DIY Green Energy Design Projects

Ready to start a low-power or energy-monitoring microcontroller-based design project? You’re in luck. We’re featuring eight award-winning, green energy-related designs that will help get your creative juices flowing.

The projects listed below placed at the top of Renesas’s RL78 Green Energy Challenge.

Electrostatic Cleaning Robot: Solar tracking mirrors, called heliostats, are an integral part of Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) plants. They must be kept clean to help maximize the production of steam, which generates power. Using an RL78, the innovative Electrostatic Cleaning Robot provides a reliable cleaning solution that’s powered entirely by photovoltaic cells. The robot traverses the surface of the mirror and uses a high voltage AC electric field to sweep away dust and debris.

Parts and circuitry inside the robot cleaner

Cloud Electrofusion Machine: Using approximately 400 times less energy than commercial electrofusion machines, the Cloud Electrofusion Machine is designed for welding 0.5″ to 2″ polyethylene fittings. The RL78-controlled machine is designed to read a barcode on the fitting which determines fusion parameters and traceability. Along with the barcode data, the system logs GPS location to an SD card, if present, and transmits the data for each fusion to a cloud database for tracking purposes and quality control.

Inside the electrofusion machine (Source: M. Hamilton)

The Sun Chaser: A GPS Reference Station: The Sun Chaser is a well-designed, solar-based energy harvesting system that automatically recalculates the direction of a solar panel to ensure it is always facing the sun. Mounted on a rotating disc, the solar panel’s orientation is calculated using the registered GPS position. With an external compass, the internal accelerometer, a DC motor and stepper motor, you can determine the solar panel’s exact position. The system uses the Renesas RDKRL78G13 evaluation board running the Micrium µC/OS-III real-time kernel.

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Water Heater by Solar Concentration: This solar water heater is powered by the RL78 evaluation board and designed to deflect concentrated amounts of sunlight onto a water pipe for continual heating. The deflector, armed with a counterweight for easy tilting, automatically adjusts the angle of reflection for maximum solar energy using the lowest power consumption possible.

RL78-based solar water heater (Source: P. Berquin)

Air Quality Mapper: Want to make sure the air along your daily walking path is clean? The Air Quality Mapper is a portable device designed to track levels of CO2 and CO gasses for constructing “Smog Maps” to determine the healthiest routes. Constructed with an RDKRL78G13, the Mapper receives location data from its GPS module, takes readings of the CO2 and CO concentrations along a specific route and stores the data in an SD card. Using a PC, you can parse the SD card data, plot it, and upload it automatically to an online MySQL database that presents the data in a Google map.

Air quality mapper design (Source: R. Alvarez Torrico)

Wireless Remote Solar-Powered “Meteo Sensor”: You can easily measure meteorological parameters with the “Meteo Sensor.” The RL78 MCU-based design takes cyclical measurements of temperature, humidity, atmospheric pressure, and supply voltage, and shares them using digital radio transceivers. Receivers are configured for listening of incoming data on the same radio channel. It simplifies the way weather data is gathered and eases construction of local measurement networks while being optimized for low energy usage and long battery life.

The design takes cyclical measurements of temperature, humidity, atmospheric pressure, and supply voltage, and shares them using digital radio transceivers. (Source: G. Kaczmarek)

Portable Power Quality Meter: Monitoring electrical usage is becoming increasingly popular in modern homes. The Portable Power Quality Meter uses an RL78 MCU to read power factor, total harmonic distortion, line frequency, voltage, and electrical consumption information and stores the data for analysis.

The portable power quality meter uses an RL78 MCU to read power factor, total harmonic distortion, line frequency, voltage, and electrical consumption information and stores the data for analysis. (Source: A. Barbosa)

High-Altitude Low-Cost Experimental Glider (HALO): The “HALO” experimental glider project consists of three main parts. A weather balloon is the carrier section. A glider (the payload of the balloon) is the return section. A ground base section is used for communication and display telemetry data (not part of the contest project). Using the REFLEX flight simulator for testing, the glider has its own micro-GPS receiver, sensors and low-power MCU unit. It can take off, climb to pre-programmed altitude and return to a given coordinate.

High-altitude low-cost experimental glider (Source: J. Altenburg)

AC Tester Schematic Update

An error was found in one of the AC tester schematics that ran in Kevin Gorga’s June 2012 article, “AC Tester” (Circuit Cellar 263). As a reader indicated, T2 is disconnected in the published version of the schematic. An edited schematic follows.

Edited version of Figure 2 in K. Gorga’s June 2012 article, “AC Tester” (Source: Paul Alciatore)

The correction is now available on Circuit Cellar‘s Errata, Corrections, & Updates page.

DIY, Microcontroller-Based Battery Monitor for RC Aircraft

I’ve had good cause to be reading and perusing a few old Circuit Cellar articles every day for the past several weeks. We’re preparing the upcoming 25th anniversary issue of Circuit Cellar, and part of the process is reviewing the company’s archives back to the first issue. As I read through Circuit Cellar 143 (2002) the other day I thought, why wait until the end of the year to expose our readers to such intriguing articles? Since joining Elektor International Media in 2009, thousands of engineers and students across the globe have become familiar with our magazine, and most of them are unfamiliar with the early articles. It was in those articles that engineers set the foundation for the development of today’s embedded technologies.

Over the next few months, I will highlight some past articles here on CircuitCellar.com as well as in our print magazine. I encourage long-time readers to revisit these articles and projects and reflect on their past and present use values. Newer readers should not regard them as simply historical documents detailing outdated technologies. Not only did the technologies covered lead to the high-level engineering you do today, many of those technologies are still in use.

The article below is about Thomas Black’s “BatMon” battery monitor for RC applications (Circuit Cellar 143, 2002). I am leading with it simply because it was one of the first I worked on.

For years, hobbyists have relied on voltmeters and guesswork to monitor the storage capacity of battery packs for RC models. Black’s precise high-tech battery monitor is small enough to be mounted in the cockpit of an RC model helicopter. Black writes:

I hate to see folks suffer with old-fashioned remedies. After three decades of such anguish, I decided that enough is enough. So what am I talking about? Well, my focus for today’s pain relief is related to monitoring the battery packs used in RC models. The cure comes as BatMon, the sophisticated battery monitoring accessory shown in Photo 1.

Photo 1: The BatMon is small enough to fit in most RC models. The three cables plug into the model’s RC system. A bright LED remotely warns the pilot of battery trouble. The single character display reports the remaining capacity of the battery.

Today, electric model hobbyists use the digital watt-meter devices, but they are designed to monitor the heavy currents consumed by electric motors. I wanted finer resolution so I could use it with my RC receiver and servos. With that in mind, a couple of years ago, I convinced my firm that we should tackle this challenge…My solution evolved into the BatMon, a standalone device that can mount in each model aircraft (see Figure 1).

Figure 1: Installation in an RC model is as simple as plugging in three cables. Multiple point measurements allow the system to detect battery-related trouble. Voltage detection at the RC receiver even helps detect stalled servos and electrical issues.

This is not your typical larger-than-life Gotham City solution. It’s only 1.3″ × 2.8″ and weighs one ounce. But the BatMon does have the typical dual persona expected of a super hero. For user simplicity, it reports battery capacity as a zero to nine (0% to 90%) level value. This is my favorite mode because it works just like a car’s gas gauge. However, for those of you who must see hard numbers, it also reports the actual remaining capacity—up to 2500 mAH—with 5% accuracy. In addition, it reports problems associated with battery pack failures, bad on/off switches, and defective servos. A super-bright LED indicator flashes if any trouble is detected. Even in moderate sunlight this visual indicator can be seen from a couple hundred feet away, which is perfect for fly-by checks. The BatMon is compatible with all of the popular battery sizes. Pack capacities from 100 mAH to 2500 mAH can be used. They can be either four-cell or five-cell of either NiCD or NiMH chemistries. The battery parameters are programmed by using a push button and simple menu interface. The battery gauging IC that I used is from Dallas Semiconductor (now Maxim). There are other firms that have similar parts (Unitrode, TI, etc.), but the Dallas DS2438 Smart Battery Monitor was a perfect choice for my RC application (see Figure 2).

Figure 2: A battery fuel gauging IC and a microcontroller are combined to accurately measure the current consumption of an RC system. The singlecharacter LCD is used to display battery data and status messages.

This eight-pin coulomb counting chip contains an A/D-based current accumulator, A/D voltage convertor, and a slew of other features that are needed to get the job done. The famous Dallas one-wire I/O method provides an efficient interface to a PIC16C63 microcontroller…In the BatMon, the one-wire bus begins at pin 6 (port RA4) of the PIC16C63 microcontroller and terminates at the DS2438’s DQ I/O line (pin 8). Using bit-banging I/O, the PIC can read and write the necessary registers. The timing is critical, but the PIC is capable of handling the chore…The BatMon is not a good candidate for perfboard construction. A big issue is that RC models present a harsh operating environment. Vibration and less than pleasant landings demand that you use rugged electronic assembly techniques. My vote is that you design a circuit board for it. It is not a complicated circuit, so with the help of a freeware PCB program you should be on your way…The connections to the battery pack and receiver are made with standard RC hobby servo connectors. They are available at most RC hobby shops. You will need a 22-AWG, two-conductor female cable for the battery (J1), a 22-AWG, two-conductor male for the RC switch (J2), and a three-conductor (any AWG) for the Aux In (J3) connector…The finished unit is mounted in the model’s cockpit using double-sided tape or held with rubber bands (see Photo 2).

Photo 2: Here's how the battery monitor looks installed in the RC model helicopter’s cockpit. You can use the BatMon on RC airplanes, cars, and boats too. Or, you could adapt the design for battery monitoring applications that aren’t RC-related.

Thomas Black designs and supports high-tech devices for the consumer and industrial markets. He is currently involved in telecom test products. During his free time, he can be found flying his RC models. Sometimes he attempts to improve his models by creating odd electronic designs, most of which are greeted by puzzled amusement from his flying pals.

The complete article is now available.

Q&A: Ayse Kivilcim Coskun (Engineer, BU)

Ayse Kivilcim Coskun’s research on 3-D stacked systems has gained notoriety in academia, and it could change the way electrical engineers and chip manufacturers think about energy efficiency for years to come. In a recent interview, the Boston University engineering professor briefed us on her work and explained how she came to focus on the topics of green computing and 3-D systems.

Boston University professor Ayse Kivilcim Coskun

The following is an excerpt from an interview that appears in Circuit Cellar 264 (July 2012), which is currently on newsstands.

NAN: When did you first become interested in computer engineering?

AYSE: I’ve been interested in electronics since high school and in science and physics since I was little. My undergraduate major was microelectronics engineering. I actually did not start studying computer engineering officially until graduate school at University of California, San Diego. However, during my undergraduate education, I started taking programming, operating systems, logic design, and computer architecture classes, which spiked my interest in the area.

NAN: Tell us about your teaching position at the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at Boston University (BU).

AYSE: I have been an assistant professor at BU for almost three years. I teach Introduction to Software Engineering to undergraduates and Introduction to Embedded systems to graduate students. I enjoy that both courses develop computational thinking as well as hands-on implementation skills. It’s great to see the students learning to build systems and have fun while learning.

NAN: As an engineering professor, you have some insight into what excites future engineers. What “hot topics” currently interest your students?

AYSE: Programming and software design in general are certainly attracting a lot of interest. Our introductory software engineering class is attracting a growing number of students across the College of Engineering every year. DSP, image processing, and security are also hot topics among the students. Our engineering students are very keen on seeing a working system at the end of their class projects. Some project examples from my embedded systems class include embedded low-power gaming consoles, autonomous toy vehicles, and embedded systems focusing on healthcare or security applications …

NAN: How did you come to focus on energy efficiency and thermal challenges?

AYSE: Energy efficiency has been a hot topic for embedded systems for several decades, mainly due to battery-life restrictions. With the growth of computing sources at all levels—from embedded to large-scale computers, and following the move to data centers and the cloud—now energy efficiency is a major bottleneck for any computing system. The focus on energy efficiency and temperature management among the academic community was increasing when I started my PhD. I got especially interested in thermally induced problems as I also had some background on fault tolerance and reliability topics. I thought it would be interesting to leverage job scheduling to improve thermal behavior and my advisor liked the idea too. Temperature-aware job scheduling in multiprocessor systems was the first energy-efficiency related project I worked on.

NAN: In May 2011, you were awarded the A. Richard Newton Graduate Scholarship at the Design Automation Conference (DAC) for a joint project, “3-D Systems for Low-Power High-Performance Computing.” Tell us about the project and how you became involved.

AYSE: My vision is that 3-D stacked systems—where multiple dies are stacked together into a single chip—can provide significant benefits in energy efficiency. However, there are design, modeling, and management challenges that need to be addressed in order to simultaneously achieve energy efficiency and reliability. For example, stacking enables putting DRAM and processor cores together on a single 3-D chip. This means we can cut down the memory access latency, which is the main performance bottleneck for a lot of applications today. This gain in performance could be leveraged to run processors at a lower speed or use simpler cores, which would enable low-power, high-performance computing. Or we can use the reduction in memory latency to boost performance of single-chip multicore systems. Higher performance, however, means higher power and temperature. Thermal challenges are already pressing concerns for 3-D design, as cooling these systems is difficult. The project focuses on simultaneously analyzing performance, power, and temperature and using this analysis to design system management methods that maximize performance under power or thermal constraints.

I started researching 3-D systems during a summer internship at  the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL) in the last year of my PhD. Now, the area is maturing and there are even some 3-D prototype systems being designed. I think it is an exciting time for 3-D research as we’ll start seeing a larger pool of commercial 3-D stacked chips in a few years. The A. Richard Newton scholarship enabled us to do the preliminary research and collect results. Following the scholarship, I also received a National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER award for designing innovative strategies for modeling and management of 3-D stacked systems.

The entire interview appears in Circuit Cellar 264  (July 2012).

DesignSpark chipKIT Challenge 2012 Winners Named

The results for the DesignSpark chipKIT Challenge are now final. Dean Boman won First Prize for his chipKIT-based Energy Monitoring System, which provides users real-time home electrical usage data. A web server provides usage tracking on a circuit-by-circuit basis. It interfaces with a home automation system for long-term monitoring and data logging.

Dean Boman's Energy Monitoring System (Source: D. Boman)

Second prize went to Raul Alvarez for his Home Energy Gateway consumption monitor, which features an embedded gateway/web server that communicates with “smart” devices.

Raul Alvarezs Home Energy Gateway (Source: R. Alvarez)

Graig Pearen won Third Prize for his PV Array Tracker (Sun Seeker) project, which tracks, monitors, and adjusts PV arrays based on weather conditions.

Graig Pearen's PV Array Tracker (Source: G. Pearen)

Click HERE for a list of all the winners. You can review their project abstracts, documentation, schematics, diagrams, code, and more.

Participants in the competition were challenged develop innovative, energy-efficient designs with eco-friendly footprints. Entries were required to include an extension card developed using the DesignSpark PCB software tool and the Microchip Max32 chipKIT development board.

According to the documentation on the design challenge site:

The chipKIT™ Max32™ development platform is a 32-bit Arduino solution that enables hobbyists and academics to easily and inexpensively integrate electronics into their projects, even if they do not have an electronic-engineering background.

The platform consists of two PIC32-based development boards and open-source software that is compatible with the Arduino programming language and development environment. The chipKIT™ hardware is compatible with existing 3.3V Arduino shields and applications, and can be developed using a modified version of the Arduino IDE and existing Arduino resources, such as code examples, libraries, references and tutorials.

The chipKIT™ Basic I/O Shield (part # TDGL005) is compatible with the chipKIT™ Max32™ board, and offers users simple push buttons, switches, LEDs, I2C™ EEPROM, I2C temperature sensor, and a 128 x 32 pixel organic LED graphic display.

 

Click HERE for a list of all the winners. You can review their project abstracts, documentation, schematics, diagrams, code, and more.

Circuit Cellar/Elektor Inc. is the Contest Administrator.