Small High-Current Power Modules

 

Exar Corp. recently announced the 10-A XR79110 and 15-A XR79115 single-output, synchronous step-down power modules. The modules will be available in mid-November in RoHS-compliant, green/halogen-free, QFN packages.

In a product release, Exar noted that “both devices provide easy to use, fully integrated power converters including MOSFETs, inductors, and internal input and output capacitors.”

The modules come in compact 10 x 10 x 4 mm and 12 x 12 x 4 mm footprints, respectively. The XR79110 and XR79115 offer versatility to convert from common input voltages such as 5, 12, and 19 V.

Both modules feature Exar’s emulated current-mode COT control scheme. The COT control loop enables operation with ceramic output capacitors and eliminates loop compensation components. According to Exar documentation, tthe output voltage can be set from 0.6 to 18 V and with exceptional full range 0.1% line regulation and 1% output accuracy over full temperature range.

The XR79110 and XR79115 are priced at $8.95 and $10.95, respectively, in 1,000-piece quantities.

Source: Exar Corp.

High-Bandwidth Oscilloscope Probe

Keysight Technologies recently announced a new high-bandwidth, low-noise oscilloscope probe, the N7020A, for making power integrity measurements to characterize DC power rails. The probe’s specs include:

  • low noise
  • large ± 24-V offset range
  • 50 kΩ DC input impedance
  • 2-GHz bandwidth for analyzing fast transients on their DC power-rails KeysightN7020A

According to Keysight’s product release, “The single-ended N7020A power-rail probe has a 1:1 attenuation ratio to maximize the signal-to-noise ratio of the power rail being observed by the oscilloscope. Comparable oscilloscope power integrity measurement solutions have up to 16× more noise than the Keysight solution. With its lower noise, the Keysight N7020A power-rail probe provides a more accurate view of the actual ripple and noise riding on DC power rails.”

 

The new N7020A power-rail probe starts at $2,650.

Source: Keysight Technologies 

Client Profile: Invenscience LC

Invenscience2340 South Heritage Drive, Suite I
Nibley UT, 84321

CONTACT: Collin Lewis, sales@invenscience.com
invenscience.com

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All of these controllers provide power and the radio control (RC) PWM signal necessary to make servos move without any programming effort.

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Circuit Cellar prides itself on presenting readers with information about innovative companies, organizations, products, and services relating to embedded technologies. This space is where Circuit Cellar enables clients to present readers useful information, special deals, and more.

Testing Power Supplies (EE Tip #112)

How can you determine the stability of your lab or bench-top supply? You can get a good impression of the stability of a power supply under various conditions by loading the output dynamically. This can be implemented using just a handful of components.

Power supply testing

Power supply testing

Apart from obvious factors such as output voltage and current, noise, hum and output resistance, it is also important that a power supply has a good regulation under varying load conditions. A standard test for this uses a resistor array across the output that can be switched between two values. Manufacturers typically use resistor values that correspond to 10% and 90% of the rated power output of the supply.

The switching frequency between the values is normally several tens of hertz (e.g. 40 Hz). The behavior of the output can then be inspected with an oscilloscope, from which you can deduce how stable the power supply is. At the rising edge of the square wave you will usually find an overshoot, which is caused by the way the regulator functions, the inductance of the internal and external wiring and any output filter.

This dynamic behavior is normally tested at a single frequency, but the designers in the Elektor Lab have tested numerous lab supplies over the years and it seemed interesting to check what happens at higher switching frequencies. The only items required for this are an ordinary signal generator with a square wave output and the circuit shown in Figure 1.Fig1-pwrsupply

You can then take measurements up to several megahertz, which should give you a really good insight for which applications the power supply is suitable. More often than not you will come across a resonance frequency at which the supply no longer remains stable and it’s interesting to note at which frequency that occurs.

The circuit really is very simple. The power MOSFET used in the circuit is a type that is rated at 80 V/75 A and has an on-resistance of only 10 mΩ (VGS = 10 V).

The output of the supply is continuously loaded by R2, which has a value such that 1/10th of the maximum output current flows through it (R2 = Vmax/0.1/max). The value of R1 is chosen such that 8/10th of the maximum current flows through it (R1 = Vmax/0.8/max). Together this makes 0.9/max when the MOSFET conducts. You should round the calculated values to the nearest E12 value and make sure that the resistors are able to dissipate the heat generated (using forced cooling, if required).

At larger output currents the MOSFET should also be provided with a small heatsink. The gate of the FET is connected to ground via two 100-Ω resistors, providing a neat 50-Ω impedance to the output of the signal generator. The output voltage of the signal generator should be set to a level between 5 V and 10 V, and you’re ready to test. Start with a low switching frequency and slowly increase it, whilst keeping an eye on the square wave on the oscilloscope. And then keep increasing the frequency… Who knows what surprises you may come across? Bear in mind though that the editorial team can’t be held responsible for any damage that may occur to the tested power supply. Use this circuit at your own risk!

— Harry Baggen and Ton Giesberts (Elektor, February 210)

High-Voltage Gate Driver IC

Allegro A4900 Gate Driver IC

Allegro A4900 Gate Driver IC

The A4900 is a high-voltage brushless DC (BLDC) MOSFET gate driver IC. It is designed for high-voltage motor control for hybrid, electric vehicle, and 48-V automotive battery systems (e.g., electronic power steering, A/C compressors, fans, pumps, and blowers).

The A4900’s six gate drives can drive a range of N-channel insulated-gate bipolar transistors (IGBTs) or power MOSFET switches. The gate drives are configured as three high-voltage high-side drives and three low-side drives. The high-side drives are isolated up to 600 V to enable operation with high-bridge (motor) supply voltages. The high-side drives use a bootstrap capacitor to provide the supply gate drive voltage required for N-channel FETs. A TTL logic-level input compatible with 3.3- or 5-V logic systems can be used to control each FET.

A single-supply input provides the gate drive supply and the bootstrap capacitor charge source. An internal regulator from the single supply provides the logic circuit’s lower internal voltage. The A4900’s internal monitors ensure that the high- and low-side external FET’s gate source voltage is above 9 V when active.

The control inputs to the A4900 offer a flexible solution for many motor control applications. Each driver can be driven with an independent PWM signal, which enables implementation of all motor excitation methods including trapezoidal and sinusoidal drive. The IC’s integrated diagnostics detect undervoltage, overtemperature, and power bridge faults that can be configured to protect the power switches under most short-circuit conditions. Detailed diagnostics are available as a serial data word.

The A4900 is supplied in a 44-lead QSOP package and costs $3.23 in 1,000-unit quantities.

Allegro MicroSystems, LLC
www.allegromicro.com