Renesas RL78 Green Energy Challenge

Up for an international design challenge? It’s time for the Renesas RL78 Green Energy Challenge! Renesas has partnered with IAR Systems to deliver engineers a power-house combo of low-power devices and high-quality software. They’re steering a great, green revolution and are challenging you to transform how the world experiences energy efficiency by developing a unique, low-power application using the RL78 MCU and IAR toolchain. Succeed and win a share of $17,500 in Grand Prizes from Renesas! * The Renesas Grand Prize winner will also win a free trip to Renesas DevCon in October where winners will be announced.

But that’s not all. Earn additional prizes like developments tools, Pmods, Wi-Fi modules, embedded systems books, and more from Contest Partners through weekly prize drawings. Follow Renesas on Twitter and Facebook for weekly challenge questions from official Contest Partners. Weekly Partner Challenges, and the respective winners, will be announced every Monday throughout the competition.

So, do you have a great idea for a remote device that monitors pollution? What about a box collecting data on home power usage or an energy harvesting biometric design? Perhaps your grand plan is for a low power controller scavenging heat from an oven or furnace, a meter reading biomass parameters, or a braking system for a wind turbine? It’s up to you! Send us your best RL78 based ideas to help make the world a better place.

The Challenge starts March 26, 2012 and ends on August 31, 2012. Winners will be announced in October at Renesas’ DevCon 2012.

Hundreds of free RL78/G13 development kits (“RDK”s), loaded with IAR’s Kickstart edition, are being distributed to those who qualify. Click here to see if you qualify for a complimentary RDK!

*Prizes in U.S. dollars.

Circuit Cellar, Inc. and Elektor International Media is the Contest Administrator.

 

Issue 261: Renesas RL78, Cap Touch, Synapse SNAP, & More!

Here’s a sneak peek at the projects and topics slated for the April issue of Circuit Cellar: Linux software development tools, DIY cap-touch, gain-controlled amplifier; color classification reader; start designing with the Renesas RL78 microcontroller; an introduction to sigma-delta modulators; RFI bypassing, with a focus on parallel capacitors; mesh networking simplified with SNAP technology; and more.

 

Clemens Valens introduces the Renesas Electronics RL78:

Click the image to link to the Renesas product page

Jeff Bachiochi takes a close look at Synapse Wireless SNAP technology:

Click the image to link to the Synapse-Wireless Kit webpage

Ed Nisley presents Part 2 of his article series “RFI Bypassing”:

The tracking generator output and spectrum analyzer input connect to adjacent PCB pads on the left of the SMD capacitor. Connecting the spectrum analyzer to the pad on the right side changes the measured self-resonant frequency.

The April issue will hit newsstands in late March.

GPS-Based Vehicle Timing & Tracking Project

The KartTracker’s Renesas kit (Source: Steve Lubbers CC259)

You can design and construct your own vehicle timing system at your workbench. Steve Lubbers did just that, and he describes his project in Circuit Cellar 259 (February 2012). He calls his design the “Kart Tracker,” which he built around a Renesas Electronics Corp. RX62N RDK. In fact, Steve writes that the kit has most of what’s need to bring such a design to fruition:

Most of the pieces of my KartTracker are already built into the Renesas Electronics RX62N development board (see Figure 1). The liquid crystal display (LCD) on the development board operates as the user interface and shows the driver what is happening as he races. The integrated accelerometer can be used to record the G forces experienced while racing. A serial port provides connections to a GPS receiver and a wireless transmitter. Removable flash memory stores all the race data so you can brag to your friends. You now have all of the pieces of my KartTracker.

The following block diagram depicts the relationship between the CPU, base station, flash drive, and other key components:

KartTracker Diagram (Source: Steve Lubbers CC259)

The software for the system is fairly straightforward. Steve writes:

The KartTracker software was built around the UART software sample provided with the RX62N development kit. To provide file system support, the Renesas microSD/Tiny FAT software was added. Finally, my custom GPS KartTracker software was added to the Renesas samples. My software consists of GPS, navigation, waypoints, and display modules. Support software was added to interface to the UART serial port, the file system, and the user display and control on the RX62N circuit board.

Pseudocode for the main processing loop (Source: Steve Lubbers CC259)

Read Steve’s article in the February issue for more details.

If you want to build a similar system, you should get familiar with the Renesas RX62N RDK. In the following video, Dave Jones of EEVBlog provides a quick and useful introduction to the RX62N RDK and its specs (Source: Renesas).

Good luck with this project. Be sure to keep Circuit Cellar posted on your progress!

Click here to purchase Circuit Cellar 259.