Arduino MOSFET-Based Power Switch

Circuit Cellar columnist Ed Nisley has used Arduino SBCs in many projects over the years. He has found them perfect for one-off designs and prototypes, since the board’s all-in-one layout includes a micrcontroller with USB connectivity, simple connectors, and a power regulator.

But the standard Arduino presents some design limitations.

“The on-board regulator can be either a blessing or a curse, depending on the application. Although the board will run from an unregulated supply and you can power additional circuitry from the regulator, the minute PCB heatsink drastically limits the available current,” Nisley says. “Worse, putting the microcontroller into one of its sleep modes doesn’t shut off the rest of the Arduino PCB or your added circuits, so a standard Arduino board isn’t suitable for battery-powered applications.”

In Circuit Cellar’s January issue, Nisley presents a MOSFET-based power switch that addresses such concerns. He also refers to one of his own projects where it would be helpful.

“The low-resistance Hall effect current sensor that I described in my November 2013 column should be useful in a bright bicycle taillight, but only if there’s a way to turn everything off after the ride without flipping a mechanical switch…,” Nisley says. “Of course, I could build a custom microcontroller circuit, but it’s much easier to drop an Arduino Pro Mini board atop the more interesting analog circuitry.”

Nisley’s January article describes “a simple MOSFET-based power switch that turns on with a push button and turns off under program control: the Arduino can shut itself off and reduce the battery drain to nearly zero.”

Readers should find the article’s information and circuitry design helpful in other applications requiring automatic shutoff, “even if they’re not running from battery power,” Nisley says.

Figure 1: This SPICE simulation models a power p-MOSFET with a logic-level gate controlling the current from the battery to C1 and R2, which simulate a 500-mA load that is far below Q2’s rating. S1, a voltage-controlled switch, mimics an ordinary push button. Q1 isolates the Arduino digital output pin from the raw battery voltage.

Figure 1: This SPICE simulation models a power p-MOSFET with a logic-level gate controlling the current from the battery to C1 and R2, which simulate a 500-mA load that is far below Q2’s rating. S1, a voltage-controlled switch, mimics an ordinary push button. Q1 isolates the Arduino digital output pin from the raw battery voltage.

The article takes readers from SPICE modeling of the circuitry (see Figure 1) through developing a schematic and building a hardware prototype.

“The PCB in Photo 1 combines the p-MOSFET power switch from Figure 2 with a Hall effect current sensor, a pair of PWM-controlled n-MOFSETs, and an Arduino Pro Mini into

The power switch components occupy the upper left corner of the PCB, with the Hall effect current sensor near the middle and the Arduino Pro Mini board to the upper right. The 3-D printed red frame stiffens the circuit board during construction.

Photo 1: The power switch components occupy the upper left corner of the PCB, with the Hall effect current sensor near the middle and the Arduino Pro Mini board to the upper right. The 3-D printed red frame stiffens the circuit board during construction.

a brassboard layout,” Nisley says. “It’s one step beyond the breadboard hairball I showed in my article “Low-Loss Hall Effect Current Sensing” (Circuit Cellar 280, 2013), and will help verify that all the components operate properly on a real circuit board with a good layout.”

For much more detail about the verification process, PCB design, Arduino interface, and more, download the January issue.

The actual circuit schematic includes the same parts as the SPICE schematic, plus the assortment of connectors and jumpers required to actually build the PCB shown in Photo 1.

Figure 2: The actual circuit schematic includes the same parts as the SPICE schematic, as well as the assortment of connectors and jumpers required to actually build the PCB shown in Photo 1.

PCB Design Guidelines (EE Tips #113)

Designing a matching printed circuit board (PCB) can be a challenge for many electronics enthusiasts. To help ease the process, Circuit Cellar and Elektor editors compiled a list of tips for laying out components, routing, and more.PCB1

  • When compactness is not a major consideration and the boards will be assembled by hand, through-hole components are the better choice. In this case you can use the pins of these components as “vias.”
  • On the other hand, surface-mount components can save a whole load of drilling on self-made PCBs. They make it simpler to achieve objectives such as minimum length for traces , minimal area inside trace loops, etc.
  • The orientation of components should consider not only simplicity of assembly but also the need to test the circuitry afterward. This is the time to remember the need for test points!
  • The place for switches, press buttons, plug-in connectors, LEDs and other user-interface components is outside the enclosure. Anything requiring subsequent access should be on the front panel of the case.
  • Components that require assembling with the right polarity should all have the same orientation.
  • Manual routing is preferable to using the autorouter. The latter has its uses nevertheless for discovering bottlenecks and other critical points.
  • When routing, never even think about giving up! Many PCBs appear “unroutable” at the outset, yet after a while it turns out you have plenty of space to spare.
  • If you’re not satisfied with your efforts, it’s better to go back a step or two rather than just muddle onwards.
  • Complete the routing for each of the functional groups of the circuit first. Link the groups together only after you have finished this stage.
  • Short traces are better than long ones. High impedance connections are more sensitive to interference and for this reason require to be kept as short as possible.
  • Where traces form a loop, their surface area should be kept to an absolute minimum.
  • Decoupling capacitors must be located as close as possible to the switching element that needs to be decoupled.
  • Traces carrying signals should be routed early on (first the short ones, then the long ones). Except, that is, when the power supply traces are particularly critical.
  • Bus lines should be routed alongside one another.
  • Separate analog circuitry from digital whenever possible.PCB2
  • On multilayer boards arrange traces carrying signals so that one of the layers hosts the vertical traces and another one accommodates the horizontal ones.
  • If possible, reserve one layer or side exclusively for a continuous ground plane. Only in exceptional situations, e.g. with high speed op-amps, is this undesirable.
  • Keep traces carrying heavy currents well away from sensitive pickups, sensors and so on.
  • Beginners should take special care with mains and high voltages!
  • Ground and earth traces require exactly the same consideration as the power supply traces. Electromagnetic interference can be minimized by keeping the power and ground traces parallel (or better still arranged over each other on either side of a double-sided board).
  • Bends should be no more than 45°. Sharp angles between the traces and the pads are also to be avoided.
  • Observe PCB manufacturers’ requirements without exception in order to avoid unpleasant surprises later.
  • If you are using software for checking conformity to specifications, carry out these checks regularly at each design phase.
  • A border of 0.12″ (approximately 3 mm) around the edge of the PCB should be kept entirely clear of components.
  • If components are to be inserted by machine you must provide at least three location marks.
  • Don’t forget the holes for fixing screws or pillars!
  • Don’t skimp on text markings on the PCB: indicate polarity, voltages, on-board functions, part designation, design date, version number…
  • Check not just twice but three times that all components will actually fit the PCB!
  • Leave time at the end of the process for tidying up and optimizing.

Good luck!

Real-Time Trailer Monitoring System

Dean Boman, a retired electrical engineer and spacecraft communications systems designer, noticed a problem during vacations towing the family’s RV trailer—tire blowouts.

“In every case, there were very subtle changes in the trailer handling in the minutes prior to the blowouts, but the changes were subtle enough to go unnoticed,” he says in his article appearing in January’s Circuit Cellar magazine.

So Boman, whose retirement hobbies include embedded system design, built the trailer monitoring system (TMS), which monitors the vibration of each trailer tire, displays the

Figure 1—The Trailer Monitoring System consists of the display unit and a remote data unit (RDU) mounted in the trailer. The top bar graph shows the right rear axle vibration level and the lower bar graph is for left rear axle. Numbers on the right are the axle temperatures. The vertical bar to the right of the bar graph is the driver-selected vibration audio alarm threshold. Placing the toggle switch in the other position  displays the front axle data.

Photo 1 —The Trailer Monitoring System consists of the display unit and a remote data unit (RDU) mounted in the trailer. The top bar graph shows the right rear axle vibration level and the lower bar graph is for left rear axle. Numbers on the right are the axle temperatures. The vertical bar to the right of the bar graph is the driver-selected vibration audio alarm threshold. Placing the toggle switch in the other position displays the front axle data.

information to the driver, and sounds an alarm if tire vibration or heat exceeds a certain threshold. The alarm feature gives the driver time to pull over before a dangerous or damaging blowout occurs.

Boman’s article describes the overall layout and operation of his system.

“The TMS consists of accelerometers mounted on each tire’s axles to convert the gravitational (g) level vibration into an analog voltage. Each axle also contains a temperature sensor to measure the axle temperature, which is used to detect bearing or brake problems. Our trailer uses the Dexter Torflex suspension system with four independent axles supporting four tires. Therefore, a total of four accelerometers and four temperature sensors were required.

“Each tire’s vibration and temperature data is processed by a remote data unit (RDU) that is mounted in the trailer. This unit formats the data into RS-232 packets, which it sends to the display unit, which is mounted in the tow vehicle.”

Photo 1 shows the display unit. Figure 1 is the complete system’s block diagram.

Figure 1—This block diagram shows the remote data unit accepting data from the accelerometers and temperature sensors and sending the data to the display unit, which is located in the tow vehicle for the driver display.

Figure 1—This block diagram shows the remote data unit accepting data from the accelerometers and temperature sensors and sending the data to the display unit, which is located in the tow vehicle for the driver display.

The remote data unit’s (RDU’s) hardware design includes a custom PCB with a Microchip Technology PIC18F2620 processor, a power supply, an RS-232 interface, temperature sensor interfaces, and accelerometers. Photo 2 shows the final board assembly. A 78L05 linear regulator implements the power supply, and the RS-232 interface utilizes a Maxim Integrated MAX232. The RDU’s custom software design is written in C with the Microchip MPLAB integrated development environment (IDE).

The remote data unit’s board assembly is shown.

Photo 2—The remote data unit’s board assembly is shown.

The display unit’s hardware includes a Microchip Technology PIC18F2620 processor, a power supply, a user-control interface, an LCD interface, and an RS-232 data interface (see Figure 1). Boman chose a Hantronix HDM16216H-4 16 × 2 LCD, which is inexpensive and offers a simple parallel interface. Photo 3 shows the full assembly.

The display unit’s completed assembly is shown with the enclosure opened. The board on top is the LCD’s rear view. The board on bottom is the display unit board.

Photo 3—The display unit’s completed assembly is shown with the enclosure opened. The board on top is the LCD’s rear view. The board on bottom is the display unit board.

Boman used the Microchip MPLAB IDE to write the display unit’s software in C.

“To generate the display image, the vibration data is first converted into an 11-element bar graph format and the temperature values are converted from Centigrade to Fahrenheit. Based on the toggle switch’s position, either the front or the rear axle data is written to the LCD screen,” Boman says.

“To implement the audio alarm function, the ADC is read to determine the driver-selected alarm level as provided by the potentiometer setting. If the vibration level for any of the four axles exceeds the driver-set level for more than 5 s, the audio alarm is sounded.

“The 5-s requirement prevents the alarm from sounding for bumps in the road, but enables vibration due to tread separation or tire bubbles to sound the alarm. The audio alarm is also sounded if any of the temperature reads exceed 160°F, which could indicate a possible bearing or brake failure.”

The comprehensive monitoring gives Boman peace of mind behind the wheel. “While the TMS cannot prevent tire problems, it does provide advance warning so the driver can take action to prevent serious damage or even an accident,” he says.

For more details about Boman’s project, including RDU and display unit schematics, check out the January issue.

Prototyping for Engineers (EE Tip #111)

Prototyping is an essential part of engineering. Whether you’re working on a complicated embedded system or a simple blinking LED project, building a prototype can save you a lot of time, money, and hassle in the long run. You can choose one of three basic styles of prototyping: solderless breadboard, perfboard, and manufactured PCB. Your project goals, your schedule, and your circuit’s complexity are variables that will influence your choice. (I am not including styles like flying leads and wire-wrapping.)PrototypeTable

Table 1 details the pros and cons associated with each of the three prototyping options. Imagine a nifty circuit caught your eye and you want to explore it. If it’s a simple circuit, you can use the solderless breadboard (“white blob”) approach. White blobs come in a variety of sizes and patterns. By “pattern” I mean the number of the solderless connectors and their layout. Each connector is a group (usually five) of tie points placed on 0.1″ centers. Photo 1 shows how these small strips are typically arranged beneath the surface.Prototype p1-4

Following the schematic, you use the tie points to connect up to five components’ leads together. Each tie point is a tiny metal pincer that grips (almost) any lead plugged into it. You can use small wires to connect multiple tie points together or to connect larger external parts (see Photo 2).

If you want something a bit more permanent, you might choose to use the perfboard (“Swiss cheese”) approach. Like the solderless breadboards, perfboards are available in many sizes and patterns; however, I prefer the one-hole/ pad variety (see Photo 3). You can often find perfboards from enclosure manufacturers that are sized to fit the enclosures (see Photo 4).

There is nothing worse than wiring a prototype PCB and finding there isn’t enough room for all your parts. So, it pays to draw a part layout before you get started just to make sure everything fits. While I’m at it, I’ll add my 2¢ about schematic and layout programs.

The staff at Circuit Cellar uses CadSoft EAGLE design software for drawing schematics. (A free version is available for limited size boards.) I use the software for creating PCB layouts, drawing schematics, and popping parts onto PCB layouts using the proper board dimensions. Then I can use the drawing for a prototype using perfboard.

The final option is to have real prototypes manufactured. This is where the CAD software becomes a necessity. If you’ve already done a layout for your hand-wired prototype, most of the work is already done (sans routing). Some engineers will hand-wire a project first to test its performance. Others will go straight to manufactured prototypes. Many prototype PCB manufacturers offer a bare-bones special—without any solder masking or silkscreen—that can save you a few dollars. However, prices have become pretty competitive. (You can get a few copies of your design manufactured for around $100.)

There are two alternatives to having a PCB house manufacture your PCBs: do-it-yourself (DIY) and routing. If you choose DIY approach, you’ll have to work with ferric chloride (or another acid) to remove unwanted copper (see Photo 5). You’ll be able to produce some PCBs quickly, but it will likely be messy (and dangerous).Prototype p5-6

Routing involves using an x-y-z table to route between copper traces to isolate them from one another (see Photo 6). You’ll need access to an x-y-z table, which can be expensive.—CC25, Jeff Bachiochi, “Electrical Engineering: Tricks and Tools for Project Success,” 2013.

This piece originally appeared in CC25 2013

Arduino-Based Hand-Held Gaming System

gameduino2-WEBJames Bowman, creator of the Gameduino game adapter for microcontrollers, recently made an upgrade to the system adding a Future Technology Devices International (FTDI) FT800 chip to drive the graphics. Associate Editor Nan Price interviewed James about the system and its capabilities.

NAN: Give us some background. Where do you live? Where did you go to school? What did you study?

Bowman-WEB

James Bowman

 JAMES: I live on the California coast in a small farming village between Santa Cruz and San Francisco. I moved here from London 17 years ago. I studied computing at Imperial College London.

NAN: What types of projects did you work on when you were employed by Silicon Graphics, 3dfx Interactive, and NVIDIA?

JAMES: Always software and hardware for GPUs. I began in software, which led me to microcode, which led to hardware. Before you know it you’ve learned Verilog. I was usually working near the boundary of software and hardware, optimizing something for cost, speed, or both.

NAN: How did you come up with the idea for the Gameduino game console?

JAMES: I paid for my college tuition by working as a games programmer for Nintendo and Sega consoles, so I was quite familiar with that world. It seemed a natural fit to try to give the Arduino some eye-catching color graphics. Some quick experiments with a breadboard and an FPGA confirmed that the idea was feasible.

NAN: The Gameduino 2 turns your Arduino into a hand-held modern gaming system. Explain the difference from the first version of Gameduino—what upgrades/additions have been made?

Gameduinofinal-WEB

The Gameduino2 uses a Future Technology Devices International chip to drive its graphics

JAMES: The original Gameduino had to use an FPGA to generate graphics, because in 2011 there was no such thing as an embedded GPU. It needs an external monitor and you had to supply your own inputs (e.g., buttons, joysticks, etc.). The Gameduino 2 uses the new Future Technology Devices International (FTDI) FT800 chip, which drives all the graphics. It has a built-in color resistive touchscreen and a three-axis accelerometer. So it is a complete game system—you just add the CPU.

NAN: How does the Arduino factor into the design?

GameduinoPCB-WEB

An Arduino, Ethernet adapter, and a Gameduino

 JAMES: Arduino is an interesting platform. It is 5 V, believe it or not, so the design needs a level shifter. Also, the Arduino is based on an 8-bit microcontroller, so the software stack needs to be carefully built to provide acceptable performance. The huge advantage of the Arduino is that the programming environment—the IDE, compiler, and downloader—is used and understood by hundreds of thousands of people.

 NAN: Is it easy or possible to customize the Gameduino 2?

 JAMES: I would have to say no. The PCB itself is entirely surface mount technology (SMT) and all the ICs are QFNs—they have no accessible pins! This is a long way from the DIP packages of yesterday, where you could change the circuit by cutting tracks and soldering onto the pins.

I needed a microscope and a hot air station to make the Gameduino2 prototype. That is a long way from the “kitchen table” tradition of the Arduino. Fortunately the Arduino’s physical design is very customization-friendly. Other devices can be stacked up, adding networking, hi-fi sound, or other sensor inputs.

 NAN: The Gameduino 2 project is on Kickstarter through November 7, 2013. Why did you decide to use Kickstarter crowdfunding for this project?

 JAMES: Kickstarter is great for small-scale inventors. The audience it reaches also tends to be interested in novel, clever things. So it’s a wonderful way to launch a small new product.

NAN: What’s next for Gameduino 2? Will the future see a Gameduino 3?

 JAMES: Product cycles in the Arduino ecosystem are quite long, fortunately, so a Gameduino 3 is distant. For the Gameduino 2, I’m writing a book, shipping the product, and supporting the developer community, which will hopefully make use of it.