EAGLE Design Challenge: Design the Next Innovation for Microchip in EAGLE V6

CadSoft and Premier Farnell announced recently the start of the EAGLE Design Challenge, which will run until August 31, 2012. Design engineers can submit design projects for a shot at winning prizes with an overall value of around $7,000.

The competition is powered by Microchip and hosted on element14. Elektor and Circuit Cellar are acting as media partners.

Participation

To participate, applicants must ensure that all designs use EAGLE Version 6 and that a Microchip MCU or DSC will be integrated in the design.

After registering at element14, you can submit a screenshot of your layout and add a project description on the competition page.

If you don’t have an EAGLE license and want to participate in the contest, you can download a free 30-days trial version at www.element14.com/eagle-freemium.

Judging

The competition will feature peer voting from the element14 community. Community members “like” entries and submit comments.

A panel of judges—consisting of CadSoft, Premier Farnell and Microchip representatives along with independent EAGLE expert Prof. Dr. Francesco Volpe from the University of Applied Sciences in Aschaffenburg—will pick the winners based on the “likes” and comments from community members. According to the rules, “judging criteria include clarity in description of the submission, its electronic concept, design complexity, design quality, and functionality.”

Prizes

1. DELL Alienware M17x r3 + EAGLE version 6 Professional incl. all three modules.

2. MICROCHIP DV164037 Kit, Eval, ICD3 w/ Explorer-16 & DM163022-1 8-Bit development board + EAGLE Version 6 Professional incl. all three modules.

3. EAGLE Version 6 Standard incl. all three modules.

Visit www.element14.com/eagle-competition for more details as well as the terms and conditions.

 

 

“Robocup” Soccer: Robot Designs Compete in Soccer Matches

Roboticists and soccer fans from around the world converged on Eindhoven, The Netherlands, from April 25–29 for the Roboup Dutch Open. The event was an interesting combination of sports and electronics engineering.

Soccer action at the Robocup Dutch Open

Since I have dozens of colleagues based in The Netherlands, I decided to see if someone would provide event coverage for our readers and members. Fortunately, TechtheFuture.com’s Tessel Rensenbrink was available and willing to cover the event. She reports:

Attending the Robocup Dutch Open is like taking a peek into the future. Teams of fully autonomous robots compete with each other in a soccer game. The matches are as engaging as watching humans compete in sports and the teams even display particular characteristics. The German bots suck at penalties and the Iranian bots are a rough bunch frequently body checking their opponents.

The Dutch Open was held in Eindhoven, The Netherlands from the 25th to the 29th of April. It is part of Robocup, a worldwide educational initiative aiming to promote robotics and artificial intelligence research. The soccer tournaments serve as a test bed for developments in robotics and help raise the interest of the general public. All new discoveries and techniques are shared across the teams to support rapid development.
The ultimate goal is to have a fully autonomous humanoid robot soccer team defeat the winner of the World Cup of Human Soccer in 2050.

In Eindhoven the competition was between teams from the Middle Size Robot League. The bots are 80 cm (2.6 ft) high, 50 cm (1.6 ft) in diameter and move around on wheels. They have an arm with little wheels to control the ball and a kicker to shoot. Because the hardware is mostly standardized the development teams have to make the difference with the software.

Once the game starts the developers aren’t allowed to aid or moderate the robots. Therefore the bots are equipped with all the hardware they need to play soccer autonomously. They’re mounted with a camera and a laser scanner to locate the ball and determine the distance. A Wi-Fi network allows the team members to communicate with each other and determine the strategy.

The game is played on a field similar to a scaled human soccer field. Playing time is limited to two halves of 15 minutes each. The teams consist of five players. If a robot does not function properly it may be taken of the field for a reset while the game continues. There is a human referee who’s decisions are communicated to the bots over the Wi-Fi network.

The Dutch Open finals were between home team TechUnited and MRL from Iran. The Dutch bots scored their first goal within minutes of the start of the game to the excitement of the predominantly orange-clad audience. Shortly thereafter a TechUnited bot went renegade and had to be taken out of the field for a reset. But even with a bot less the Dutchies scored again. When the team increased their lead to 3 – 0 the match seemed all but won. But in the second half MRL came back strong and had everyone on the edge of their seats by scoring two goals.

When the referee signaled the end of the game, the score was 3-2 for TechUnited. By winning the tournament the Dutch have established themselves as a favorite for the World Cup held in Mexico in June. Maybe, just maybe, the Dutch will finally bring home a Soccer World Cup trophy.

The following video shows a match between The Netherlands and Iran. The Netherlands won 2-1.

TechTheFuture.com is part of the Elektor group. 

 

Raspberry Pi Now Shipping

Got Raspberry Pi? Probably not. But rest assured. The wait is almost over.

After receiving an inquiry about the status of Raspberry Pi from a Circuit Cellar member earlier today, I decided to do a bit of research. It didn’t take long to figure out that hundreds of thousands of orders have been placed and shipping has begun.

Raspberry Pi (Source: Raspberry Pi Foundation & posted on Elektor.com)

TheInquirer.net reported last week that more than 350,000 orders have been placed since February and the next shipments are scheduled for May.

According to an April 18 post by element14’s Sagar Jethani, shipping is underway and “will be made strictly in the order that commitments were received within each region — Europe, Asia, and the Americas.” He added that “Everyone who ordered before 18th April will definitely receive their Raspberry Pi before the end of June. Those placing new orders from today can expect a July delivery.”

I encourage Circuit Cellar members to tell us what they think about Raspberry Pi once their receive their orders. We’ll be happy to review project articles for publication in print or online.

The Raspberry Pi Foundation’s compact (85.60 mm × 53.98 mm × 17 mm) single-bard computer features a Broadcom BCM2835, an ARM1176JZFS, and a Videocore 4 GPU. The ARM GNU/Linux system costs $25.

You can order the Raspberry Pi from element14 and RS Components.

Check out my first Raspberry Pi post for additional information.

User Interface Innovation: Collaborative Navigation in Virtual Search and Rescue

An engineering team from Virginia Tech’s Center of HCI and Department of Computer Science recently won first place in the IEEE’s 2012 3DUI Contest the for their Collaborative Navigation in Virtual Search and Rescue Escort (CARNAGE) project. The project was designed to enable emergency responders to collaborate and safely navigate a dangerous environment such as a disaster area.

The contest was open to researchers, students, and professionals working on 3-D user interface technologies. Entrants were challenged to design an application to enable two users—situated in different locations with his or her own UI—to navigate a 3-D environment without speaking to each other.

Collaborative Augmented Rescue Navigation and Guidance Escort UI (Source: Virginia Tech News, YouTube)

The Virginia Tech team—comprising Felipe Bacim, Eric Ragan, Siroberto, and Cheryl Stinson—described their design in a concise system description, which is currently available on the 3DUI 2012 contest website:

Our task specifically looks at communication between a scene commander and a disaster relief responder during a search and rescue operation. The responders inside the environment have great difficulty navigating because of hazards, reduced visibility, disorientation, and lack of survey knowledge of the environment. Observing the operation from outside of the disaster area, scene commanders work to help coordinate the response effort  [1, 2]. With the responder’s notifications about the environment, scene commanders can provide new instructions, alert the responders to risks, and issue evacuation orders. Since neither the commander nor the responder has complete information about the environment, effective communication is essential.

As technology advances, the incorporation of new tools into search and rescue protocols shows promise for improving  operation efficiency and safety. In this research, we explore the  use of 3D user interfaces to assist collaborative search-and-rescue. Ideally, users should be able to focus on their primary tasks in the VE, rather than struggle with travel and way finding. Using virtual reality (VR) as a prototyping testbed, we implemented a proof-of-concept collaborative guidance system. Preliminary evaluation has demonstrated promising results for efficient rescue operations.

The team also created an explanatory 6:16-minute project video:

Click here for more information about the IEEE Symposium on 3D User Interfaces in Costa Mesa, CA.

Source: Virginia Tech News

 

Weekly Elektor Wrap Up: Preamplifier 2012, Pico C, & a Webshop Hunt

It’s time for our Friday Elektor wrap up. Our Elektor colleagues were hard at work during this first week of April. Here’s quick review.

Elektor Preamplifier 2012: The Sound of Silence

Elektor has a 40-year history of high-end audio (tube and solid state) coverage: projects, books, circuit boards, and even DVDs. The latest project is the Preamplifier 2012, which was designed by renowned audio specialist Douglas Self, with Elektor audio staffer Ton Giesberts doing the board designs and testing on Elektor’s $50,000 audio precision analyzer! It achieves incredibly low noise figures using low impedance design techniques throughout, but still based on an affordable and easy-to-find opamp: the NE5532. The Preamplifier 2012’s most notable characteristics are its ultra low noise MC/MD section (get out your vinyl records) and the remarkably low-value pots in the Baxandall tone control (like 1-kΩ).Douglas Self and Elektor Audio Labs already stunned the audio community with their NE5532 Op-amplifier a while ago with 32 NE5532 op-amps basically paralleled on a board producing 10 W of extremely high-quality sound. Simply put: they know what they’re doing!You can read about the seven-board design in the April 2012 edition. In fact, why not follow the series?

Part 1: www.elektor.com/110650

Part 2: www.elektor.com/110651

Part 3: currently in editing for June 2012 edition.

NE5532 Opamplifier: www.elektor.com/100124

Pico C Webinar Announcement

Elektor announced this week that it will run a new webinar via element14 on the Elektor Pico C meter, which was featured in the April 2011 editions. The Pico C meter can measure small capacitances. In February 2012 the device was upgraded with new firmware.

According to an Elektor news item, UK-based author/designer Jon Drury will run the webinar slated for Thursday, April 19, 2012. He’ll cover a unique way of giving the original instrument a much wider range while also extending its functionality, all with new software and practically no changes to the existing Pico C hardware. Microcontroller fans, including AVR enthusiasts, can also learn how to adapt the software for different calibration capacitors. Elektor staffers are reporting that Jon may also give a sneak preview of his PicoLO oscilloscope and Pico DDS generator.  You can register at element14.

“E” Hunt!

In other news, Elektor is challenging you to find hidden Easter eggs in its webshop. Find eggs, get a discount. Click here to get started.

 

 

Weekly Elektor Wrap Up: Design West, RL78 Challenge, a Robot Kit, & More!

Last week was busy for the international Elektor staff. In San Jose, CA, the team announced along with Circuit Cellar and Renesas the launch of the Renesas RL78 Green Energy Challenge, met with members at the Design West conference booth, held meetings with various clients, and reviewed the latest and greatest embedded technologies.

Along with IAR Systems, Renesas is challenging engineers around the world to enter the RL78 challenge and build energy-efficient, low-power applications using the RL78 MCU and IAR toolchain. Winners can take home a share of $17,500 in Grand Prizes from Renesas, and the Grand Prize winner will also win a free trip to Renesas DevCon in October 2012.

RL78 Kit

Traffic at the conference booth was steady as usual. Members and clients visited to discuss the Elektor group’s magazines (Elektor, Circuit Cellar, and audioXpress), books, kits, and projects.

As for exciting embedded technologies, staff reported on new 8-bit MCUs from Microchip Technology, interesting compiler-related announcements from companies like IAR Systems, Intel’s seven-Atom “industrial orchestra,” and more. (Keep watching CircuitCellar.com for more reports on Design West announcements and events.)

Intel's "Industrial Controller in Concert" featured seven Atom processors, four operating systems, 36 paint ball hoppers, and 2300 rubber balls, a video camera for motion sensing, a digital synthesizer, a multi-touch display, and more.

Visit Elektor’s news page for information posted last week about a two-legged wireless robot kit, a solar-powered Wikipedia Server, and more.

CircuitCellar.com is an Elektor group publication.

Design West Update: Intel’s Computer-Controlled Orchestra

It wasn’t the Blue Man Group making music by shooting small rubber balls at pipes, xylophones, vibraphones, cymbals, and various other sound-making instruments at Design West in San Jose, CA, this week. It was Intel and its collaborator Sisu Devices.

Intel's "Industrial Controller in Concert" at Design West, San Jose

The innovative Industrial Controller in Concert system on display featured seven Atom processors, four operating systems, 36 paint ball hoppers, and 2300 rubber balls, a video camera for motion sensing, a digital synthesizer, a multi-touch display, and more. PVC tubes connect the various instruments.

Intel's "Industrial Controller in Concert" features seven Atom processors 2300

Once running, the $160,000 system played a 2,372-note song and captivated the Design West audience. The nearby photo shows the system on the conference floor.

Click here learn more and watch a video of the computer-controlled orchestra in action.

Design West Update: Advanced 8-Bit MCUs

Is the 8-bit MCU dead? No. And if you take a look at Microchip Technology’s PIC16F(LF)178x family, it’s clear that it will be around for a long time to come.

Microchip Technology announced Monday from Design West in San Jose, CA, that it “expanded its 8-bit PIC16F(LF)178X midrange core MCU family to include advanced analog and integrated communication peripherals, such as on-chip 12-bit analog-to-digital converters (ADCs), 8-bit digital-to-analog converters (DACs), operational amplifiers, and high-speed comparators, along with EUSART (including LIN), I2C, and SPI interface peripherals.”

Microchip claims the low power consumption and advanced analog and digital integration make the MCUs (28- and 40-pin packages) well suited for lighting (LED), battery management, motor control, and more.

Check out the specs and more details at www.microchip.com/pagehandler/en-us/family/8bit/.

Weekly Elektor Wrap Up: Thermometer with Giant Display, AVR Software-Defined Radio Webinar, & More!

It’s time to review what our Elektor colleagues in The Netherlands, France, and beyond worked on and covered this week! As usual, they’ve been quite busy working in the Elektor lab, organizing webcasts, prepping for Design West, and assembling upcoming issues of Elektor magazine. The following is a wrap-up of some of the many things Elektor staffers covered and worked on this week.

Below is a video of a thermometer with a giant display.

The electromechanical display was recovered from a ’60s-era pinball machine.

The thermometer with a giant display

Using the display and some innovative programming techniques, it’s possible to build a water-temperature indicator a swimming pool. After the temperature appears on the 4″ reels, the circuit’s consumption decreases to zero. But the temperature display remains perfectly visible. You needn’t worry about batteries (dry or rechargeable), adjustments, or maintenance. (Published in Elektor issue 424, April 2012 www.elektor.com/110673)

Board for Elektor's thermometer with a giant display

On the event front, Elektor Academy and element14 have teamed up to bring you a series of exclusive webinars covering blockbuster projects from recent editions of Elektor magazine. Participation in these webinars is completely free! All you need to do is register via www.element14.com/community/events/3258. The “AVR Software-Defined Radio” webinar takes place Thursday, March 9, 2012. Click here for more information.

Elektor also reported some interesting electronics news this week. The items that will most interest Circuit Cellar readers are an Uninterruptible Power Supply in a Chip and a Python-Based Tool for Diagnosing Dead-Core Boards.

CircuitCellar.com is part of the Elektor group.

Read CircuitCellar.com for Updates/News from Design West, San Jose

Circuit Cellar and Elektor editors and staffers will attend Design West in San Jose, CA, from March 27 to 29. If you can’t make it to the conference, check www.CircuitCellar.com daily for conference updates, news, and more!

Feed the latest posts from CircuitCellar.com to your RSS reader! Doing so will keep you up-to-date on everything we post! Setting up the feed is simple.Add www.circuitcellar.com/feed/rss to your RSS reader and enjoy!

The Circuit Cellar/Elektor booth at ESC 2011 (San Jose, CA)

This year’s conference comprises seven summits at once: ESC, Android, Black Hat, DesignMED, LED, Sensors, and Multicore.

Members and clients are encouraged to stop by booth #2332 to chat with staff, subscribe to our magazines, grab free copies of the magazines, and check out our books. Readers should feel free to bring and pitch article proposals, book proposals, and project ideas!

 

Weekly Elektor Wrap Up: An Innovative ECG Patch, an Affordable Linux Computer, & an AVR Software-Defined Radio Event

It’s time for our weekly wrap up of Elektor news and content for Circuit Cellar members. As usual, our colleagues in Europe and beyond are always covering some cool embedded-related topics.

Let’s start with an interesting post about an innovative processor-based healthcare system: an intelligent patch capable of continuously monitoring heart activity. The design combines embedded and wireless technologies to measure, record, and transmit electrocardiogram signals:

The patch developed by the research labs Imec and Holst Centre and the Danish company Delta measures 3 ECG signals while a 3D accelerometer monitors physical activity. The captured data is processed by a microprocessor integrated in the patch and relevant information is transmitted wirelessly using the new Bluetooth Low Energy technology. Energy consumption is low enough to allow continuous operation during one week.

Click here to read the entire post.

Have you been reading Circuit Cellar columnist Bob Japenga’s articles on embedded Linux? If so, you’ll check out Elektor’s post about Raspberry Pi:

The board is based on a Broadcom BCM2835 SoC, which includes an ARM1176JZF-S 700 MHz processor, a VideoCore IV GPU and 128 or 256 MB of RAM is intended to run Linux kernel based operating systems. Selling for only 28 Euros the distributors’ websites have been overwhelmed by the demand and the first batch of 10,000 pieces was sold out in less than an hour.

The foundation plans to release two versions: Model A & Model B. Model A will have 128 MB RAM, one USB port and no Ethernet controller, while model B will contain 256 MB RAM, two USB ports and a 10/100 Ethernet controller.

Click here for the entire article. You can also read my recent post on Raspberry Pi. Check it out!

Lastly, consider attending the upcoming Elektor Academy webinar “AVR Software Defined Radio.” The webinar is scheduled for 3/29/12. Click here for more information. If you attend, be sure to let us know what you think!

Circuit Cellar and CircuitCellar.com are part of the Elektor group.

Robot Design with Microsoft Kinect, RDS 4, & Parallax’s Eddie

Microsoft announced on March 8 the availability of Robotics Developer Studio 4 (RDS 4) software for robotics applications. RDS 4 was designed to work with the Kinect for Windows SDK. To demonstrate the capabilities of RDS 4, the Microsoft robotics team built the Follow Me Robot with a Parallax Eddie robot, laptop running Windows 7, and the Kinect.

In the following short video, Microsoft software developer Harsha Kikkeri demonstrates Follow Me Robot.

Circuit Cellar readers are already experimenting Kinect and developing embedded system to work with it n interesting ways. In an upcoming article about a Kinect-based project, designer Miguel Sanchez describes a interesting Kinect-based 3-D imaging system.

Sanchez writes:

My project started as a simple enterprise that later became a bit more challenging. The idea of capturing the silhouette of an individual standing in front of the Kinect was based on isolating those points that are between two distance thresholds from the camera. As depth image already provides the distance measurement, all the pixels of the subject will be between a range of distances, while other objects in the scene will be outside of this small range. But I wanted to have just the contour line of a person and not all the pixels that belong to that person’s body. OpenCV is a powerful computer vision library. I used it for my project because of function blobs. This function extracts the contour of the different isolated objects of a scene. As my image would only contain one object—the person standing in front of the camera—function blobs would return the exact list of coordinates of the contour of the person, which was what I needed. Please note that this function is a heavy image processing made easy for the user. It provides not just one, but a list of all the different objects that have been detected in the image. It can also specify is holes inside a blob are permitted. It can also specify the minimum and maximum areas of detected blobs. But for my project, I am only interested in detecting the biggest blob returned, which will be the one with index zero, as they are stored in decreasing order of blob area in the array returned by the blobs function.

Though it is not a fault of blobs function, I quickly realized that I was getting more detail than I needed and that there was a bit of noise in the edges of the contour. Filtering out on a bit map can be easily accomplished with a blur function, but smoothing out a contour did not sound so obvious to me.

A contour line can be simplified by removing certain points. A clever algorithm can do this by removing those points that are close enough to the overall contour line. One of these algorithms is the Douglas-Peucker recursive contour simplification algorithm. The algorithm starts with the two endpoints and it accepts one point in between whose orthogonal distance from the line connecting the two first points is larger than a given threshold. Only the point with the largest distance is selected (or none if the threshold is not met). The process is repeated recursively, as new points are added, to create the list of accepted points (those that are contributing the most to the general contour given a user-provided threshold). The larger the threshold, the rougher the resulting contour will be.

By simplifying a contour, now human silhouettes look better and noise is gone, but they look a bit synthetic. The last step I did was to perform a cubic-spline interpolation so contour becomes a set of curves between the different original points of the simplified contour. It seems a bit twisted to simplify first to later add back more points because of the spline interpolation, but this way it creates a more visually pleasant and curvy result, which was my goal.

 

(Source: Miguel Sanchez)
(Source: Miguel Sanchez)

The nearby images show aspects of the process Sanchez describes in his article, where an offset between the human figure and the drawn silhouette is apparent.

The entire article is slated to appear in the June or July edition of Circuit Cellar.

Weekly Elektor Wrap Up: Laser, Digital Peak Level Meter, & “Wolverine” MCU

It’s Friday, so it’s time for a review of Elektor news and content. Among the numerous interesting things Elektor covered this week were a laser project, a digital peak level meter for audio engineering enthusiasts, and an exciting new ultra-low-power MCU.

Are you an embedded designer who wants to start a laser project? Read about “the world’s smallest laser”:

What is the biggest constraint in creating tiny lasers? Pump power. Yes sir, all lasers require a certain amount of pump power from an outside source to begin emitting a coherent beam of light and the smaller a laser is, the greater the pump power needed to reach this state. The laser cavity consists of a tiny metal rod enclosed by a ring of metal-coated, quantum wells of semiconductor material. A team of researchers from the University of California has developed a technique that uses quantum electrodynamic effects in coaxial nanocavities to lower the amount of pump power needed. This allowed them to build the world’s smallest room-temperature, continuous wave laser. The whole device is only half a micron in diameter (human hair has on average a thickness of 50 micron).

The nanolaser design appears to be scalable – meaning that they could be shrunk to even smaller sizes – an important feature that would make it possible to harvest laser light from even smaller structures. Applications for such lasers could include tiny biochemical sensors or high-resolution displays, but the researchers are still working out the theory behind how these tiny lasers operate. They would also like to find a way to pump the lasers electrically instead of optically.

Be sure to check out Elektor’s laser projection project.

In other news, Elektor reached out to audio engineering-minded audio enthusiasts and presented an interesting project:

Are you an audio amateur hobbyist or professional? Do you try to avoid clipping in your recordings? To help you get your audio levels right, in January 2012 Elektor published a professional-quality peak level meter featuring 2x 40 LEDs, controlled by a powerful digital signal processor (DSP). As part of the eight-lesson course on Audio DSP, all the theory behind the meter was explained, and the accompanying source code was made available as a free download.

The DSP Board has been available for a while, and now we are proud to announce that the Digital Peak Level Meter is available as an Elektor quality kit for you to build. Although the meter was designed as an extension module for the Audio DSP board, it can be used with any microcontroller capable of providing SPI-compatible signals. So get your Peak Level Meter now and add a professional touch to your recording studio!

And lastly, on the MCU front, Elektor ran interesting piece about the Texas Instruments “Wolverine,” which should be available for sampling in June 2012:

Codenamed “Wolverine” for its aggressive power-saving technology, the improved ultra-low-power MSP430 microcontroller platform from Texas Instruments offers at least 50 % less power consumption than any other microcontroller in the industry: 360 nA real-time clock mode and less than 100 µA/MHz active power consumption. Typical battery powered applications spend as much as 99.9 % of their time in standby mode; Wolverine-based devices can consume as little as 360 nA in standby mode, more than doubling battery life.

Wolverine’s low power performance is made possible by using one unified ferromagnetic RAM (FRAM) for code and data instead of traditional Flash and SRAM memories, allowing them to consume 250 times less energy per bit compared to Flash- and EEPROM-based microcontrollers. Power consumption is further reduced thanks to an ultra low leakage  process technology that offers a 10x improvement in leakage and optimized mixed signal capabilities.

MSP430FR58xx microcontrollers based on the Wolverine technology platform will be available for sampling in June 2012.

Circuit Cellar and CircuitCellar.com are part of the Elektor group.