Tuesday’s Newsletter: IoT Tech Focus

Coming to your inbox tomorrow: Circuit Cellar’s IoT Technology Focus newsletter. Tomorrow’s newsletter covers what’s happening with Internet-of-Things (IoT) technology–-from devices to gateway networks to cloud architectures. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

Bonus: We’ve added Drawings for Free Stuff to our weekly newsletters. Make sure you’ve subscribed to the newsletter so you can participate.

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You’ll get your IoT Technology Focus newsletter issue tomorrow.

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Our weekly Circuit Cellar Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

Embedded Boards.(2/26) The focus here is on both standard and non-standard embedded computer boards that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up to production volumes.

Analog & Power. (3/5) This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op amps, batteries and more.

Microcontroller Watch (3/12) This newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

Tuesday’s Newsletter: Microcontroller Watch

Coming to your inbox tomorrow: Circuit Cellar’s Microcontroller Watch newsletter. Tomorrow’s newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

Bonus: We’ve added Drawings for Free Stuff to our weekly newsletters. Make sure you’ve subscribed to the newsletter so you can participate.

Already a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber? Great!
You’ll get your Microcontroller Watch newsletter issue tomorrow.

Not a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber?
Don’t be left out! Sign up now:

Our weekly Circuit Cellar Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

IoT Technology Focus. (2/19) Covers what’s happening with Internet-of-Things (IoT) technology–-from devices to gateway networks to cloud architectures. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

Embedded Boards.(2/26) The focus here is on both standard and non-standard embedded computer boards that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up to production volumes.

Analog & Power. (3/5) This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op amps, batteries and more.

Raspberry Pi DAQ HAT Can Stack Eight High

By Eric Brown

In August, Measurement Computing Corp. (MCC) launched its MCC 118 voltage measurement DAQ HAT for the Raspberry Pi with eight ±10 V inputs and sample rates up to 100 kS/s. It has now released a promised MCC 152 voltage output and digital I/O HAT that can be stacked along with the MCC 118 and future MCC HATs in configurations of up to eight boards.

 
MCC 152 with Raspberry Pi (left) and stacked with other MCC 152 boards
(click images to enlarge)
The $99 MCC 152 is equipped with two 12-bit, 0-5 V analog outputs with update rates up to 5 kS/s. There are also 8x bidirectional digital I/O lines with 3.3 V and 5 V support that can be “configured as input or output on a bit by bit basis,” says MCC. Each output bit can source 10 mA and sink 25 mA, and can be individually disabled.

Screw terminal connections are available for all I/O, and power is provided via the Raspberry Pi’s 40-pin GPIO connector. The 65 mm × 56.5 mm × 12mm HAT supports 0 to 55°C temperatures.

HAT configuration parameters are stored in an on-board EEPROM so you can set up the GPIO pins via the Pi when the HAT is connected. When stacking boards, onboard jumpers identify each board in the stack.



MCC 152 block diagram
(click image to enlarge)
MCC provides an open-source MCC DAQ HAT Library in C/C++ and Python hosted on GitHub. The library includes console-based example programs with descriptions and lists of demonstrated functions. A MCC DAQ HAT Manager utility program offers an MCC 152 App to verify functionality. The utility requires the Raspbian desktop interface. API and hardware documentation are also provided.

Further information

The MCC 152 HAT is available for $99. More information may be found at the MCC 152 announcement and product page.

This article originally appeared on LinuxGizmos.com on January 10.

Measurement Computing | www.mccdaq.com

Free IoT Security Platform Runs on OpenWrt Routers and the Raspberry Pi

By Eric Brown

At the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas, Minim announced a free spin-off of Minim, its cloud-managed Wi-Fi and security Software as a Service (SaaS) platform. Minim Labs is designed to work with a new open source software agent called Unum that runs on Raspbian and OpenWrt Linux devices. Optimized images are available for the OpenWrt-based Gli.Net GL-B1300 router and Raspberry Pi. The first 50 sign-ups will get the B1300 router for free (see below).


Minim Labs setup screen
(click image to enlarge)
The Minim Labs toolkit “secures and manages all connected devices in the home, such as the Google Home Hub, Sony Smart TV, and FreeRTOS devices,” providing “device fingerprinting, security scans, AI-powered recommendations, router management, analytics, and parental controls,” says Minim. By signing up to a Minim Labs account you receive a MAC address to register an Unum-enabled device.

The GitHub hosted Unum agent runs on the Linux router where it identifies connected devices and securely streams device telemetry to the Minim platform. Users can open a free Minim Labs account to register up to 10 Unum-enabled devices, offering access to Minim WiFi management apps and APIs. Alternately, you can use Unum with your own application server.

The GL-B1300 and Raspberry Pi builds are designed to walk “home network tinkerers” through the process of protecting devices with Unum and Minim Labs. More advanced developers can download a Unum SDK to modify the software for any OpenWrt-based router.

“By open sourcing our agent and giving technologists free access to our platform, we hope to build a global community that’ll contribute valuable product feedback and code,” stated Jeremy Hitchcock, Founder and CEO of Minim.

Gli.Net’s OpenWrt routers

Gli.Net’s GL-B1300 router runs OpenWrt on a quad-core, Cortex-A7 Qualcomm Atheros IPQ4028 SoC clocked to 717 MHz. The SoC is equipped with a DSP, 256MB RAM, 32 MB flash, and dual-band 802.11ac with 2×2 MIMO. The SoC and supports up to 5-port Ethernet routers abd provides Qualcomm TEE, Crypto Engine, and Secure Boot technologies.


 
GL-B1300 (left) and GL-AR750S
(click images to enlarge)
The GL-B1300 router has dual GbE ports, a WAN port, and a USB 3.0 port. The $89 price includes a 12V adapter and Ethernet cable.

The testimonial quote below says that the GL-AR750S Slate router, which is a CES 2019 Innovation Awards Honoree, will also support Unum and Minim Labs out of the box. The $70 GL-AR750S Slate runs on a MIPS-based, 775MHz Qualcomm QCA9563 processor and is equipped with 128MB RAM, 128MB NAND flash, and a microSD slot.

The Slate router provides 3x GbE ports and dual-band 802.11ac with dual external antennas. Other features include USB 2.0 and micro-USB power ports plus a UART and GPIO. The router supports WireGuard, OpenVPN, and Cloudflare DNS over TLS.


Gli.Net router comparison chart, including GL-B1300 and GL-AR750S
(click image to enlarge)
In addition to its routers, Gli.Net also sells the OpenWrt-on-Atheros/MIPS Domino Core computer-on-module. The Domino Core shipped in a Kickstarter launched Domino.IO IoT kit back in 2015.

“We are glad that Minim is going to launch open-source tools for DIY users and increase awareness of personal Internet security,” stated GL.iNet CTO Dr. Alfie Zhao. “This initiative shows shared value and vision with GL.iNet. We are happy to provide support for Minim tools on our GL-AR750S Slate router and GL-B1300 router, both of which have support to the latest OpenWrt.”

Further information

The free Minim Labs security platform is available for signup now, and the open source Unum agent is available for download. Minim is offering the first 50 Minim Labs signups with a free startup kit containing the GL-B1300 router. More information may be found at the Minim Labs product page.

This article originally appeared on LinuxGizmos.com on January 9.

Minim | www.minim.co

 

Tuesday’s Newsletter: Analog & Power

Coming to your inbox on Tuesday: Circuit Cellar’s Analog & Power newsletter. This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including ADCs, DACs, DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op amps, batteries and more.

Bonus: We’ve added Drawings for Free Stuff to our weekly newsletters. Make sure you’ve subscribed to the newsletter so you can participate.

Already a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber? Great!
You’ll get your Analog & Power newsletter issue tomorrow.

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Don’t be left out! Sign up now:

Our weekly Circuit Cellar Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

Microcontroller Watch. (2/12) This newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

IoT Technology Focus. (2/19) Covers what’s happening with Internet-of-Things (IoT) technology–-from devices to gateway networks to cloud architectures. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

Embedded Boards.(2/26) The focus here is on both standard and non-standard embedded computer boards that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up to production volumes.

Next Newsletter: ICs for Consumer Electronics

Coming to your inbox tomorrow: Circuit Cellar’s ICs for Consumer Electronics newsletter. Today’;s consumer electronic product designs demand ICs that enable low-power, high-functionality and cutthroat costs. Today’s microcontroller, analog IC and power chip vendors are laser-focused on this lucrative, high-stakes market. This newsletter looks at the latest technology trends and product developments in for consumer electronics ICs.

Bonus: We’ve added Drawings for Free Stuff to our weekly newsletters. Make sure you’ve subscribed to the newsletter so you can participate.

Already a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber? Great!
You’ll get your
ICs for Consumer Electronics newsletter issue tomorrow.

Not a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber?
Don’t be left out! Sign up now:

Our weekly Circuit Cellar Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

Analog & Power. (2/5) This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op amps, batteries and more.

Microcontroller Watch (2/12) This newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

IoT Technology Focus. (2/19) Covers what’s happening with Internet-of-Things (IoT) technology–-from devices to gateway networks to cloud architectures. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

Next Newsletter: Embedded Boards

Coming to your inbox tomorrow: Circuit Cellar’s Embedded Boards newsletter. Tomorrow’s newsletter content focuses on both standard and non-standard embedded computer boards that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up to production volumes.

Bonus: We’ve added Drawings for Free Stuff to our weekly newsletters. Make sure you’ve subscribed to the newsletter so you can participate.

Already a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber? Great!
You’ll get your
Embedded Boards newsletter issue tomorrow.

Not a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber?
Don’t be left out! Sign up now:

Our weekly Circuit Cellar Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

January has a 5th Tuesday, so we’re bringing you a bonus newsletter:
ICs for Consumer Electronics (1/28)  Today’;s consumer electronic product designs demand ICs that enable low-power, high-functionality and cutthroat costs. Today’;s microcontroller, analog IC and power chip vendors are laser-focused on this lucrative, high-stakes market. This newsletter looks at the latest technology trends and product developments in for consumer electronics ICs.

Analog & Power. (2/5) This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op amps, batteries and more.

Microcontroller Watch (2/12) This newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

IoT Technology Focus. (2/19) Covers what’s happening with Internet-of-Things (IoT) technology–-from devices to gateway networks to cloud architectures. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

Tuesday’s Newsletter: IoT Tech Focus

Coming to your inbox tomorrow: Circuit Cellar’s IoT Technology Focus newsletter. Tomorrow’s newsletter covers what’s happening with Internet-of-Things (IoT) technology–-from devices to gateway networks to cloud architectures. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

Bonus: We’ve added Drawings for Free Stuff to our weekly newsletters. Make sure you’ve subscribed to the newsletter so you can participate.

Already a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber? Great!
You’ll get your IoT Technology Focus newsletter issue tomorrow.

Not a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber?
Don’t be left out! Sign up now:

Our weekly Circuit Cellar Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

Embedded Boards.(1/22) The focus here is on both standard and non-standard embedded computer boards that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up to production volumes.

January has a 5th Tuesday, so we’re bringing you a bonus newsletter:
ICs for Consumer Electronics (1/28)  Today’;s consumer electronic product designs demand ICs that enable low-power, high-functionality and cutthroat costs. Today’;s microcontroller, analog IC and power chip vendors are laser-focused on this lucrative, high-stakes market. This newsletter looks at the latest technology trends and product developments in for consumer electronics ICs

Analog & Power. (2/5) This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op amps, batteries and more.

Microcontroller Watch (2/12) This newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

Easing into the IoT Cloud (Part 2)

Modules in Action

In Part 1 of this article series, Brian examined some of the technologies and services available today, enabling you to ease into the IoT cloud. Now, in Part 2, he discusses the hardware features of the Particle IoT modules, as well as the circuitry and program code for the project. He also explores the integration of a Raspberry Pi solution with the Particle cloud infrastructure.

By Brian Millier

After looking at broader aspects of easing into the IoT Cloud in Part 1, now it’s time to get into the hardware and software details. Let’s take a look at three of the Particle modules, shown in Figure 1. The P0 module contains the Cypress Semiconductor BCM43362 Wi-Fi chip and STMicroelectronics STM32F205RGY6 120 MHz Arm Cortex M3 microcontroller (MCU), in a small surface mount package. The Photon module contains this P0 module, plus a 3.3 V switch-mode power supply regulator, USB socket, mode switches and an RGB LED—all mounted on a 24-pin DIP package. The Electron module contains the U-blox SARA-U260/U270 3G cellular modem, the STM32F205RGT6 120  MHz Arm Cortex M3 MCU, a BQ24195 power management unit/battery charger, a Maxim Integrated battery gauge IC, plus the same mode switches and RGB LED contained on the Photon. It is mounted on a larger, 36-pin DIP module.

Figure 1
Shown here are three of the Particle IoT modules. The two on the left are Wi-Fi, and the one on the right is 3G Cellular.

The Photon and Electron share a common set of peripheral ports. These include 1x 12- bit ADC with up to 8 inputs, 2x 12-bit DACs, 2x  SPI, 1x I2C, 1x I2S, 1x CAN, 1x USB, 9x PWM, 1x UART and 18x GPIO.

The Electron module, having 12 more pins, has more of some of the above peripheral ports. Because the peripheral ports of both modules occupy many of the available pins, there will be fewer GPIO pins available if you use some the peripheral ports.
Particle provides libraries or high-level APIs for just about all the peripheral ports I’ve listed. The only peripheral port that I found was not supported was the I2S block. I2S is basically a high-speed bus dedicated to audio DACs/ADCs/Codecs. Due to the high speed, synchronous data transfers that I2S devices demand, such devices are generally not compatible with the real-time operating system (FreeRTOS) that the

Particle device runs under (unless you use DMA-based I2S).
Particle’s GPIO, I2C and SPI API’s are written to be compatible with their counterparts in Arduino. Because of that, third-party Arduino libraries that are available for many common peripheral chips/breakout modules will work with the Particle modules without further tweaking.

Both the Proton and Electron come with a tiny U.FL socket for an external antenna. In the Electron, a Taoglas external antenna is required and is provided. The Photon has a small PCB-mounted Wi-Fi chip antenna, but you can also use an external antenna if you are mounting the Photon in a case that doesn’t allow RF to penetrate. There is an Automatic RF mode, where the best signal from either the chip or external antenna is used.

The Electron module can draw around 2 A or more when communicating with a cell tower. This is more current than can be supplied if you were to plug the Electron into a PC’s USB port. Although you can get USB adapters that supply greater than 2 A, you wouldn’t be able to communicate with the Electron via USB, which would be handy during debugging. Particle wisely decided to include a Li-Po battery charger on-board and included a 2,000 mA-hours Li-Po battery with JST plug in the Electron kit. This assures the user that there will be enough power available to operate the cellular modem’s RF circuitry at full power.

As of this writing, the Particle 3G Electron (in the DIP package) is only available in an educational “kit” format, which includes the Electron module, antenna, LiPo battery, USB cable and a small protoboard. With all those support components included, it’s a good deal at $69. The E-Series SMT module, meant to be integrated into a commercial product, is more expensive ($79 in unit quantities), and doesn’t include any of the support components in the Electron kit.

PROJECT CIRCUIT DETAILS

The first Particle-based project I built was the over-temperature alarm that I described in Part 1 of this series. It also sends out an alert if the power fails. Figure 2 is a schematic of the circuit. I decided to use the Dallas Semiconductor (now Maxim Integrated) DS18S20 1-wire temperature measurement device. It is more expensive than a thermistor, but is accurate to within ± 0.5°C and doesn’t need any calibration procedure. The Particle library contains a “ds18x20” library that handles both the DS18B20 and the DS18S20 devices. These two devices differ in that each one outputs temperature at a different resolution, and the library handles this transparently. The DS18x20 can be operated in a 2-wire mode—signal and parasitic power on one wire, and ground on the other. However, timing constraints are less onerous if you use separate wires for the signal and power lines, and that is how I wired mine.

Figure 2
Schematic diagram of the project, using an Electron Cellular module.

I chose a small Nokia 5110 LCD display for the user interface. These are inexpensive, as they are pulled from or are surplus units from popular older Nokia cell phones. An Arduino-based Nokia 5110 library works with Particle devices. This can be found in the “Library” section of the Particle Web-based IDE. The 5110 LCD has a separate backlight pin, which can be driven by a PWM signal, to control the backlight LED’s brightness. I run the backlight with a PWM duty cycle of 25%, which is plenty bright and uses less power.

The user controls are as follows:

1) An SPDT switch acts as the Setpoint UP/DOWN adjustment.
2) A TEST pushbutton, when pressed, simulates an over-temperature condition and sends out the same message for test purposes.
3) A RESET pushbutton is connected to the Electron module’s *RST pin.
4) While not shown in my diagram, I later added a switch in series with the Li-Po battery’s positive wire, to disconnect the Li-Po completely. This allows the unit to be turned off when the USB power adapter is unplugged and this switch is shut off.
The LCD displays the current time, which is synchronized with the Particle cloud server, so it’s very accurate. It also displays the measured temperature and the Setpoint temperature. The fourth line of the display indicates the AC power status. Because the power status is only monitored once per minute, it will not report a momentary power-loss.

Read the full article in the January 342 issue of Circuit Cellar

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Tuesday’s Newsletter: Microcontroller Watch

Coming to your inbox tomorrow: Circuit Cellar’s Microcontroller Watch newsletter. Tomorrow’s newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

Bonus: We’ve added Drawings for Free Stuff to our weekly newsletters. Make sure you’ve subscribed to the newsletter so you can participate.

Already a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber? Great!
You’ll get your Microcontroller Watch newsletter issue tomorrow.

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Don’t be left out! Sign up now:

Our weekly Circuit Cellar Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

IoT Technology Focus. (1/15) Covers what’s happening with Internet-of-Things (IoT) technology–-from devices to gateway networks to cloud architectures. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

Embedded Boards.(1/22) The focus here is on both standard and non-standard embedded computer boards that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up to production volumes.

January has a 5th Tuesday, so we’re bringing you a bonus newsletter:
ICs for Consumer Electronics (1/28)  Today’;s consumer electronic product designs demand ICs that enable low-power, high-functionality and cutthroat costs. Today’;s microcontroller, analog IC and power chip vendors are laser-focused on this lucrative, high-stakes market. This newsletter looks at the latest technology trends and product developments in for consumer electronics ICs.

Analog & Power. (2/5) This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op amps, batteries and more.

Catalog of 122 Open-Spec Linux Hacker Boards

Circuit Cellar’s sister website Linuxgizmos,com has posted its 2019 New Year’s edition catalog of hacker-friendly, open-spec SBCs that run Linux or Android. The catalog provides recently updated descriptions, specs, pricing, and links to details for all 122 SBCs.

CHECK IT OUT HERE!

Wednesday’s Newsletter: Analog & Power

Coming to your inbox on Wednesday: Circuit Cellar’s Analog & Power newsletter. This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including ADCs, DACs, DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op amps, batteries and more.

Bonus: We’ve added Drawings for Free Stuff to our weekly newsletters. Make sure you’ve subscribed to the newsletter so you can participate.

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You’ll get your Analog & Power newsletter issue tomorrow.

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Our weekly Circuit Cellar Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

Microcontroller Watch. (1/8) This newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

IoT Technology Focus. (1/15) Covers what’s happening with Internet-of-Things (IoT) technology–-from devices to gateway networks to cloud architectures. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

Embedded Boards.(1/22) The focus here is on both standard and non-standard embedded computer boards that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up to production volumes.

Raspberry Pi HAT Serves Up Robotics Control Smorgasbord

By Eric Brown

Adafruit has released a $35 robotics HAT add-on for any 40-pin Raspberry Pi board. The Adafruit Crickit (Creative Robotics & Interactive Construction Kit) HAT is designed for controlling motors, servos, or solenoids using Python 3. The board is limiting to powering 5V devices and requires a 5 V power supply.


Adafruit Crickit HAT with Pi and connected peripherals
(click image to enlarge)

The Crickit HAT incorporates Adafruit’s “i2c-to-whatever” bridge firmware, called seesaw. With seesaw, “you only need to use two data pins to control the huge number of inputs and outputs on the Crickit,” explains Adafruit founder and MIT engineer Limor Fried in an announcement on the Raspberry Pi blog. “All those timers, PWMs, NeoPixels, sensors are offloaded to the co-processor. Stuff like managing the speed of motors via PWM is also done with the co-processor, so you’ll get smooth PWM outputs that don’t jitter when Linux gets busy with other stuff.”


 
Crickit HAT with and without Raspberry Pi
(click images to enlarge)
The Crickit HAT uses a “bento box” approach to robotics, writes Fried. “Instead of having eight servo drivers, or four 10A motor controllers, or five stepper drivers, it has just a little bit of everything,” she adds.

Specifications listed for the Adafruit Crickit HAT include:

  • 4x analog or digital servo control, with precision 16-bit timers
  • 2x bi-directional brushed DC motor control, 1 Amp current-limited each, with 8-bit PWM speed control (or one stepper)
  • 4x high-current “Darlington” 500mA drive outputs with kick-back diode protection — for solenoids, relays, large LEDs, or one uni-polar stepper
  • 4x capacitive touch input sensors with alligator pads
  • 8x signal pins, which can be used as digital in/out or analog inputs
  • 1x NeoPixel driver with 5V level shifter connected to the seesaw chip (not the Pi), so you won’t be giving up pin 18. It can drive over 100 pixels.
  • 1x Class D, 4-8 ohm speaker, 3W-max audio amplifier connected to the I2S pins on the Pi for high-quality digital audio — even works on Zeros
  • 1x micro-USB to serial converter port for updating seesaw with the drag-n-drop bootloader, or plugging into a computer; it can also act as a USB converter for logging into the console and running command lines on the Pi.


 
Crickit HAT, front and back
(click images to enlarge)
 Further information

The Adafruit Crickit HAT is currently listed as “out of stock” at $34.95. More information may be found in Adafruit’s Crickit HAT announcement and product page.

This article originally appeared on LinuxGizmos.com on December 18..

Adafruit | www.adafruit.com

Tuesday’s Newsletter: Microcontroller Watch

Coming to your inbox tomorrow: Circuit Cellar’s Microcontroller Watch newsletter. Tomorrow’s newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

Bonus: We’ve added Drawings for Free Stuff to our weekly newsletters. Make sure you’ve subscribed to the newsletter so you can participate.

Already a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber? Great!
You’ll get your Microcontroller Watch newsletter issue tomorrow.

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Our weekly Circuit Cellar Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

IoT Technology Focus. (12/18) Covers what’s happening with Internet-of-Things (IoT) technology–-from devices to gateway networks to cloud architectures. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

Embedded Boards.(12/24) (Monday) The focus here is on both standard and non-standard embedded computer boards that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up to production volumes.

Analog & Power. (1/2) (Wednesday) This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op amps, batteries and more.

Tuesday’s Newsletter: Analog & Power

Coming to your inbox tomorrow: Circuit Cellar’s Analog & Power newsletter. Tomorrow’s newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including ADCs, DACs, DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op amps, batteries and more.

Bonus: We’ve added Drawings for Free Stuff to our weekly newsletters. Make sure you’ve subscribed to the newsletter so you can participate.

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You’ll get your Analog & Power newsletter issue tomorrow.

Not a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber?
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Our weekly Circuit Cellar Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

Microcontroller Watch. (12/11) This newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

IoT Technology Focus. (12/18) Covers what’s happening with Internet-of-Things (IoT) technology–-from devices to gateway networks to cloud architectures. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

Embedded Boards.(12/24) The focus here is on both standard and non-standard embedded computer boards that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up to production volumes.