May Circuit Cellar: Sneak Preview

The May issue of Circuit Cellar magazine is out next week!. We’ve been hard at work laying the foundation and nailing the beams together with a sturdy selection of  embedded electronics articles just for you. We’ll soon be inviting you inside this 84-page magazine.

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Here’s a sneak preview of May 2019 Circuit Cellar:

EMBEDDED COMPUTING AT WORK

Technologies for Digital Signage
Digital signage ranks among the most dynamic areas of today’s embedded computing space. Makers of digital signage players, board-level products and other technologies continue to roll out new solutions for implementing powerful digital signage systems. Circuit Cellar Chief Editor Jeff Child looks at the latest technology trends and product developments in digital signage.

PC/104 and PC/104 Family Boards
PC/104 has come a long way since its inception over 25 ago. With its roots in ISA-bus PC technology, PC/104 evolved through the era of PCI and PCI Express by spinning off its wider family of follow on versions including PC/104-Plus, PCI-104, PCIe/104 and PCI/104-Express. This Product Focus section updates readers on these technology trends and provides a product gallery of representative PC/104 and PC/104-family boards.

TOOLS & TECHNIQUES FOR EMBEDDED ENGINEERING

Code Analysis Tools
Today it’s not uncommon for embedded devices to have millions of lines of software code. Code analysis tools have kept pace with these demands making it easier for embedded developers to analyze, debug and verify complex embedded software. Circuit Cellar Chief Editor Jeff Child explores the latest technology trends and product developments in code analysis tools.

Transistor Basics
In this day and age of highly integrated ICs, what is the relevance of the lone, discrete transistor? It’s true that most embedded systems can be solved by chip level solutions. But electronic component vendors do still make and sell individual transistors because there’s still a market for them. In this article, Stuart Ball reviews some important basics about transistors and how you can use them in your embedded system design.

Pressure Sensors
Over the years, George Novacek has done articles examining numerous types of sensors that measure various physical aspects of our world. But one measurement type he’s not yet discussed in the past is pressure. Here, George looks at pressure sensors in the context of using them in an electronic monitoring or control system. The story looks at the math, physics and technology associated with pressure sensors.

MICROCONTROLLERS DO IT ALL

Robotic Arm Plays Beer Pong
Simulating human body motion is a key concept in robotics development. With that in mind, learn how these Cornell graduates Daniel Fayad, Justin Choi and Harrison Hyundong Chang accurately simulate the movement of a human arm on a small-sized robotic arm. The Microchip PIC32 MCU-based system enables the motion-controlled, 3-DoF robotic arm to take a user’s throwing motion as a reference to its own throw. In this way, they created a robotic arm that can throw a ping pong ball and thus play beer pong.

Fancy Filtering with the Teensy 3.6
Signal filtering entails some tricky tradeoffs. A fast MCU that provides hardware-based floating-point capability eases some of those tradeoffs. In the past, Brian Millier has used the Arm-based Teensy MCU modules to serve meet those needs. In this article, Brian taps the Teensy 3.6 Arm MCU module to perform real-time audio FFT-convolution filtering.

Real-Time Stock Monitoring Using an MCU
With today’s technology, even very simple microcontroller-based devices can fetch and display data from the Internet. Learn how Cornell graduates David Valley and Saelig Khatta built a system using that can track stock prices in real-time and display them conveniently on an LCD screen. For the design, they used an Espressif Systems ESP8266 Wi-Fi module controlled by a Microchip PIC32 MCU. Our fun little device fetches chosen stock prices in real-time and displays them on a screen.

… AND MORE FROM OUR EXPERT COLUMNISTS

Attacking USB Gear with EMFI
Many products use USB, but have you ever considered there may be a critical security vulnerability lurking in your USB stack? In this article, Colin O’Flynn walks you through on example product that could be broken using electromagnetic fault injection (EMFI) to perform this attack without even removing the device enclosure.

An Itty Bitty Education
There’s no doubt that we’re living in a golden age when it comes to easily available and affordable development kits for fun and education. With that in mind, Jeff Bachiochi shares his experiences programming and playing with the Itty Bitty Buggy from Microduino. Using the product, you can build combine LEGO-compatible building blocks into mobile robots controlled via Bluetooth using your cellphone.

Digital Pressure Sensors Boost Design Flexibility

All Sensors has announced a new line of digital pressure sensors: the ELVR Series.  The new device series offers OEM customers increased design flexibility for pressure ranges from 2.5 to 75 mbar (1 to 30 inch H2O). The ELVR Series is a direct replacement to First Sensors’ HCLA product line.

Product highlights include an I2C or SPI interface, an analog 0.5 V to 4.5 V output signal, and significantly reduced position sensitivity. All Sensors’ CoBeam2 Technology allows for greater sensitivity while reducing package stress. The ELVR sensors can communicate directly with microcontrollers, eliminating the need for additional A/D converters. ELVR available at 3 V and 5 V supply voltage. the ELVR series is well suited for portable applications. A wide range of miniature SIP and DIP package options allows for flexible and space-saving PCB-mounting. Devices are available in bidirectional and unidirectional 2.5, 12.5, 25, 50 and 75 mbar pressure ranges.(inches of water)

Product Features

  • Miniature package with SIP, DIP and SMT lead configurations
  • PC board mountable package
  • Multiple port and lead configurations available

Electrical Features

  • Digital I2C , SPI interface and analog output
  • 12 Bit digital resolution and higher available upon request
  • Offered at 3 V and 5 V supply voltages. High Speed (cycle time 0.25 ms typical and response time 0.5 ms typical.)
  • All Sensors’ proprietary low pressure CoBeam2 Technology die

Custom pressure range and calibration outputs are available upon request. The device is well suited for applications including medical devices, pneumatic controls, instrumentation, environmental controls, HVAC and industrial controls. Samples are available for product testing.

All Sensors | www.allsensors.com 

Mini Sensor Dies Target IoT and Autos

TDK has announced new miniaturized EPCOS MEMS pressure sensor dies. The automotive versions of the C33 series boast dimensions of just 1 mm x 1 mm x 0.4 mm. They are designed for absolute pressures of 1.2 bar to 10 bar and are qualified based on bild-wo-background-en-HighResolutionDataAEC-Q101. The typical operating voltage is 3 V. With a supply voltage of 5 V they offer sensitivities of between 15 mV/bar and 80 mV/bar, depending on the type. The miniaturized pressure sensors are suitable for a temperature range from -40 °C to +135 °C and can even withstand 140 °C for short periods. They also offer a very long-term stability of ± 0.35% FS (full scale).

The C39 type, with its footprint of just 0.65 mm x 0.65 mm is especially suitable for IoT and consumer applications. One noteworthy feature of the C39 is its low insertion height of just 0.24 mm, which makes the low-profile MEMS pressure sensor die ideal for applications in smartphones and wearables, for example, where space requirements are critical. The C39 is designed for an absolute pressure of 1.2 bar and, like the C33 series, offers long-term stability of ± 0.35% FS. All the pressure sensor dies operate on the piezoresistive principle and deliver, via a Wheatstone bridge, an analog signal that is proportional to the applied pressure and the supply voltage.

Further information on the products at www.epcos.com/pressure_sensor_elements

TDK-Lambda | www.us.tdk-lambda.com