awesome.

Oh, wait. we did an Ides of March Festival, dressing up Union Square as a Roman Forum.

What’s the craziest project your group or group members have completed?

Well, a few weeks ago, I went home at 10 PM, and woke to a tweeted photo announcing that this had been built in our social area; It’s actually not among our most surprising events, but it has reappeared several times since (fast dis/assembly), and a reporter caught it once. I just happened to receive this link a couple of hours ago, so it was handy to forward to you. We do a lot of art and participation projects around Boston.

What does Artisan’s social calendar look like these days?

Too many events to list! We’re really looking to stabilize our base, seek congruent funding donors (we are a non-profit, but thus far have mostly run on internally-earned income). I’d be happy to arrange an interview with one of our honchos if you like—the goings-ons around here are really too much to fit in one brain. Those of us who give tours actually regularly take each other’s tours to learn stuff about the place we never knew.

What would you like to say to fellow hackers out there?

Keep getting awesomer. We love you!

Also, any philanthropists out there? Our members and facilities could be an excellent way to multiply your awesome impact.

Keep up with Artisan’s Asylum! Check out their website!

Show us your hackerspace! Tell us about your group! Where does your group design, hack, create, program, debug, and innovate? Do you work in a 20′ × 20′ space in an old warehouse? Do you share a small space in a university lab? Do you meet at a local coffee shop or bar? What sort of electronics projects do you work on? Submit your hackerspace and we might feature you on our website!

Robotics, Hardware Interfacing, and Vintage Electronics

Gerry O’Brien, a Toronto-based robotics and electronics technician at R.O.V. Robotics, enjoys working on a variety of projects in his home lab. His projects are largely driven by his passion for electronics hardware interfacing.

Gerry’s background includes working at companies such as Allen-Vanguard Corp., which builds remotely operated vehicle (ROV) robots and unmanned ground vehicles (UGVs) for military and police bomb disposal units worldwide. “I was responsible for the production, repair, programming and calibration of the robot control consoles, VCU (vehicle control unit) and the wireless communication systems,” he says.

Gerry recently sent Circuit Cellar photos of his home-based electronics and robotics lab. (More images are available on his website.) This is how he describes the lab’s layout and equipment:

In my lab I have various designated areas with lab benches that I acquired from the closing of a local Nortel  R&D office over 10 years ago.

All of my electronics benches have ESD mats and ground wrist straps.  All of my testing gear, I have purchased on eBay over the years….

PCB flip rack

PCB flip-rack

To start, I have my “Electronics Interfacing Bench” with a PCB flip-rack , which allows me to Interface PCBs while they are powered (in-system testing). I am able to interface my Tektronix TLA715 logic analyzer and other various testing equipment to the boards under test. My logic analyzer currently has two  logic I/O modules that have 136 channels each. So combined, I have 272 channels for logic analysis. I also have a four-channel digital oscilloscope module to use with this machine. I can now expand this even further by interfacing my newly acquired expansion box, which allows me to interface many more modules to the logic analyzer mainframe.

Gerry's lab bench

Gerry’s lab bench

Gerry recently upgraded his  Tektronix logic analyzer with an expansion box.

Gerry recently upgraded his Tektronix logic analyzer with an expansion box.

Interface probes

Logic analyzer interface probes

I also have a soldering bench where I have all of my soldering gear, including a hot-air rework station and 90x dissecting microscope with a video interface.

Dissecting microscope with video interface

Dissecting microscope with video interface

My devoted robotics bench has several robotic arm units, Scorbot and CRS robots with their devoted controllers and pneumatic Interface control boards.

Robotics bench

Robotics bench and CRS robot

On my testing bench, I currently have an Agilent/HP 54610B 500-MHz oscilloscope with the GPIB to RS-232 adapter for image capturing. I also have an Advantest model R3131A 9 kHz to 3-GHz bandwidth spectrum analyzer, a Tektronix model AFG3021 function generator, HP/Agilent 34401A multimeter and an HP 4CH programmable power supply. For the HP power supply, I built a display panel with four separate voltage output LCD displays, so that I can monitor the voltages of all four outputs simultaneously. The stock monochrome LCD display on the HP unit itself is very small and dim and only shows one output at a time.

Anyhow, my current testing bench setup will allow me to perform various signal mapping and testing on chips with a large pin count, such as the older Altera MAX9000 208-pin CPLDs and many others that I enjoy working with.

The testing bench

The testing bench

And last but not least… I have my programming and interfacing bench devoted to VHDL programming, PCB Design, FPGA hardware programming (JTAG), memory programming (EEPROM  and flash memory), web design, and video editing.

Interfacing bench and "octo-display"

Interfacing bench and “octo-display”

I built a PC computer and by using  a separate graphics display cards, one being an older Matrols four-port SVGA display card; I was able to build a “octo-display” setup. It seamlessly shares eight monitors providing a total screen resolution size of 6,545 x 1,980 pixels.

If you care to see how my monitor mounting assembly was built, I have posted pictures of its construction here.

A passion for electronics interfacing drives Gerry’s work:

I love projects that involve hardware Interfacing.  My area of focus is on electronics hardware compared to software programming. Which is one of the reasons I have focused on VHDL programming (hardware description language) for FPGAs and CPLDs.

I leave the computer software programming of GUIs to others. I will usually team up with other hobbyists that have more of a Knack for the Software programming side of things.  They usually prefer to leave the electronics design and hardware production to someone else anyhow, so it is a mutual arrangement.

I love to design and build projects involving vintage Altera CPLDs and FPGAs such as the Altera MAX7000 and MAX9000 series of Altera components. Over the years, I have a managed to collect a large arsenal of vintage Altera programming hardware from the late ’80s and early ’90s.  Mainly for the Altera master programming unit (MPU) released by Altera in the early ’90s. I have been building up an arsenal of the programming adapters for this system. Certain models are very hard to find. Due to the rarity of this Altera programming system, I am currently working on designing my own custom adapter interface that will essentially allow me to connect any compatible Altera component to the system… without the need of the unique adapter. A custom made adapter essentially.  Not too complicated at all really, it’s just a lot of fun to build and then have the glory of trying out other components.

I love to design, build, and program FPGA projects using the VHDL hardware description language and also interface to external memory and sensors. I have a devoted website and YouTube channel where I post various hardware repair videos or instructional videos for many of my electronics projects. Each project has a devoted webpage where I post the instructional videos along with written procedures and other information relating to the project. Videos from “Robotic Arm Repair” to a “DIY SEGA Game Gear Flash Cartridge” project. I even have VHDL software tutorials.

The last project I shared on my website was a project to help students dive into a VHDL based VGA Pong game using the Altera DE1 development board.

 

Client Profile: Integrated Knowledge Systems

Integrated Knowledge Systems' NavRanger board

Integrated Knowledge Systems’ NavRanger board

Phoenix, AZ

CONTACT: James Donald, james@iknowsystems.com
www.iknowsystems.com

EMBEDDED PRODUCTS: Integrated Knowledge Systems provides hardware and software solutions for autonomous systems.
featured Product: The NavRanger-OEM is a single-board high-speed laser ranging system with a nine-axis inertial measurement unit for robotic and scanning applications. The system provides 20,000 distance samples per second with a 1-cm resolution and a range of more than 30 m in sunlight when using optics. The NavRanger also includes sufficient serial, analog, and digital I/O for stand-alone robotic or scanning applications.

The NavRanger uses USB, CAN, RS-232, analog, or wireless interfaces for operation with a host computer. Integrated Knowledge Systems can work with you to provide software, optics, and scanning mechanisms to fit your application. Example software and reference designs are available on the company’s website.

EXCLUSIVE OFFER: Enter the code CIRCUIT2014 in the “Special Instructions to Seller” box at checkout and Integrated Knowledge Systems will take $20 off your first order.


 

Circuit Cellar prides itself on presenting readers with information about innovative companies, organizations, products, and services relating to embedded technologies. This space is where Circuit Cellar enables clients to present readers useful information, special deals, and more.

Q&A: Robotics Mentor and Champion

Peter Matteson, a Senior Project Engineer at Pratt & Whitney in East Hartford, CT, has a passion for robotics. We recently discussed how he became involved with mentoring a high school robotics team, the types of robots the team designs, and the team’s success.—Nan Price, Associate Editor

 

NAN: You mentor a FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) robotics team for a local high school. How did you become involved?

Peter Matteson

Peter Matteson

PETER: I became involved in FIRST in late 2002 when one of my fraternity brothers who I worked with at the time mentioned that FIRST was looking for new mentors to help the team the company sponsored. I was working at what was then known as UTC Power (sold off to ClearEdge Power Systems last year) and the company had sponsored Team 177 Bobcat Robotics since 1995.

After my first year mentoring the kids and experiencing the competition, I got hooked. I loved the competition and strategy of solving a new game each year and designing and building a robot. I enjoyed working with the kids, teaching them how to design and build mechanisms and strategize the games.

The FIRST team’s 2010 robot is shown.

The FIRST team’s 2010 robot is shown.

A robot’s articulating drive train is tested  on an obstacle (bump) at the 2010 competition.

A robot’s articulating drive train is tested on an obstacle (bump) at the 2010 competition.

NAN: What types of robots has your team built?

A temporary control board was used to test the drive base at the 2010 competition.

A temporary control board was used to test the drive base at the 2010 competition.

PETER: Every robot we make is purposely built for a specific game the year we build it. The robots have varied from arm robots with a 15’ reach to catapults that launch a 40” diameter ball, to Frisbee throwers, to Nerf ball shooters.

They have varied in drive train from 4 × 4 to 6 × 6 to articulating 8 × 8. Their speeds have varied from 6 to 16 fps.

NAN: What types of products do you use to build the robots? Do you have any favorites?

PETER: We use a variant of the Texas Instruments (TI) cRIO electronics kit for the controller, as is required per the FIRST competition rules. The motors and motor controllers we use are also mandated to a few choices. We prefer VEX Robotics VEXPro Victors, but we also design with the TI Jaguar motor controllers. For the last few years, we used a SparkFun CMUcam webcam for the vision system. We build with Grayhill encoders, various inexpensive limit switches, and gyro chips.

The team designed a prototype minibot.

The team designed a prototype minibot.

For pneumatics we utilize compressors from Thomas and VIAIR. Our cylinders are primarily from Bimba, but we also use Parker and SMC. For valves we use SMC and Festo. We usually design with clipart plastic or stainless accumulator tanks. Our gears and transmissions come from AndyMark, VEX Robotics’s VEXPro, and BaneBots.

The AndyMark shifter transmissions were a mainstay of ours until last year when we tried the VEXPro transmissions for the first time. Over the years, we have utilized many of the planetary transmissions from AndyMark, VEX Robotics, and BaneBots. We have had good experience with all the manufacturers. BaneBots had a shaky start, but it has vastly improved its products.

We have many other odds and ends we’ve discovered over the years for specific needs of the games. Those are a little harder to describe because they tend to be very specific, but urethane belting is useful in many ways.

NAN: Has your team won any competitions?

Peter’s FIRST team is pictured at the 2009 championship at the Georgia Dome in Atlanta, GA. (Peter is standing fourth from the right.)

Peter’s FIRST team is pictured at the 2009 championship at the Georgia Dome in Atlanta, GA. (Peter is standing fourth from the right.)

PETER: My team is considered one of the most successful in FIRST. We have won four regional-level competitions. We have always shined at the competition’s championship level when the 400 teams from the nine-plus countries that qualify vie for the championship.

In my years on the team, we have won the championship twice (2007 and 2010), been the championship finalist once (2011), won our division, made the final four a total of six times (2006–2011), and were division finalists in 2004.

A FIRST team member works on a robot “in the pits” at the 2011 Hartford, CT, regional competition.

A FIRST team member works on a robot “in the pits” at the 2011 Hartford, CT, regional competition.

Team 177 was the only team to make the final four more than three years in a row, setting the bar at six consecutive trips. It was also the only team to make seven trips to the final four, including in 2001.

NAN: What is your current occupation?

PETER: I am a Senior Project Engineer at Pratt & Whitney. I oversee and direct a team of engineers designing components for commercial aircraft propulsion systems.

NAN: How and when did you become interested in robotics?

PETER: I have been interested in robotics for as long as I can remember. The tipping point was probably when I took an industrial robotics course in college. That was when I really developed a curiosity about what I could do with robots.

The industrial robots course started with basic programming robots for tasks. We had a welding robot we taught the weld path and it determined on its own how to get between points.

We also worked with programming a robot to install light bulbs and then determine if the bulbs were working properly.

In addition to practical labs such as those, we also had to design the optimal robot for painting a car and figure out how to program it. We basically had to come up with a proposal for how to design and build the robot from scratch.

This robot from the 2008 competition holds a 40” diameter ball for size reference.

This robot from the 2008 competition holds a 40” diameter ball for size reference.

NAN: What advice do you have for engineers or students who are designing robots or robotic systems?

PETER: My advice is to clearly set your requirements at the beginning of the project and then do some research into how other people have accomplished them. Use that inspiration as a stepping-off point. From there, you need to build a prototype. I like to use wood, cardboard, and other materials to build prototypes. After this you can iterate to improve your design until it performs exactly as expected.

Ohio-Based “Design Dungeon”

“Steve Ciarcia had a ‘Circuit Cellar.’ I have a ‘Design Dungeon,’” Steve Lubbers says about his Dayton, OH-based workspace.

“An understanding wife and a spare room in the house allocated a nice place for a workshop. Too bad the engineer doesn’t keep it nice and tidy! I am amazed by the nice clean workspaces that have previously been published! So for those of you who need a visit from FEMA, don’t feel bad. Take a look at my mess.”

Steve Lubbers describes his workbench as a “work in progress.”

Steve Lubbers describes his workbench as a “work in progress.”

The workspace is a creative mess that has produced dozens of projects for Circuit Cellar contests. From the desk to the floor to the closet, the space is stocked with equipment and projects in various stages.

Lubbers writes:

The doorway is marked “The Dungeon.” The first iteration of The Dungeon was in my parents’ basement. When I bought a house, the workshop and the sign moved to my new home.

The door is a requirement when company comes to visit. Once you step inside, you will see why. The organizational plan seems to be a pile for everything, and everything in a pile. Each new project seems to reduce the amount of available floor space.

Lubbers_Floor

Lubbers’s organization plan is simple: “A pile for everything, and everything in a pile.”

“High-tech computing” is accomplished on a PDP-11/23. This boat anchor still runs to heat the room, but my iPod has more computing abilities! My nieces and nephews don’t really believe in 8” disks, but I have proof.

The desk (messy of course) holds a laptop computer and a ham radio transceiver. Several of my Circuit Cellar projects have been related to amateur radio. A short list of my ham projects includes a CW keyer, an antenna controller, and a PSK-31 (digital communications) interface.

Lubbers_Desk

Is there a desk under there?

My workbench has a bit of clear space for my latest project and fragments of previous projects are in attendance. The skull in the back right is wearing the prototype for my Honorable Mention in the Texas Instruments Design Stellaris 2010 contest. It’s a hands-free USB mouse. The red tube was the fourth-place winner in the microMedic 2013 National Contest.

Front and center is the prototype for my March 2014 Circuit Cellar article on robotics. Test equipment is a mix of old and new. Most of the newer equipment has been funded by past Circuit Cellar contests and articles.

Lubbers_Hero

“My wife allows my Hero Jr. robot to visit the living room. He is housebroken after all,” Lubbers says.

The closet is a “graveyard” for all of the contest kits I have received, models I would like to build, and other contraptions the wife doesn’t allow to invade the rest of the house. (She is pretty considerate because you will find my Hero Jr. robot in the living room.)

At one time, The Dungeon served as my home office. For about five years I had the ideal “down the hall” commute. A stocked lab helped justify my ability to work from home.

When management pulled the plug on working remotely, the lab got put to work developing about a dozen projects for Circuit Cellar contests. There has been a dry spell since my last contest entry, so these days I am helping develop the software for the ham radio Satellite FOX-1. My little “CubeSat” will operate as a ham radio transponder and a platform for university experiments when it launches in late 2014. Since I will probably never go to space myself, the next best thing is launching my code into orbit. It’s a good thing that FOX-1 is smaller than a basketball. If it was bigger, it might not fit on my workbench!

Lubbers’s article about building a swarm of robots will appear in Circuit Cellar’s March issue. To learn more about Lubbers, read our 2013 interview.