Don’t Wait for IoT Standards

Input Voltage

–Jeff Child, Editor-in-Chief

JeffHeadShot

I’ll admit it. When the phrase “Internet-of-Things” started to gain momentum some years ago, I was pretty dismissive of it. In the world of embedded systems technology that I’ve been covering for decades, the idea of network-connected embedded devices was far from new. At that point, I’d seen numerous catch phrases come and go—few of them ever sticking around. Fast forward to today, and boy was my skepticism misplaced! Market analysts vary in how they slice up the IoT market, but the general thinking puts the gowth range at several trillion dollars by the year 2020. IoT cuts across several market areas with industrial, transportation, smart homes and energy segments growing fastest. Even when you exclude PCs, phones, servers and tablets—concentrating on embedded devices using processors, microcontrollers, connectivity and high-level operating systems—we’re still talking billions of units.

Now that I’m sold that the hype around IoT is justified, I’m intrigued with this question: What specific IoT standards and protocols are really necessary to get started building an IoT implementation? From my point of view, I think there’s perhaps been too much hesitation on that score. I think there’s a false perception among some that joining the IoT game is some future possibility—a possibility waiting for standards.

Over the past couple years, major players like Google, GE, Qualcomm and others have scrambled to come up with standards suited for broad and narrow types of IoT devices. And those efforts have all helped move IoT forward. But in reality, all the pieces—from sensors to connectivity standards to gateway technologies to cloud infrastructures—all exist today. Businesses and organizations can move forward today to build highly efficient and scalable IoT infrastructures. They can make use of the key connectivity technologies that are usable today, rather than get too caught up with “future” thinking based on nascent industry standards.

In terms of the basic connectivity technologies for IoT, the industry is rich with choices. It’s actually rather rare that an IoT system can be completely hardwired end-to-end. As a result, most IoT systems of any large scale depend on a variety of wireless technologies including everything from device-level technologies to Wi-Fi to cellular networking. At the device-level, the ISM 802.15.4 is a popular standard for low power kinds of gear. 802.15.4 is the basis for established industrial network schemes like ZigBee, and can be used with protocols like 6LoWPAN to add higher layer functions using IP technology. Where power is less of a constraint, the standard Wi-Fi 802.11 is also a good method of IoT activity—whether leveraging off of existing Wi-Fi infrastructures or just using Wi-Fi hubs and routers in a purpose-built network implementation.

Another attractive IoT edge connectivity technology is Bluetooth LE (low energy) or BLE. While it was created for applications in healthcare, fitness, security and home entertainment, Bluetooth LE offers connectivity for any low power device. It’s especially useful in devices that need to operate for more than a year without recharging. If cellular networks make sense as a part of your IoT architecture, virtual networking platforms are available via all the major carriers—AT&T, Sprint, T-Mobile and Verizon Wireless.

IoT is definitely having an impact in the microcontroller-based embedded design space that’s at the heart of Circuit Cellar’s coverage. Not to overstate the matter, IoT systems today make up less than a tenth of the microcontroller application market. MCUs are used in a myriad of non-IoT systems. But, according to market research done by IHS in 2015, IoT is growing at a rate of 11% in the MCU space, while the overall MCU market is expected to grow at just 4% through 2019.

IoT requires the integration of edge technologies where data is created, connectivity technologies that move and share data using Internet and related technologies and then finally aggregating data where it can be processed by applications using Cloud-based gateways and servers. While that sounds complex, all the building blocks to implement such IoT installations are not future technologies. They are simply an integration of hardware, software and service elements that are readily available today. In the spirit of Circuit Cellar’s tag line “Inspiring the Evolution of Embedded Design,” get inspired and start building your IoT system today.

This appears in the September (326) issue of Circuit Cellar magazine

ST Deploys Low-Layer Software for All STM32 MCUs

STMicroelectronics has completed the introduction of its free Low-Layer Application Programming Interface (LL API) software to the STM32Cube software packages for all STM32 microcontrollers. The LL APIs enable expert developers to work within the convenient and easy-to-use STMCube environment, and optimize their code down to the register level using ST-validated software for faster time to market.

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The combination of LL APIs and Hardware Abstraction Layer (HAL) software in all STM32Cube packages now gives developers complete flexibility when choosing how to control device peripherals. They can leverage the HAL’s ease of use and portability or use LL APIs to optimize performance, code footprint, and power consumption. Code examples tailored to run on the associated STM32 Nucleo board provide templates that simplify porting to other STM32 MCUs.

With features such as peripheral-initialization services that are functionally equivalent to STM32 Standard Peripheral Libraries (SPLs), the LL APIs present an easy migration path from the older SPLs to the simple but powerful STM32Cube ecosystem. Using the LL APIs can deliver superior performance, comparable to that of STM32Snippets direct-register-access code examples.

The LL APIs are MISRA-C 2004 compliant except where indicated, and have been checked using Grammatech CodeSonar for optimum code quality and reliability. An automatic-update mechanism inside STM32CubeMX keeps the LL APIs up to date with the latest releases. The STM32CubeMX tool automates the generation of peripheral-initialization code with LL APIs for STM32L0, STM32F0, STM32L4, and STM32F3 MCUs. Support for the remaining STM32 series will be added in the coming months. A written guide and an automated tool for the SPL-to-LL code migration are also available.

More information on STM32CubeMX is available at www.st.com/stm32cubefw

STMicroelectronics | www.st.com

Don’t Miss Our Newsletter: Embedded Boards

Circuit Cellar’s Embedded Boards themed newsletter is coming to your inbox tomorrow. In tomorrow’s newsletter you’ll get news about the products and technologies trends in the board-level embedded computer market. Embedded boards are a critical building block around which system developers can build all manor of intelligent systems. PR_EPM-43_HI

The focus here is on both standard and non-standard embedded computer boards that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up to production volumes.

 

Bonus: We’ve added Drawings for Free Stuff to our weekly newsletters. Make sure you’ve subscribed to the newsletter so you can participate.

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Remember, our new enhanced weekly CC Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

Analog & Power. This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op-amps, batteries, and more.

Microcontroller Watch. This newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

IoT Technology Focus. The Internet-of-Things (IoT) phenomenon is rich with opportunity. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

…and…

August has a 5th Tuesday. So look for a bonus Newsletter this  month!

September Circuit Cellar: A Sneak Preview

The September (326) issue of Circuit Cellar magazine serves up a meaty selection of useful technology resources along with inspiring, interesting embedded electronics design articles.

Not a Circuit Cellar subscriber?  Don’t be left out! Sign up today:

cclogo_2013_header

Here’s a sneak preview of September Circuit Cellar:

FOCUS ON MICROCONTROLLERS

Getting Started with PSoC Microcontrollers (Part 3): Data Conversion, Capacitive Sensing and More
In Part 3, Nishant Mittal gets into some if the PSoC’s more complex features like Data Conversion.

Implementing a Time-Oriented Task Manager for 8-bit PIC Microcontrollers
Pedro Bertoleti shows readers how to build a time-oriented task manager using Microchip’s PIC 16F628A 8-bit microcontroller.

SPECIAL SECTION: EMBEDDED SECURITY

Microcontrollers Beef Up Security Features: Defense in a Connected World
Jeff Child explores the various flavors of embedded security features that microcontroller vendors are adding to their devices.

Resources for Embedded Security: Hardware, Software and Services
Circuit Cellar collects four pages worth of info about companies that provide embedded security products, tools and services.

TECHNOLOGY FEATURES

Using Power Audio Amplifiers in Untypical Ways (Part 1): Best Building Blocks
Petre Petrov shows readers how to use PAAs as universal building blocks to create analog signal generators, analog power supplies, voltage splitters and more.

Data Acquisition Advances Focus on Interfacing
Jeff Child discusses the latest data acquisition solutions, with a look at how interface technologies have evolved.

Future of IoT Communications: Will Upgraded Cellular Networks Benefit IoT?
This guest essay by Andrew Girson, CEO of Barr Group, explores how IoT will fare in the 5G network era.

MORE FROM OUR EXPERT COLUMNISTS:

Block Diagram Reduction and Automatic Tuning
George Novacek steps through how to think in terms of block diagrams to help you reduce system complexity early on in a design.

Numeric Precision vs. DDS Calculations
Using the full frequency resolution of a DDS chip outstrips the capabilities of floating point numbers. Ed Nisley looks at high-res frequency calibration and measurements in the DDS realm.

Deadbolt the Uninvited: Locked Out of My Home
In this Part 2 of Jeff Bachiochi’s electronic lock story, he gets into some of the power and remote-control issues of his electronic deadbolt lock project.

Diagnosing Performance Variations in HPC
Ayse K. Coskun delves into how application performance variations can cause inefficiency
in high-performance computing (HPC) systems and how to diagnose these variations.

Microchip Launched Two New MCU Families

Microchip Technology has made available its new SAM D5x and SAM E5x microcontroller (MCU) families. These new 32-bit MCU families offer extensive connectivity interfaces, high performance and robust hardware-based security for a wide variety of applications. The SAM D5/E5 MCUs combine the performance of an ARM Cortex-M4 processor with a Floating Point Unit (FPU). This combination offloads the Central Processing Unit (CPU), increasing system efficiency and enabling process-intensive applications on a low-power platform.

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Running at up to 120 MHz, the D5x and E5x MCUs feature up to 1 MB of dual-panel Flash with Error Correction Code (ECC), easily enabling live updates with no interruption to the running system. Additionally, these families are available with up to 256 KB of SRAM with ECC, vital to mission-critical applications such as medical devices or server systems.

These new MCUs have multiple interfaces that provide design flexibility for even the most demanding connectivity needs. Both families include a Quad Serial Peripheral Interface (QSPI) with an Execute in Place (XIP) feature. This allows the system to use high-performance serial Flash memories, which are both small and inexpensive compared to traditional pin parallel Flash, for external memory needs.

The SAM D5/E5 devices also feature a Secure Digital Host Controller (SDHC) for data logging, a Peripheral Touch Controller (PTC) for capacitive touch capabilities and best-in-class active power performance (65 microA/MHz) for applications requiring power efficiency. Additionally, the SAM E5 family includes two CAN-FD ports and a 10/100 Mbps Ethernet Media Access Controller (MAC) with IEEE 1588 support, making it well-suited for industrial automation, connected home and other Internet of Things (IoT) applications.

Both the SAM D5x and E5x families contain comprehensive cryptographic hardware and software support, enabling developers to incorporate security measures at a design’s inception. Hardware-based security features include a Public Key Cryptographic Controller (PUKCC) supporting Elliptic Curve Cryptography (ECC) and RSA schemes as well as an Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) cipher and Secure Hash Algorithms (SHA).

The SAM E54 Xplained Pro Evaluation Kit is available to kick-start development. The kit incorporates an on-board debugger, as well as additional peripherals, to further ease the design process. All SAM D5x/E5x MCUs are supported by the Atmel Studio 7 Integrated Development Environment (IDE) as well as Atmel START, a free online tool to configure peripherals and software that accelerates development. SAM D5x and SAM E5x devices are available today in a variety of pin counts and package options in volume production quantities. Devices in the SAM D5/E5 series are available starting at $2.43 each in 10,000 unit quantities. The SAM E54 Xplained Pro Evaluation Kit is available for $84.99 each.

Microchip | www.microchip.com

Don’t Miss Our Newsletter: IoT Technology Focus

In tommorrow’s IoT Technology Focus newsletter you’ll get news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.LoRa-NNNCo-PR-graphic-press

Bonus: We’ve added Drawings for Free Stuff to our weekly newsletters. Make sure you’ve subscribed to the newsletter so you can participate.

Already a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber? Great!
You’ll get your “IoT Technology Focus” themed newsletter issue tomorrow.

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Remember, our new enhanced weekly CC Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

Embedded Boards. This content looks at embedded board-level computers. The focus here is on modules—Arduino, Raspberry Pi, COM Express, and other small-form-factor —that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up production volumes.

Analog & Power. This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op-amps, batteries, and more.

Microcontroller Watch. This newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

…and…

August has a 5th Tuesday. So look for a bonus Newsletter this  month!

Cypress MCUs Selected for Toyota Camry Instrument Cluster

Cypress Semiconductor has announced that global automotive supplier DENSO has selected Cypress’ Traveo automotive microcontroller (MCU) family and FL-S Serial NOR Flash memory family to drive the advanced graphics in its instrument cluster for the 2017 Toyota Camry. The DENSO instrument cluster uses Traveo devices that Cypress says were the industry’s first 3D-capable ARM Cortex-R5 cluster MCUs.

Denso Instrument Cluster

The FL-S memory in the cluster is based on Cypress’ proprietary MirrorBit NOR Flash process technology, which enables high density serial NOR Flash memory by storing two bits per cell. The DENSO instrument cluster has 4.2- and 7.0-inch screens capable of audio, video and navigation in the center display of the 2017 Toyota Camry.

Cypress works with the world’s top automotive companies to support automotive systems including Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS), 3-D graphics displays, wireless connectivity, full-featured touchscreens and superior body electronics. Cypress’ automotive portfolio includes the Traveo MCU family, power-management ICs (PMICs), PSoC programmable system-on-chip solutions, CapSense capacitive-sensing solutions, TrueTouch touchscreens, NOR flash, F-RAM and SRAM memories, and USB, Wi-Fi and Bluetooth connectivity solutions. The portfolio is backed by Cypress’ commitment to zero defects, excellent service and adherence to the most stringent industry standards, such as the ISO/TS 16949 quality management system, the Automotive Electronics Council (AEC) guidelines for ICs and the Production Part Approval Process (PPAP).

Cypress Semiconductor | www.cypress.com

Don’t Miss Our Newsletter: Microcontroller Watch

In tommorrow’s Microcontroller Watch we’ll feature key updates on the latest microcontroller technology  — the latest MCU design wins — new MCU product announcements — MCU industry events –and more.35352057604_77bb4aab93_m

Plus: we’ve added Drawings for Free Stuff to our weekly newsletters. Make sure you’ve subscribed to the newsletter so you can participate.

Already a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber? Great!
You’ll get your “Microcontroller Watch” themed newsletter issue tomorrow.

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Remember, our new enhanced weekly CC Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

IoT Technology Focus. The Internet-of-Things (IoT) phenomenon is rich with opportunity. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

Embedded Boards. This content looks at embedded board-level computers. The focus here is on modules—Arduino, Raspberry Pi, COM Express, and other small-form-factor —that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up production volumes.

Analog & Power. This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op-amps, batteries, and more.

…and…

August has a 5th Tuesday. So look for a bonus Newsletter this  month!

Don’t Miss Circuit Cellar’s Analog & Power Newsletter

Analog & Power is where stuff gets real. Converting signals to and from analog is how embedded devices interact with the real world. And without power supplies and power conversion, electronic systems can’t do anything. Circuit Cellar’s Analog & Power MFG_IB048E096T40N1-00themed newsletter is coming to your inbox tomorrow.

This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op-amps, batteries and more.

               Already a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber? Great!
You’ll get your “Analog & Power” themed newsletter issue tomorrow.

Not a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber?
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Remember, our new enhanced weekly CC Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

Microcontroller Watch. This newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

IoT Technology Focus. The Internet-of-Things (IoT) phenomenon is rich with opportunity. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

Embedded Boards. This content looks at embedded board-level computers. The focus here is on modules—Arduino, Raspberry Pi, COM Express, and other small-form-factor —that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up production volumes.

Dev Kit Enables Cars to Express Their Emotions

Renesas Electronics has announced that it has developed a development kit for its R-Car that takes advantage of “emotion engine”, an artificial sensibility and intelligence technology pioneered by cocoro SB Corp. The new development kit enables cars with the sensibility to read the driver’s emotions and optimally respond to the driver’s needs based on their emotional state.

The development kit includes cocoro SB’s emotion engine, which was developed leveraging its sensibility technology to recognize emotional states such as confidence or uncertainty based on the speech of the driver. The car’s response to the driver’s emotional state is displayed by a new driver-attentive user interface (UI) implemented in the Renesas R-Car system-on-chip (SoC). Since it is possible for the car to understand the driver’s words and emotional state, it can provide the appropriate response that ensures optimal driver safety.

20170719-verbal-emotion-recognition-engine-st

As this technology is linked to artificial intelligence (AI) based machine learning, it is possible for the car to learn from conversations with the driver, enabling it to transform into a car that is capable of providing the best response to the driver. Renesas plans to release the development kit later this year.

Renesas  demonstrated its connected car simulator incorporating the new development kit based on cocoro SB’s emotion engine at the SoftBank World 2017 event earlier this month in held by SoftBank at the Prince Park Tower Tokyo.

Renesas considers the driver’s emotional state, facial expression and eyesight direction as key information that combines with the driver’s vital signs to improve the car and driver interface, placing drivers closer to the era of self-driving cars. For example, if the car can recognize the driver is experiencing an uneasy emotional state, even if he or she has verbally accepted the switch to hands free autonomous-driving mode, it is possible for the car to ask the driver “would you prefer to continue driving and not switch to autonomous-driving mode for now?” Furthermore, understanding the driver’s emotions enables the car to control vehicle speed according to how the driver is feeling while driving at night in autonomous-driving mode. By providing carmakers and IT companies with the development kit that takes advantage of this emotion engine, Renesas hopes to expand the possibilities for this service model to the development of new interfaces between cars and drivers and other mobility markets that can take advantage of emotional state information. Based on the newly-launched Renesas autonomy, a new advanced driving assistance systems (ADAS) and automated driving platform, Renesas enables a safe, secure, and convenient driving experience by providing next-generation solutions for connected cars.

Renesas Electronics America | www.renesas.com

Don’t Miss Circuit Cellar’s Newsletter: Embedded Boards

Board-level embedded computers are a critical building block around which system developers can build all manor of intelligent systems. Circuit Cellar’s Embedded Boards themed newsletter is coming to your inbox tomorrow. COM Express mm

The focus here is on module types like Arduino, Raspberry Pi, COM Express, and other small-form-factor modules that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up to production volumes.

Already a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber? Great!
You’ll get your “Embedded Boards” themed newsletter issue tomorrow.

Not a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber?
Don’t be left out! Sign up now:

Remember, our new enhanced weekly CC Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

Analog & Power. This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op-amps, batteries, and more.

Microcontroller Watch. This newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

IoT Technology Focus. The Internet-of-Things (IoT) phenomenon is rich with opportunity. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

Don’t Miss CC’s Newsletter: IoT Technology Watch

The Internet-of-Things (IoT) phenomenon is rich with opportunity. Circuit Cellar’s IoT Technology Focus themed newsletter is coming to your inbox tomorrow. The newsletter will update you on the latest news and trends including IoT gateways, IoT device security, IoT wireless connectivity and IoT cloud implementations.

Already a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber? Great!
You’ll get your “IoT Technology Focus” themed newsletter issue tomorrow.

Not a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber?
Don’t be left out! Sign up now:

Remember, our new enhanced weekly CC Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

Embedded Boards. This content looks at embedded board-level computers. The focus here is on modules (e.g., Arduino, Raspberry Pi, COM Express, and other small-form-factor modules) that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up production volumes.

Analog & Power. This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op-amps, batteries, and more.

Microcontroller Watch. This newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

August Circuit Cellar: A Sneak Preview

The August (325) issue of Circuit Cellar magazine is jammed packed with useful technical information and inspiring, intriguing embedded electronics design stories.

Not a Circuit Cellar subscriber?  Don’t be left out! Sign up today:

 

Here’s a sneak preview of August Circuit Cellar:

FUN WITH GUITAR AMPLIFIERS!

Digital Guitar Amplifier/ Effects Processor—Part 2
Brian Millier details the digital guitar amplifier/effects unit he built using two Teensy Arduino modules.

A Range of Power Supplies for Hollow-State Guitar Amplifiers
Richard Honeycutt compares several different power supplies used for hollow-state guitar amplifiers.

MICROCONTROLLERS & PROCESSORS!

Firmware Upgrade with the PIC32
Nick Sicalides delves into performing firmware upgrades using a bootloader on the Microchip PIC32

Getting Started with PSoC Microcontrollers (Part 2): Putting PSoC to Work
Nishant Mittal goes even deeper on the Cypress PSoC providing some useful design examples.

Moore’s Law and the Chip Industry’s Perfect Storm
In this Interview Q&A Krste Asanovic explains RISC-V and the open sourcing of processor architecture.

SECURITY & RELIABILITY & ENCRYPTION!

Power Analysis of a Software DES Encryption Routine
Columnist Colin O’Flynn examines how to break a software implementation of the DES security routine.

Reliability and Failure Prediction: A New Take
Craig Armenti and Dave Wiens discuss a better way to simulate PCB vibration and acceleration.

Preventing Unwanted Entry
Columnist Jeff Bachiochi takes us inside his exploration of electronic lock systems, getting down to the fine details.

Future of Embedded Security: Wi-Fi to the Danger Zone
This guest essay by Adam Cecchetti, CEO of Deja vu Security, explains how memory leaks in your embedded system could have life or death consequences.

AND MORE FROM OUR EXPERT COLUMNISTS:

Automatic Control (Part 4) The Implementation
George Novacek describes the PID temperature controller he built for a meat smoker.

Fully Differential Amplifiers
Robert Lacoste sings the praises of fully differential amplifiers and presents a few designs using them.

Build an Embedded Systems Consulting Company (Part 5) Axiom Wrap-Up
Bob Japenga shares more insights on running a successful embedded design firm built to last.

Cypress and Arrow Team up for IoT Development Platform

Cypress Semiconductor and Arrow Electronics have announced a new development platform that enables engineers to quickly bring a broad range of connected IoT products to market.

The new Quicksilver kit features Cypress’ Wireless Connectivity for Embedded Devices (WICED) platform and incorporates the robust connectivity of the Cypress CYW43907 802.11n Wi-Fi microcontroller (MCU). The kit is slated for release in this  month (July 2017), and a second Quicksilver kit will deliver high-performance 802.11ac Wi-Fi enabling high-data-rate and media-rich experiences in the IoT in the fourth quarter of 2017.

According to Cypress, development customers are seeking to connect their products to the cloud for the first time to enable compelling IoT features, and they are also looking for fast time to market. The WICED-based Quicksilver kit provides them with the flexibility to build quickly now and streamline design enhancements later. Customers can quickly get to market with a certified module that provides turnkey cloud connectivity software and then migrate to cost or performance-driven production solutions while maintaining hardware and software compatibility.

The first Quicksilver kit will provide users with complete design capabilities to implement the WICED Studio SDK and features Arduino-compatible headers for expansion capability. The kit includes temperature, humidity and three-axis motion sensors to design a complete IoT edge device for a broad range of end markets, including factory automation, lighting, smart irrigation, home appliances and home automation.

Circuit Cellar Newsletters to Focus on Microcontrollers, IoT and More

Circuit Cellar’s ongoing mission is to provide important information to help you make smart choices with your engineering projects—from prototype to production. As part of that effort, we’re now offering themed newsletter content each week that focuses on critical areas of system development.

Already a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber? Great!
You’ll get the first “Microcontroller Watch” themed newsletter issue tomorrow.

Not a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber?
Don’t be left out! Sign up now:

Our new enhanced weekly CC Newsletter will switch its theme each week, covering these four areas every month:

Microcontroller Watch. This newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

IoT Technology Focus. The Internet-of-Things (IoT) phenomenon is rich with opportunity. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

Embedded Boards. This content looks at embedded board-level computers. The focus here is on modules (e.g., Arduino, Raspberry Pi, COM Express, and other small-form-factor modules) that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up production volumes.

Analog & Power. This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op-amps, batteries, and more.