November Circuit Cellar: A Sneak Preview

The November issue of Circuit Cellar magazine is coming soon. Want a sneak peak? We’ve got a great section of excellent embedded electronics articles for you.

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Here’s a sneak preview of November Circuit Cellar:

TECHNOLOGY IN A CONNECTED WORLD

IoT Gateway Advances Take Diverse Paths: Flexible Networked Solutions
The Internet-of-Things (IoT) phenomenon offers huge opportunities. Circuit Cellar Chief Editor Jeff Child explores how IoT gateways play a vital role in those systems by providing Nov 328 coverbidirectional communication between the devices in the field and the cloud.

Power Analysis Attack on RSA: Asymmetric Adventures
Colin O’Flynn has done a number of great columns about cryptography—in particular symmetric cryptography. This time he’s tackling an asymmetric algorithm: a RSA implementation. Colin describes what’s unique about an RSA cryptosystem and takes us through a power analysis attack.

FOCUS ON ANALOG

Analog Solutions Fuel Industrial System Needs: Connectivity, Control and IIoT
Whether it’s connecting with analog sensors or driving actuators, analog ICs play many critical roles in industrial applications. Here, Circuit Cellar Chief Editor Jeff Child examines the latest analog technologies and products serving the needs of today’s industrial systems.

Using Power Audio Amplifiers in Untypical Ways (Part 2): More Alternative Uses
In Part 1 Petre Petrov described many interesting ways to use power audio amplifiers (PAAs) as universal building blocks similar to the op amps and comparators. Here, he discusses several more things that can be built from PAAs including wave generators and transformer drivers.

SPOTLIGHT ON MONITORING AND TESTING

Gas Monitoring and Sensing (Part 2): Putting the Sensor to Work
Columnist Jeff Bachiochi continues his exploration of gas monitoring and sensing. This time he discusses some of the inexpensive sensors available that can be applied to this application. Jeff then tackles the factors to consider when calibrating these sensors and how to use them effectively.

Logger Device Tracks Amp Hours (Part 2): Alternative Energy Sources
n this follow on to Part 1 of his story, William Wachsmann describes putting to use the amp-hour logger he built using a microcontroller and a clamp-on ammeter. This time he discusses modifying the amp-hour software so it can be used as an analog input logger to measure solar and wind power.

Negative Feedback in Electronics: A Look at the Opposite Side
Complementing his discussion last month on positive feedback, columnist George Novacek now takes a look at negative feedback. Just like positive feedback, negative feedback can significantly change or modify a circuit’s performance.

LF Quartz Resonator Tester: A Stimulating Discussion
Ed Nisley returns to the rich topic of low-frequency quartz resonators. This time he describes a tester built with an ordinary Arduino Nano and an assortment of inexpensive RF modules.

INTERESTING EMBEDDED PROJECTS

Simulating a Hammond Tonewheel Organ (Part 1) Mimicking a Mechanical Marvel
Hammond tonewheel organs were based upon additive sine-wave synthesis. Because of that, it’s possible to simulate the organ using a microcontroller program that feeds its output waveform to a DAC. Brian Millier takes on this project, making use of an ARM-based Teensy module to do the heavy lifting.

Machine Auto-Sorts Resistors: MCUs, Measurement and Motor Control
Typical electronics lab benches become littered with resistors from past projects. These three Cornell University graduates tackled this problem by building a resistor sorting system. It enables users to input multiple resistors, measure their resistance and sort them. The project integrates motor controllers, resistance measurement and a graphical user interface.

Don’t Miss Our Newsletter: IoT Technology Focus

Coming to your inbox tomorrow: Circuit Cellar’s IoT Technology Focus newsletter. Tomorrow’s newsletter content covers wha’s happening with Internet-of-Things (IoT) technology–from devices to gateway networks to cloud architectures. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

Bonus: We’ve added Drawings for Free Stuff to our weekly newsletters. Make sure you’ve subscribed to the newsletter so you can participate.

everyware_server_M2M_cloudAlready a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber? Great!
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Our weekly Circuit Cellar Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

Embedded Boards.(10/24) The focus here is on both standard and non-standard embedded computer boards that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up to production volumes.

October has a 5th Tuesday (10/31) There’s an extra Newsletter this month: PCB Design

Analog & Power. (11/7) This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op amps, batteries and more.

Microcontroller Watch. (11/14) This newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

Don’t Miss Our Newsletter: Microcontroller Watch

Coming to your inbox tomorrow: Circuit Cellar’s Microcontroller Watch themed newsletter. Tomorrow’s newsletter content keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers themselves along with their associated tools and support products.20150220-rh850-d1x

Bonus: We’ve added Drawings for Free Stuff to our weekly newsletters. Make sure you’ve subscribed to the newsletter so you can participate.

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Our weekly Circuit Cellar Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

IoT Technology Focus. The Internet-of-Things (IoT) phenomenon is rich with opportunity. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

Embedded Boards. The focus here is on both standard and non-standard embedded computer boards that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up to production volumes.

Analog & Power. This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op-amps, batteries and more.

…and…

October has a 5th Tuesday. So look for a bonus Newsletter this  month!

Embedded Analytics Firm Makes ‘Self-Aware Chip’ Push

UltraSoC has announced a significant global expansion to address the increasing demand for more sophisticated, ‘self-aware’ silicon chips in a range of electronic products, from lightweight sensors to the server farms that power the Internet. The company’s growth plans are centering on shifts in applications such as server optimization, the IoT, and UltraSoC_EmbeddedAnalyticsautomotive safety and security, all of which demand significant improvements in the intelligence embedded inside chips.

UltraSoC’s semiconductor intellectual property (SIP) simplifies development and provides valuable embedded analytic features for designers of SoCs (systems on chip). UltraSoC has developed its technology—originally designed as a chip development tool to help developers make better products—to now fulfill much wider, pressing needs in an array of applications: safety and security in the automotive industry, where the move towards autonomous vehicles is creating unprecedented change and risk; optimization in big data applications, from Internet search to data centers; and security for the Internet of Things.

These developments will be accelerated by the addition of a new facility in Bristol, UK, which will be home to an engineering and innovation team headed by Marcin Hlond, newly appointed as Director of System Engineering. Hlond will oversee UltraSoC’s embedded analytics and visualization products, and lead product development and innovation. He has over two decades of experience as system architect and developer, most recently at Blu Wireless, NVidia and Icera. He will focus on fulfilling customers’ needs for more capable analytics and rich information to enable more efficient development of SoCs, and to enhance the reliability and security of a broad range of electronic products. At the same time, the company will continue to expand engineering headcount at its headquarters in Cambridge, UK.

UltraSoC | www.ultrasoc.com

Don’t Miss Our Newsletter: Analog & Power

Coming to your inbox tomorrow: Circuit Cellar’s Analog & Power themed newsletter. Tomorrow’s newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op-amps, batteries and more.

Bonus: We’ve added Drawings for Free Stuff to our weekly newsletters. Make sure you’ve subscribed to the newsletter so you can participate.Power-on-Package-Enable

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Our weekly Circuit Cellar Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

Microcontroller Watch. This newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

IoT Technology Focus. The Internet-of-Things (IoT) phenomenon is rich with opportunity. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

Embedded Boards. The focus here is on both standard and non-standard embedded computer boards that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up to production volumes.

Ultrasonic Sensing MCUs Target Smart Water Meters

Texas Instruments has unveiled a new family of MSP430 microcontrollers with an integrated ultrasonic sensing analog front end that enables smart water meters to deliver higher accuracy and lower power consumption. In addition, TI introduced two new reference designs that make it easier to design modules for adding automated meter reading (AMR) capabilities to existing mechanical water meters. The new MCUs and reference designs support the growing demand for more accurate water meters and remote meter reading to enable efficient water resource management, accurate measurement and timely billing.

New ultrasonic MCUs and new reference designs make both electronic and mechanical water meters smarter (PRNewsfoto/Texas Instruments Incorporated)

New ultrasonic MCUs and new reference designs make both electronic and mechanical water meters smarter.

As part of the ultra-low-power MSP430 MCU portfolio for sensing and measurement, the new MSP430FR6047 MCU family lets developers add more intelligence to flow meters by taking advantage of a complete waveform capture feature and analog-to-digital converter (ADC)-based signal processing. This technique enables more accurate measurement than competitive devices, with precision of 25 ps or better, even at flow rates less than 1 liter per hour. In addition, the integrated MSP430FR6047 devices reduce water meter system component count by 50 percent and power consumption by 25 percent, enabling a meter to operate without having to charge the battery for 10 or more years. The new MCUs also integrate a low-energy accelerator module for advanced signal processing, 256 KB of ferroelectric random access memory (FRAM), a LCD driver and a metering test interface.

The MSP430 Ultrasonic Sensing Design Center offers a comprehensive development ecosystem that allows developers to get to market in months. The design center provides tools for quick development and flexibility for customization, including software libraries, a GUI, evaluation modules with metrology and DSP libraries.

TI’s new Low-Power Water Flow Measurement with Inductive Sensing Reference Design is a compact solution for the electronic measurement of mechanical flow meters with low power consumption for longer battery life. Enabled by the single-chip SimpleLink dual-band CC1350 wireless MCU, this reference design also gives designers the ability to add dual-band wireless communications for AMR networks. Designers can take advantage of the reference design’s small footprint to easily retrofit existing mechanical flow meters, enabling water utilities to add AMR capability while avoiding expensive replacement of deployed meters. The CC1350 wireless MCU consumes only 4 µA while measuring water flow rates, enabling longer product life.

A second new reference design is an ultra-low power solution based on the SimpleLink Sub-1 GHz CC1310 wireless MCU. The Low-Power Wireless M-Bus Communications Module Reference Design uses TI’s wireless M-Bus software stack and supports all wireless M-Bus operating modes in the 868-MHz band. This reference design provides best-in-class power consumption and flexibility to support wireless M-Bus deployments across multiple regions.

Texas Instruments | www.ti.com

Tool Solutions Emerge for Cypress Semi’s PSoC BLE 6 MCU

Cypress Semiconductor has announced the public release of the PSoC 6 BLE Pioneer Kit and PSoC Creator Integrated Design Environment (IDE) software version 4.2 that enable designers to begin development with the PSoC 6 microcontroller (MCU) for IoT applications. PSoC BLE 6 is the industry’s lowest power, most flexible MCU with built-in Bluetooth Low Energy wireless connectivity and integrated hardware-based security in a single device.

Early adopters are already using the flexible dual-core architecture of PSoC 6, using the ARM Cortex-M4 core as a host processor and the Cortex-M0+ core to manage peripheral functions such as capacitive sensing, Bluetooth Low Energy connectivity and sensor aggregation. Early adopter applications include wearables, personal medical devices and wireless speakers. Designers are also utilizing the built-in security features in PSoC 6 to help guard against unwanted access to data.

CY8CKIT-062-BLEThe PSoC BLE Pioneer Kit features a PSoC 63 MCU with Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) connectivity. The kit enables development of modern touch and gesture-based interfaces that are robust and reliable with a linear slider, touch buttons and proximity sensors based on the latest generation of Cypress’ industry-leading CapSense capacitive-sensing technology. Designers can also use the board to add USB Power Delivery (PD) with its Cypress EZ-PD CCG3 USB-C controller. The kit also includes a 2.7-inch E-ink Display Shield add-on board (CY8CKIT-028-EPD) with thermistor, digital mic, and 9-axes motion sensor.

Offering best-in-class flexibility and ease-of-use, the PSoC 6 MCU architecture can serve as the catalyst for differentiated, visionary IoT devices. Designers can use software-defined peripherals to create custom analog front-ends (AFEs) or digital interfaces for innovative system components such as E-ink displays. The architecture is supported by Cypress’ PSoC Creator IDE and the expansive Arm ecosystem. Designers can find more information about PSoC Creator at http://www.cypressw.com/creator.

The PSoC 6 BLE Pioneer Kit (CY8CKIT-062-BLE) is available for purchase for $75 at the Cypress Online Store and through select distribution partners. PSoC 6 devices are currently sampling. Production devices are expected by the end of 2017.

Cypress Semiconductor | www.cypress.com

Infineon Invests in Voice-Interface Tech for IoT

Infineon has made a strategic minority investment in XMOS Limited, a Bristol based fabless semiconductor company that provides voice processors for IoT devices. Infineon leads the recent $15 million Series-E funding round. According to Infineon, cars, homes, industrial plants and consumer devices are rapidly becoming connected to the Internet: 3 xcore-microphone-arrayyears from now, 30 billion devices will belong to the IoT. While today the interaction between humans and machines is mostly done by touch, the next evolutionary step of IoT will lead to the omni-presence of high-performance voice control. Infineon Technologies  wants to further develop its capabilities to shape this market segment.

Today, voice controllers, used in voice recognition systems, struggle to differentiate between speech from a person in the room, and a synthesized source such as a radio, TV; they often identify the voice of interest based on the loudest noise. Earlier in 2017 Infineon and XMOS demonstrated an enhanced solution to overcome these issues, using intelligent human-sensing microphones and gesture recognition. The solution featured a combination of Infineon’s radar and silicon microphone sensors to detect the position and the distance of the speaker from the microphones, with XMOS far field voice processing technology used to capture speech.

Infineon Technologies | www.infineon.com

XMOS | www.xmos.com

Don’t Miss Our Newsletter: Embedded Boards

Coming to your inbox tomorrow: Circuit Cellar’s Embedded Boards themed newsletter. In tomorrow’s newsletter you’ll get news about products and technology trends in the board-level embedded computer market. Embedded boards are a critical building block around which system developers can build all manor of intelligent systems. Arbor_1__EmETXe-i90U0_photo_17071013_436

The focus here is on both standard and non-standard embedded computer boards that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up to production volumes.

Bonus: We’ve added Drawings for Free Stuff to our weekly newsletters. Make sure you’ve subscribed to the newsletter so you can participate.

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You’ll get your “Embedded Boards” themed newsletter issue tomorrow.

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Don’t be left out! Sign up now:

Our weekly Circuit Cellar Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

Analog & Power. This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op-amps, batteries, and more.

Microcontroller Watch. This newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

IoT Technology Focus. The Internet-of-Things (IoT) phenomenon is rich with opportunity. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

Microchip Adds AVR and SAM MCUs to Programming Service

Microchip Technology  has expanded its custom programming service to include AVR and SAM microcontrollers (MCUs). Users can add their custom code to MCUs from more than 30 AVR and SAM families, along with nearly all PIC MCUs and memory devices, directly from the manufacturer via microchipDIRECT.  Microchip  provides an online custom programming service to all of its clients.

Microchip’s custom programming service is available to any client regardless of their order size and can be used throughout the development process. From a7be46ac521844589d6de789549e7c153very small runs to verify that the code is working, all the way up through full-scale production runs, this cost-effective programming service offers customers the flexibility to add their code to any order size, from one device to millions. Additionally, each first verification order is complimentary and includes three free samples programmed to each client’s exact specifications.

To get started, clients choose their part number on microchipDIRECT and then add their code and other configuration settings, shown on the intuitive online form, directly into the encrypted website. The MCUs will then be programmed directly by Microchip with no need to involve a third party programming or manufacturing facility, thus eliminating the risk of code exposure during the programming process.

In addition to custom programming services, microchipDIRECT also offers value-added services such as tape and reeling, labels, ink dotting and more. With the largest inventory of Microchip products in the industry, microchipDIRECT provides a full service channel for all purchasing needs. The mobile-optimized website also offers global support in ten languages, volume pricing, live service agents, numerous payment options and order notifications for customer convenience. For more information visit www.microchipdirect.com.

Custom programming directly from Microchip is available for nearly all PIC MCUs and more than 30 AVR and SAM families with additional device support rolling out over the next year. For more information about this custom programming service, visit: www.microchipdirect.com/avr-sam-programming.html

Microchip Technology | www.microchip.com

Emulating Legacy Interfaces

Do It with Microcontrollers

There’s a number of important legacy interface technologies—like ISA and PCI—that are no longer supported by the mainstream computing industry. In his article Wolfgang examines ways to use inexpensive microcontrollers to emulate the bus signals of legacy interconnect schemes.

By Wolfgang Matthes

Many of today’s PC users have never heard of interfaces like the ISA bus or the PCI bus. But in the realm of industrial and embedded computers, they are still very much alive. Large numbers of add-on cards and peripherals are out there. Many of them are even still being manufactured today—especially PCI cards and PC/104 modules for industrial control and measurement applications. In many cases, bandwidth requirements for those applications are low. As a result, it is possible to emulate the interfaces with inexpensive microcontrollers. That essentially means using a microcontroller instead of an industrial or embedded PC host.

Photo 1 - The PC/104 specifications relate to small modules, which can be stacked one above the other.

Photo 1 – The PC/104 specifications relate to small modules, which can be stacked one above the other.

To develop and bring up such a device is a good exercise in engineering education. But it has its practical uses too. Industrial-grade modules and cards are designed and manufactured for reliability and longevity. That makes them far superior to the kits, boards, shields and so on, that are intended primarily for educational purposes and tinkering. Moreover, a microcontroller platform can be programmed independently—without operating systems and device drivers. These industrial-grade boards can operate in environments that consume considerably less power and are free from the noise typical of the interior of personal computers. The projects depicted here are open source developments. Descriptions, schematics, PCB files and program sources are available for downloading.

Fields of Use

The basic idea is to make good use of peripheral modules and add-in cards. Photo 1 shows examples. Typical applications are based on industrial or embedded personal computers. The center of the system is the host—the PC. Peripheral modules or cards are attached to a standardized expansion interface, that is, in principle, an extended processor bus. That means the processor of the PC can directly address the registers within the devices. The programming interface is the processor’s instruction set. As a result, latencies are low and the peripheral modules can be programmed somewhat like microcontroller ports—without regard to complicated communication protocols. For example, if the peripheral was attached to communication interfaces like USB or Ethernet, that would complicate matters. Common expansion interfaces are the legacy ISA bus, the PCI bus and the PCI Express (PCIe) interface. …

We’ve made the October 2017 issue of Circuit Cellar available as a sample issue. In it, you’ll find a rich variety of the kinds of articles and information that exemplify a typical issue of the current magazine.
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Declaration of Embedded Independence

Input Voltage

–Jeff Child, Editor-in-Chief

JeffHeadShot

There’s no doubt that we’re living in an exciting era for embedded systems developers. Readers like you that design and develop embedded systems no longer have to compromise. Most of you probably remember when the processor or microcontroller you chose dictated both the development tools and embedded operating system (OS) you had to use. Today more than ever, there are all kinds of resources available to help you develop prototypes—everything from tools to chips to information resources on-line. There’s inexpensive computing modules available aimed at makers and DIY experts that are also useful for professional engineers working on high-volume end products.

The embedded operating systems market is one particular area where customers no longer have to compromise. That wasn’t always the case. Most people identify the late 90s with the dot.com bubble … and that bubble bursting. But closer to our industry was the embedded Linux start-up bubble. The embedded operating systems market began to see numerous start-ups appearing as “embedded Linux” companies. Since Linux is a free, open-source OS, these companies didn’t sell Linux, but rather provided services to help customers create and support implementations of open-source Linux. But, as often happens with disruptive technology, the establishment then pushed back. The establishment in that case were the commercial “non-open” embedded OS vendors. I recall a lot of great spirited debates at the time—both in print and live during panel discussions at industry trade shows—arguing for and against the very idea of embedded Linux. For my part, I can’t help remembering, having both written some of those articles and having sat on those panels myself.

Coinciding with the dot-com bubble bursting, the embedded Linux bubble burst as well. That’s not to say that embedded Linux lost any luster. It continued its upward rise, and remains an incredibly important technology today. Case in point: The Android OS is based on the Linux kernel. What burst was the bubble of embedded Linux start-up companies, from which only a handful of firms survived. What’s interesting is that all the major embedded OS companies shifted to a “let’s not beat them, let’s join them” approach to Linux. In other words, they now provide support for users to develop systems that use Linux alongside their commercial embedded operating systems.

The freedom not to have to compromise in your choices of tools, OSes and systems architectures—all that is a positive evolution for embedded system developers like you. But in my opinion, I think it’s possible to misinterpret the user-centric model and perhaps declare victory too soon. When you’re developing an embedded system aimed at a professional, commercial application, not everything can be done in DIY mode. There’s value in having the support of sophisticated technology vendors to help you develop and integrate your system. Today’s embedded systems routinely use millions of lines of code, and in most systems these days software running on a processor is what provides most of the functionality. If you develop that software in-house, you need high quality tools to makes sure it’s running error free. And if you out-source some of that embedded software, you have to be sure the vendor of that embedded software is providing a product you can rely on.

The situation is similar on the embedded board-level computing side. Yes, there’s a huge crop of low-cost embedded computer modules available to purchase these days. But not all embedded computing modules are created equal. If you’re developing a system with a long shelf life, what happens when the DRAMs, processors or I/O chips go end-of-life? Is it your problem? Or does the board vendor take on that burden? Have the boards been tested for vibration or temperature so that they can be used in the environment your application requires? You have to weigh the costs versus the kinds of support a vendor provides.

All in all, the trend toward a ”no compromises” situation for embedded systems developers is a huge win. But when you get beyond the DIY project level of development, it’s important to keep in mind that the vendor-customer relationship is still a critical part of the system design process. With all that in mind, it’s cool that we can today make a declaration of independence for embedded systems technology. But I’d rather think of it as a declaration of interdependence.

This appears in the October (327) issue of Circuit Cellar magazine

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CENTRI Demos Chip-to-Cloud IoT Security on ST MCUs

CENTRI has announced compatibility of its IoTAS platform with the STMicroelectronics STM32 microcontroller family based on ARM Cortex-M processor cores. CENTRI successfully completed and demonstrated two proofs of concept on the STM32 platform DJDTab0VoAAB_sKto protect all application data in motion from chipset to public Cloud using CENTRI IoTAS. CENTRI Internet of Things Advanced Security (IoTAS) for secure communications was used in an application on an STM32L476RC device with connected server applications running on both Microsoft Azure and Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (Amazon EC2) Clouds. The proofs of concept used wireless connections to showcase the real-world applicability of IoT device communications in the field and to highlight the value of IoTAS compression and encryption.

IoTAS uses hardware-based ID to establish secure device authentication on the initial connection. The solution features patented single-pass data encryption and optimization to ensure maximum security while providing optimal efficiency and speed of data transmissions. The small footprint of IoTAS combined with the flexibility and compute power of the STM32 platform with seamless interoperability into the world’s most popular Cloud services provides device makers a complete, secure chip-to-Cloud IoT platform. CENTRI demonstrated IoTAS capabilities at the ST Developers Conference, September 6, 2017 at the Santa Clara Convention Center.

STMicroelectronics | www.st.com

8-bit Microcontroller Features Compact 8-Pin Package

STMicroelectronics has introduced its new 8-bit STM8S001 microcontroller (MCU) in an economical SO-8 package. The STM8S001 has I2C, UART, and SPI interfaces, giving unusually versatile connectivity options. With a generous 8KB Flash memory, 1 KB RAM, 128-byte EEPROM, and 3-channel 10-bit ADC also on-chip, it delivers key features of ST’s STM8S003 MCU in a space-saving, low-pin-count device. Additional features include five en.STM8S_MCU_8_pin_package_N3970S_bigGPIOs, one 8-bit and two 16-bit timers, and an internal RC oscillator that allows flexible clock control from 128 kHz to 16 MHz. There is also a Single-Wire Interface Module (SWIM) for programming and debugging.

Fully specified from -40°C to 125°C and featuring the modern and efficient STM8 core operating at 16 MHz, the STM8S001 is well suited for industrial devices like smart sensors and lighting controls, as well as consumer products such as toys, small appliances, personal electronics, PC peripherals, battery chargers, and many others. The STM8S001 in 8-pin SO-8 is in production now, priced from $0.20 for orders of 1,000 pieces. A Discovery kit will be available in Q4 2017.

STMicroelectronics | www.st.com

Nissan Chooses Renesas Chips for Automatic-Parking Gear

Renesas Electronics has announced that its R-Car system-on-chip (SoC) for car infotainment and advanced driving assistant systems (ADAS) as well as its RH850 automotive control microcontroller have been adopted by Nissan for the ProPILOT Park, a full-fledged automated-parking system, of its new LEAF, Nissan’s new 100 percent electric vehicle.

The R-Car SoC adopted in the ProPILOT Park of the new Nissan LEAF recognizes spaces adequate for parking, verifies that there are no obstacles in the way, and handles 20170906-soc-mcu-automated-parkingthe role of issuing control commands for acceleration, braking, steering and shifting. The R-Car SoC includes Renesas’ exclusive parallel image processor (IMP) dedicated for image processing. The IMP takes the high-resolution images from the latest automotive CMOS digital cameras and performs high-speed, low-power signal processing. The RH850 MCU accepts the chassis control commands from the R-Car SoC and transmits these commands to the various electronic control units (ECUs) used. This enables the Nissan LEAF’s ProPILOT Park to achieve safe and reliable parking operation.

Based on the newly-launched Renesas autonomy, a new advanced driving assistance systems (ADAS) and automated driving platform, Renesas enables a safe, secure, and convenient driving experience by providing innovative solutions for next-generation car.

Renesas Electronics | www.renesas.com