Free Webinar: Bridge Android & Your Electronics Projects

Do you want to add a powerful wireless Android device to your own projects? Now you can, and doing so is easier than you think.

With their high-resolution touchscreens, ample computing power, WLAN support, and telephone functions, Android smartphones and tablets are ideal for use as control centers in your projects. But until now, it has been difficult to connect them to external circuitry. Elektor’s AndroPod interface board, which adds a serial TTL port and an RS-485 port to the picture, changes this situation.

The Elektor AndroPod module

In a free webinar on June 21, 2012, Bernhard Wörndl-Aichriedler (codesigner of the AndroPod Interface) will explain how easy it is to connect your own circuitry to an Android smartphone using the AndroPod interface. Click here to register.

Elektor Academy and element14 have teamed up to bring you a series of exclusive webinars covering blockbuster projects from recent editions of Elektor magazine. Participation in these webinars is completely free!

Webinar: AndroPod – Bridging Android and Your Electronics Projects
Date: Thursday June 21, 2012
Time: 16:00 CET
Presenter: Bernhard Wörndl-Aichriedler (Codesigner of the Andropod Interface)
Language: English

CircuitCellar.com is an Elektor International Media publication.

DesignSpark chipKIT Challenge 2012 Winners Named

The results for the DesignSpark chipKIT Challenge are now final. Dean Boman won First Prize for his chipKIT-based Energy Monitoring System, which provides users real-time home electrical usage data. A web server provides usage tracking on a circuit-by-circuit basis. It interfaces with a home automation system for long-term monitoring and data logging.

Dean Boman's Energy Monitoring System (Source: D. Boman)

Second prize went to Raul Alvarez for his Home Energy Gateway consumption monitor, which features an embedded gateway/web server that communicates with “smart” devices.

Raul Alvarezs Home Energy Gateway (Source: R. Alvarez)

Graig Pearen won Third Prize for his PV Array Tracker (Sun Seeker) project, which tracks, monitors, and adjusts PV arrays based on weather conditions.

Graig Pearen's PV Array Tracker (Source: G. Pearen)

Click HERE for a list of all the winners. You can review their project abstracts, documentation, schematics, diagrams, code, and more.

Participants in the competition were challenged develop innovative, energy-efficient designs with eco-friendly footprints. Entries were required to include an extension card developed using the DesignSpark PCB software tool and the Microchip Max32 chipKIT development board.

According to the documentation on the design challenge site:

The chipKIT™ Max32™ development platform is a 32-bit Arduino solution that enables hobbyists and academics to easily and inexpensively integrate electronics into their projects, even if they do not have an electronic-engineering background.

The platform consists of two PIC32-based development boards and open-source software that is compatible with the Arduino programming language and development environment. The chipKIT™ hardware is compatible with existing 3.3V Arduino shields and applications, and can be developed using a modified version of the Arduino IDE and existing Arduino resources, such as code examples, libraries, references and tutorials.

The chipKIT™ Basic I/O Shield (part # TDGL005) is compatible with the chipKIT™ Max32™ board, and offers users simple push buttons, switches, LEDs, I2C™ EEPROM, I2C temperature sensor, and a 128 x 32 pixel organic LED graphic display.

 

Click HERE for a list of all the winners. You can review their project abstracts, documentation, schematics, diagrams, code, and more.

Circuit Cellar/Elektor Inc. is the Contest Administrator.

Elektor Weekly Wrap-Up: “Elektor Projects” Site, Arduino Webinar, & Special Issue Prep

It’s been a remarkable week for Elektor International Media. Staffers launched a new community site, announced an upcoming Android-related webinar, and worked with U.S.-based colleagues to plan Circuit Cellar’s 25th anniversary special edition.

Elektor Projects Community Site

Elektor announced this week of a new community website—Elektor Projects—for “Elektor Plus” members. Elektor Projects is a site where members can share electronics experiences, read about designs, and participate in electronics projects, games, and challenges. Check it out at www.elektor-projects.com.

Elektor's new community website, Elektor-Projects.com

The site enables members to:

  • Present projects and get published in Elektor magazine
  • Sell products through the web shop
  • Build a reputation by showing of your skills in projects, contributions, comments, games and contests.

Click here to join the site!

Elektor staff celebrated the launch of Elektor Projects with a special cake. Any beer to go with it?

Webninar: Arduino Controlled by LabVIEW

Elektor announced Wednesday it is teaming up with element14 to deliver a webinar on connecting Arduino and LabVIEW using LIFA.

Arduino and LabVIEW are handy programming environments for designers of all levels, especially those who do not know how to program (or don’t want to). Both platforms enable rapid application development.

In this webinar Elektor editor Clemens Valens will cover how to get start with LabVIEW and LIFA. He’ll detail how to develop a virtual instrument to blink the LED on Elektor’s Arduino-compatible board called Platino.

In addition, Valens will cover LIFA, add a custom relay board, and replace the USB cable by a Bluetooth connection to the PC. In the end, users will be able to wirelessly monitor the status of the Arduino/Platino/Relay system on an iPad or Android tablet anywhere in the world.

Webinar: Arduino Controlled by LabVIEW
Date: Thursday, May 24, 2012
Time: 15:00 GMT (16:00 CET)
Presenter: Clemens Valens (Elektor Contributing Editor)
Language: English

Click here to register for the webinar.

25 Year Anniversary Issue

Elektor Director Don Akkermans met with Elektor US and Circuit Cellar staff in Connecticut this week to discuss the various exciting endeavors on tap for the rest of 2012 and beyond.

One particularly exciting development under discussion was Circuit Cellar’s 25th Anniversary Special! We’re planning an amazing 25th anniversary edition of Circuit Cellar, with essays by columnists and industry leaders on the past, present, and future of embedded design, programming, and computer technology. Elektor staffers will be among the contributors.

Stay tuned for more information in the coming weeks about this must-have collector’s item!

CircuitCellar.com is an Elektor group publication.

Issue 262: Full-Featured SBCs at Your Fingertips

Fact 1: Easy-to-use, full-featured SBCs are popping up everywhere. Fact 2: Open-source software is becoming more commonplace each day. (Even Microsoft Corp. has begun taking open source seriously.) Conclusion: It’s an opportune time to be an electronics innovator.

In Circuit Cellar May 2012, Steve Ciarcia surveys some of the more affordable, 32-bit hardware options at your disposal. In “Power to the People” he writes:

While last month I may have implied that 8 bits is enough to control the world, there are significant things happening in high-end, 32-bit embedded processors that might really produce that inevitability. There are quite a few new system-on-chip-based, low-cost, single-board computers (SBCs) specifically designed to compete with or augment the smartphone and pad computer market. These and other full-feature budget SBCs are something you should definitely keep on your radar.

These devices typically have a high-end, 32-bit processor, such as ARM Cortex-A8, running 400 MHz to 1,000 MHz, coupled with a GPU core (and sometimes a separate DSP core) along with 128 MB to 512 MB of DDR SDRAM. These boards typically boot a full-up desktop operating system (OS)—such as Linux or Android (and soon Windows 8)—and often contain enough graphics horsepower for full-frame rate HD video and gaming.

Texas Instruments made a significant splash a few years ago with the introduction of the BeagleBoard SBC (beagleboard.org, $149 at the time) with their OMAP3530 chip along with 256-MB of flash memory and 128 MB of SDRAM running Angstrom Linux on a high-resolution HDMI monitor. That board has since been superseded by the BeagleBoard-xM (1,000 MHz and 512 MB) at the same price and supplemented by the BeagleBone board. Selling for just $89, BeagleBone includes a 600-MHz AM3517 processor, 256-MB SDRAM, a 2-GB microSD card, and Ethernet (something the original BeagleBoard lacked).

All of the software for these boards is open source, and a significant community of developers has grown up around them. In particular, a lot of effort has been put into software infrastructure, with a number of OSes now ported to many of these boards, along with languages (both compiled and interpreted) and application frameworks, such as XBMC for multimedia and home-theater applications.

Another SBC that has been generating a lot of buzz lately is the Raspberry Pi board (raspberrypi.org), mainly because the “B” version is priced at just $35. Raspberry Pi is based on a Broadcom chip, which is unexpected. Broadcom traditionally only gave hardware documentation and software drivers to major customers, like set-top box manufacturers, not to an open-source marketplace. Apparently, the only proprietary piece of software for the Raspberry Pi board will be the driver/firmware for the GPU core. Unfortunately, as I write this, there are a few lingering manufacturing issues, and Raspberry Pi still awaits shipping.

Both the concept and size of an “SBC” are evolving as well. In addition to the bare development boards, a number of interesting second-level products based on these chips has begun to appear. Take a look at designsomething.org. A couple of projects in particular are Pandora’s Pandora Handheld and Always Innovating’s HDMI Dongle. The former is a pocket-sized computer that flips open to reveal an 800 × 480 touchscreen and an alphanumeric keypad with gaming controls. Besides the obvious applications as a video viewer, gaming platform, and “super PDA,” I see huge opportunities for this box as a user interface for things like USB-based test instruments.

The Always Innovating HDMI Dongle is amazing for how much functionality they’ve crammed into a small package: it’s no bigger than a USB thumb drive (it also needs a USB socket for power), but it can turn any TV with an HDMI input jack and USB socket into a fully functional, Android-based computer with 1080p HD video playback, games, and Wi-Fi-based Internet access. These dongles might easily become distributed home theater nodes, delivering high-quality video and audio to multiple rooms from a common file server; or, one of the other low-cost SBCs might become the brain of a robot that can see and understand the world around it using open-source computer vision (OpenCV).

While it makes an old hardware guy like me feel less useful, it’s clear that the hardware—or, more specifically, the necessity to always design unique hardware—is no longer the bottleneck when it comes to powerful embedded applications. In a turnaround from decades ago, the ball is now clearly in the court of the software developers.

The applications for these boards and “thumb-thingies” are endless. Basically, they have the hardware muscle to handle anything that a smartphone or pad computer can do for much less. A lot of work has already been done on the OS and middleware layers. We just need to dive in and create the applications! Then it basically becomes a simple matter of programming. Of course, you know how much I personally look forward to that.

Circuit Cellar 262 (May 2012) is on newsstands now. Click here for a free preview of the issue.

Tech Highlights from Design West: RL78, AndroPod, Stellaris, mbed, & more

The Embedded Systems Conference has always been a top venue for studying, discussing, and handling the embedded industry’s newest leading-edge technologies. This year in San Jose, CA, I walked the floor looking for the tech Circuit Cellar and Elektor members would love to get their hands on and implement in novel projects. Here I review some of the hundreds of interesting products and systems at Design West 2012.

RENESAS

Renesas launched the RL78 Design Challenge at Design West. The following novel RL78 applications were particularly intriguing.

  • An RL78 L12 MCU powered by a lemon:

    A lemon powers the RL78 (Photo: Circuit Cellar)

  • An RL78 kit used for motor control:

    The RL78 used for motor control (Photo: Circuit Cellar)

  • An RL78 demo for home control applications:

    The RL78 used for home control (Photo: Circuit Cellar)

TEXAS INSTRUMENTS

Circuit Cellar members have used TI products in countless applications. Below are two interesting TI Cortex-based designs

A Cortex-M3 digital guitar (you can see the Android connection):

TI's digital guitar (Photo: Circuit Cellar)

Stellaris fans will be happy to see the Stellaris ARM Cortex -M4F in a small wireless application:

The Stellaris goes wireless (Photo: Circuit Cellar)

NXP mbed

Due to the success of the recent NXP mbed Design Challenge, I stopped at the mbed station to see what exciting technologies our NXP friends were exhibiting. They didn’t disappoint. Check out the mbed-based slingshot developed for playing Angry Birds!

mbed-Based sligshot for going after "Angry Birds" (Photo: Circuit Cellar)

Below is a video of the project on the mbedmicro YouTube page:

FTDI

I was pleased to see the Elektor AndroPod hard at work at the FTDI booth. The design enables users to easily control a robotic arm with Android smartphones and tablets.

FTDI demonstrates robot control with Android (Photo: Circuit Cellar)

As you can imagine, the possible applications are endless.

The AndroPod at work! (Photo: Circuit Cellar)