Motor Drivers Provide Solution for Low- to Mid-Power Applications

STMicroelectronics has released the STSPIN830 and STSPIN840 single-chip drivers that simplify the design of low-to-mid-power motor controls in the 7 V to 45 V range.  The devices contain flexible control logic and low-RDS(ON) power switches for industrial applications, medical technology, and home appliances.
The STSPIN830 for driving 3-phase brushless DC motors has a mode-setting pin that lets users control the three half bridges of the integrated power stage with direct U, V, and W pulse-width modulated (PWM) inputs, or by applying signals to each gate individually for higher control flexibility. A dedicated sense pin for each inverter leg simplifies setting up three-shunt or single-shunt current sensing for Field-Oriented Control (FOC).

The STSPIN840 can drive two brushed DC motors or one larger motor leveraging ST’s well- known, market-proven paralleling concept, which allows the integrated full bridges to be configured as two separate bridges or as a single bridge using the two sets of MOSFETs in parallel for lower RDS(ON) and higher current rating.

Both drivers contain rich features, including PWM current-control circuitry with adjustable off-time, a convenient standby pin for power saving, and protection circuitry including non-dissipative overcurrent protection, short-circuit protection, undervoltage lockout, thermal shutdown, and interlocking to help create robust and reliable drives.

The integrated power stage of each device features ST-proprietary MOSFETs with low RDS(ON) of only 500 mΩ to combine high efficiency with economy. The option to use the output bridges individually or connected in parallel, in the STSPIN840, helps trim the BOM for multi-motor applications.

With their high feature integration and flexibility, the drivers enable more compact and cost-effective controls for industrial, robotic, medical, building-automation, and office-equipment applications. The STSPIN830 is ideal for factory-automation end-points, home appliances, small pumps, and fans for computer or general-purpose cooling. The STSPIN840 targets ATM and money-handling machines, multi-axis stage-lighting mechanisms, thermal printers, textile or sewing machines, and vending machines.

The STSPIN830 and STSPIN840 are both in production now, as 4 mm x 4 mm QFN devices. Pricing for both starts from $1.25 for orders of 1,000 pieces.

Two STM32 Nucleo expansion boards are provided to facilitate product evaluation and build functional prototypes using the STM32 Open Development Environment: X-NUCLEO-IHM16M1 for the STSPIN830 and X-NUCLEO-IHM15A1 for the STSPIN840, both priced at $16.

STMicroelectronics | www.st.com

BLDC Fan Current

Motors and Measurements

Today’s small fans and blowers depend on brushless DC (BLDC) motor technology for their operation. Here, Ed explains how these seemingly simple devices are actually quite complex when you measure them in action.

By Ed Nisley

The 3D printer Cambrian Explosion unleashed both the stepper motors you’ve seen in previous articles and the cooling fans required to compensate for their abuse. As fans became small and cheap, Moore’s Law converted them from simple DC motors into electronic devices, simultaneously invalidating the assumptions people (including myself) have about their proper use.

In this article, I’ll make some measurements on the motor inside a tangential blower and explore how the data relates to the basic physics of moving air.

Brushless DC Motors

Electric motors, regardless of their power source, produce motion by opposing the magnetic field in their rotor against the field in their stator. Small motors generally produce one magnetic field with permanent magnets, which means the other magnetic field must change with time in order to keep the rotor spinning. Motors powered from an AC source, typically the power line for simple motors, have inherently time-varying currents, but motors connected to a DC source require a switching mechanism, called a commutator, to produce the proper current waveforms.

Mechanical commutators date back to the earliest days of motor technology, when motors passed DC power supply current through graphite blocks sliding over copper bars to switch the rotor winding currents without external hardware. For example, the commutator in the lead photo switches the rotor current of a 1065 horsepower marine propulsion motor installed on Fireboat Harvey in 1930, where it’s still in use after nine decades.

Fireboat Harvey’s motors produce the stator field using DC electromagnets powered by steam-driven exciter generators. Small DC motors now use high-flux, rare-earth magnets and no longer need boilers or exhaust stacks.

Although graphite sliding on copper sufficed for the first century of DC motors, many DC motors now use electronic commutation, with semiconductor power switches driven by surprisingly complex logic embedded in a dedicated controller. These motors seem “inside out” compared to older designs, with permanent magnets producing a fixed rotor field and the controller producing a time-varying stator field. The relentless application of Moore’s Law put the controller and power switches on a single PCB hidden inside the motor case, out of sight and out of mind.

Because semiconductor switches eliminated the need for carbon brushes, the motors became known as Brushless DC motors. Externally, they operate from a DC supply and, with only two wires, don’t seem particularly complicated. Internally, their wiring and currents resemble multi-phase AC induction motors using pseudo-sinusoidal stator voltage waveforms. As a result, they have entirely different power supply requirements.

The magnetic field in the rotor of a mechanically commutated motor has a fixed relationship to the stator field. As the rotor turns, its magnetic field remains stationary with respect to the stator as the brushes activate successive sections of the rotor winding to produce essentially constant torque against the stator field. Electronically commutated motors must sense the rotor position to produce stator currents with the proper torque against the moving rotor field. As you’ll see, the motor controller can use the back EMF generated by the spinning rotor to determine its position, thereby eliminating any additional components.

Figure 1
The blower motor current varies linearly with its supply voltage, so the power consumption varies as the square of the voltage. The motor speed depends on the balance between torque and load.

I originally thought Brushless DC (BLDC) motors operated much like steppers, with the controller regulating the winding current, but the switches actually regulate the voltage applied to the windings, with the current determined by the difference between the applied voltage and the back EMF due to the rotor speed. The difference between current drive and voltage drive means steppers and BLDC motors have completely different behaviors.

Constant Voltage Operation

The orange trace along the bottom of Figure 1 shows the current drawn by the 24 V tangential blower shown in Figure 2, without the anemometer on its outlet, for supply voltages between 2.3 V and 26 V. The BLDC motor controller shapes the DC supply voltage into AC waveforms, the winding current varies linearly with the applied voltage and, perhaps surprisingly, the blower looks like a 100 Ω resistor.

Figure 2
An anemometer measures the blower’s outlet air speed and a square of retroreflective tape on the rotor provides a target for the laser tachometer. If you are doing this in a lab, you should build a larger duct with a flow straightener and airtight joints.

The blower’s power dissipation therefore varies as the square of the supply voltage, as shown by the calculated dots in the purple curve. In fact, the quadratic equation fitting the data has 0.00 coefficients for both the linear and constant terms, so it’s as good as simple measurements can get.

As you saw in March (Circuit Cellar #332) and May (Circuit Cellar #334), a stepper motor driven by a microstepping controller has a constant winding current and operates at a constant power. Increasing the supply voltage increases the rate of current change but, because the controller applies the increasing voltage with a lower duty cycle, it doesn’t directly increase power dissipation. …

Read the full article in the July 336 issue of Circuit Cellar

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Note: We’ve made the October 2017 issue of Circuit Cellar available as a free sample issue. In it, you’ll find a rich variety of the kinds of articles and information that exemplify a typical issue of the current magazine.

Stepper Motor Back EMF

Supply Voltage vs. Current Control

Continuing with the topic of stepper motors, this time Ed looks at back electromotive force (EMF) and its effects. He examines the relationship between running stepper motors at high speeds and power supply voltage requirements.

By Ed Nisley

Early 3D printers used ATX supplies from desktop PCs for their logic, heater and motor power. This worked well enough—although running high-wattage heaters from the 12 V supply tended to incinerate cheap connectors. More mysteriously, stepper motors tended to run roughly and stall at high printing speeds, even with microstepping controllers connected to the 12 V supply.

In this article, I’ll examine the effect of back EMF on stepper motor current control. I’ll begin with a motor at rest, then show why increasing speeds call for a much higher power supply voltage than you may expect.

Microstepping Current Control

As you saw in my March 2018 article (Circuit Cellar 332), microstepping motor drivers control the winding currents to move the rotor between its full-step positions. Chips similar to the A4988 on the Protoneer CNC Shield in my MPCNC sense each winding’s current through a series resistor, then set the H-bridge MOSFETs to increase, reduce or maintain the current as needed for each step. Photo 1 shows the Z-axis motor current during the first few steps as the motor begins turning, measured with my long-obsolete Tektronix Hall effect current probes, as shown in this article’s lead photo above.

Photo 1 Each pulse in the bottom trace triggers a single Z-axis microstep. The top two traces show the 32 kHz PWM ripple in the A and B winding currents at 200 mA/div. The Z-axis acceleration limit reduces the starting speed to 18 mm/s = 1,100 mm/min.

The upper trace (I’ll call it the “A” winding) comes from the black A6302 probe clamped around the blue wire, with the vertical scale at 200 mA/div. The current starts at 0 mA and increases after each Z-axis step pulse in the bottom trace. Unlike the situation in most scope images, the “ripple” on the trace isn’t noise. It’s a steady series of PWM pulses regulating the winding current.

The middle trace (the “B” winding) increases from -425 mA because it operates in quadrature with the A winding. The hulking pistol-shaped Tektronix A6303 current probe, rated for 100 A, isn’t well-suited to measure such tiny currents, as you can see from the tiny green stepper motor wire lying in the gaping opening through the probe’s ferrite core. Using it with the A6302 probe shows the correct relation between the currents in both windings, even if its absolute calibration isn’t quite right.

Photo 2 zooms in on the A winding current, with the vertical scale at 50 mA/div, to show the first PWM pulse in better detail. The current begins rising from 0 mA, at the rising edge of the step pulse, as the A4988 controller applies +24 V to the motor winding and reaches 110 mA after 18 µs. The controller then applies -24 V to the winding by swapping the H bridge connections. This causes the current to fall to 40 mA, whereupon it turns on both lower MOSFETs in the bridge to let the current circulate through the transistors with very little loss.

Photo 2
Zooming in on the first microstep pulse of Photo 1 shows the A4988 driver raising the stepper winding current from 0 mA as the motor starts turning. The applied voltage and motor inductance determine the slope of the current changes.

The next PWM cycle starts 15 µs later, in the rightmost division of the screen, where it rises from the 40 mA winding current set by the first pulse. It will also end at 110 mA, although that part of the cycle occurs far off-screen. You can read the details of the A4988 control algorithms and current levels in its datasheet, with the two-stage decreasing waveform known as “mixed decay” mode.

Although the H-bridge MOSFETs in the A4988 connect the motor windings directly between the supply voltage and circuit ground, the winding inductance prevents the current from changing instantaneously. The datasheet gives a nominal inductance of 4.8 mH, matching what I measured, but you can also estimate the value from the slope of the current changes.. . …

Read the full article in the May 334 issue of Circuit Cellar

Don’t miss out on upcoming issues of Circuit Cellar. Subscribe today!
Note: We’ve made the October 2017 issue of Circuit Cellar available as a free sample issue. In it, you’ll find a rich variety of the kinds of articles and information that exemplify a typical issue of the current magazine.

HDMI TFT Modules Simplify Connectivity

HDMI TFT module product line that greatly simplifies the process of connecting to the display. Rather than juggling an FPC ribbon cable with a middle-man controller board, you can connect an HDMI cable from your desired board or computer right into the TFT module. This makes it easy to interface with your display from the development and prototyping stages, all the way into final application production.

The ease-of-use of these new products follows through into touch panel integration as well. For both the resistive and capacitive (PCAP) touch panel options, USB-HID driver recognition is installed. Each of the touch panel modules are also each pre-calibrated in-house to the display they’re mounted on. This means that a simple USB to micro-USB cable just needs to be connected from your board with touch interaction output (such as Raspberry Pi) to the module and your touch interactivity is ready to go immediately.

Integrated Precision Solution for Batteries

Analog Devices has introduced a precision integrated analog front end, controller, and pulse-width modulator (PWM) for battery testing and formation capable of increasing system accuracy and efficiency in lithium-ion battery formation and grading. Compared to conventional technology, the new AD8452 provides 50% more channels in the same amount of space, adding capacity and increasing battery production throughput. The AD8452 uses switching technology that recycles the energy from the battery while discharging and delivers 10 times more accuracy than conventional switching solutions.

AD8452The higher accuracy allows for more uniform cells within battery packs and contributes to longer living batteries in applications such as electric vehicles. It also enhances the safety of manufacturing processes by providing better detection and monitoring to help prevent over and undercharging which can lead to battery failures. The AD8452 delivers bill of material (BoM) cost savings of up to 50% for charging/discharging boards and potential system cost savings of approximately 20%. System simulating demonstration boards will be available and can enable lower R&D engineering cost and shorter time to market for test equipment manufacturers.

AD8452 Features

  • Enables energy recycling battery formation/grading for systems of 20 Ahours or less with up to 95% power efficiency
  • Industry leading precise measurement of current and voltage better than 0.02% over 10⁰C temperature change
  • Solution size 70% smaller than previous product generation

Analog Devices | www.analog.com

Sensor Node Gets LoRaWAN Certification

Advantech offers its standardized M2.COM IoT LoRaWAN certified sensor node WISE-1510 with integrated ARM Cortex-M4 processor and LoRa transceiver. The module the  is able to provide multi-interfaces for sensors and I/O control such as UART, I2C, SPI, GPIO, PWM and ADC. The WISE-1510 sensor node is well suited for for smart cities, WISE-1510_3D _S20170602171747agriculture, metering, street lighting and environment monitoring. With power consumption optimization and wide area reception, LoRa  sensors or applications with low data rate requirements can achieve years of battery life and kilometers of long distance connection.

WISE-1510 has has received LoRaWAN certification from the LoRa Alliance. Depending on deployment requirements, developers can select to use Public LoRaWAN network services or build a private LoRa system with WISE-3610 LoRa IoT gateway. Advantech’s WISE-3610  is a Qualcomm ARM Cortex A7 based hardware platform with private LoRa ecosystem solution that can connect up to 500 WISE-1510 sensor node devices. Powered by Advantech’s WISE-PaaS IoT Software Platform, WISE-3610 features automatic cloud connection through its WISE-PaaS/WISE Agent service, manages wireless nodes and data via WSN management APIs, and helps customers streamline their IoT data acquisition development through sensor service APIs, and WSN drivers.

Developers can leverage microprocessors on WISE-1510 to build their own applications. WISE-1510 offers unified software—ARM Mbed OS and SDK for easy development with APIs and related documents. Developers can also find extensive resources from Github such as code review, library integration and free core tools. WISE-1510 also offers worldwide certification which allow developers to leverage their IoT devices anywhere. Using Advantech’s WISE-3610 LoRa IoT Gateway, WISE-1510 can be connected to WISE-  PaaS/RMM or  ARM Mbed Cloud service with IoT communication protocols including LWM2M, CoAP, and MQTT. End-to-end integration assists system integrators to overcome complex challenges and helps them build IoT applications quickly and easily.

WISE-1510 features and specifications:

  • ARM Cortex-M4 core processor
  • Compatible support for public LoRaWAN or private LoRa networks
  • Great for low power/wide range applications
  • Multiple I/O interfaces for sensor and control
  • Supports wide temperatures  -40 °C to 85 °C

Advantech | www.advantech.com

Low-Power AC Input LED Drivers

XPThe DLE25 and DLE35 series of AC input LED drivers incorporate universal input with active power factor correction in a two-power stage design to eliminate flicker while providing a high-efficiency solution. The series includes dimmable constant current versions with PWM, voltage, and resistance programming capabilities.

The DLE25 and DLE35 drivers are packaged in an IP67-rated 3.68“ × 2.89“ × 1.29“ enclosure and are waterproof to depths up to 1 m, making them suitable for use in almost any outdoor application. Typical operating efficiency is in the 78% to 83% range.

Accommodating the extended universal input voltage range from 90 to 305 VAC, the DLE series supports the 277 VAC system used in the US. The series complies with EN61347 and UL8750 safety approvals and Class B conducted and radiated noise limits as specified by EN55015.

The DLE25 series costs $21.06 in 500-piece quantities.

XP Power, Ltd.
www.xppower.com

Flexible I/O Expansion for Rugged Applications

WynSystemsThe SBC35-CC405 series of multi-core embedded PCs includes on-board USB, gigabit Ethernet, and serial ports. These industrial computers are designed for rugged embedded applications requiring extended temperature operation and long-term availability.

The SBC35-CC405 series features the latest generation Intel Atom E3800 family of processors in an industry-standard 3.5” single-board computer (SBC) format COM Express carrier. A Type 6 COM Express module supporting a quad-, dual-, or single-core processor is used to integrate the computer. For networking and communications, the SBC35-CC405 includes two Intel I210 gigabit Ethernet controllers with IEEE 1588 timestamping and 10-/100-/1,000-Mbps multispeed operation. Four Type-A connectors support three USB 2.0 channels and one high-speed USB 3.0 channel. Two serial ports support RS-232/-422/-485 interface levels with clock options up to 20 Mbps in the RS-422/-485 mode and up to 1 Mbps in the RS-232 mode.

The SBC35-CC405 series also includes two MiniPCIe connectors and one IO60 connector to enable additional I/O expansion. Both MiniPCIe connectors support half-length and full-length cards with screw-down mounting for improved shock and vibration durability. One MiniPCIe connector also supports bootable mSATA solid-state disks while the other connector includes USB. The IO60 connector provides access to the I2C, SPI, PWM, and UART signals enabling a simple interface to sensors, data acquisition, and other low-speed I/O devices.

The SBC35-CC405 runs over a 10-to-50-VDC input power range and operates at temperatures from –40°C to 85°C. Enclosures, power supplies, and configuration services are also available.

Linux, Windows, and other x86 OSes can be booted from the CFast, mSATA, SATA, or USB interfaces, providing flexible data storage options. WinSystems provides drivers for Linux and Windows 7/8 as well as preconfigured embedded OSes.
The single-core SBC35-CC405 costs $499.

Winsystems, Inc.
www.winsystems.com

HMI Development on Intelligent Displays

4dsystems_HRES4D Systems and Future Technology Devices International Limited (FTDI) (aka, FTDI Chip) recently introduced the 4DLCD-FT843. The intelligent display solution incorporates FTDI Chip’s FT800 Embedded Video Engine (EVE) with the subsequent introduction of two additional products. This combined product gives design engineers a foundation on which to quickly and easily construct human-machine interfaces (HMIs).

The first of these products is the ADAM (Arduino Display Adaptor Module). This 47.5-mm × 53.4-mm Arduino-compatible shield permits communication between the Arduino via the SPI. The shield is suitable for use with Arduino Uno, Due, Duemilanove, Leonardo, Mega 1280/2560, and Pro 5V. The shield’s micro-SD card provides the Arduino-based display system with ample data storage. The 4DLCD-FT843 can use the micro-SD card to retrieve objects (e.g., images, sounds, fonts, etc.). Drawing power from the Arduino’s 5-V bus, the ADAM regulates the 4DLCD-FT843’s supply to 3.3 V. The FT800 EVE controller can handle many of the graphics functions that would otherwise need to be managed by the Arduino.

The ADAM is complemented by the 4DLCD-FT843-Breakout. With a 26.5-mm × 12-mm footprint, this simple breakout module enables the 4DLCD-FT843 to be attached to a general host or breadboard for prototyping purposes. It features a 10-way FPC connection for attachment with the 4DLCD-FT843 along with a 10-way, 2.54-mm pitch male pin header that enables it to directly connect to the host board. Both products support a –10°C-to-70°C operational temperature range.

The EVE-driven 4DLCD-FT843 has a 4.3” TFT QWVGA display with a four-wire resistive touchscreen. It features a 64-voice polyphonic sound synthesizer, a mono PWM audio output, a programmable interrupt controller, a PWM dimming controller for the display’s backlight, and a flexible ribbon connector.

Contact 4D Systems or FTDI Chip for pricing.

4D Systems
www.4dsystems.com.au

Future Technology Devices International Limited (FTDI) (aka, FTDI Chip)
www.ftdichip.com

An Engineer Who Retires to the Garage

Jerry Brown, of Camarillo, CA, retired from the aerospace industry five years ago but continues to consult and work on numerous projects at home. For example, he plans to submit an article to Circuit Cellar about a Microchip Technology PIC-based computer display component (CDC) he designed and built for a traffic-monitoring system developed by a colleague.

Jerry Brown sits at his workbench. The black box atop the workbench is an embedded controller and is part of a traffic monitoring system he has been working on.

Jerry Brown sits at his workbench. The black box atop the workbench is an embedded controller and part of  his traffic monitoring system project.

“The traffic monitoring system is composed of a beam emitter component (BEC), a beam sensor component (BSC), and the CDC, and is intended for unmanned use on city streets, boulevards, and roadways to monitor and record the accumulative count, direction of travel, speed, and time of day for vehicles that pass by a specific location during a set time period,” he says.

Brown particularly enjoys working with PWM LED controllers. Circuit Cellar editors look forward to seeing his project article. In the meantime, he sent us the following description and pictures of the space where he conceives and executes his creative engineering ideas.

Jerry's garage-based lab.

Brown’s garage-based lab.

My workspace, which I call my “lab,” is on one side of my two-car garage and is fairly well equipped. (If you think it looks a bit messy, you should have seen it before I straightened it up for the “photo shoot.”)  

I have a good supply of passive and active electronic components, which are catalogued and, along with other parts and supplies, are stored in the cabinets and shelves alongside and above the workbench. I use the computer to write and compile software programs and to program PIC flash microcontrollers.  

The photos show the workbench and some of the instrumentation I have in the lab, including a waveform generator, a digital storage oscilloscope, a digital multimeter, a couple of power supplies, and a soldering station.  

The black box visible on top of the workbench is an embedded controller and is part of the traffic monitoring system that I have been working on.

Instruments in Jerry's lab include a waveform generator, a digital storage oscilloscope, a digital multimeter, a couple of power supplies, and a soldering station.

Instruments in Brown’s lab include a waveform generator, a digital storage oscilloscope, a digital multimeter, a couple of power supplies, and a soldering station. 

Brown has a BS in Electrical Engineering and a BS in Business Administration from California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo, CA. He worked in the aerospace industry for 30 years and retired as the Principal Engineer/Manager of a Los Angeles-area aerospace company’s electrical and software design group.

Client Profile: Invenscience LC

Invenscience2340 South Heritage Drive, Suite I
Nibley UT, 84321

CONTACT: Collin Lewis, sales@invenscience.com
invenscience.com

EMBEDDED PRODUCTS: Torxis Servos and various servo controllers

FEATURED PRODUCT: Invenscience features a wide range of unique servo controllers that generate the PWM signal for general RC servomotors of all brands and Torxis Servos. (The Simple Slider Servo Controller is pictured.) Included in this lineup are:

  • Gamer joystick controllers
  • Conventional joystick controllers
  • Equalizer-style slider controllers
  • Android device Bluetooth controllers

All of these controllers provide power and the radio control (RC) PWM signal necessary to make servos move without any programming effort.

EXCLUSIVE OFFER: Use the promo code “CC2014” to receive a 10% discount on all purchases through March 31, 2014.

Circuit Cellar prides itself on presenting readers with information about innovative companies, organizations, products, and services relating to embedded technologies. This space is where Circuit Cellar enables clients to present readers useful information, special deals, and more.

Amplifier Classes from A to H

Engineers and audiophiles have one thing in common when it comes to amplifiers. They want a design that provides a strong balance between performance, efficiency, and cost.

If you are an engineer interested in choosing or designing the amplifier best suited to your needs, you’ll find columnist Robert Lacoste’s article in Circuit Cellar’s December issue helpful. His article provides a comprehensive look at the characteristics, strengths, and weaknesses of different amplifier classes so you can select the best one for your application.

The article, logically enough, proceeds from Class A through Class H (but only touches on the more nebulous Class T, which appears to be a developer’s custom-made creation).

“Theory is easy, but difficulties arise when you actually want to design a real-world amplifier,” Lacoste says. “What are your particular choices for its final amplifying stage?”

The following article excerpts, in part, answer  that question. (For fuller guidance, download Circuit Cellar’s December issue.)

CLASS A
The first and simplest solution would be to use a single transistor in linear mode (see Figure 1)… Basically the transistor must be biased to have a collector voltage close to VCC /2 when no signal is applied on the input. This enables the output signal to swing

Figure 1—A Class-A amplifier can be built around a simple transistor. The transistor must be biased in so it stays in the linear operating region (i.e., the transistor is always conducting).

Figure 1—A Class-A amplifier can be built around a simple transistor. The transistor must be biased in so it stays in the linear operating region (i.e., the transistor is always conducting).

either above or below this quiescent voltage depending on the input voltage polarity….

This solution’s advantages are numerous: simplicity, no need for a bipolar power supply, and excellent linearity as long as the output voltage doesn’t come too close to the power rails. This solution is considered as the perfect reference for audio applications. But there is a serious downside.

Because a continuous current flows through its collector, even without an input signal’s presence, this implies poor efficiency. In fact, a basic Class-A amplifier’s efficiency is barely more than 30%…

CLASS B
How can you improve an amplifier’s efficiency? You want to avoid a continuous current flowing in the output transistors as much as possible.

Class-B amplifiers use a pair of complementary transistors in a push-pull configuration (see Figure 2). The transistors are biased in such a way that one of the transistors conducts when the input signal is positive and the other conducts when it is negative. Both transistors never conduct at the same time, so there are very few losses. The current always goes to the load…

A Class-B amplifier has more improved efficiency compared to a Class-A amplifier. This is great, but there is a downside, right? The answer is unfortunately yes.
The downside is called crossover distortion…

Figure 2—Class-B amplifiers are usually built around a pair of complementary transistors (at left). Each transistor conducts 50% of the time. This minimizes power losses, but at the expense of the crossover distortion at each zero crossing (at right).

Figure 2—Class-B amplifiers are usually built around a pair of complementary transistors (at left). Each transistor conducts 50% of the time. This minimizes power losses, but at the expense of the crossover distortion at each zero crossing.

CLASS AB
As its name indicates, Class-AB amplifiers are midway between Class A and Class B. Have a look at the Class-B schematic shown in Figure 2. If you slightly change the transistor’s biasing, it will enable a small current to continuously flow through the transistors when no input is present. This current is not as high as what’s needed for a Class-A amplifier. However, this current would ensure that there will be a small overall current, around zero crossing.

Only one transistor conducts when the input signal has a high enough voltage (positive or negative), but both will conduct around 0 V. Therefore, a Class-AB amplifier’s efficiency is better than a Class-A amplifier but worse than a Class-B amplifier. Moreover, a Class-AB amplifier’s linearity is better than a Class-B amplifier but not as good as a Class-A amplifier.

These characteristics make Class-AB amplifiers a good choice for most low-cost designs…

CLASS C
There isn’t any Class-C audio amplifier Why? This is because a Class-C amplifier is highly nonlinear. How can it be of any use?

An RF signal is composed of a high-frequency carrier with some modulation. The resulting signal is often quite narrow in terms of frequency range. Moreover, a large class of RF modulations doesn’t modify the carrier signal’s amplitude.

For example, with a frequency or a phase modulation, the carrier peak-to-peak voltage is always stable. In such a case, it is possible to use a nonlinear amplifier and a simple band-pass filter to recover the signal!

A Class-C amplifier can have good efficiency as there are no lossy resistors anywhere. It goes up to 60% or even 70%, which is good for high-frequency designs. Moreover, only one transistor is required, which is a key cost reduction when using expensive RF transistors. So there is a high probability that your garage door remote control is equipped with a Class-C RF amplifier.

CLASS D
Class D is currently the best solution for any low-cost, high-power, low-frequency amplifier—particularly for audio applications. Figure 5 shows its simple concept.
First, a PWM encoder is used to convert the input signal from analog to a one-bit digital format. This could be easily accomplished with a sawtooth generator and a voltage comparator as shown in Figure 3.

This section’s output is a digital signal with a duty cycle proportional to the input’s voltage. If the input signal comes from a digital source (e.g., a CD player, a digital radio, a computer audio board, etc.) then there is no need to use an analog signal anywhere. In that case, the PWM signal can be directly generated in the digital domain, avoiding any quality loss….

As you may have guessed, Class-D amplifiers aren’t free from difficulties. First, as for any sampling architecture, the PWM frequency must be significantly higher than the input signal’s highest frequency to avoid aliasing….The second concern with Class-D amplifiers is related to electromagnetic compatibility (EMC)…

Figure 3—A Class-D amplifier is a type of digital amplifier (at left). The comparator’s output is a PWM signal, which is amplified by a pair of low-loss digital switches. All the magic happens in the output filter (at right).

Figure 3—A Class-D amplifier is a type of digital amplifier. The comparator’s output is a PWM signal, which is amplified by a pair of low-loss digital switches. All the magic happens in the output filter.

CLASS E and F
Remember that Class C is devoted to RF amplifiers, using a transistor conducting only during a part of the signal period and a filter. Class E is an improvement to this scheme, enabling even greater efficiencies up to 80% to 90%. How?
Remember that with a Class-C amplifier, the losses only occur in the output transistor. This is because the other parts are capacitors and inductors, which theoretically do not dissipate any power.

Because power is voltage multiplied by current, the power dissipated in the transistor would be null if either the voltage or the current was null. This is what Class-E amplifiers try to do: ensure that the output transistor never has a simultaneously high voltage across its terminals and a high current going through it….

CLASS G AND CLASS H
Class G and Class H are quests for improved efficiency over the classic Class-AB amplifier. Both work on the power supply section. The idea is simple. For high-output power, a high-voltage power supply is needed. For low-power, this high voltage implies higher losses in the output stage.

What about reducing the supply voltage when the required output power is low enough? This scheme is clever, especially for audio applications. Most of the time, music requires only a couple of watts even if far more power is needed during the fortissimo. I agree this may not be the case for some teenagers’ music, but this is the concept.

Class G achieves this improvement by using more than one stable power rail, usually two. Figure 4 shows you the concept.

Figure 4—A Class-G amplifier uses two pairs of power supply rails. b—One supply rail is used when the output signal has a low power (blue). The other supply rail enters into action for high powers (red). Distortion could appear at the crossover.

Figure 4—A Class-G amplifier uses two pairs of power supply rails. b—One supply rail is used when the output signal has a low power (blue). The other supply rail enters into action for high powers (red). Distortion could appear at the crossover.


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Turn Your Android Device into an Application Tool

A few years ago, the Android Open Accessory initiative was announced with the aim of making it easier for hardware manufacturers to create accessories that work with every Android device. Future Technology Devices International (FTDI) joined the initiative and last year introduced the FTD311D multi-interface Android host IC. The goal was to enable engineers and designers to make effective use of tablets and smartphones with the Android OS, according to Circuit Cellar columnist Jeff Bachiochi.

The FTD311D “provides an instant bridge from an Android USB port(B) to peripheral hardware over general purpose input-out (GPIO), UART, PWM, I2C Master, SPI Slave, or SPI Master interfaces,” Bachiochi says.

In the magazine’s December issue Bachiochi takes a comprehensive look at the USB Android host IC and how it works. By the end of his article, readers will have learned quite a bit about how to use FTDI’s apps and the FT311D chip to turn an Android device into their own I/0 tool.

Bachiochi used the SPI Master demo to read key presses and set LED states on this SPI slave 16-key touch panel.

Bachiochi used the SPI Master demo to read key presses and set LED states on this SPI slave 16-key touch panel.

Here is how Bachiochi describes the FT311D and its advantages:

The FT311D is a full-speed USB host targeted at providing access to peripheral hardware from a USB port on an Android device. While an Android device can be a USB host, many are mobile devices with limited power. For now, these On-The-Go (OTG) ports will be USB devices only (i.e., they can only connect to a USB host as a USB device).

Since the USB host is responsible for supplying power to a USB peripheral device, it would be bad design practice to enable a USB peripheral to drain an Android mobile device’s energy. Consequently, the FT311D takes on the task of USB host, eliminating any draw on the Android device’s battery.

All Android devices from V3.1 (Honeycomb) support the Android Open Accessory Mode (AOAM). The AOAM is the complete reverse of the conventional USB interconnect. This game-changing approach to attaching peripherals enables three key advantages. First, there is no need to develop special drivers for the hardware; second, it is unnecessary to root devices to alter permissions for loading drivers; and third, the peripheral provides the power to use the port, which ensures the mobile device battery is not quickly drained by the external hardware being attached.

Since the FT311D handles the entire USB host protocol, USB-specific firmware programming isn’t required. As the host, the FT311D must inquire whether the connected device supports the AOAM. If so, it will operate as an Open Accessory Mode device with one USB BULK IN endpoint and one USB BULK OUT endpoint (as well as the control endpoint.) This interface will be a full-speed (12-Mbps) USB enabling data transfer in and out.

The AOAM USB host has a set of string descriptors the Android OS is capable of reading. These strings are (user) associated with an Android OS application. The Android then uses these strings to automatically start the application when the hardware is connected. The FT311D is configured for one of its multiple interfaces via configuration inputs at power-up. Each configuration will supply the Android device with a unique set of string descriptors, therefore enabling different applications to run, depending on its setup.

The FT311D’s configuration determines whether each application will have access to several user interface APIs that are specific to each configuration.

The article goes on to examine the various interfaces in detail and to describe a number of demo projects, including a multimeter.

Many of Bachiochi's projects use printable ASCII text commands and replies. This enables a serial terminal to become a handy user I/O device. This current probe circuit outputs its measurements in ASCII-printable text.

Many of Bachiochi’s projects use printable ASCII text commands and replies. This enables a serial terminal to become a handy user I/O device. This current probe circuit outputs its measurements in ASCII-printable text.

Multimeters are great tools. They have portability that enables them to be brought to wherever a measurement must be made. An Android device has this same ability. Since applications can be written for these devices, they make a great portable application tool. Until the AOAM’s release, there was no way for these devices to be connected to any external circuitry and used as an effective tool.

I think FTDI has bridged this gap nicely. It provided a great interface chip that can be added to any circuit that will enable an Android device to serve as an effective user I/O device. I’ve used the chip to quickly interface with some technology to discover its potential or just test its abilities. But I’m sure you are already thinking about the other potential uses for this connection.

Bachiochi is curious to hear from readers about their own ideas.

If you think the AOAM has future potential, but you want to know what’s involved with writing Android applications for a specific purpose, send me an e-mail and I’ll add this to my list of future projects!

You can e-mail Bachiochi at jeff.bachiochi@imaginethatnow.com or post your comment here.

 

High-Voltage Gate Driver IC

Allegro A4900 Gate Driver IC

Allegro A4900 Gate Driver IC

The A4900 is a high-voltage brushless DC (BLDC) MOSFET gate driver IC. It is designed for high-voltage motor control for hybrid, electric vehicle, and 48-V automotive battery systems (e.g., electronic power steering, A/C compressors, fans, pumps, and blowers).

The A4900’s six gate drives can drive a range of N-channel insulated-gate bipolar transistors (IGBTs) or power MOSFET switches. The gate drives are configured as three high-voltage high-side drives and three low-side drives. The high-side drives are isolated up to 600 V to enable operation with high-bridge (motor) supply voltages. The high-side drives use a bootstrap capacitor to provide the supply gate drive voltage required for N-channel FETs. A TTL logic-level input compatible with 3.3- or 5-V logic systems can be used to control each FET.

A single-supply input provides the gate drive supply and the bootstrap capacitor charge source. An internal regulator from the single supply provides the logic circuit’s lower internal voltage. The A4900’s internal monitors ensure that the high- and low-side external FET’s gate source voltage is above 9 V when active.

The control inputs to the A4900 offer a flexible solution for many motor control applications. Each driver can be driven with an independent PWM signal, which enables implementation of all motor excitation methods including trapezoidal and sinusoidal drive. The IC’s integrated diagnostics detect undervoltage, overtemperature, and power bridge faults that can be configured to protect the power switches under most short-circuit conditions. Detailed diagnostics are available as a serial data word.

The A4900 is supplied in a 44-lead QSOP package and costs $3.23 in 1,000-unit quantities.

Allegro MicroSystems, LLC
www.allegromicro.com

PWM Controller Uses BJTs to Reduce Costs

Dialog iW1679 Digital PWM Controller

Dialog iW1679 Digital PWM Controller

The iW1679 digital PWM controller drives 10-W power bipolar junction transistor (BJT) switches to reduce  costs in 5-V/2-A smartphone adapters and chargers. The controller enables designers to replace field-effect transistors (FETs) with lower-cost BJTs to provide lower standby power and higher light-load and active average efficiency in consumer electronic products.

The iW1679 uses Dialog’s adaptive multimode PWM/PFM control to dynamically change the BJT switching frequency. This helps the system improve light-load efficiency, power consumption, and electromagnetic interference (EMI). The iW1679 provides high, 83% active average efficiency; maintains high efficiency at loads as light as 10%. It achieves less than 30-mW no-load standby power with fast standby recovery time. The controller meets stringent global energy efficiency standards, including: US Department of Energy, European Certificate of Conformity (CoC) version 5, and Energy Star External Power Supplies (EPS) 2.0.

The iW1679 offers a user-configurable, four-level cable drop compensation option. It comes in a standard, low-cost, eight-lead SOIC package and provides protection from fault conditions including output short-circuit, output overvoltage, output overcurrent, and overtemperature.

The iW1679 costs $0.29 each in 1,000-unit quantities.

Dialog Semiconductor
www.iwatt.com