High-Voltage Amplifiers Target Error-Sensitive Applications

Texas Instruments (TI) has introduced three new amplifiers that offer a combination of high speed and high precision, allowing designers to create more accurate circuits for error-sensitive applications.  With maximum supply voltages ranging from 27 V to 36 V, the new devices support more precise measurement and faster processing of a wide variety of input signals in test and measurement, medical, and data-acquisition systems.

Designers can select the amplifier architecture that meets their system requirements, with input voltages, bandwidths and key features. The OPA2810 is a 27-V junction gate field-effect transistor (JFET)-input dual operational amplifier (op amp) with 120-MHz bandwidth and 500-µV max offset voltage. The OPA189 is a 36-V zero-drift op amp with 14-MHz bandwidth and is multiplexer (MUX) friendly. And finally, the THS3491 is a 32-V current-feedback amplifier with
900-MHz small-signal bandwidth and ±420-mA output current.

The high bandwidths of the OPA2810 and OPA189 enable high-gain configurations and faster response times for more accurate measurements. Designers can use the THS3491 current-feedback amplifier’s wide small-signal bandwidth, high slew rate and output current of ±420 mA to achieve low distortion and high output power levels. The THS3491 is capable of 10-Vpeak-to-peak output levels at 200 MHz into 100-Ω loads for test and measurement systems, such as arbitrary waveform generators, laser diode drivers and high capacitive load drive applications.

With an industry-leading maximum offset and lowest voltage noise of 5.7 nV/√Hz for 27-V amplifiers in the 100- to 200-MHz bandwidth range, the OPA2810 op amp allows engineers to achieve more precise measurements in data-acquisition and signal-processing applications. According to TI, the OPA189 is the widest bandwidth zero-drift op amp with the lowest noise of 5.2 nV/√Hz. With a low maximum drift of 0.02 μV/°C, the OPA189 also minimizes temperature error without calibration, increasing system accuracy over an extended temperature range.

The 120-MHz OPA2810 op amp offers best-in-class current consumption of 3.6 mA, while providing excellent signal-to-noise ratio and distortion. Designed for applications that require high gain and low distortion in power-sensitive designs, the OPA189 is the lowest power zero-drift op amp with a 14-MHz bandwidth. This device enables engineers to design high-resolution, noise-sensitive industrial systems while only consuming 1.3 mA of quiescent current, which can benefit analog input modules, and battery and LCD test equipment. TI’s new high-voltage amplifiers are available with at prices ranging from $1.98 to $6.20.

Texas Instruments | www.ti.com

Circuit Cellar Flash Back – Motion Triggered Video Camera Multiplexer

The new year 2018 is almost upon us. It’s a special year for us because the year marks Circuit Cellar’s 30th anniversary. In tribute of that, we thought we’d share an article from the very first issue. 


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Motion Triggered Video Camera Multiplexer
by Steve Ciarcia

One of the most successful Circuit Cellar projects ever was the ImageWise video digitizing and display system (BYTE, MayAugust ‘87). It seems to be finding its way into a lot of industrial applications. I suppose I should feel flattered that a whole segment of American industry might someday depend on a Circuit Cellar project, but I can’t let that hinder me from completing the project that was the original incentive for ImageWise. Let me explain.

How it all started

When I’m not in the Circuit Cellar I’m across town at INK or in an office that I use to meet a prospective consulting client so that he doesn’t think that I only lead a subterranean existence. Rather than discuss the work done for other clients to make my point, however, I usually demonstrate my engineering expertise more subtly by just leaving some of the electronic “toys” I’ve presented lying around. The Fraggle Rock lunchbox with the dual-disk SBI 80 in it gets them every time! ImageWise was initially conceived to be the “piece de resistance”” of these hardware toys. The fact that it may have had some commercial potential was secondary. I just wanted to see the expressions on the faces of usually stern businessmen when I explained that the monitor on the corner of my desk wasn’t a closedcircuit picture of the parking lot outside my office building. It was a live video data transmission from the driveway at my house in an adjacent town.

Implementing this video system took a lot of work and it seems like I’ve opened Pandora’s box in the process. It would have been a simple matter to just aim a camera at my house and transmit a picture to the monitor on the desk but the Circuit Cellar creed is that hardware should actually work, not just impress business executives. ImageWise is a standalone serial video digitizer (there is a companion serial input video display unit as well) which is not computer dependent. Attached to a standard video camera, it takes a “video snapshot” at timed intervals or when manually triggered. The 256×244-pixel (64level grayscale) image is digitized and stored in a 62K-byte block of memory. It is then serially transmitted either as an uncompressed or run-length-encoded compressed file (this will generally reduce the 62K bytes to about 40K bytes per picture, depending upon content).

An ImageWise digitizer/transmitter normally communicates with its companion receiver/display at 28.8K bits per second. Digitized pictures therefore can be taken and displayed about every 14 seconds. While this might seem like a long time, it is quite adequate for surveillance activities and approximates the picture taking rate of bank security cameras.

“Real-Time” is relative

When we have to deal with remote rather than direct communication, “freeze-frame” imaging systems such as ImageWise can lose most of their “real time” effectiveness as continuous-activity monitors due to slow transmission mediums. Using a 9600-bps modem, a compressed image will take about 40 seconds to be displayed. At 1200 bps it will take over 5 minutes!

Of course, using such narrow logic could lead one to dismiss freeze-frame video imaging and opt for hardwired direct video, whatever the distance. However, unless you own a cable television or telephone company you might have a lot of trouble stringing wires across town. All humor aside, the only reason for using continuous monitoring systems at all is to capture and record asynchronous “events.” In the case of a surveillance system, the “event” is when someone enters the area under surveillance. For the rest of the time, you might as well be taking nature photos because, according to the definition of an event, nothing else is important. Most continuous surveillance video systems are, by necessity, real-time monitors as well. Because they have no way to ascertain that an event has occurred they simply record everything and ultimately capture the “event” by default. So what if there is 6 hours of video tape or 200 gigabytes of useless video data transmission around a 4-second “event.”

If we know exactly when an event occurs and take a freeze frame picture exactly at that time, there is no difference between its record of the event and a real-time recorder or snap-shot camera at the same instant. The only difference is that a freeze-frame recorder needs some local intelligence to ascertain that an event is occurring so that it knows when to snap a picture. Sounds simple, right?

To put real-timing into my driveway monitor, I combined a video camera and an infrared motion detector. When someone (or something) enters the trigger zone of the motion detector it will also be within the field of the video camera. If motion is detected, the controller triggers the ImageWise to capture that video frame at that instant and transmit the picture via modem immediately. The result is, in fact, real-time video, albeit delayed by 40 seconds. Using a 9600-bps modem, you will see what is going on 40 seconds after it has occurred. (Of course, you’ll see parts of the picture sooner as it is painting on the screen.) Subsequent motion will trigger additional pictures until eventually the system senses nothing and goes back to timed update. With such a system you’ll also gain new knowledge. You’ll know that it was the UPS truck that drove over the hedge because you were watching, but you aren’t quite sure who bagged the flower bed.

Of course knowing a little bit is sometimes worse than nothing at all. While a single video camera and motion detector might cover the average driveway, my driveway has multiple entrances and a variety of parking areas. When I first installed a single camera to cover the main entrance all it did was create frustration. I would see a car enter and park. If the person exited the vehicle they were soon out of view of the camera and I’d be thinking, “OK, what are they doing?” Rather than laying booby traps for some poor guy delivering newspapers, I decided to expand the system to cover additional territory. Ultimately, I installed three cameras and four motion detectors which could cover all important areas and provide enough video resolution to specifically recognize individuals. (Since I have four telephone lines into my house and only one is being used with ImageWise, I suppose the next step is to use one of them as a live intercom to speak to these visitors. A third line already goes to the home control system so I could entertain less-welcome visitors with a few special effects).

Motion Triggered Video M U X

Enough of how I got into this mess! What this is all leading to is the design of my motion triggered video camera multiplexing (MTVCM) system. I am presenting it because it was fun to do, it solved a particular personal problem, and if I don’t document it somehow, 1’11 never remember what I’ve got wired the next time I work on it.

The MTVCM is a 3-board microcomputer-based 4-channel video multiplexer with optoisolated trigger control inputs (see figure 1). Unlike the high-tech totally solidmultiplexer state audio/video (AVMUX) which I presented a couple years ago (BYTE Feb ‘86), the MTVCM is designed to be simple, lightning-proof, reliable, and above all flexible.

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The MTVCM is designed for relatively harsh environments. To minimize wire lengths from cameras and sensors, the MTVCM is mounted in an outside garage where its anticipated operating temperature range is -20°C to +85”C. The MTVCM operates as a standalone unit running a preprogrammed control program or can be remotely commanded to operate in a specific manner. It is connected to the Imagewise and additional electronics in the house via a twisted-pair RS-232 line, one TTL “camera ready” line, and a video output cable. At the heart of the MTVCM is an industrial temperature version of the Micromint BCC52 8052based controller which has an onboard full floating-point 8K BASIC, EPROM programmer, 48K bytes of memory, 24 bits of parallel I/O and 2 serial ports (for more information on the BCC52 contact Micromint directly, see the Articles section of the Circuit Cellar BBS, see my article “Build the BASIC-52 Computer,” BYTE, Aug ‘85, or send $2 to CIRCUIT CELLAR INK for a reprint of the original BCC52 article).

Because the BCC52 is well documented, I will not discuss it here.
The MTVCM is nothing more than a specific application of a BCC52 process controller with a little custom I/O. In the MTVCM the custom I/O consists of a 4channel relay multiplexer board and a 4-channel optoisolated input board (Micromint now manufactures a BCC40R 8-channel relay output board and a BCC40D direct decoding 8-channel optoisolated input/output board. Their design is different and should not be confused with my MTVCM custom I/O boards). Each of my custom circuits is mounted on a BCC55 decoded and buffered BCC-bus prototyping board.

Figure 2 details the basic circuitry of the BCC55 BCC-bus prototyping board. The 44-pin BCC-bus is a relatively straightforward connection system utilizing a low-order multiplexed address/data configuration directly compatible with many standard microprocessors such as the Z8, 8085, and the 8052. On the protoboard all the pertinent busses are fully latched and buffered. The full 16-bit address is presented on J19 and J20 while the 8-bit buffered data bus is available at J21. J22 presents eight decoded I/O strobes within an address range selected via JP2.

The Multiplexer Board

Figure 3 is the schematic of the relay multiplexer added to the prototyping board. The relay circuit is specifically addressed at C900H and any data sent to that location via an XBY command [typically XBY(0C900H)=X] will be latched into the 74LS273. Since it can be destructive to attach two video outputs together, the four relays are not directly controlled by the latch outputs. Instead, bits DO and Dl are used to address a 74LS139 one-off our decoder chip. The decoder is enabled by a high-level output on bit D3. Therefore, a 1000 (binary) code selects relay 4 while a 1011 code selects relay 1. An output of 0000 shuts off the relay mux (eliminating the decoder and going directly to the relay drivers allows parallel control of the four relays).

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All the normally-open relay contacts are connected together as a common output. Since only a single relay is ever on at one time, that video signal will be routed to the output. If the computer fails or there is a power interrupt, the default output state of a 74LS273 is normally high. Therefore, the highest priority camera should be attached to that input. If the system gets deep-sixed, the output will default to that camera and will still be of some use (I could also have used one of the normally-closed contacts instead but chose not to).

Fools and Mother Nature

I’m sure you’re curious so I will anticipate your question and answer it at the same time. With all the high-tech stuff that I continually present, how come I used mechanical relays? The answer is lightning! Anyone familiar with my writings will remember that I live in a hazardous environment when it comes to
Mother Nature. Every year I get blasted and it’s always the high-tech stuff that gets blitzed.

Because the MTVCM has to work continuously as well as be reliable I had to take measures to protect it from externally-induced calamities. This meant that all the inputs and outputs had to be isolated. In the case of the video mux, the only low-cost totally isolated switches are mechanical relays. CMOS multiplexer chips like the ones I’ve used in other projects are not isolated and would be too susceptible. (Just think of the MTVCM as a computer with three 150-foot lightning collectors running to the cameras.) Relays still serve a useful purpose whatever the level of integrated circuit technology. They also work.

Because the infrared motion sensors are connected to the AC power line and their outputs are common with it, these too had to be isolated to protect the MTVCM. Figure 4 details the circuit of the 4-channel optoisolator input board which connects to the motion detectors.

The Optoisolator Board

The opto board is addressed at CAOOH. Reading location CAOOH
[typically X=XBY(OCAOOH)] will read the 8 inputs of the 74LS244. Bits O-3 are connected to the four optoisolators and bits 4-7 are connected to a 4-pole dip switch which is used for configuration and setup. Between the optoisolators and the LS244 are four 74LS86 exclusive-OR gates. They function as selectable inverters. Depending upon the inputs to the optoisolators (normally high or low) and the settings of DIP SW2 you can select what level outputs you want for your program (guys like me who never got the hang of using PNP transistors have to design hardware so that whatever programming we are forced to do can at least be done in positive logic).

anniversary 7The optoisolators are common units sold by OPT022, Gordos,and other manufacturers. They are generically designated as either IAC5 or IDC5 modules depending upon whether the input voltage is 115 VAC or 5-48 VDC.
Since the motion detectors I used were designed to control AC flood lights, I used the IAC5 units connected across the lights.

Now that we have the hardware I suppose we have to have some software. For all practical purposes, however, virtually none is required. Since teh MTVCM is designed with hardcoded parallel port addressing, you only need about a three-line program to read the inputs, make a decision and select a video mux channel; you know, something like READ CAOOH, juggle it, and OUT C900H. I love simple software.

Of course, I got a little more carried away when I actually wrote my camera control program. I use a lot of REM statements to figure out what I did. Since it would take up too much room here, I’ve posted the MTVCM mux control software on the Circuit Cellar BBS (203-8711988) where you can download it if you want to learn more. Basically, it just sits there looking at camera #l.. If it receives a motion input from one of the sensors, it switches to the appropriate camera and generates a “camera ready” output (TTL output which is optoisolated at the other end) to the ImageWise in the house. It stays on that camera if it senses additional motion or switches to other cameras if it senses motion in their surveillance area. Eventually, it times out and goes back to camera # 1.

Basically, that’s all there is to the MTVCM. If you are an engineer you can think of it as a lightning-proof electrically-isolated process-control system. If not, just put it in your entertainment room and use it as a real neat camera controller. Now I’ve opened a real bag of worms. Remotely controlling the ImageWise digitizer/transmitter from my office through the house to the MTVCM is turning into a bigger task than I originally conceived. Getting the proper picture and tracking someone in the driveway is only part of the task.

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I can already envision a rack of computer equipment in the house which has to synchronize this data traffic. My biggest worry is not how much coordination or equipment it will involve, but how I can design it so that I can do it all with a three-line BASIC program! Be assured that I’ll tell you how as the saga unfolds.

Article first appeared in Issue 1 of Circuit Cellar magazine – January/February 1988

Wide Range Power Monitor Embeds ADCs

Analog Devices, acquired earlier this year by Linear Technology, has announced the LTC2992, a wide range I²C system monitor that monitors the current, voltage and power of two 0 V to 100 V rails without additional circuitry. The LTC2992 has flexible power supply options, deriving power from a 3 V to 100 V  monitored supply, a 2.7 V to 100 V secondary supply, or from the on-board shunt regulator. These supply options eliminate the need for a separate buck regulator, shunt regulator or inefficient resistive divider while monitoring any 0 V to 100 V rail. The LTC2992 is a simple, single-IC solution that uses three delta-sigma ADCs and a multiplier to provide 8- or 12-bit current and voltage measurements and 24-bit power readings.

LTC2992The LTC2992’s wide operating range is ideal for many applications, especially 48V telecom equipment, advanced mezzanine cards (AMC) and blade servers. The onboard shunt regulator provides support for supplies greater than 100V and negative supply monitoring. The LTC2992 measures current and voltage either continuously or on-demand, calculates power and stores all of this information along with minimum and maximum values in I²C accessible registers. Four GPIOs can also be configured as ADC inputs to measure neighboring auxiliary voltages. Measurements are made with only ±0.3% of total unadjusted error (TUE) over the entire temperature range. If any parameter trips the user-programmable thresholds, the LTC2992 flags an alert register and pin per the SMBus alert response protocol. The 400 kHz I²C interface features nine device addresses, a stuck bus reset timer, and a split SDA pin that simplifies I²C opto-isolation.  The LTC2992-1 version offers an inverted data output I²C pin for use with inverting opto-isolator configurations.

The LTC2992 and LTC2992-1 are offered in commercial, industrial and automotive versions, supporting operating temperature ranges from 0°C to 70°C, –40°C to 85°C and –40°C to 125°C, respectively. Both versions are available today in RoHS-compliant, 16-lead 4mm x 3mm DFN and 16-lead MSOP packages. Pricing starts at $3.85 each in 1,000-piece quantities. Please visit www.linear.com/products/power_monitors for more product selection and information.

Summary of Features:

  • Rail-to-Rail Input Range: 0 V to 100 V
  • Wide Input Supply Range: 2.7 V to 100 V
  • Shunt Regulator for Supplies >100 V
  • Three Delta-Sigma ADCs with Less Than ±0.3% TUE
  • 12-Bit Resolution for Currents & Voltages
  • Four GPIOs Configurable as ADC Inputs
  • Shutdown Mode with IQ < 50 µA
  • I²C Interface
  • Split SDA Pin Eases Opto-Isolation
  • Available in 16-Lead 4mm x 3mm DFN & 16-Lead MSOP Packages

Analog Devices | www.analog.com

Linear Technology | www.linear.com

New Radiation Hardened Multiplexers for Space Flight Data Acquisition Systems

Intersil Corp. recently launched the ISL71840SEH and ISL71841SEH, new radiation hardened (rad hard) multiplexers that offer ESD protection and high signal chain accuracy and timing performance. The ISL71840SEH 30V 16-channel multiplexer is a drop-in replacement for Intersil’s HS9-1840ARH, which has been aboard nearly every satellite and space exploration mission (e.g., NASA’s Orion flight test). For applications with form factor constraints, the ISL71841SEH offers high performance and 41% reduced board space compared with an ISL71840SEH two-chip solution.ISL71840-Intersil

Both the ISL71840SEH and ISL71841SEH offer per-switch over-voltage protection. When an input channel experiences over-voltage, the remaining channels continue sending data to the ADC. Both multiplexers provide a “cold spare” redundant capability, which enables the connection of two or three additional unpowered multiplexers to a common data bus. If needed, a redundant multiplexer is immediately activated. Both multiplexers provide a wide supply range with split-rail operation from ±10.8 V to 16.5 V and an absolute maximum of ±20 V.

Source: Intersil Corp.

PCI Switching Solutions

Pickering
Pickering Interfaces expanded its range of PCI switching solutions with the introduction of seven new PCI cards and the expansion of an eighth card. The expansion includes programmable and precision resistors, general-purpose relays, high-density matrices, and multiplexers.

The 50-293 PCI programmable resistor and relay card offers two or four programmable resistor channels. An optional eight single pole, double throw (SPDT) relays can be used for general-purpose switching. Each resistor can be programmed with resistance calls that set the module’s resistance to a ±1% resolution accuracy and the ability to read back the resistance setting to 0.3%. Depending on the version, the resolution is 0.25 to 2 Ω and the resistance is up to 131 kΩ.

The expanded 50-297 PCI precision resistor card family increases the versions offered from six to 42. Each version provides a choice of the number of resistor channels, the resistance range, and the resistance setting resolution. Depending on the version, the resolution is from 0.125 to 2 Ω and the resistor counts from three to 18. Resistor values up to 1.51 MΩ can be simulated and accuracy is ±0.2% resolution.

Two PCI general-purpose 2-A relay cards were also introduced. Model 50-131 provides 16 or 26 single pole, double throw (SPDT) relays. Model 50-132 provides 16, 32, or 39 SPST relays, each rated at 2 A and featuring up to 60-W hot switch power.

Pickering’s PCI 2-A 1-pole high-density matrix solutions include three models. The 50-527 is a 32 × 2, one-pole matrix; the 50-528 offers 32 × 4 or 16 × 4 configurations; and the 50-529 offers 16 × 8 and 8 × 8 configurations.

The 50-635 PCI low-cost electromechanical relay (EMR) multiplexer (MUX) system has a variety of different configurations ranging from a 64:1 single-pole MUX to a quad 8:1 two-pole MUX. All the PCI relay cards use high-quality EMRs and standard D-type connectors.

Contact Pickering Interfaces for pricing.

Pickering Interfaces, Ltd.
www.pickeringtest.com