DC-DC Converter Boasts 4 A, 60 V Internal Switch

Analog Devices, acquired last year by Linear Technology, has announced the Power by Linear LT8364, a current mode, 2 MHz step-up DC/DC converter with an internal 4 A, 60 V switch. It operates from an input voltage range of 2.8 V to 60 V, and is suitable for applications with input sources ranging from a single-cell Li-Ion battery to multi-cell battery stacks, automotive inputs, telecom power supplies and industrial power rails.

LT8364

The LT8364 can be configured as either a boost, SEPIC or an inverting converter. Its switching frequency can be programmed between 300 kHz and 2 MHz, enabling designers to minimize external component sizes and avoid critical frequency bands, such as AM radio. Furthermore, it offers over 90% efficiency while switching at 2 MHz. Burst Mode operation reduces quiescent current to only 9 μA while keeping output ripple below 15 mVp-p. The combination of a small 4 mm x 3 mm DFN or high voltage MSOP-16E package and tiny externals ensures a highly compact footprint while minimizing solution cost.

The LT8364’s 100 mΩ power switch delivers efficiencies of over 95%. It also offers spread spectrum frequency modulation to minimize EMI concerns. A single feedback pin sets the output voltage whether the output is positive or negative, minimizing pin count. Other features include external synchronization, programmable UVLO, frequency foldback and programmable soft-start.

The LT8364EDE is available in a 4 mm x 3 mm DFN-12 package and the LT8364EMSE is available in a high voltage MSOP-16E (4 pins removed for high voltage spacing). Industrial temperature (–40°C to 125°C) versions (LT8364IDE and LT8364IMSE), and high temperature (–40°C to 150°C) versions (LT8364HDE and LT8364HMSE) are also available.

Summary of Features: LT8364

  •     Wide Input Voltage Range: 2.8 V to 60 V
  •     Internal 4 A, 60 V Power Switch
  •     Ultralow Quiescent Current & Low Ripple Burst Mode Operation: IQ = 9 μ A
  •     BIAS Pin for Higher Efficiency
  •     Positive or Negative Output Voltage Programming with a Single Feedback Pin
  •     Programmable, Synchronizable Frequency: 300 kHz to 2 MHz
  •     Optional Spread Spectrum Frequency Modulation for Low EMI
  •     Thermally Enhanced 12-Lead 4 mm × 3 mm DFN & High Voltage Pin Spacing Version of 16-Lead MSOP packages

Pricing for the LT8364 in 1,100s starts at $3.25.

Linear Technology | www.linear.com

Configurable Regulator

LinearThe LTM4644 quad output step-down µModule (micromodule) regulator is configurable as a single (16-A), dual (12-A, 4-A, or 8-A, 8-A), triple (8-A, 4-A, 4-A), or quad (4-A each) output regulator. This flexibility enables system designers to rely on one simple and compact µModule regulator for the various voltage and load current requirements of FPGAs, ASICs, and microprocessors as well as other board circuitry. The LTM4644 is ideal for communications, data storage, industrial, transportation, and medical system applications.

The LTM4644 regulator includes DC/DC controllers, power switches, inductors and compensation components. Only eight external ceramic capacitors (1206 or smaller case sizes) and four feedback resistors (0603 case size) are required to regulate four independently adjustable outputs from 0.6 to 5.5 V. Separate input pins enable the four channels to be powered from a common supply rail or different rails from 4 to 14 V.

At an ambient temperature of 55°C, the LTM4644 delivers up to 13 A at 1.5 V from a 12-V input or up to 14 A with 200-LFM airflow. The four channels operate at 90° out-of-phase to minimize input ripple whether at the 1-MHz default switching frequency or synchronized to an external clock between 700 kHz and 1.3 MHz. With the addition of an external bias supply above 4 V, the LTM4644 can regulate from an input supply voltage as low as 2.375 V. The regulator also includes output overvoltage and overcurrent fault protection.

The LTM4644 costs $22.85 each in 1,000-unit quantities.

Linear Technology Corp.
www.linear.com

Arduino MOSFET-Based Power Switch

Circuit Cellar columnist Ed Nisley has used Arduino SBCs in many projects over the years. He has found them perfect for one-off designs and prototypes, since the board’s all-in-one layout includes a micrcontroller with USB connectivity, simple connectors, and a power regulator.

But the standard Arduino presents some design limitations.

“The on-board regulator can be either a blessing or a curse, depending on the application. Although the board will run from an unregulated supply and you can power additional circuitry from the regulator, the minute PCB heatsink drastically limits the available current,” Nisley says. “Worse, putting the microcontroller into one of its sleep modes doesn’t shut off the rest of the Arduino PCB or your added circuits, so a standard Arduino board isn’t suitable for battery-powered applications.”

In Circuit Cellar’s January issue, Nisley presents a MOSFET-based power switch that addresses such concerns. He also refers to one of his own projects where it would be helpful.

“The low-resistance Hall effect current sensor that I described in my November 2013 column should be useful in a bright bicycle taillight, but only if there’s a way to turn everything off after the ride without flipping a mechanical switch…,” Nisley says. “Of course, I could build a custom microcontroller circuit, but it’s much easier to drop an Arduino Pro Mini board atop the more interesting analog circuitry.”

Nisley’s January article describes “a simple MOSFET-based power switch that turns on with a push button and turns off under program control: the Arduino can shut itself off and reduce the battery drain to nearly zero.”

Readers should find the article’s information and circuitry design helpful in other applications requiring automatic shutoff, “even if they’re not running from battery power,” Nisley says.

Figure 1: This SPICE simulation models a power p-MOSFET with a logic-level gate controlling the current from the battery to C1 and R2, which simulate a 500-mA load that is far below Q2’s rating. S1, a voltage-controlled switch, mimics an ordinary push button. Q1 isolates the Arduino digital output pin from the raw battery voltage.

Figure 1: This SPICE simulation models a power p-MOSFET with a logic-level gate controlling the current from the battery to C1 and R2, which simulate a 500-mA load that is far below Q2’s rating. S1, a voltage-controlled switch, mimics an ordinary push button. Q1 isolates the Arduino digital output pin from the raw battery voltage.

The article takes readers from SPICE modeling of the circuitry (see Figure 1) through developing a schematic and building a hardware prototype.

“The PCB in Photo 1 combines the p-MOSFET power switch from Figure 2 with a Hall effect current sensor, a pair of PWM-controlled n-MOFSETs, and an Arduino Pro Mini into

The power switch components occupy the upper left corner of the PCB, with the Hall effect current sensor near the middle and the Arduino Pro Mini board to the upper right. The 3-D printed red frame stiffens the circuit board during construction.

Photo 1: The power switch components occupy the upper left corner of the PCB, with the Hall effect current sensor near the middle and the Arduino Pro Mini board to the upper right. The 3-D printed red frame stiffens the circuit board during construction.

a brassboard layout,” Nisley says. “It’s one step beyond the breadboard hairball I showed in my article “Low-Loss Hall Effect Current Sensing” (Circuit Cellar 280, 2013), and will help verify that all the components operate properly on a real circuit board with a good layout.”

For much more detail about the verification process, PCB design, Arduino interface, and more, download the January issue.

The actual circuit schematic includes the same parts as the SPICE schematic, plus the assortment of connectors and jumpers required to actually build the PCB shown in Photo 1.

Figure 2: The actual circuit schematic includes the same parts as the SPICE schematic, as well as the assortment of connectors and jumpers required to actually build the PCB shown in Photo 1.

MCU-Based Projects and Practical Tasks

Circuit Cellar’s January issue presents several microprocessor-based projects that provide useful tools and, in some cases, entertainment for their designers.

Our contributors’ articles in the Embedded Applications issue cover a hand-held PIC IDE, a real-time trailer-monitoring system, and a prize-winning upgrade to a multi-zone audio setup.

Jaromir Sukuba describes designing and building the PP4, a PIC-to-PIC IDE system for programming and debugging a Microchip Technology PIC18. His solar-powered,

The PP4 hand-held PIC-to-PIC programmer

The PP4 hand-held PIC-to-PIC programmer

portable computing device is built around a Digilent chipKIT Max32 development platform.

“While other popular solutions can overshadow this device with better UI and OS, none of them can work with 40 mW of power input and have fully in-house developed OS. They also lack PP4’s fun factor,” Sukuba says. “A friend of mine calls the device a ‘camel computer,’ meaning you can program your favorite PIC while riding a camel through endless deserts.”

Not interested in traveling (much less programming) atop a camel? Perhaps you prefer to cover long distances towing a comfortable RV? Dean Boman built his real-time trailer monitoring system after he experienced several RV trailer tire blowouts. “In every case, there were very subtle changes in the trailer handling in the minutes prior to the blowouts, but the changes were subtle enough to go unnoticed,” he says.

Boman’s system notices. Using accelerometers, sensors, and a custom-designed PCB with a Microchip Technology PIC18F2620 microcontroller, it continuously monitors each trailer tire’s vibration and axle temperature, displays that information, and sounds an alarm if a tire’s vibration is excessive.  The driver can then pull over before a dangerous or trailer-damaging blowout.

But perhaps you’d rather not travel at all, just stay at home and listen to a little music? This issue includes Part 1 of Dave Erickson’s two-part series about upgrading his multi-zone home audio system with an STMicroelectronics STM32F100 microprocessor, an LCD, and real PC boards. His MCU-controlled, eight-zone analog sound system won second-place in a 2011 STMicroelectronics design contest.

In addition to these special projects, the January issue includes our columnists exploring a variety of  EE topics and technologies.

Jeff Bachiochi considers RC and DC servomotors and outlines a control mechanism for a DC motor that emulates a DC servomotor’s function and strength. George Novacek explores system safety assessment, which offers a standard method to identify and mitigate hazards in a designed product.

Ed Nisley discusses a switch design that gives an Arduino Pro Mini board control over its own power supply. He describes “a simple MOSFET-based power switch that turns on with a push button and turns off under program control: the Arduino can shut itself off and reduce the battery drain to nearly zero.”

“This should be useful in other applications that require automatic shutoff, even if they’re not running from battery power,” Nisley adds.

Ayse K. Coskun discusses how 3-D chip stacking technology can improve energy efficiency. “3-D stacked systems can act as energy-efficiency boosters by putting together multiple chips (e.g., processors, DRAMs, other sensory layers, etc.) into a single chip,” she says. “Furthermore, they provide high-speed, high-bandwidth communication among the different layers.”

“I believe 3-D technology will be especially promising in the mobile domain,” she adds, “where the data access and processing requirements increase continuously, but the power constraints cannot be pushed much because of the physical and cost-related constraints.”