Microchip PICs with Integrated Crypto Engine

Anticipating the need for secure communications for the next level of device connectivity, Microchip Technology has integrated a complete hardware crypto engine into its PIC24F family of microcontrollers. Computers normally use software routines to carry out data encryption number crunching, but for low-power microcontrollers, this method will generally use up too much of the processor’s resources and be too slow.microchipPIC24FGB2

Microchip has integrated several security features into the PIC24F family of microcontrollers (identified by its “GB2″ suffix) to protect embedded data. The fully featured hardware crypto engine supports the AES, DES and 3DES standards to reduce software overhead, lower-power consumption, and enable faster throughput. A Random Number Generator is also implemented that can be used to create random keys for data encryption, decryption, and authentication to provide a high level of security. For additional protection, the one-time-programmable (OTP) key storage prevents the encryption key from being read or overwritten.

These security features increase the integrity of embedded data without sacrificing power consumption. With XLP technology, the “GB2” family achieves 180-µA/MHz run currents and 18-nA sleep currents for long battery life in portable applications.

[via Elektor]

CC275: Build a Signal Frequency Counter

In the June issue of Circuit Cellar, George Adamidis, a physicist and electronics engineer from Greece, shares his design for a 1.5-GHz frequency counter.

His design is based on an 8-bit microcontroller, but his modifications enable using the device as a 28-bit counter.

Here is a picture of the complete project.

“This design began as a Microchip Technology 8-bit PIC learning project. But it became more than that,” Adamidis says in his article. “Although I used an 8-bit PIC, I actually created a 28-bit counter.”

“The device measures signal frequencies from 0.1 Hz to 1.5 GHz and displays them on a 2 × 16 character LCD,” Adamidis continues. “It offers a frequency resolution up to 0.1 Hz for frequencies in the 0.1-Hz-to-100-MHz range and up to 4 Hz for 100-MHz-to-1.5-GHz frequencies. (The display resolution generally differs from the measurement accuracy.) Minimum and maximum hold functions, selection of frequency units, and gate time adjustment are also supported. “

Adamidis says it is “remarkable” that his frequency counter is actually a 28-bit counter.

“It uses a Microchip Technology PIC18F2620 microcontroller, which has only 16-bit internal counters. I used the PIC18F2620’s internal 16-bit Timer0 module (configured as a 16-bit counter), an additional 4-bit NXP Semiconductors 74F161 binary counter, and the PIC18F2620’s internal prescaler (in 1:256 prescale mode) in series to achieve a total of 28 bits.”

This is the 1.5-GHz frequency counter’s block diagram.

 

To read more about  the theory of operation, hardware, and software behind Adamidis’s design, check out this month’s issue of Circuit Cellar.