I/O Raspberry Pi Expansion Card

The RIO is an I/O expansion card intended for use with the Raspberry Pi SBC. The card stacks on top of a Raspberry Pi to create a powerful embedded control and navigation computer in a small 20-mm × 65-mm × 85-mm footprint. The RIO is well suited for applications requiring real-world interfacing, such as robotics, industrial and home automation, and data acquisition and control.

RoboteqThe RIO adds 13 inputs that can be configured as digital inputs, 0-to-5-V analog inputs with 12-bit resolution, or pulse inputs capable of pulse width, duty cycle, or frequency capture. Eight digital outputs are provided to drive loads up to 1 A each at up to 24 V.
The RIO includes a 32-bit ARM Cortex M4 microcontroller that processes and buffers the I/O and creates a seamless communication with the Raspberry Pi. The RIO processor can be user-programmed with a simple BASIC-like programming language, enabling it to perform logic, conditioning, and other I/O processing in real time. On the Linux side, RIO comes with drivers and a function library to quickly configure and access the I/O and to exchange data with the Raspberry Pi.

The RIO features several communication interfaces, including an RS-232 serial port to connect to standard serial devices, a TTL serial port to connect to Arduino and other microcontrollers that aren’t equipped with a RS-232 transceiver, and a CAN bus interface.
The RIO is available in two versions. The RIO-BASIC costs $85 and the RIO-AHRS costs $175.

Roboteq, Inc.
www.roboteq.com

Two Campuses, Two Problems, Two Solutions

In some ways, Salish Kootenai College (SKC)  based in Pablo, MT, and Penn State Erie, The Behrend College in Erie, PA, couldn’t be more different

SKC, whose main campus is on the Flathead Reservation, is open to all students but primarily serves Native Americans of the Bitterroot Salish, Kootenai, and Pend d’Orellies tribes. It has an enrollment of approximately 1,400. Penn State Erie has roughly 4,300.

But one thing the schools have in common is enterprising employees and students who recognized a problem on their campuses and came up with technical solutions. Al Anderson, IT director at the SKC, and Chris Coulston, head of the Computer Science and Software Engineering department at Penn State Erie, and his team have written articles about their “campus solutions” to be published in upcoming issues of Circuit Cellar.

In the summer of 2012, Anderson and the IT department he supervises direct-wired the SKC dorms and student housing units with fiber and outdoor CAT-5 cable to provide students better  Ethernet service.

The system is designed around the Raspberry Pi device. The Raspberry Pi queries the TMP102 temperature sensor. The Raspberry Pi is queried via the SNMP protocol.

The system is designed around the Raspberry Pi device. The Raspberry Pi queries the TMP102 temperature sensor. The Raspberry Pi is queried via the SNMP protocol.

“Prior to this, students accessed the Internet via a wireless network that provided very poor service.” Anderson says. “We wired 25 housing units, each with a small unmanaged Ethernet switch. These switches are daisy chained in several different paths back to a central switch.”

To maintain the best service, the IT department needed to monitor the system’s links from Intermapper, a simple network management protocol (SNMP) software. Also, the department had to monitor the temperature inside the utility boxes, because their exposure to the sun could cause the switches to get too hot.

This is the final installation of the Raspberry Pi. The clear acrylic case can be seen along with the TMP102 glued below the air hole drilled into the case. A ribbon cable was modified to connect the various pins of the TMP102 to the Raspberry Pi.

This is the final installation of the Raspberry Pi in the SKC system. The clear acrylic case can be seen along with the TMP102 glued below the air hole drilled into the case. A ribbon cable was modified to connect the various pins of the TMP102 to the Raspberry Pi.

“We decided to build our own monitoring system using a Raspberry Pi to gather temperature data and monitor the network,” Anderson says. “We installed a Debian Linux distro on the Raspberry Pi, added an I2C Texas Instruments TMP102 temperature sensor…, wrote a small Python program to get the temperature via I2C and convert it to Fahrenheit, installed SNMP server software on the Raspberry Pi, added a custom SNMP rule to display the temperature from the script, and finally wrote a custom SNMP MIB to access the temperature information as a string and integer.”

Anderson, 49, who has a BS in Computer Science, did all this even as he earned his MS in Computer Science, Networking, and Telecommunications through the Johns Hopkins University Engineering Professionals program.

Anderson’s article covers the SNMP server installation; I2C TMP102 temperature integration; Python temperature monitoring script; SNMP extension rule; and accessing the SNMP Extension via a custom MIB.

“It has worked flawlessly, and made it through the hot summer fine,” Anderson said recently. “We designed it with robustness in mind.”

Meanwhile, Chris Coulston, head of the Computer Science and Software Engineering department at Penn State Erie, and his team noticed that the shuttle bus

The mobile unit to be installed in the bus. bus

The mobile unit to be installed in the bus.

introduced as his school expanded had low ridership. Part of cause was the unpredictable timing of the bus, which has seven regular stops but also picks up students who flag it down.

“In order to address the issues of low ridership, a team of engineering students and faculty constructed an automated vehicle locator (AVL), an application to track the campus shuttle and to provide accurate estimates when the shuttle will arrive at each stop,” Coulston says.

The system’s three main hardware components are a user’s smartphone; a base station on campus; and a mobile tracker that stays on the traveling bus.

The base station consists of an XTend 900 MHz wireless modem connected to a Raspberry Pi, Coulston says. The Pi runs a web server to handle requests from the user’s smart phones. The mobile tracker consists of a GPS receiver, a Microchip Technology PIC 18F26K22 and an XTend 900 MHz wireless modem.

Coulston and his team completed a functional prototype by the time classes started in August. As a result, a student can call up a bus locater web page on his smartphone. The browser can load a map of the campus via the Google Maps JavaScript API, and JavaScript code overlays the bus and bus stops. You can see the bus locater page between 7:40 a.m. to 7 p.m. EST Monday through Friday.

“The system works remarkably well, providing reliable, accurate information about our campus bus,” Coulston says. “Best of all, it does this autonomously, with very little supervision on our part.  It has worked so well, we have received additional funding to add another base station to campus to cover an extended route coming next year.”

The base station for the mobile tracker is a sandwich of Raspberry Pi, interface board, and wireless modem.

The base station for the mobile tracker is a sandwich of Raspberry Pi, interface board, and wireless modem.

And while the system has helped Penn State Erie students make it to class on time, what does Coulston and his team’s article about it offer Circuit Cellar readers?

“This article should appeal to readers because it’s a web-enabled embedded application,” Coulston says. “We plan on providing users with enough information so that they can create their own embedded web applications.”

Look for the article in an upcoming issue. In the meantime, if you have a DIY wireless project you’d like to share with Circuit Cellar, please e-mail editor@circuitcellar.com.

 

 

 

 

Q&A: Krystal Horton, the Raspberry Pi Kid

Eben Upton and Krystal met in October at the Broadcom MASTERS

Krystal Horton is the clever kid behind the blog Raspberry Pi Kid: An 11-Year-Old’s Adventures with Raspberry Pi.  Since starting her blog in January 2013, her entries have covered everything from unpacking her first Pi, to projects she has created with the SBC, to her recent dinner with Eben Upton, founder and trustee of the Raspberry Pi Foundation, and his wife, Liz Upton, who oversees the foundation website.

Krystal met the couple in October 2013 in Washington, D.C., as one of 30 finalists competing in the 2013 Broadcom MASTERS, a national science, technology, engineering, and math competition for middle school students.  (At the competition, Krystal was named one of two Rising Stars students who will represent Broadcom MASTERS at the 2014 International Science and Engineering Fair, the world’s largest international high school science fair competition.)

“They also gave each of the finalists their own Raspberry Pi,” Krystal says in her October 2 blog entry from Washington, D.C.  “I’m hoping to have each of the finalists guest post on my blog after they’ve had a chance to try out the RPi.”

Liz Upton describes Krystal as “brilliant.” Recently, Circuit Cellar Managing Editor Mary Wilson asked the seventh-grader several questions about her interest in the Raspberry Pi and the blog she created to complement it.

Krystal and her oak borer beetle infestation science project.

Krystal and her oak borer beetle infestation science project.

MARY: Tell us a little bit about yourself and why you became interested in working with the Raspberry Pi.

KRYSTAL: I am an 11-year-old seventh-grader in Southern California. I have been interested in science and technology ever since I can remember. My cousin got a Raspberry Pi for Christmas and my uncle saw how curious I was. So, he gave me one for New Year’s. He gave me some basic lessons on how to hook it up, turn it on, and type into Vim. That and some YouTube videos, tutorials, and eBooks and I was off and running. I now blog at http://raspberrypikid.wordpress.com and sometimes I tweet through @kid_pi.

MARY: Why did you decide to start your blog Raspberry Pi Kid? What type of feedback/comments have you gotten from visitors to your site? Will you rename the blog and keep posting when you’re 12?

KRYSTAL: I’ve learned so much from other people’s blogs, but they’re written for adults and are very hard for a kid to understand. So, I thought that I could put things in kid language and in simple steps so that other kids would be inspired and learn from what I’ve done. I want to give back to the Raspberry Pi and blogging communities.

On my blog, I’m often talking about problems that I’m having (I still haven’t figured out analog to digital conversion) and a lot of people offer to help me out. Others congratulate me and wish that they’d had an RPi when they were my age. I’ve also heard from other kids my age who are learning to code. I put my dad’s email address on the account and he gets invitations for me to Skype with CoderDojos and to guest blog for people. I have over 52,000 views to my blog right now. I hadn’t even thought about whether the name would change when I turn 12, but I’ll definitely keep blogging.

MARY:  Was the SBC difficult to set up? What was the first project you worked on with it?

KRYSTAL: The only hard thing about setting it up is all of the accessories that you need. It doesn’t even come with a power supply, keyboard, or mouse. My uncle gave me some of the stuff (power supply, wireless keyboard/mouse, breadboard), I had some stuff at home (memory card, network cable), and I bought some stuff from Adafruit’s very useful website (wireless adapter, ADC chip, breadboard accessories).

I really like the idea of programming the computer to do things. So, the first thing I did was start programming in Python through Vim and IDLE. I got a book from the library, read tutorials online, and emailed my uncle questions.

MARY: Can you tell me about some other Pi-based projects you have finished or are working on? Do you have something you would like to do next? Where do you get your ideas? Where do you go for guidance?

Krystal and her robot

Krystal and her robot

KRYSTAL: I love playing Minecraft, so when I saw that there’s a Pi version, I installed it and blogged about it. I’ve also used the Scratch programming language to create games and blink LEDs. I’ve used RPi as a Linux computer with the Wheezy version. I just wish that Midori would play YouTube videos so that I could watch Pi tutorials on my Pi. I have also installed OpenELEC (Open Embedded Linux Entertainment Center) so that I can stream HD video to my TV. I’ve also used PuTTY to control the Pi with a laptop (my uncle showed me that one).

In the future, I want to keep working with Scratch, a free visual programming language for kids from MIT (where I want to go to college). I want to figure out analog to digital so that I can connect sensors. And I want to use the RPi to do a science fair project. I really, really want to get a 3-D printer and connect it to the Pi.  I’m planning to order a MakiBOX soon, but it’ll take six-10 weeks to arrive and then I have to build it and learn how to use it.

When I don’t know how to do something, my dad helps me find answers on YouTube or other people’s blogs. He’s a scientist, not a programmer, so he learns with me sometimes. If he can’t help me, I email my uncle who does know how to program. He has automated his house with a RasPi. If I can’t get in touch with him, then I post a question on a forum and wait for answers.

Close up view of the credit-card sized Pi

Close up view of the credit-card sized Pi

MARY: What were some of the challenges you had to overcome with the Pi? What, if anything, would you change about it?

KRYSTAL: One of the problems I’ve had is when things don’t work for me as the blogs say they should. I had a really hard time getting Wi-Fi to work even though I followed the instructions exactly.

If I could change anything, I’d label the GPIO pins right on the board. I’ve had to look up that diagram soooo many times. There are several versions now, so I’d recommend marking them to make it easier to tell which one it is when getting a case for it. I’ve read stories about people breaking off the connector where the memory card goes. That’s scary, I hope they fix that if they can.

MARY: What do you think are the SBC’s best features?

KRYSTAL: Everyone says that the price and size are the Pi’s best features and I agree. But I also like that it’s so open to let me put any kind of Linux I want on it. Some people have even put the Android Operating System on it. Not me… yet.

MARY: What new skills/tools have you learned about through your Pi?

KRYSTAL: Some of the things I’ve learned through using my Pi are: coding in Python and Scratch, basic electronics (how to use a breadboard, multimeter, LEDs, etc.), and using Linux and all of the absolutely free software for it. These are very valuable skills for anyone to learn. I’ve learned about IP addresses and using a computer without the graphical interface at times also.

MARY: What advice would you give to another kid (or adult tinkerer) who is interested in getting started with the Raspberry Pi?

KRYSTAL: The advice that I’d give is to work on fun projects. This shouldn’t feel like boring work. Also, don’t get frustrated if things don’t work right the first time. That’s just part of coding. Most big cities also have groups of computer users. Find one and connect with them.

MARY: How many other 11-year-old girls do you know who are drawn to the Raspberry Pi? Any thoughts about that?

KRYSTAL: I’ve met online several kids who are using Pi. I spoke through Skype with a group in Washington, D.C., one Saturday morning. There were probably 15 kids and many were girls. I watched a video of a girl who tests all of the Raspberry Pis that get sent back as broken.

I think that computers and technology are going to be incredibly important to my generation. It is very scary that so few (girls or boys) are learning how technology works and how to code. Coders are going to rule the future, and I want be a part of that. All kids should. And their parents need to encourage it.  Websites like code.org and adafruit.com and devices like Raspberry Pi are helping.

Q&A: Peter Lomas – Raspberry Pi: One Year Later, 1 Million Sold

Peter Lomas

Clemens Valens, Editor-in-Chief of Elektor Online and head of Elektor Labs, caught up with Peter Lomas, hardware designer for the Raspberry Pi single-board computer, earlier this year at the Embedded World 2013 trade show in Nuremberg, Germany. This is a longer version of an interview with Lomas published in Elektor’s May 2013 issue. The Lomas interview provided a one-year update on the rapid growth of interest in the Raspberry Pi since Elektor’s April 2012 interview with Eben Upton, one of the founders and trustees of the Raspberry Pi Foundation. The UK-based charitable foundation developed the inexpensive, credit card-sized computer to encourage the study of basic computer science in schools. In early 2012, the Raspberry Pi’s first production batches were arriving. Since then, more than 1 million boards have been sold.

CLEMENS: Raspberry Pi, the phenomena. It is quite amazing what happened.

PETER: It is, and lots of people keep asking me, why has Raspberry Pi done what it has done, what makes it different? I think it’s something we’ve really been trying to grasp. The first thing that happened with Raspberry Pi, which I think is important, is that we had one of our very first prototypes on a UK blog for one of the BBC correspondents, Rory Cellan-Jones, and they made a little video, a YouTube video, and that got 600,000 hits. So I guess that if you look at it from one aspect, that created a viral marketing, a very viral marketing campaign for Raspberry Pi. The other I think, the name, Raspberry Pi was key. And the logo that Paul Beach did for us is absolutely key because it has become iconic.

CLEMENS: Yes, it’s very recognizable.

PETER: Very recognizable. If I show you that, you know exactly what it is, in the electronics circle. So I think the brand has been very important. But you know, we shouldn’t forget the amount of work that Liz Upton’s been doing with the blogs and on our website, keeping people informed about what we’re doing. Then, I think we’ve got the fact we are a charity… that we are focused on the education of computing and electronics and that’s our motive—not actually to make boards and to make money except to fund the foundation.

CLEMENS: I looked at the Raspberry Pi website, and it doesn’t look easy to me. You target education, children, and on the website it’s hard to find what Raspberry Pi exactly is. It’s not really explained. You have to know it. There are several distributions, so you have to know Linux and you have to program in Python.

PETER: Well, that’s true and, in a weird way, that’s part of its success, because you actually have to be active. In order to do something with Pi, you can’t just get it out of a shiny box, put it on the desk and press “on.” You have to do some mental work. You have to figure some things out. Now, I actually think that there’s a bit of a benefit there, because when it actually works, you have some achievement. You’ve done something. Not “we’ve done something.” You’ve done it personally, and there is a gratification from doing it.

CLEMENS: But it’s not the easiest platform.

PETER: No, but with our educational proposition, the whole object now is to package that up in easier-to-use bundles. We can make the SD card boot straight to Scratch (a website project and simple programming language developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Media Lab), so Linux becomes temporarily invisible, and there’s a set of worksheets and instructions. But we’re never going to take away, hopefully, the fact that you have to put your wires in, and I do think that is part of the importance and the attraction of it.

CLEMENS: Because of all these layers of complexity and having to program it in English (Python is in English), for the non-English population it is yet another hurdle. That’s why Arduino was so successful; they made the programming really easy. They had cheap hardware but also a way to easily program it.

PETER: There’s no doubt Arduino is a brilliant product. You are right, it enables people to get to what I call “Hello World” very easily. But, in fact, on a Raspberry Pi, after you’ve made those connections and plugged the card in, you can get to an equivalent “Hello World.” But ours is the Scratch cat. Once you’ve moved the Scratch cat, you can go in a few different directions: you can move it some more, or you can use Scratch with an I/O interface to make an LED light up or you can press a button to make the Scratch cat move. There are endless directions you can go. I’ve found, and I think Eben has similarly experienced, that kids just get it. As long as you don’t make it too complicated, the kids just get it. It’s the adults who have more problems.

CLEMENS: I saw that there are at least three different distributions for the boards. So what are the differences between the three? Why isn’t there just one?

PETER: Well, they all offer subtly different features. The whole idea was to make Raspberry Pi as an undergraduate tool. You give it to Cambridge University, hopefully Manchester University, and undergraduates can view the science before they start it. They have the summer. They can work on it, come back, and say: “Look, I did this on this board.” That’s where it all started.

CLEMENS: OK. So, you were already on quite a high level.

PETER: Well we were on a high level, that’s true. We were on a high level, so Scratch wouldn’t have been on the agenda. It was really just Python—that’s actually where the Pi comes from.
What has really happened is that we’ve developed this community and this ecosystem around Pi. So we have to be able to support the, if you like, “different roots” of people wanting to use Pi. Now we’ve got the RISC OS that you can use. And people are even doing bare-metal programming. If we just gave one distribution, I guess we’re closing it up. I fully approve of having different distributions.

CLEMENS: From the website, it’s not clear to me what is different in these distributions. For the first one, it is written: “If you’re just starting out.”

PETER: I think maybe we do need to put some more material in there to explain to people the difference. I have to explain: I’m the hardware guy. I’m the guy who sat there connecting the tracks up, connecting the components up. My expertise with the operating systems, with the distributions that we have, is really limited to the graphical interface because that’s what I use day in, day out.

CLEMENS: Once you have chosen your distribution and you want to control an LED, you have to open a driver or something, I suppose?

PETER: Well, you’ve got the library; you just have to make a library call. Again, it’s not easy. You have to go and find the libraries and you have to download them. Which is where things such as the Pi-Face (add-on board) come in, because that comes with an interactive library that will go onto Scratch. And you’ve got the Gertboard (another extension board) and that comes with the libraries to drive it and some tutorial examples and then you can wind that back to just the bare metal interface on the GPIOs.

CLEMENS: So the simplicity is now coming from the add-on boards?

PETER: Some of the add-on boards can make it simpler, where they give you the switches and they give you the LEDs. You don’t need to do any wiring. My view is that I’m trying to make it like an onion: You can start with the surface and you can do something, and then you can peel away the layers. The more interested you get, the more layers you can peel away and the more different directions you can go (in what you do with it). You must have seen the diverse things that can be done.

CLEMENS: I’ve looked at some projects. I was surprised by the number of media centers. That’s how RS Components (which distributes the Raspberry Pi) is promoting the board. Aren’t you disappointed with that? It seems to be, for a lot of people, a cheap platform to do a Linux application on. They just want to have a media center.

PETER: I know exactly what you mean. And I suppose I should be disappointed that some people buy it, they make it into a media center, and that’s all it does. But I think if only 5% or 10% of those people who make it into a media center will think: “Well, that was easy, maybe I’ll get another and see if I can do something else with it,” then it’s a success.

CLEMENS: It would be an enabler.

PETER: Getting the technology in front of people is the first problem. Getting the “Hello World” so they’ve got a sense of achievement is the second problem. Then turning them over from doing that to “Okay, well what if I try and do this?”  then that’s  Nirvana. Certainly for the kids that’s crucial, because we’re changing them from doing what they’re told, to start doing things that they think they might be able to do—and trying it. That makes them into engineers.

CLEMENS: Let’s move on to the board’s hardware.

PETER: Sure.

CLEMENS: So, you chose a Broadcom processor. Because Eben worked at Broadcom?

PETER: He still works within Broadcom. It would be hard for me to argue that that wasn’t an influence on the decision, because Eben said: “Oh look, here’s the bright shiny chip. It can do all the things that we want, why wouldn’t we use it?” The decision we made is we nailed our credentials and our reputations to the website by saying it will cost $35—it will cost $25 for the basic one. And there was no way on Earth any of us were going to go back on that… We had a spreadsheet, the basic numbers looked plausible, we just had to do a lot of work to chop it down—to hone it, to get it tight so it would actually meet the prices. So, I think if we’d gone another way, like maybe with Samsung, that would have blown the budget.

CLEMENS: Did Broadcom help in any way to make this possible?

PETER: Every semiconductor manufacturer helped the project by making the chips available. Also, the price point of the chips is important. I think some of the people who helped us took an educated gamble and gave us good pricing from day one. Because the big problem you get with trying to bootstrap any project, is that if you don’t know what your volume is going to be. You have to be conservative.

So, initially, we priced for a thousand boards, but quickly we priced for 20,000 boards, but nowhere in our wildest dreams did we think we were going to get to a 200,000-board requirement on launch day and be so tantalizingly close to selling a million after our first year. So that’s helped in a lot of ways, because obviously it’s driven the price of all the components down. I’m not going to pretend it doesn’t please the vendors of the components that had faith in us from day one, because they’ve obviously made some money out of it.

We always had the rationale that we had to have a sustainable model where the foundation, our community that is buying the boards, and our suppliers were all making a living and could feed themselves. It would have been a total disaster if someone such as Broadcom had said: “Tell you what guys, let’s give you the processors. We’ll give you the first 20,000.” And so, we could have provided all sorts of extra bells and whistles to the design. Then, when we would have sold these 20,000 boards, we’re going to raise the price of everything by $12. That would’ve been the end of Raspberry Pi.

CLEMENS: If Eben and the others had not worked for Broadcom…

PETER: Would we have used a different chip? Well, I sort of speculated about this and I went around and had a look and, at the time for the price point, we couldn’t find anything that would’ve met our requirements as well as that chip. So I was comfortable that was the one that would allow us to get to where we wanted to be, and I think the big key crunch for that was the high-definition multimedia interface (HDMI). From a technical point of view, one of the challenges we had was getting the breakout under the BGA, because blind and buried vias on PCBs are very expensive.

CLEMENS: How many layers is the board?

PETER: Six, which is a pretty bog-standard layer count. The only little trick that we used was to put blind vias only on layers one and two—so we had an extra drilling stage—but only one bonding stage. So that added $0.02 onto the cost of the board. But, because the next layer down was a ground plane, it meant that a lot of the connections that come out of the Broadcom processor just go down one layer. And that meant that I could have space underneath to route other things and actually make it all happen.

CLEMENS: Don’t they have guidelines at Broadcom?

PETER: Oh, they do have guidelines! Use blind and buried vias or vias in pads. Our first prototype was all singing, all dancing, but it would have cost $100 to $110 to manufacture. So we got the machete out and started hacking down all the things that we didn’t need. So you’ve got all the functionality that you want. You can get the performance that you want, you can get the compliance, but it’s got nothing extra.

CLEMENS: Have you been thinking about the future of Raspberry Pi?

PETER: Well, yeah… In our industry, you know, Moore’s law guarantees that everything is old-hat in two years’ time. So we’re thinking about it, but that’s all we’re doing. We’re trying to improve our educational release. I mean, let’s face it, I’m not going to pretend that the Raspberry Pi is perfect. We only made one modification to the board from design to release. We’ve only made some minor modifications under the V2 release. Some of that is to fix some anomalies, some of that was also to help our new manufacturing partner, Sony (in Pencoed, Wales), take it. Their process needed some slight changes to the board to make it easier to manufacture.

CLEMENS: About the original idea of Raspberry Pi, the educational thing. I had a look at the forum and there are lots of forums about technical details, quite a lot of questions and topics about start-up problems. But the educational forum is pretty small.

PETER: You’re right. You’re absolutely right. A lot of that work has been going on slowly and carefully in the background. To be completely honest with you, we were caught on the hub with the interest with Raspberry Pi, and so I’ve certainly spent the last 12 months making sure that we can deliver the product to our community so that they can develop with it and perhaps talk a little bit about our educational goals. But we’re absolutely refocusing on that.

CLEMENS: First, get the hardware into people’s hands and then focus on the education.

PETER: Exactly. And of course, we’ve also released the first computers in schools as manual teaching tools. But also we’ve got Clive, who is a full-time employee helping with the educational deployment. And it’s great that we’ve had all this support (from Google Giving) to get 15,000 kits into schools. I won’t pretend we don’t have a lot of work to do but, I think of where we were a year ago, just still trying to launch.

CLEMENS: It all went really fast.

PETER: Oh yes, it’s gone like a rocket!

CLEMENS: Have you personally learned something valuable from it?

PETER: Well, I’ve learned lots of things. I think the most valuable, maybe not a lesson, but a reinforcement of something I already thought, is that education doesn’t just exist in the classroom. It exists all around us. The opportunity to learn and the opportunity to teach exists every day in almost every aspect in what we do. You know, there are people who spend their lives trying to keep every secret, keep everything to themselves. But there are also people who just give. And I’ve met so many people who are just givers. I suppose I’ve learned there is a whole new system of education that goes on outside of the standard curriculum that helps people do what they want to do.

Editor’s Note: Interview by Clemens Valens, Transcription by Joshua Walbey.

RESOURCES

  • Embedded Linux Wiki, “RPi Gertboard,” elinux.org/RPi_Gertboard
  • W. Hettinga, “What Are You Doing? The Raspberry Pi $25 Computer,” Elektor April 2012.
  • Massachusetts Institute of Technology Media Lab, “Scratch,” scratch.mit.edu
  • University of Manchester School of Computer Science, Projects Using Raspberry Pi, “Pi-Face Digital Interface,” http://pi.cs.man.ac.uk/interface.htm

 

CC277: (Re)Discovering Embedded

Authors in this issue range from a columnist who reintroduces us to the advantages of switched-capacitor filters to a frequent contributor who discusses his first encounter—and project—with the credit card-sized Raspberry Pi computer.

Columnist Robert Lacoste recently rediscovered one of his 1981 Elektor magazines, which included an article on switched-capacitor filters. “Since mastering switched-capacitor filters is now mandatory for many mixed-signal designs, I thought: Why not refresh the topic for a Circuit Cellar Darker Side article?” Lacoste says. Beginning on page 56, Lacoste shows you how to modify a simple one-pole RC filter into a switched-capacitor filter.

Frequent contributor Brian Millier placed his name on a waiting list to purchase his first Raspberry Pi. He finally received it in late 2012 and started the project that would inspire his two-part series “Raspberry Pi I/O?Board” (p. 42). The series explores the strengths and weaknesses of the single-board computer (SBC)?and explains the versatile I/O board he developed for it. “In the time since I received my Raspberry Pi, one of the board’s developers has designed an I/O board called the Gertboard. I feel my board is quite distinct and has some advantages over the Gertboard,” Millier says.

Speaking of the Raspberry Pi’s developers, this issue includes an interview with “RPi hardware guy” Peter Lomas (p. 38). He looks at the growth in popularity of the Raspberry Pi since its initial launch and shares how the nonprofit Raspberry Pi Foundation plans to foster its mission of promoting the $35 SBC as a tool to teach children computer skills and encourage inventiveness.

This month’s issue offers many other interesting reads. For example, columnist Jeff Bachiochi continues his series on creating user-friendly graphic displays. Part 1 focused on the microcontroller used to create his serial display. Part 2 discusses implementing dynamic button commands (p. 70).

In Part 4 of his “Testing and Testability” series (p. 52), columnist George Novacek explains the importance of an electronic system’s internal diagnostics. In addition, columnist Bob Japenga wraps up his “Concurrency in Embedded Systems” series by focusing on file usage (p. 48). “Modern embedded systems are doing more than I ever imagined when I first started,” Japenga says. “Adding a file system to your design can provide significant advantages to improve your product.”

This issue also presents two more final installments. One describes how to use a DSP-SQL interface to access large amounts of data (p. 20). The other outlines a DIY SBC project (p. 30).


Editor’s Note: The Client Profile focusing on Beta LAYOUT in Circuit Cellar’s June issue (p. 16) included incorrect information. Tony Shoot can be reached at tony@beta-layout.us. Visit circuitcellar.com/featured/client-profile-beta-layouts online to see the full profile.