New Products: July 2013

CWAV, Inc. USBee QX

MIXED SIGNAL OSCILLOSCOPE WITH PROTOCOL ANALYZER

The USBee QX is a PC-based mixed-signal oscilloscope (MSO) integrated with a protocol analyzer utilizing USB 3.0 and Wi-Fi technology. The highly integrated, 600-MHz MSO features 24 digital channels and four analog channels.

With its large 896-Msample buffer memory and data compression capability, the USBeeQX can capture up to 32 days of traces. It displays serial or parallel protocols in a human-readable format, enabling developers to find and resolve obscure and difficult defects. The MOS includes popular serial protocols (e.g., RS-232/UARTs, SPI, I2C, CAN, SDIO, Async, 1-Wire, and I2S), which are typically costly add-ons for benchtop oscilloscopes. The MOS utilizes APIs and Tool Builders that are integrated into the USBee QX software to support any custom protocol.

The USBee QX’s Wi-Fi capability enables you set up testing in the lab while you are at your desk. The Wi-Fi capability also creates electrical isolation of the device under test to the host computer.

The USBee QX costs $2,495.

CWAV, Inc.
www.usbee.com

 


DownStream Technologies FabStream

FREE PCB DESIGN SOFTWARE SUITE

FabStream is an integrated PCB design and manufacturing solution designed for the DIY electronics market, including small businesses, start-ups, engineers, inventors, hobbyists, and other electronic enthusiasts. FabStream consists of free SoloPCB Design software customized to each manufacturing partner in the FabStream network.

The FabStream service works in three easy steps. First, you log onto the FabStream website (www.fabstream.com), select a FabStream manufacturing partner, and download the free design software. Next, you create PCB libraries, schematics, and board layouts. Finally, the software leads you through the process of ordering PCBs online with the manufacturer. You only pay for the PCBs you purchase. Because the service is mostly Internet-based, FabStream can be accessed globally and is available 24/7/365.

FabStream’s free SoloPCB Design software includes a commercial-quality schematic capture, PCB layout, and autorouting in one, easy-to-use environment. The software is customized to each manufacturing partner. All of the manufacturer’s production capabilities are built into SoloPCB, enabling you to work within the manufacturers’ constraints. Design changes can be made and then verified through an integrated analyzer that uses a quick pass/fail check to compare the modification to the manufacturer’s rules.

SoloPCB does not contain any CAM outputs. Instead, a secure, industry-standard IPC-2581 manufacturing file is automatically extracted, encrypted, and electronically routed to the manufacturer during the ordering process. The IPC-2581 file contains all the design information needed for manufacturing, which eliminates the need to create Gerber and NC drill files.

FabStream is available as a free download. More information can be found at www.fabstream.com

DownStream Technologies, LLC
www.downstreamtech.com

 


Rohde Schwarz SMW200A

HIGH-PERFORMANCE VECTOR SIGNAL GENERATOR

The R&S SMW200A high-performance vector signal generator combines flexibility, performance, and intuitive operation to quickly and easily generate complex, high-quality signals for LTE Advanced and next-generation mobile standards. The generator is designed to simpify complex 4G device testing.

With its versatile configuration options, the R&S SMW200A’s range of applications extends from single-path vector signal generation to multichannel multiple-input and multiple-output (MIMO) receiver testing. The vector signal generator provides a baseband generator, a RF generator, and a real-time MIMO fading simulator in a single instrument.

The R&S SMW200A covers the100 kHz-to-3-GHz, or 6 GHz, frequency range, and features a 160-MHz I/Q modulation bandwidth with internal baseband. The generator is well suited for verification of 3G and 4G base stations and aerospace and defense applications.

The R&S SMW200A can be equipped with an optional second RF path for frequencies up to 6 GHz. It can have a a maximum of two baseband and four fading simulator modules, providing users with two full-featured vector signal generators in a single unit. Fading scenarios, such as 2 × 2 MIMO, 8 × 2 MIMO for TD-LTE, and 2 × 2 MIMO for LTE Advanced carrier aggregation, can be easily simulated.

Higher-order MIMO applications (e.g., 3 × 3 MIMO for WLAN or 4 × 4 MIMO for LTE-FDD) are easily supported by connecting a third and fourth source to the R&S SMW200A. The R&S SGS100A are highly compact RF sources that are controlled directly from the front panel of the R&S SMW200A.

The R&S SMW200A ensures high accuracy in spectral and modulation measurements. The SSB phase noise is –139 dBc (typical) at 1 GHz (20 kHz offset). Help functions are provided for additional ease-of-use, and presets are provided for all important digital standards and fading scenarios. LTE and UMTS test case wizards simplify complex base station conformance testing in line with the 3GPP specification.

Contact Rohde & Schwarz for pricing.

Rohde & Schwarz
www.corporate.rohde-schwarz.com

 


Texas Instruments CC2538

INTEGRATED ZIGBEE SINGLE-CHIP SOLUTION WITH AN ARM CORTEX-M3 MCU

The Texas Instruments (TI) CC2538 system-on-chip (SoC) is designed to simplify the development of ZigBee wireless connectivity-enabled smart energy infrastructure, home and building automation, and intelligent lighting gateways. The cost-efficient SoC features an ARM Cortex-M3 microcontroller, memory, and hardware accelerators on one piece of silicon. The CC2538 supports ZigBee PRO, ZigBee Smart Energy and ZigBee Home Automation and lighting standards to deliver interoperability with existing and future ZigBee products. The SoC also uses IEEE 802.15.4 and 6LoWPAN IPv6 networks to support IP standards-based development.

The CC2538 is capable of supporting fast digital management and features scalable memory options from 128 to 512 KB flash to support smart energy infrastructure applications. The SoC sustains a mesh network with hundreds of end nodes using integrated 8-to-32-KB RAM options that are pin-for-pin compatible for maximum flexibility.

The CC2538’s additional benefits include temperature operation up to 125°C, optimization for battery-powered applications using only 1.3 uA in Sleep mode, and efficient processing for centralized networks and reduced bill of materials cost through integrated ARM Cortex-M3 core.

The CC2538 development kit (CC2538DK) provides a complete development platform for the CC2538, enabling users to see all functionality without additional layout. It comes with high-performance CC2538 evaluation modules (CC2538EMK) and motherboards with an integrated ARM Cortex-M3 debug probe for software development and peripherals including an LCD, buttons, LEDs, light sensor and accelerometer for creating demo software. The boards are also compatible with TI’s SmartRF Studio for running RF performance tests. The CC2538 supports current and future Z-Stack releases from TI and over-the-air software downloads for easier upgrades in the field.

The CC2538 is available in an 8-mm x 8-mm QFN56 package and costs $3 in high volumes. The CC2538 is also available through TI’s free sample program. The CC2538DK costs $299.

Texas Instruments, Inc.
www.ti.com

Client Profile: Beta LAYOUT

Beta LAYOUT
965 Eubanks Drive, Suite 1B,
Vacaville, CA 95688

www.magic-pcb.com

Contact: Tony Shoot – tony.shoot@beta-layout.us

Product Information: Are you looking for a unique system to identify your PCBs and electronic devices that is fast, copy-proof, reliable, and virtually indestructible? Are you tired of fighting with illegible EAN codes, ripped-off labels, and product piracy?

Beta LAYOUT has the perfect solution: MAGIC-PCB, the RFID PCB identification system. Imagine your bare PCB could “invisibly” contain the board revision, bill of materials, firmware version, documentation link, schematics and layout file, date code, and manufacturing plant information without using any space.

MAGIC-PCB RFID tags are embedded into PCBs at an early stage of PCB production. Use this exciting technology in your product design cycle to authenticate, track, and protect your product. For more information, visit www.pcb-pool.com/ppus/info_pcbpool_rfid.html.

Beta LAYOUT also offers the UHF RFID Kit, an ideal tool to research RFID technology without major investment. The kit costs $385 and includes a write-read module with a USB port, a USB cable (to the PC), antennas for medium/long range and short range, a connecting cable antenna to the write-read module, a MAGIC PCB with an embedded RFID chip, four mini PCBs with RFID chips (different ranges), and RFID chips for different antenna designs. The reader can bulk read up to 255 transponders. For more information, visit www.beta-estore.com/rkus/index.html.

Exclusive Offer: A discount will be offered to Circuit Cellar readers who purchase a UHF RFID starter kit. For more information, contact Tony Shoot tony.shoot@beta-layout.us.

Client Profile: Imagineering, Inc.

Imagineering, Inc.
2425 Touhy Avenue
Elk Grove Village, IL 60007

www.PCBnet.com

Contact: Khurrum Dhanji, KDhanji@PCBnet.com

Embedded Products/Services: Multilayer rigid and flex printed circuit boards, high-mix mixed-volume printed circuit board assembly

Join the quoting revolution happening now at PCBnet.com. No longer do you have to wait days for full turnkey quotes. Imagineering’s online systems take just minutes to give you quotes for PCBs, components, and assembly all in one place and all online!

Exclusive Offer: Place a full turnkey order with Imagineering for PCBs, components, and assembly labor and receive 25% off your bare boards and 10% off your labor! Imagineering also has daily specials online as well as a new customer promotion. PCBs for $10 per piece! See all the company’s offers at PCBnet.com.

PCB Service for Prototypes

Elektor recently inked a deal with Eurocircuits for the production and sale of PCBs. The decision is an important step toward delivering valuable services to Elektor members.

All of Elektor’s PCB orders will be handled by Eurocircuits. If you have a nice design yourself, you can try the Elektor PCB Service for prototypes or small production runs. Visit ElektorPCBService.com for more information.

Elektor.TV visited the Eurocircuits booth at the Electronics Show in Munich. In the video Dirk Stans (a Eurocircuits owner) comments on some of the company’s services and deliverables.

CircuitCellar.com is an Elektor International Media site.

Prevent Embedded Design Errors (CC 25th Anniversary Preview)

Attention, electrical engineers and programmers! Our upcoming 25th Anniversary Issue (available in early 2013) isn’t solely a look back at the history of this publication. Sure, we cover a bit of history. But the issue also features design tips, projects, interviews, and essays on topics ranging from user interface (UI) tips for designers to the future of small RAM devices, FPGAs, and 8-bit chips.

Circuit Cellar’s 25th Anniversary issue … coming in early 2013

Circuit Cellar columnist Robert Lacoste is one of the engineers whose essay will focus on present-day design tips. He explains that electrical engineering projects such as mixed-signal designs can be tedious, tricky, and exhausting. In his essay, Lacoste details 25 errors that once made will surely complicate (at best) or ruin (at worst) an embedded design project. Below are some examples and tips.

Thinking about bringing an electronics design to market? Lacoste highlights a common error many designers make.

Error 3: Not Anticipating Regulatory Constraints

Another common error is forgetting to plan for regulatory requirements from day one. Unless you’re working on a prototype that won’t ever leave your lab, there is a high probability that you will need to comply with some regulations. FCC and CE are the most common, but you’ll also find local regulations as well as product-class requirements for a broad range of products, from toys to safety devices to motor-based machines. (Refer to my article, “CE Marking in a Nutshell,” in Circuit Cellar 257 for more information.)

Let’s say you design a wireless gizmo with the U.S. market and later find that your customers want to use it in Europe. This means you lose years of work, as well as profits, because you overlooked your customers’ needs and the regulations in place in different locals.

When designing a wireless gizmo that will be used outside the U.S., having adequate information from the start will help you make good decisions. An example would be selecting a worldwide-enabled band like the ubiquitous 2.4 GHz. Similarly, don’t forget that EMC/ESD regulations require that nearly all inputs and outputs should be protected against surge transients. If you forget this, your beautiful, expensive prototype may not survive its first day at the test lab.

Watch out for errors

Here’s another common error that could derail a project. Lacoste writes:

Error 10: You Order Only One Set of Parts Before PCB Design

I love this one because I’ve done it plenty of times even though I knew the risk.

Let’s say you design your schematic, route your PCB, manufacture or order the PCB, and then order the parts to populate it. But soon thereafter you discover one of the following situations: You find that some of the required parts aren’t available. (Perhaps no distributor has them. Or maybe they’re available but you must make a minimum order of 10,000 parts and wait six months.) You learn the parts are tagged as obsolete by its manufacturer, which may not be known in advance especially if you are a small customer.

If you are serious about efficiency, you won’t have this problem because you’ll order the required parts for your prototypes in advance. But even then you might have the same issue when you need to order components for the first production batch. This one is tricky to solve, but only two solutions work. Either use only very common parts that are widely available from several sources or early on buy enough parts for a couple of years of production. Unfortunately, the latter is the only reasonable option for certain components like LCDs.

Ok, how about one more? You’ll have to check out the Anniversary Issue for the list of the other 22 errors and tips. Lacoste writes:

Error 12: You Forget About Crosstalk Between Digital and Analog Signals

Full analog designs are rare, so you have probably some noisy digital signals around your sensor input or other low-noise analog lines. Of course, you know that you must separate them as much as possible, but you can be sure that you will forget it more than once.

Let’s consider a real-world example. Some years ago, my company designed a high-tech Hi-Fi audio device. It included an on-board I2C bus linking a remote user interface. Do you know what happened? Of course, we got some audible glitches on the loudspeaker every time there was an I2C transfer. We redesigned the PCB—moving tracks and adding plenty of grounded copper pour and vias between sensitive lines and the problem was resolved. Of course we lost some weeks in between. We knew the risk, but underestimated it because nothing is as sensitive as a pair of ears. Check twice and always put guard-grounded planes between sensitive tracks and noisy ones.

Circuit Cellar’s Circuit Cellar 25th Anniversary Issue will be available in early 2013. Stay tuned for more updates on the issue’s content.