New 40-nm Microcontrollers for Motor Control

Renesas Electronics Corp. recently announced the RH850/C1x series of 32-bit microcontrollers (MCUs), which it said are designed for motor control in hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) and electric vehicles (EVs). Based on Renesas’s 40-nm process, the RH850/C1x series features the RH850/C1H and RH850/C1M MCUs, which enable embedded designers to enhance efficiency, reduce system costs, and achieve higher safety levels for HEV/EV motor control systems.

Source: Renesas Electronics Corp.

Source: Renesas Electronics Corp.

The new RH850/C1x devices can be used with the RAA270000KFT RH850 family power supply management IC (PMIC), which is currently available in sample quantities. The power management IC integrates into one device all the power supply systems required for MCU operation, two external sensor power supply tracks, and a full complement of monitoring and diagnostic functions, significantly reducing the user burden associated with power supply system design.

The RH850/C1H and RH850/C1M MCUs incorporate large memory capacities achieved through 40 nm MONOS process technology. The RH850/C1x series is based on Renesas’s metal oxide nitride oxide silicon (MONOS) embedded flash, which has an extensive track record in mass production. The MONOS characteristics include fast readout, low power consumption, and large storage capacity. The RH850/C1M and RH850/C1H devices offer memory capacities of 2 MB and 4 MB, respectively. In addition, 32-KB data flash memory, with essentially the same functionality as EEPROM, is included for data storage.

The microcontrollers also feature an extensive set of peripheral functions for HEV/EV motor control. The RH850/C1x MCUs can implement three types of motor control in hardware: sine wave PWM, over modulation, and square wave.

Samples of the RH850/C1H and RH850/C1M MCUs are scheduled to be available from the beginning of 2015 and will cost $45 and $50 per unit, respectively. Mass production is scheduled for May 2016 and is expected to reach a scale of 100,000 units per month.

Source: Renesas Electronics Corp.

DIY Arduino-Based ECG System

Cornell University students Sean Hubber and Crystal Lu built an Arduino-based electrocardiography (ECG) system that enables them to view a heart’s waveform on a mini TV. The basic idea is straightforward: an Arduino Due converts a heartbeat waveform to an NTSC signal.

Here you can see the system in action. The top line (green) has a 1-s time base. The bottom line (yellow) has a 5-s time base. (Source: Hubber & Lu)

Here you can see the system in action. The top line (green) has a 1-s time base. The bottom line (yellow) has a 5-s
time base. (Source: Hubber & Lu)

In their article, “Hands-On Electrocardiography,” Hubber and Lu write:

We used the Arduino Due to convert the heartbeat waveform to an NTSC signal that could be used by a mini-TV. The Arduino Due continuously sampled the input provided by the voltage limiter at 240 sps. Similar to MATLAB, the vectorized signal was shifted left to make room at the end for the most recent sample. This provided a continuous real-time display of the incoming signal. Each frame outputted to the mini-TV contains two waveforms. One has a 1-s screen width and the other has a 5-s screen width. This enables the user to see a standard version (5 s) and a more zoomed in version (1 s). Each frame also contains an integer representing the program’s elapsed time. This code was produced by Cornell University professor Bruce Land.

As you can see in the nearby block diagram, Hubber and Lu’s ECG system comprises a circuit, an Arduino board, a TV display, MATLAB programming language, and a voltage limiter.

The system's block diagram (Circuit Cellar 289, 2014)

The system’s block diagram (Circuit Cellar 289, 2014)

The system’s main circuit is “separated into several stages to ensure that retrieving the signal would be user-safe and that sufficient amplification could be made to produce a readable ECG signal,” Hubber and Lu noted.

The first stage is the conditioning stage, which ensures user safety through DC isolation by initially connecting the dry electrode signals directly to capacitors and resistors. The capacitors help with DC isolation and provide a DC offset correction while the resistors limit the current passing through. This input-conditioning stage is followed by amplification and filtering that yields an output with a high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). After the circuit block, the signal is used by MATLAB and voltage limiter blocks. Directly after DC isolation, the signal is sent into a Texas Instruments INA116 differential amplifier and, with a 1-kΩ RG value, an initial gain of 51 is obtained. The INA116 has a low bias current, which permits the high-impedance signal source. The differential amplifier also utilizes a feedback loop, which prevents it from saturating.

Following the differentiation stage, the signal is passed through multiple filters and receives additional amplification. The first is a low-pass filter with an approximately 16-Hz cutoff frequency. This filter is primarily used to eliminate 60-Hz noise. The second filter is a high-pass filter with an approximately 0.5-Hz cutoff frequency. This filter is mostly used to eliminate DC offset. The total amplification at this stage is 10. Since the noise was significantly reduced and the SNR was large, this amplification produced a very strong and clear signal. With these stages done, the signal was then strong enough to be digitally analyzed. The signal could then travel to both the MATLAB and voltage limiter blocks.

Hubber and Lu’s article was published in Circuit Cellar 289, 2014. Get it now!

New DSP “Lab-in-a-Box” for ARM-Based Audio Systems

Cambridge, UK-based, ARM and its partners will start shipping a DSP “Lab-in-a-Box” (LiB) to universities worldwide to help boost practical skills development and the creation of new ARM-based audio systems. This will include products such as high-definition home media and voice-controlled home automation systems. The LiB kits contain ARM Cortex-M4-based microcontroller boards by STMicroelectronics and audio cards from Wolfson Microelectronics and Farnell element14.ARMDSPLiBWeb

As the centerpiece of the ARM University Program, LiB packages offer ARM-based technology and high-quality teaching and training materials that support electronics and computer engineering courses. DSP courses have traditionally used software simulation packages, or hands-on labs using relatively expensive development kits costing around $300 per student. By comparison, this new DSP LiB will cost around $50 and will allow students to practice theory with advanced hardware sourced from widely-available products.

“Our Lab-in-a-Box offerings are proving hugely popular in universities because of the low-cost access to state-of-the-art technology,” said Khaled Benkrid, manager of the Worldwide University Program, ARM. “The DSP kits, powered by ARM Cortex-M4-based processors, enable high performance yet energy-efficient digital signal processing at a very affordable price. We expect to see them being used by students to create commercially-viable audio applications and it’s another great example of our partnership supporting engineers in training and beyond.”

The DSP LiB will begin shipping to universities in July 2014. It is the latest in a series of initiatives led by ARM which span multiple academic topics including embedded systems design, programming and SoC design. The DSP kits will also be offered to developers outside academia at a later date.

[via audioXpress.com]

Specs & Code Matter (EE Tip #136)

No matter how many engineering hours you’ve logged over the years, it’s always a good idea to keep in mind that properly focusing on specs and code can make or break a project. In 2013, Aubrey Kagan—an experienced engineer and long-time Circuit Cellar author—explained this quite well in CC25:

There was a set of BCD thumbwheel switches that I was reading into a micro. In order to reduce the number of input lines required, each 4 bits of a digit was multiplexed with the other digits and selection was made by a transistor enabling the common line of each switch in turn. This was standard industry practice. The problem was that in order to economize, I had used the spare transistors in a Darlington driver IC. Everything worked fine in the lab, but on very hot days the unit would fail in the field with very strange results.

Long story short, the saturation voltage on the Darlington transistor would increase with temperature to above the digital input threshold and the micro would read undefined switch settings and then jump to non-existing code. I learned three things: read and understand all the specifications on a datasheet, things get a lot hotter in a cabinet in the sun than the lab, and you should make sure your code can handle conditions that are not supposed to occur.—Aubrey Kagan, CC25 (2o13)

Want to share an EE tip of your own? Email our editors to share your tips and tricks.

July Issue Offers Data-Gathering Designs and More

The concept of the wireless body-area network (WBAN), a network of wireless wearable computing devices, holds great promise in health-care applications.

Such a network could integrate implanted or wearable sensors that provide continuous mobile health (mHealth) monitoring of a person’s most important “vitals”—from calorie intake to step count, insulin to oxygen levels, and heart rate to blood pressure. It could also provide real-time updates to medical records through the Internet and alert rescue or health-care workers to emergencies such as heart failures or seizures.

Data Gathering DesignsConceivably, the WBAN would need some sort of controller, a wearable computational “hub” that would track the data being collected by all the sensors, limit and authorize access to that information, and securely transmit it to other devices or medical providers.

Circuit Cellar’s July issue (now available online for membership download or single-issue purchase)  features an essay by Clemson University researcher Vivian Genaro Motti, who discusses her participation in the federally funded Amulet project.

Amulet’s Clemson and Dartmouth College research team is prototyping pieces of “computational jewelry” that can serve as a body-area network’s mHealth hub while being discreetly worn as a bracelet or pendant. Motti’s essay elaborates on Amulet’s hardware and software architecture.

Motti isn’t the only one aware of the keen interest in WBANs and mHealth. In an interview in the July issue, Shiyan Hu, a professor whose expertise includes very-large-scale integration (VLSI), says that many of his students are exploring “portable or wearable electronics targeting health-care applications.”

This bracelet-style Amulet developer prototype has an easily accessible board.

This bracelet-style Amulet developer prototype has an easily accessible board.

Today’s mHealth market is evident in the variety of health and fitness apps available for your smartphone. But the most sophisticated mHealth technologies are not yet accessible to embedded electronics enthusiasts. (However, Amulet has created a developer prototype with an easily accessible board for tests.)

But market demand tends to increase access to new technologies. A BCC Research report predicts the mHealth market, which hit $1.5 billion in 2012, will increase to $21.5 billion by 2018. Evolving smartphones, better wireless coverage, and demands for remote patient monitoring are fueling the growth. So you can anticipate more designers and developers will be exploring this area of wearable electronics.

AND THAT’S NOT ALL…
In addition to giving you a glimpse of technology on the horizon, the July issue provides our staple of interesting projects and DIY tips you can adapt at your own workbench. For example, this issue includes articles about microcontroller-based strobe photography; a thermal monitoring system using ANT+ wireless technology; a home solar-power setup; and reconfiguring and serial backpacking to enhance LCD user interfaces.

We’re also improving on an “old” idea. Some readers may recall contributor Tom Struzik’s 2010 article about his design for a Bluetooth audio adapter for his car (“Wireless Data Exchange: Build a 2,700-lb. Bluetooth Headset,” Circuit Cellar 240).

In the July issue, Struzik writes about how he solved one problem with his design: how to implement a power supply to keep the phone and the Bluetooth adapter charged.

“To run both, I needed a clean, quiet, 5-V USB-compatible power supply,” Struzik says. “It needed to be capable of providing almost 2 A of peak current, most of which would be used for the smartphone. In addition, having an in-car, high-current USB power supply would be good for charging other devices (e.g., an iPhone or iPad).”

Struzik’s July article describes how he built a 5-V/2-A automotive isolated switching power supply. The first step was using a SPICE program to model the power supply before constructing and testing an actual circuit. Struzik provides something extra with his article: a video tutorial explaining how to use Linear Technology’s LTspice simulator program for switching design. It may help you design your own circuit.

This is Tom Struzik's initial test circuit board, post hacking. A Zener diode is shown in the upper right, a multi-turn trimmer for feedback resistor is in the center, a snubber capacitor and “stacked” surface-mount design (SMD) resistors are on the center left, USB D+/D– voltage adjust trimmers are on top center, and a “test point” is shown in the far lower left. If you’re looking for the 5-V low dropout (LDO) regulator, it’s on the underside of the board in this design.

This is Tom Struzik’s initial test circuit board, post hacking. A Zener diode is shown in the upper right, a multi-turn trimmer for feedback resistor is in the center, a snubber capacitor and “stacked” surface-mount design (SMD) resistors are on the center left, USB D+/D– voltage adjust trimmers are on top center, and a “test point” is shown in the far lower left. If you’re looking for the 5-V low dropout (LDO) regulator, it’s on the underside of the board in this design.