Member Profile: Tom Freund

Tom Freund

Tom Freund

LOCATION:
West Hartford, CT, USA

MEMBER STATUS:
Tom has been a member for four years.

TECH INTERESTS:
Tom says he enjoys machine learning; algorithm design; embedded, prognostic, and diagnostic systems; and eLua and C programming.

RECENT EMBEDDED TECH ACQUISITION:
Tom recently bought a Femtoduino board and a Texas Instruments TMP102 sensor breakout board.

PREFERRED MICROCONTROLLER:
His current microcontrollers of choice are the STMicroelectronics STM32 32-bit ARM Cortex and Atmel’s ATmega328.

CURRENT PROJECTS:
Tom is working on PicoDB, an open-source, NoSQL database tool for 32-bit microcontrollers written in Lua. (To learn more, visit www.lua.org/wshop12/Freund.pdf.)

THOUGHTS ON THE FUTURE OF EMBEDDED TECH:
Tom says when he thinks about embedded technology’s future, just one phrase comes to mind: “the Internet of things.”

“In 10 to 15 years time, we will look back and think of Facebook, Twitter, and (yes) even Google as the ’Model T’ days of global networking,” he says. “That is because everything will be connected to everything at various levels of security. We and our infrastructure will be ’minded’ by unseen digital butlers that help us cope with life and its unpredictability, as well as protect that which should be kept private.”

The Transistor: Something for Every DIY-er

The Transistor is a UT-based hackerspace. Its members have a love for all things open source and DIY. They enjoy working with embedded electronics and have created their own version of Arduino.

Orem

Location 1187 S 1480 W Orem, UT 84058
Members 55

Salt Lake City

Location 440 S 700 E
Unit #102, Salt Lake City, UT 84102
Members 18

The Transistor Hackerspace

Founder Deven Fore tells us about The Transistor:

ROBBERT: Tell us about your meeting space!

DEVEN: We currently have two locations. One in Salt Lake City, UT and one in Orem, UT.

Our Salt Lake City location is about 1,000 sq ft in a nice office building. We have one main area and two smaller rooms.

Our Orem location is about 5,700 sq ft in a large warehouse that also has offices. We have sectioned off a wood shop, a metal shop, a clean CNC, an assembly area, a members desks area, a lounge, a server room, an electronics room, and a few other dedicated areas.

ROBBERT: What tools do you have in your space? (Soldering stations? Oscilloscopes? 3-D printers?)

DEVEN: Too many things to list. All the general things you would expect, such as:

  • Soldering irons
  • Oscilloscopes
  • Analyzers
  • PCB work stations
  • Laser cutter
  • Vinyl cutter
  • Heat press
  • Chop saws
  • Mini lathe
  • Servers
  • Air tools
  • Cut-off saws
  • Mig welder
  • V90 FireBall router
  • A couple small miscellaneous CNC routers
  • 3-D printers
  • Networking gear

ROBBERT: Are there any tools your group really wants or needs?

DEVEN: We would love to have a large mill (CNC or manual) some day. Also, just all-around upgrades to current equipment.

ROBBERT: Does your group work with embedded tech (Arduino, Raspberry Pi, embedded security, MCU-based designs, etc.)?

DEVEN: All the time.

ROBBERT: Can you tell us about some of your group’s recent tech projects?

DEVEN: Currently we are working on miniature MAME cabinets. They are two player and will hold up to a 22″ LCD. We will release the CNC plans to the public as soon as we are done.

We’re working on a lot of miscellaneous projects: software, hardware, security, and so forth.

We’re also currently working on building some displays for The Living Planet Aquarium, in Sandy UT.

ROBBERT: What’s the craziest project your group or group members have completed?

DEVEN: Nothing too crazy. We built a drink cooler a year or so ago for the Red Bull Challenge. We designed and build a few full-size four-player MAME cabinets (planned for release to the public on our website, and featured in J. Baichtal’s Hack This: 24 Incredible Hackerspace Projects from the DIY Movement (Que Publishing, 2011).

4-player MAME cabinet

4-player MAME cabinet

ROBBERT: Do you have any events or initiatives you’d like to tell us about? Where can we learn more about it?

DEVEN: Lots of things are going on right now. Nothing specific, aside from working with the aquarium. We have a lot of public events/user groups that meet at our space. Our calender is on our website if you are interested in specifics.

ROBBERT: What would you like to say to fellow hackers out there?

DEVEN: Have fun, be productive, be safe.

Want to learn more about The Transistor? Check out their Facebook or MeetUp page!

Check out their calender to see what The Transistor is up to.

Show us your hackerspace! Tell us about your group! Where does your group design, hack, create, program, debug, and innovate? Do you work in a 20′ × 20′ space in an old warehouse? Do you share a small space in a university lab? Do you meet a local coffee shop or bar? What sort of electronics projects do you work on? Submit your hackerspace and we might feature you on our website!

Member Profile: Dean Boman

Dean Boman

Dean Boman

LOCATION:
Chandler, AZ

MEMBER STATUS:
Dean has been a subscriber for about  20 years.

TECH INTERESTS:
Dean enjoys designing and building home automation systems. His current system’s functions include: security system monitoring, irrigation control, water leak detection, temperature and electrical usage monitoring, fire detection, access control, weather and water usage monitoring, solar hot water system control, and security video recording.

MOST RECENT EMBEDDED TECH ACQUISITION:
A Microchip Technology debugger.

CURRENT PROJECTS:
Dean is currently designing a hybrid solar power system to power his home automation system. “The power system will use a processor-controlled dual-input power converter design to harvest the maximum energy possible from the photovoltaic cells and then augment that with utility power as necessary to support the load,” he explained. “The system will be a hybrid between an on-grid and an off-grid system. The hybrid approach was chosen to avoid the regulatory issues with an on-grid system and the cost of batteries in an off-grid system.”

THOUGHTS ON THE FUTURE OF EMBEDDED TECH:
“As more and more capability is being made available to the embedded world, the design opportunities are endless. I particularly find it exciting that network connectivity can now be so easily added to an embedded system so various embedded systems can communicate with each other and with the outside world via the Internet. I am concerned that so many of the new embedded parts are designed with extremely fine pitch leads, which makes DIY assembly with hand soldering a challenge,” he said.

Member Profile: Steve Hendrix

Steve Hendrix

Location: Sagamore Hills, OH (located between Cleveland and Akron)

Education: BS, United States Air Force Academy, El Paso County, CO

Occupation: Steve began moonlighting as an engineering consultant in 1979. He has been a full-time consultant since 1992.

Member Status: He says he has been a subscriber since “forever.” He remembers reading the Circuit Cellar columns in Byte magazine.

Technical Interests: Steve enjoys embedded design, from picoamps to kiloamps, from nanovolts to kilovolts, from microhertz to gigahertz, and from nanowatts to kilowatts.
Current Projects: He is working on eight active professional projects. Most of his projects involve embedding Microchip Technology’s PIC18 microcontroller family.

Some of Steve’s projects include Texas Instruments Bluetooth processors and span all the previously mentioned ranges in the interfacing hardware. Steve says he is also working on a personal project involving solar photovoltaic power.

Thoughts on the Future of Embedded Technology: Steve thinks of embedded technology as “a delicate balancing act: time spent getting the technology set up vs. time we would spend to do the same job manually; convenience and connectivity vs. privacy, time, and power saved vs. energy consumed; time developing the technology vs. its payoffs; and connectedness with people far away vs. with those right around us.” Additionally, he says there are always the traditional three things to balance “good, fast, cheap—choose two!”

Member Profile: Joe Pfeiffer

Joe Pfeiffer

Location: Las Cruces, NM

Education: BS with a double major in Computer Science and Physics, 1979, and a PhD in Computer Science, 1986, both from the University of Washington in Seattle

Occupation: Joe was a professor in the Department of Computer Science at New Mexico State University in Las Cruces until he retired in 2010. Joe’s research interests focused on visual programming languages and geometric reasoning for mobile robots. Most of his teaching involved computer architecture, Assembly language programming, and OSes.

Member Status: Joe says he’s been a Circuit Cellar subscriber for at least 10 years.

Technical Interests: He enjoys programming Microchip Technology PIC processors. More recently, he has become interested in Android programming and development under Linux.

Most Recent Embedded Tech-Related Acquisition: Joe bought a model rocket altimeter (and a bunch of related connectors and things) for a rocket he’s building for his National Association of Rocketry Level 2 high-power certification.

Current Projects: Joe is currently developing a shop oven. “I want it to be useful for solder reflow work—so I’ll want it to be able to follow the reflow temperature profile—and also accurately maintain a temperature for applications like powder coating. I’m planning a USB interface so I can log its activity for later analysis,” he explained.

Thoughts on the Future of Embedded Technology: Joe feels that computing is becoming more pervasive and connected. “From a digital caliper that cost me under $10, to a Bluetooth-connected OBD-II scanner for a car—it’s just amazing,” he said. “One thing I worry about is that, along with so much in computing and technology, the bar is getting too high for entry. As through-hole, hand-solderable components slowly disappear, it seems like it’ll be harder and harder for someone to create a first simple project and get started,” he added.

Member Profile: Tom Kibalo

Tom Kibalo

Location: Annapolis, MD

Education: BS, Electrical Engineering (City College, NY), and MS Electrical Engineering (University of Maryland)

Occupation: Tom is Principal Engineer of a large defense firm and CEO of KibaCorp, which he says is “dedicated to innovative educational technologies for the hobbyist, student, and practicing engineer.” He is also an adjunct faculty member at a local community college.

Member Status: Tom has been a subscriber for more than eight years.

Technical Interests: He is interested in robotics, embedded programming, microcontrollers, wireless applications, and engineering education.

Most Recent Embedded Tech-Related Acquisition: Tom’s most recent purchase was a Raspberry Pi with direct GPIO connections.

Current Projects: He is working on a battery-powered Wi-Fi sensor network that uses low-power Microchip Technology PIC32 components. (His project is shown in the photo.)

Thoughts on the Future of Embedded Technology: Tom thinks these are “exciting times where system-on-a-chip (SoC) technologies are extending the domain of embedded applications with Linux OS and a large base of language libraries.”

Member Profile: John Peterson

John Peterson

John Peterson

Location: Menlo Park, CA

Education: BS and MS, University of Utah

Occupation: Software Developer

Member Status: John has been a subscriber since 2002.

Technical Interests: His interests include user interfaces for embedded systems, field-programmable gate array (FPGA) development, and embedded Internet development.

Most Recent Embedded Tech-Related Purchase: John recently purchased a power supply for one of his designs.

Current Projects: He is currently working on a custom light controller for strings of progammable LED lights.

Thoughts on the Future of Embedded Technology: John feels that smartphones have raised everybody’s expectations for how we interact with everyday things (e.g., cars, appliances, household control, etc.). “Either the phone becomes the interface (via the network) or the gadgets need touchscreen displays,” John said.

Member Profile: Gordon David Dick

Gordon Dick

Location: Stony Plain, AB, Canada (Stony Plain is suburb of Edmonton, home of the Oilers)

Education: MS, the University of Saskatchewan in Saskatoon, SK, Canada

Occupation: Gordon is semi-retired. He used to be an Electronics Technology and Computer Engineering Technology instructor at the Northern Alberta Institute of Technology in Edmonton.

Member Status: Gordon says he used to have Circuit Cellar issues dating back to 1995. “We were getting issues under the ‘college program’ then,” he explained. Later, his department subscribed to the magazine and the issues came directly to Gordon. Then he obtained a personal subscription. “I still have my paper copies containing my own articles. And we bought the CDs to get all the back issues.”

Technical Interests: Gordon has always been interested in electronics, both as a hobby and as a profession. He focused first on audio, then turned to microcontrollers. He has built a few microcontroller-based instruments, some of which have been the topics of his Circuit Cellar articles. “For a time, I was involved in building microcontroller-based dog training equipment. I built a microcontroller-based weather station, which I also wrote an article about. I have several microcontroller-based projects in my home that are specific to my needs. My cold-room temperature controller is microcontroller-based, for example.”

Most Recent Embedded Tech-Related Acquisition: Gordon bought a SparkFun Electronics FG085 frequency generator kit.

Current Projects: He is working with a Freescale Semiconductor MPL3115 pressure/temperature I2C transducer for his weather station. “It has amazing barometric pressure resolution,” Gordon explained.

Member Profile: Dr. Alexander Pozhitkov

Dr. Alexander Pozhitkov

Dr. Alexander Pozhitkov

Location: Seattle, WA

Education: MS in Chemistry, Moscow State University, PhD in Genetics and Bioinformatics, University of Cologne, Germany

Occupation: Research scientist

Member Status: He has been a subscriber for a year.

Technical Interests: Alex is interested in low-level hardware programming and high-voltage electronics, including vacuum tubes.

Most Recent Embedded Tech-Related Acquisition: He recently received a single-board fanless PC with a solid-state hard drive as a gift.

Current Projects: Alex is further developing the NakedCPU platform he wrote about in his two-part article series, “The NakedCPU,” (Circuit Cellar 259–260, 2012).

Thoughts on the Future of Embedded Technology: Alex says he’s worried that embedded solutions are becoming less transparent. He remembers working with one system that had several DVDs of examples and libraries but it didn’t have a comprehensive guide to the system’s architecture. “As a researcher and someone who wants to get to the bottom of things, such a situation is frustrating. This is certainly my personal researcher’s view. I am not commenting on the application side of increasingly complicated embedded systems.”