Client Profile: ImageCraft Creations, Inc.

CorStarter prototyping board

CorStarter prototyping board

2625 Middlefield Road, #685,
Palo Alto, CA 94306

CONTACT: Richard Man,
richard@imagecraft.com
imagecraft.com

EMBEDDED PRODUCTS:ImageCraft Version 8 C compilers with an IDE for Atmel AVR and Cortex M devices are full-featured toolsets backed by strong support.

CorStarter-STM32 is a complete C hardware and software kit for STM32 Cortex-M3 devices. The $99 kit includes a JTAG pod for programming and debugging.

ImageCraft products offer excellent features and support within budget requisitions. ImageCraft compiler toolsets are used by professionals who demand excellent code quality, full features, and diligent support in a timely manner.

The small, fast compilers provide helpful informational messages and include an IDE with an application builder (Atmel AVR) and debugger (Cortex-M), whole-program code compression technology, and MISRA safety checks. ImageCraft offers two editions that cost $249 and $499.

The demo is fully functional for 45 days, so it is easy to test it yourself.

EXCLUSIVE OFFER: For a limited time, ImageCraft is offering Circuit Cellar readers $40 off the Standard and PRO versions of its Atmel AVR and Cortex-M compiler toolsets. To take advantage of this offer, please visit http://imagecraft.com/xyzzy.html.


 

Circuit Cellar prides itself on presenting readers with information about innovative companies, organizations, products, and services relating to embedded technologies. This space is where Circuit Cellar enables clients to present readers useful information, special deals, and more.

Client Profile: Digi International, Inc

Contact: Elizabeth Presson
elizabeth.presson@digi.com

Featured Product: The XBee product family (www.digi.com/xbee) is a series of modular products that make adding wireless technology easy and cost-effective. Whether you need a ZigBee module or a fast multipoint solution, 2.4 GHz or long-range 900 MHz—there’s an XBee to meet your specific requirements.

XBee Cloud Kit

Digi International XBee Cloud Kit

Product information: Digi now offers the XBee Wi-Fi Cloud Kit (www.digi.com/xbeewificloudkit) for those who want to try the XBee Wi-Fi (XB2B-WFUT-001) with seamless cloud connectivity. The Cloud Kit brings the Internet of Things (IoT) to the popular XBee platform. Built around Digi’s new XBee Wi-Fi
module, which fully integrates into the Device Cloud by Etherios, the kit is a simple way for anyone with an interest in M2M and the IoT to build a hardware prototype and integrate it into an Internet-based application. This kit is suitable for electronics engineers, software designers, educators, and innovators.

Exclusive Offer: The XBee Wi-Fi Cloud Kit includes an XBee Wi-Fi module; a development board with a variety of sensors and actuators; loose electronic prototyping parts to make circuits of your own; a free subscription to Device Cloud; fully customizable widgets to monitor and control connected devices; an open-source application that enables two-way communication and control with the development board over the Internet; and cables, accessories, and everything needed to connect to the web. The Cloud Kit costs $149.

Small, Self-Contained GNSS Receiver

TM Series GNSS modules are self-contained, high-performance global navigation satellite system (GNSS) receivers designed for navigation, asset tracking, and positioning applications. Based on the MediaTek chipset, the receivers can simultaneously acquire and track several satellite constellations, including the US GPS, Europe’s GALILEO, Russia’s GLONASS, and Japan’s QZSS.

LinxThe 10-mm × 10-mm receivers are capable of better than 2.5-m position accuracy. Hybrid ephemeris prediction can be used to achieve less than 15-s cold start times. The receiver can operate down to 3 V and has a 20-mA low tracking current. To save power, the TM Series GNSS modules have built-in receiver duty cycling that can be configured to periodically turn off. This feature, combined with the module’s low power consumption, helps maximize battery life in battery-powered systems.

The receiver modules are easy to integrate, since they don’t require software setup or configuration to power up and output position data. The TM Series GNSS receivers use a standard UART serial interface to send and receive NMEA messages in ASCII format. A serial command set can be used to configure optional features. Using a USB or RS-232 converter chip, the modules’ UART can be directly connected to a microcontroller or a PC’s UART.

The GPS Master Development System connects a TM Series Evaluation Module to a prototyping board with a color display that shows coordinates, a speedometer, and a compass for mobile evaluation. A USB interface enables simple viewing of satellite data and Internet mapping and custom software application development.
Contact Linx Technologies for pricing.

Linx Technologies
www.linxtechnologies.com

Prototyping for Engineers (EE Tip #111)

Prototyping is an essential part of engineering. Whether you’re working on a complicated embedded system or a simple blinking LED project, building a prototype can save you a lot of time, money, and hassle in the long run. You can choose one of three basic styles of prototyping: solderless breadboard, perfboard, and manufactured PCB. Your project goals, your schedule, and your circuit’s complexity are variables that will influence your choice. (I am not including styles like flying leads and wire-wrapping.)PrototypeTable

Table 1 details the pros and cons associated with each of the three prototyping options. Imagine a nifty circuit caught your eye and you want to explore it. If it’s a simple circuit, you can use the solderless breadboard (“white blob”) approach. White blobs come in a variety of sizes and patterns. By “pattern” I mean the number of the solderless connectors and their layout. Each connector is a group (usually five) of tie points placed on 0.1″ centers. Photo 1 shows how these small strips are typically arranged beneath the surface.Prototype p1-4

Following the schematic, you use the tie points to connect up to five components’ leads together. Each tie point is a tiny metal pincer that grips (almost) any lead plugged into it. You can use small wires to connect multiple tie points together or to connect larger external parts (see Photo 2).

If you want something a bit more permanent, you might choose to use the perfboard (“Swiss cheese”) approach. Like the solderless breadboards, perfboards are available in many sizes and patterns; however, I prefer the one-hole/ pad variety (see Photo 3). You can often find perfboards from enclosure manufacturers that are sized to fit the enclosures (see Photo 4).

There is nothing worse than wiring a prototype PCB and finding there isn’t enough room for all your parts. So, it pays to draw a part layout before you get started just to make sure everything fits. While I’m at it, I’ll add my 2¢ about schematic and layout programs.

The staff at Circuit Cellar uses CadSoft EAGLE design software for drawing schematics. (A free version is available for limited size boards.) I use the software for creating PCB layouts, drawing schematics, and popping parts onto PCB layouts using the proper board dimensions. Then I can use the drawing for a prototype using perfboard.

The final option is to have real prototypes manufactured. This is where the CAD software becomes a necessity. If you’ve already done a layout for your hand-wired prototype, most of the work is already done (sans routing). Some engineers will hand-wire a project first to test its performance. Others will go straight to manufactured prototypes. Many prototype PCB manufacturers offer a bare-bones special—without any solder masking or silkscreen—that can save you a few dollars. However, prices have become pretty competitive. (You can get a few copies of your design manufactured for around $100.)

There are two alternatives to having a PCB house manufacture your PCBs: do-it-yourself (DIY) and routing. If you choose DIY approach, you’ll have to work with ferric chloride (or another acid) to remove unwanted copper (see Photo 5). You’ll be able to produce some PCBs quickly, but it will likely be messy (and dangerous).Prototype p5-6

Routing involves using an x-y-z table to route between copper traces to isolate them from one another (see Photo 6). You’ll need access to an x-y-z table, which can be expensive.—CC25, Jeff Bachiochi, “Electrical Engineering: Tricks and Tools for Project Success,” 2013.

This piece originally appeared in CC25 2013

Client Profile: Pololu Robotics

Pololu Robotics
www.pololu.com
920 Pilot Road
Las Vegas, NV 89119

Contact: inbox@pololu.com

Pololu Robotics Zumo

Pololu Robotics Zumo

Embedded Products/Services: Pololu designs, manufactures, and distributes a variety of robotic and electronic parts. Get the building blocks for your next project at Pololu, where you can find wheels, motors, motion controllers, basic prototyping supplies, sensors, complete robot kits, and more. Pololu also offers a custom laser cutting service starting at $25.

Product information: The Pololu Zumo robot is an Arduino-controllable tracked robot platform that measures less than 10 cm × 10 cm, which is small enough to qualify for Mini Sumo. The Zumo includes two micro-metal gearmotors coupled to a pair of silicone tracks, a stainless steel bulldozer-style blade, six infrared reflectance sensors for line following or edge detection, a three-axis accelerometer and magnetometer, and a buzzer for simple sounds and music. A kit version is also available.

Exclusive offer: Use coupon code ZUMOCC20 for 20% off any one item in Pololu’s Zumo category (www.pololu.com/zumo).

Q&A: Jeremy Blum, Electrical Engineer, Entrepreneur, Author

Jeremy Blum

Jeremy Blum

Jeremy Blum, 23, has always been a self-proclaimed tinkerer. From Legos to 3-D printers, he has enjoyed learning about engineering both in and out of the classroom. A recent Cornell University College of Engineering graduate, Jeremy has written a book, started his own company, and traveled far to teach children about engineering and sustainable design. Jeremy, who lives in San Francisco, CA, is now working on Google’s Project Glass.—Nan Price, Associate Editor

NAN: When did you start working with electronics?

JEREMY: I’ve been tinkering, in some form or another, ever since I figured out how to use my opposable thumbs. Admittedly, it wasn’t electronics from the offset. As with most engineers, I started with Legos. I quickly progressed to woodworking and I constructed several pieces of furniture over the course of a few years. It was only around the start of my high school career that I realized the extent to which I could express my creativity with electronics and software. I thrust myself into the (expensive) hobby of computer building and even built an online community around it. I financed my hobby through my two companies, which offered computer repair services and video production services. After working exclusively with computer hardware for a few years, I began to dive deeper into analog circuits, robotics, microcontrollers, and more.

NAN: Tell us about some of your early, pre-college projects.

JEREMY: My most complex early project was the novel prosthetic hand I developed in high school. The project was a finalist in the prestigious Intel Science Talent Search. I also did a variety of robotics and custom-computer builds. The summer before starting college, my friends and I built a robot capable of playing “Guitar Hero” with nearly 100% accuracy. That was my first foray into circuit board design and parallel programming. My most ridiculous computer project was a mineral oil-cooled computer. We submerged an entire computer in a fish tank filled with mineral oil (it was actually a lot of baby oil, but they are basically the same thing).

DeepNote Guitar Hero Robot

DeepNote Guitar Hero Robot

Mineral Oil-Cooled Computer

Mineral Oil-Cooled Computer

NAN: You’re a recent Cornell University College of Engineering graduate. While you were there, you co-founded Cornell’s PopShop. Tell us about the workspace. Can you describe some PopShop projects?

Cornell University's PopShop

Cornell University’s PopShop

JEREMY: I recently received my Master’s degree in Electrical and Computer Engineering from Cornell University, where I previously received my BS in the same field. During my time at Cornell, my peers and I took it upon ourselves to completely retool the entrepreneurial climate at Cornell. The PopShop, a co-working space that we formed a few steps off Cornell’s main campus, was our primary means of doing this. We wanted to create a collaborative space where students could come to explore their own ideas, learn what other entrepreneurial students were working on, and get involved themselves.

The PopShop is open to all Cornell students. I frequently hosted events there designed to get more students inspired about pursuing their own ideas. Common occurrences included peer office hours, hack-a-thons, speed networking sessions, 3-D printing workshops, and guest talks from seasoned venture capitalists.

Student startups that work (or have worked) out of the PopShop co-working space include clothing companies, financing companies, hardware startups, and more. Some specific companies include Rosie, SPLAT, LibeTech (mine), SUNN (also mine), Bora Wear, Yorango, Party Headphones, and CoVenture.

NAN: Give us a little background information about Cornell University Sustainable Design (CUSD). Why did you start the group? What types of CUSD projects were you involved with?

CUSD11JEREMY: When I first arrived at Cornell my freshman year, I knew right away that I wanted to join a research lab, and that I wanted to join a project team (knowing that I learn best in hands-on environments instead of in the classroom). I joined the Cornell Solar Decathlon Team, a very large group of mostly engineers and architects who were building a solar-powered home to enter in the biannual solar decathlon competition orchestrated by the Department of Energy.

By the end of my freshman year, I was the youngest team leader in the organization.  After competing in the 2009 decathlon, I took over as chief director of the team and worked with my peers to re-form the organization into Cornell University Sustainable Design (CUSD), with the goal of building a more interdisciplinary team, with far-reaching impacts.

CUSD3

Under my leadership, CUSD built a passive schoolhouse in South Africa (which has received numerous international awards), constructed a sustainable community in Nicaragua, has been the only student group tasked with consulting on sustainable design constraints for Cornell’s new Tech Campus in New York City, partnered with nonprofits to build affordable homes in upstate New York, has taught workshops in museums and school, contributed to the design of new sustainable buildings on Cornell’s Ithaca campus, and led a cross-country bus tour to teach engineering and sustainability concepts at K–12 schools across America. The group is now comprised of students from more than 25 different majors with dozens of advisors and several simultaneous projects. The new team leaders are making it better every day. My current startup, SUNN, spun out of an EPA grant that CUSD won.

CUSD7NAN: You spent two years working at MakerBot Industries, where you designed electronics for a 3-D printer and a 3-D scanner. Any highlights from working on those projects?

JEREMY: I had a tremendous opportunity to learn and grow while at MakerBot. When I joined, I was one of about two dozen total employees. Though I switched back and forth between consulting and full-time/part-time roles while class was in session, by the time I stopped working with MakerBot (in January 2013), the company had grown to more than 200 people. It was very exciting to be a part of that.

I designed all of the electronics for the original MakerBot Replicator. This constituted a complete redesign from the previous electronics that had been used on the second generation MakerBot 3-D printer. The knowledge I gained from doing this (e.g., PCB design, part sourcing, DFM, etc.) drastically outweighed much of what I had learned in school up to that point. I can’t say much about the 3-D scanner (the MakerBot Digitizer), as it has been announced, but not released (yet).

The last project I worked on before leaving MakerBot was designing the first working prototype of the Digitizer electronics and firmware. These components comprised the demo that was unveiled at SXSW this past April. This was a great opportunity to apply lessons learned from working on the Replicator electronics and find ways in which my personal design process and testing techniques could be improved. I frequently use my MakerBot printers to produce custom mechanical enclosures that complement the open-source electronics projects I’ve released.

NAN: Tell us about your company, Blum Idea Labs. What types of projects are you working on?

JEREMY: Blum Idea Labs is the entity I use to brand all my content and consulting services. I primarily use it as an outlet to facilitate working with educational organizations. For example, the St. Louis Hacker Scouts, the African TAHMO Sensor Workshop, and several other international organizations use a “Blum Idea Labs Arduino curriculum.” Most of my open-source projects, including my tutorials, are licensed via Blum Idea Labs. You can find all of them on my blog (www.jeremyblum.com/blog). I occasionally offer private design consulting through Blum Idea Labs, though I obviously can’t discuss work I do for clients.

NAN: Tell us about the blog you write for element14.

JEREMY: I generally use my personal blog to write about projects that I’ve personally been working on.  However, when I want to talk about more general engineering topics (e.g., sustainability, engineering education, etc.), I post them on my element14 blog. I have a great working relationship with element14. It has sponsored the production of all my Arduino Tutorials and also provided complete parts kits for my book. We cross-promote each-other’s content in a mutually beneficial fashion that also ensures that the community gets better access to useful engineering content.

NAN: You recently wrote Exploring Arduino: Tools and Techniques for Engineering Wizardry. Do you consider this book introductory or is it written for the more experienced engineer?

JEREMY: As with all the video and written content that I produce on my website and on YouTube, I tried really hard to make this book useful and accessible to both engineering veterans and newbies. The book builds on itself and provides tons of optional excerpts that dive into greater technical detail for those who truly want to grasp the physics and programming concepts behind what I teach in the book. I’ve already had readers ranging from teenagers to senior citizens comment on the applicability of the book to their varying degrees of expertise. The Amazon reviews tell a similar story. I supplemented the book with a lot of free digital content including videos, part descriptions, and open-source code on the book website.

NAN: What can readers expect to learn from the book?

JEREMY: I wrote the book to serve as an engineering introduction and as an idea toolbox for those wanting to dive into concepts in electrical engineering, computer science, and human-computer interaction design. Though Exploring Arduino uses the Arduino as a platform to experiment with these concepts, readers can expect to come away from the book with new skills that can be applied to a variety of platforms, projects, and ideas. This is not a recipe book. The projects readers will undertake throughout the book are designed to teach important concepts in addition to traditional programming syntax and engineering theories.

NAN: I see you’ve spent some time introducing engineering concepts to children and teaching them about sustainable engineering and renewable energy. Tell us about those experiences. Any highlights?

JEREMY: The way I see it, there are two ways in which engineers can make the world a better place: they can design new products and technologies that solve global problems or they can teach others the skills they need to assist in the development of solutions to global problems. I try hard to do both, though the latter enables me to have a greater impact, because I am able to multiply my impact by the number of students I teach. I’ve taught workshops, written curriculums, produced videos, written books, and corresponded directly with thousands of students all around the world with the goal of transferring sufficient knowledge for these students to go out and make a difference.

Here are some highlights from my teaching work:

bluestamp

I taught BlueStamp Engineering, a summer program for high school students in NYC in the summer of 2012. I also guest-lectured at the program in 2011 and 2013.

I co-organized a cross-country bus tour where we taught sustainability concepts to school children across the country.

indiaI was invited to speak at Techkriti 2013 in Kanpur, India. I had the opportunity to meet many students from IIT Kanpur who already followed my videos and used my tutorials to build their own projects.

Blum Idea Labs partnered with the St. Louis Hacker Scouts to construct a curriculum for teaching electronics to the students. Though I wasn’t there in person, I did welcome them all to the program with a personalized video.

brooklyn_childrens_zoneThrough CUSD, I organized multiple visits to the Brooklyn Children’s Zone, where my team and I taught students about sustainable architecture and engineering.

Again with CUSD, we visited the Intrepid museum to teach sustainable energy concepts using potato batteries.

intrepid

NAN: Speaking of promoting engineering to children, what types of technologies do you think will be important in the near future?

JEREMY: I think technologies that make invention more widely accessible are going to be extremely important in the coming years. Cheaper tools, prototyping platforms such as the Arduino and the Raspberry Pi, 3-D printers, laser cutters, and open developer platforms (e.g., Android) are making it easier than ever for any person to become an inventor or an engineer.  Every year, I see younger and younger students learning to use these technologies, which makes me very optimistic about the things we’ll be able to do as a society.

Client Profile: Netburner, Inc

NetBurner, Inc.
5405 Morehouse Drive
San Diego, CA 92121

www.netburner.com

Contact: sales@netburner.com

Embedded Products/Services: The NetBurner solution provides hardware, software, and tools to network enable new and existing products. All components are integrated and fully functional, so you can immediately begin working on your application.

Product Categories:

  • Serial to Ethernet: Modules can be used out of the box with no programming, or you can use a development kit to create your own custom applications. Hardware ranges from a single chip to small modules with many features.
  • Core Modules: Typically used as the core processing module in a design, core modules include the processor, flash, RAM and on-board network capability. The processor pins are brought out to connectors and include functions such as SPI, I2C, address/data bus, ADC, DAC, UARTs, digital I/O, PWM, and CAN.
  • Development Kits: Development kits can be used to customize any of NetBurner’s Serial-to-Ethernet or Core Modules. Kits include the Eclipse IDE, a C/C++ compiler/linker, a debugger, a RTOS, a TCP/IP stack, and board support packages.

Product Information: The MOD54415 and the NANO54415 modules provide 250-MHz processor, up to 32 MB flash, 64 MB DDR, ADC, DAC, eight UARTs, four I2C, three SPI, 1-wire, microSD flash socket, five PWM, and up to 44 digital I/O.

Exclusive Offer: Receive 15% off on select development kits. Promo code: CIRCUITCELLAR


Circuit Cellar prides itself on presenting readers with information about innovative companies, organizations, products, and services relating to embedded technologies. This space is where Circuit Cellar enables clients to present readers useful information, special deals, and more.

AAR Arduino Autonomous Mobile Robot

The AAR Arduino Robot is a small autonomous mobile robot designed for those new to robotics and for experienced Arduino designers. The robot is well suited for hobbyists and school projects. Designed in the Arduino open-source prototyping platform, the robot is easy to program and run.

The AAR, which is delivered fully assembled, comes with a comprehensive CD that includes all the software needed to write, compile, and upload programs to your robot. It also includes a firmware and hardware self test. For wireless control, the robot features optional Bluetooth technology and a 433-MHz RF.

The AAR robot’s features include an Atmel ATmega328P 8-bit AVR-RISC processor with a 16-MHz clock, Arduino open-source software, two independently controlled 3-VDC motors, an I2C bus, 14 digital I/Os on the processor, eight analog input lines, USB interface programming, an on-board odometer sensor on both wheels, a line tracker sensor, and an ISP connector for bootloader programming.

The AAR’s many example programs help you get your robot up and running. With many expansion kits available, your creativity is unlimited.

Contact Global Specialties for pricing.

Global Specialties
http://globalspecialties.com

Client Profile: MicroDigital, Inc.

Micro Digital, Inc.
2900 Bristol Street, G 204,
Costa Mesa, CA 92626

www.smxrtos.com

Contact: David Moore

MDIEmbedded Products/Services: SMX® RTOS is a modular Real Time Operating System designed to meet the needs of small to medium-size embedded systems. It offers these modules: Preemptive multitasking kernel, TCP/IP dual IPv4/IPv6, 802.11a/b/g/i/n WiFi, USB Host/Device/OTG, flash file systems, GUI, security, IEEE 754 floating point, and more. Each is a strong product on its own, and all are tightly integrated to work well together. It offers good support for the latest ARM, Cortex, and ColdFire processors. See www.smxrtos.com/rtos and www.smxrtos.com/processors.

SMX® RTOS offers a broad selection of middleware modules, optional protocols, and drivers for the latest embedded processors. All are tightly integrated and work well together, so you can spend your time developing your product rather than gathering components from all over the Internet and integrating them. All are strong products on their own. SMX comes with full source code and simple, unambiguous, royalty-free licensing. You are free to modify our products in any way you wish and need not return changes to us.

 


Circuit Cellar prides itself on presenting readers with information about innovative companies, organizations, products, and services relating to embedded technologies. This space is where Circuit Cellar enables clients to present readers useful information, special deals, and more.

Client Profile: Netburner, Inc

NetBurner, Inc.
5405 Morehouse Drive
San Diego, CA 92121

www.netburner.com

Contact: sales@netburner.com

Embedded Products/Services: The NetBurner solution provides hardware, software, and tools to network enable new and existing products. All components are integrated and fully functional, so you can immediately begin working on your application.

Product Categories:

  • Serial to Ethernet: Modules can be used out of the box with no programming, or you can use a development kit to create your own custom applications. Hardware ranges from a single chip to small modules with many features.
  • Core Modules: Typically used as the core processing module in a design, core modules include the processor, flash, RAM and on-board network capability. The processor pins are brought out to connectors and include functions such as SPI, I2C, address/data bus, ADC, DAC, UARTs, digital I/O, PWM, and CAN.
  • Development Kits: Development kits can be used to customize any of NetBurner’s Serial-to-Ethernet or Core Modules. Kits include the Eclipse IDE, a C/C++ compiler/linker, a debugger, a RTOS, a TCP/IP stack, and board support packages.

Product Information: The MOD54415 and the NANO54415 modules provide 250-MHz processor, up to 32 MB flash, 64 MB DDR, ADC, DAC, eight UARTs, four I2C, three SPI, 1-wire, microSD flash socket, five PWM, and up to 44 digital I/O.

Exclusive Offer: Receive 15% off on select development kits. Promo code: CIRCUITCELLAR


Circuit Cellar prides itself on presenting readers with information about innovative companies, organizations, products, and services relating to embedded technologies. This space is where Circuit Cellar enables clients to present readers useful information, special deals, and more.

Client Profile: Custom Computer Services (CCS), Inc.

Custom Computer Services (CCS), Inc.
Spring City Drive
Waukesha, WI 53186

www.ccsinfo.com

Contact: Sales, sales@ccsinfo.com

Embedded Products/Services: CCS specializes in embedded software and hardware development tools. Available to the development community is a range of solutions for Microchip Technology microcontrollers, and digital signal controllers (DSCs), that include: C compilers, prototyping boards, development kits, and programmers/debuggers. CCS also offers custom engineering services and a line of embedded Ethernet devices (e.g., EZ Web Lynx). For more information visit www.ccsinfo.com.

Product Information: The CCSC Version 5 compiler with all of its new features and enhancements has just been released! Version 5 is the first release to include an aggressive code optimizer, plus a dynamic C Profiler tool. Other enhancements include:

  • New libraries—generate relevant and tight code for a specific application. Included are: RS-232, RS-485, PWM, timers, a capacitive touchpad, and more.
  • C++ stream operator support—C++ streams provide a unified interface for I/O and data formatting.
  • Serial port monitor—a graphing capability enables real-time graphing at a PC from a Microchip Technology PIC microcontroller program. For more information on Version 5, visit www.ccsinfo.com/version5

Exclusive Offer: For Circuit Cellar readers, CCS is offering $60 off the purchase price of any development kit. Development kits include: the IDE C Compiler, prototyping board, an ICD-U64 debugger/programmer, a breadboard with auxiliary parts, a power supply, and cables. Call the sales department at 262-522-6500 ext. 35 and mention the promo code CC60, or visit www.ccsinfo.com and use the promo code CC60 in your cart. This offer is valid until August 31, 2013.

Custom Computer Services, Inc.