2012 ESC Boston: Tech from Microchip, Fujitsu, & More

The 2012 Embedded Systems Conference in Boston started September 17 and ends today. Here’s a wrap-up of the most interesting news and products.

MICROCHIP TECHNOLOGY

Microchip Technology announced Monday morning the addition of 15 new USB PIC microcontrollers to its line of full-speed USB 2.0 Device PIC MCUs. In a short presentation, Microchip product marketing manager Wayne Freeman introduced the three new 8-bit, crystal-free USB PIC families.

The PIC16F145x family (three devices) features the Microchip’s lowest-cost MCUs. The devices are available in 14- and 20-pin packages, support full-speed USB communication, don’t require external crystals, include PWM with complement generation, and more. They’re suitable for applications requiring USB connectivity and cap sense capabilities.

Microchip’s three PIC18F2x/4xK50 devices (available in 28- and 40/44-pins) enable “easy migration” from legacy PIC18 USB devices. In addition to 1.8- to 5-V operation, they feature a Charge Time Measurement Unit (CTMU) for cap-touch sensing, which makes them handy for data logging systems for tasks such as temperature and humidity measurement.

The nine devices in the PIC18F97J94 family are available in 64-, 80-, and 100-pin packages. Each device includes a 60 × 8 LCD controller and also integrates a real-time clock/calendar (RTCC) with battery back-up. Systems such as hand-held scanners and home automation panels are excellent candidates for these devices.

Several interesting designs were on display at the Microchip booth.

  • The M2M PICtail module was used in an SMS texting system.

This SMS text messaging system was featured at Microchip’s Machine-to-Machine (M2M) station. The M2M PICtail module (located on the bottom left) costs around $200.

  • Microchip featured its PIC MCU iPod Accessory Kit in glucose meter design. It was one of several healthcare-related systems that exhibitors displayed at the conference.

The interface can be an iPhone, iPad, or iPod Touch.

Visit www.microchip.com for more information.

RENESAS

As most of you know, the entry period for the Renesas RL78 Green Energy Challenge ended on August 31 and the judges are now reviewing the entries. Two particular demos on display at the Renesas booth caught my attention.

  • A lemon powering an RL78 L12 MCU:

Lemon power and the RL78

  • An R8C capacitive touch system:

Cap touch technology is on the minds of countless electrical engineers.

Go to www.am.renesas.com.

FREESCALE

I was pleased to see a reprint of Mark Pedley’s recent Circuit Cellar article, “eCompass” (August 2012), on display at Freescale’s booth. The article covers the topics of building and calibrating a tilt‐compensating electronic compass.

A Circuit Cellar reprint for attendees

Two of the more interesting projects were:

  • An Xtrinsic sensor demo:

Xtrinsic and e-compass

  • A Tower-based medical suitcase, which included a variety of boards: MED-BPM (a dev board for blood pressure monitor applications), MED-EKG (an aux board for EKG and heart rate monitoring applications), and more.

Tower System-based medical suitcase

STMicro

I stopped by the STMicro booth for a look at the STM32F3DISCOVERY kit, but I quickly became interested in the Dual Interface EEPROM station. It was the smartphone that caught my attention (again). Like other exhibitors, STMicro had a smartphone-related application on hand.

  • The Dual EEPROMs enable you to access memory via either  wired or RF interfaces. Energy harvesting is the new function STMicro is promoting. According to the documentation, “It also features an energy harvesting and RF status function.”

The Dual Interface EEPROM family has an RF and I2C interface

  • According to STMicro’s website, the DATALOG-M24LR-A PCB (the green board, top left) “features an M24LR64-R Dual Interface EEPROM IC connected to an STM8L101K3 8-bit microcontroller through an I2C bus on one side, and to a 20 mm x 40 mm 13.56 MHz etched RF antenna on the other one side. The STM8L101K3 is also interfaced with an STTS75 temperature sensor and a CR2330 coin cell battery.”

FUJITSU

I’m glad I spend a few moments at the Fujitsu booth. We rarely see Circuit Cellar authors using Fujitsu parts, so I wanted to see if there was something you’d find intriguing. Perhaps the following images will pique your interest in Fujitsu technologies.

The FM3 family, which features the ARM Cortext-M3 core, is worth checking out. FM3 connectivity demonstration

Connectivity demo

Check out Fujitsu’s System Memory site and document ion to see if its memory products and solutions suit your needs. Access speed comparison: FRAM vs. SRAM vs. EEPROM

Access speed comparison

The ESC conference site has details about the other exhibitors that had booths in the exhibition hall.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Member Profile: Richard Lord

Richard Lord is an engineer, author, and photographer whose article series on an innovative digital camera controller project will begin in the October issue of Circuit Cellar.  Lord’s Photo-Pal design is an electronic flash-trigger camera controller built around a Microchip Technology PIC16F873. It features four modes of operation: triggered shutter, triggered flash, multiple flash, and time lapse. Now you too can take sound-triggered photos.

The Photo-Pal enables Richard to take amazing photos like this and capture high-speed action.

  • Member Name: Richard H. Lord
  • Location: Durham, NH, United States
  • Education: BS Electrical Engineering 1969, MS Biomedical Engineering, 1971
  • Occupation: Retired electronics hardware design engineer
  • Member Status: Richard said he has subscribed to Circuit Cellar for at least 14 years, maybe longer.
  • Technical Interests: Richard’s interests include photography, model railroading, and microcontroller projects.
  • Most Recent Embedded Tech-Related Purchase: Richard’s most recent purchase was a Microchip Technology dsPIC30F4013 digital signal controller.
  • Current Project: Richard is working on a Microchip PIC16F886-based multipurpose front panel interface controller.
  • Thoughts on the Future of Embedded Technology: “With the ready availability of prepackaged 32-bit processor modules, it’s easy to forget there are many applications where 8-bit controllers are more appropriate”, Richard said. He continued by saying he gets a lot of enjoyment from the challenge of working within the capabilities and constraints of the smaller microcontrollers.

CC266: Microcontroller-Based Data Management

Regardless of your area of embedded design or programming expertise, you have one thing in common with every electronics designer, programmer, and engineering student across the globe: almost everything you do relates to data. Each workday, you busy yourself with acquiring data, transmitting it, repackaging it, compressing it, securing it, sharing it, storing it, analyzing it, converting it, deleting it, decoding it, quantifying it, graphing it, and more. I could go on, but I won’t. The idea is clear: manipulating and controlling data in its many forms is essential to everything you do.

The ubiquitous importance of data is what makes Circuit Cellar’s Data Acquisition issue one of the most popular each year. And since you’re always seeking innovative ways to obtain, secure, and transmit data, we consider it our duty to deliver you a wide variety of content on these topics. The September 2012 issue (Circuit Cellar 266) features both data acquisition system designs and tips relating to control and data management.

On page 18, Brian Beard explains how he planned and built a microcontroller-based environmental data logger. The system can sense and record relative light intensity, barometric pressure, relative humidity, and more.

a: This is the environmental data logger’s (EDL) circuit board. b: This is the back of the EDL.

Data acquisition has been an important theme for engineering instructor Miguel Sánchez, who since 2005 has published six articles in Circuit Cellar about projects such as a digital video recorder (Circuit Cellar 174), “teleporting” serial communications via the ’Net (Circuit Cellar 193), and a creative DIY image-processing system (Circuit Cellar 263). An informative interview with Miguel begins on page 28.

Turn to page 38 for an informative article about how to build a compact acceleration data acquisition system. Mark Csele covers everything you need to know from basic physics to system design to acceleration testing.

This is the complete portable accelerometer design. with the serial download adapter. The adapter is installed only when downloading data to a PC and mates with an eight pin connector on the PCB. The rear of the unit features three powerful
rare-earth magnets that enable it to be attached to a vehicle.

In “Hardware-Accelerated Encryption,” Patrick Schaumont describes a hardware accelerator for data encryption (p. 48). He details the advanced encryption standard (AES) and encourages you to consider working with an FPGA.

This is the embedded processor design flow with FPGA. a: A C program is compiled for a softcore CPU, which is configured in an FPGA. b: To accelerate this C program, it is partitioned into a part for the software CPU, and a part that will be implemented as a hardware accelerator. The softcore CPU is configured together with the hardware accelerator in the FPGA.

Are you now ready to start a new data acquisition project? If so, read George Novacek’s article “Project Configuration Control” (p. 58), George Martin’s article “Software & Design File Organization” (p. 62), and Jeff Bachiochi’s article “Flowcharting Made Simple” (p. 66) before hitting your workbench. You’ll find their tips on project organization, planning, and implementation useful and immediately applicable.

Lastly, on behalf of the entire Circuit Cellar/Elektor team, I congratulate the winners of the DesignSpark chipKIT Challenge. Turn to page 32 to learn about Dean Boman’s First Prize-winning energy-monitoring system, as well as the other exceptional projects that placed at the top. The complete projects (abstracts, photos, schematic, and code) for all the winning entries are posted on the DesignSpark chipKIT Challenge website.

Build a Microcontroller-Based Mail Client

Does the sheer amount of junk mail that fills your Inbox make you hate everything about e-mail? If so, it’s time to have a little fun with electronic mail by building a compact microcontroller-based mail client system. Alexander Mann designed a system that uses an Atmel ATmega32 and a Microchip Technology ENC28J60 Ethernet controller to check continuously for e-mail. When a message arrives, he can immediately read it on the system’s LCD and respond with a standard keyboard.

Mann writes:

My MiniEmail system is a compact microcontroller-based mail client (see Photo 1). The silent, easy-to-use system doesn’t require a lot of power and it is immune to mail worms. Another advantage is the system’s short start-up time. If you want to write a quick e-mail but your PC is off, you can simply switch on the miniature e-mail client and start writing without having to wait for your PC to boot up and load the necessary applications. All you need is an Ethernet connection and the MiniEmail system.

Photo 1: The complete MiniEmail system includes an LCD, a keyboard, and several connections. (A. Mann, Circuit Cellar 204)

HARDWARE

The hardware for the MiniEmail system is inexpensive. It cost me about $50. The LCD is the most expensive part. To keep things simple, I left the system’s power supply, 5- to 3.3-V conversion crystals, and latch out of Figure 1.

Figure 1: This is a block diagram of MiniEmail’s hardware. The arrows indicate the directions of data flow between the devices. The rounded boxes indicate parts that do not sit on the circuit board.

The main components are an Atmel ATmega32 microcontroller and a Microchip Technology ENC28J60 Ethernet controller. Because a mail client is a piece of complex software, you need a fast microcontroller that has a considerable amount of program space. The MiniEmail system uses almost all of the ATmega32’s features, including the SPI, internal EEPROM and SRAM, counters, USART interface, sleep modes, all 32 I/O lines, and most of the 32 KB of program memory. The ENC28J60 is a stand-alone Ethernet controller that provides basic functionality for transmitting frames over an Ethernet connection. It has 8 KB of built-in SRAM, which can be divided into transmit and receive buffers as desired, and it provides several interrupt sources (e.g., when new packets have arrived). The ATmega32 also has 128 KB of external SRAM connected as well as an LCD, which is a standard module with a resolution of 128 × 64 pixels.

Take a look at the ATmega32’s pin connections in Figure 2. Ports A and C are used as 8-bit-wide general I/O ports, one of which is latched using an NXP Semiconductors 74HC573.

Figure 2: Here’s the complete schematic for the MiniEmail. The LF1S022 is the RJ-45 connector for the Ethernet connection.

The two ports provide data connections to the LCD and SRAM (U3). For the SRAM, you need three additional wires: write (*RAM_WR), read strobe (*RAM_RD), and the seventeenth bit of the address (ADDR16). The LCD connector (CON1) uses five additional wires (for the signals CS1, CS2, DI, EN, and RW). CS1 and CS2 are taken from the general I/O port A (DATA6 and DATA7) and determine which of the two halves of the LCD is selected (i.e., the two controllers on the LCD module you are talking to). RW (where you can use ADDR16 again) sets the direction of the LCD access (read or write). DI describes the type of instruction sent to the LCD. EN is the enable signal for read and write cycles. For the keyboard, you need only two pins: KEY_DATA and KEY_CLOCK. The clock signal must be connected to an external interrupt pin, INT1. One additional wire is needed to switch the latch (LE).

You are left with eight I/O pins on the ATmega32’s ports B and D. RXD and TXD are connected to a MAX232, an RS-232 level converter that also provides the negative supply voltage needed for the LCD (LCD_VOUT in Figure 2). The ATmega32’s USART functionality is used as a debugging interface. It isn’t needed for normal operation.

SOFTWARE

The firmware for this project is posted on the Circuit Cellar FTP site. I wrote the firmware in C language with a few small parts of inline assembler. I used the open-source software suite WinAVR, which includes the GNU GCC compiler with special libraries for AVR devices and avrdude, a tool for the in-system programming of AVR microcontrollers…

USER INTERFACE

The user interface consists of three control elements: menus, edit fields, and an elaborate text editor. A special screen (the Mail Menu) enables you to quickly browse through your mailbox. After power-up, the system displays a greeting message. After a short while, the Main menu appears (see Photo 2).

Photo 2: This is a screenshot of MiniEmail’s main menu. In the upper-right corner, a clock shows the current time, which is retrieved from the Internet. An arrow to the left of the menu items indicates the selected item. (A. Mann, Circuit Cellar 204)

The Compose Mail, Check Mailbox, and Configuration submenus form a hierarchical menu structure. When the other items listed beneath the respective menu titles in the diagram are activated (e.g., start the text editor), they enable you to input data, such as a username and password, or retrieve mail from the mail server. “Standby” is the only action that is accessible directly from the main menu. All other actions are grouped by function in the submenus.

WRITING MAIL

With respect to the firmware, sending mail is much easier than reading it, so let’s first focus on the Compose Mail menu. The first item in the menu starts the text editor so you can enter the body of your letter. You then enter the recipient’s mailing address and the subject of your e-mail, just like you would do when sending e-mail from your PC. Additional fields, such as CC or BCC are not included, but since this requires only one more line in the header of the mail, it is not difficult. Your e-mail also needs a reply address, so the recipient knows who sent the mail. The reply address is normally the same for all of the messages you write. The text you enter in this edit field is stored in the ATmega32’s EEPROM, so you don’t have to type it every time you write a letter. After you select the last menu item, “Send” initiates the dispatch of the mail and displays a message that indicates whether or not it was successful.

CHECKING FOR MAIL

What makes this part more sophisticated is the ability to handle not only one e-mail at a time, but also fetch mail from the server. The system can determine which messages are new and which messages have been read. It can also extract data such as the sender, subject, or sent date from the header of the mail and then display the information.

The amount of mail the firmware can handle is limited by the size of the external SRAM. The maximum number of e-mails is currently 1,024. (If you’ve got more mail, you will be so busy answering it that you won’t have time to build your own MiniEmail client—or you should delete some old mail). Note that 1,024 is the number of unique identifiers that the system can remember. The server assigns a unique identifier to each piece of mail. The system uses the identifiers to keep track of which letters are new on the server, which have already been read, and which have been marked for deletion.

All of the header data for all of the 1,024 messages cannot be held in SRAM at once; only the most recent (about 50) mail headers are held. When you want to browse through older e-mails, the firmware automatically reconnects to the server and fetches the headers of the next 50 e-mails.

When you select Check Mailbox in the main menu, you get to a submenu where you can retrieve and read mail. Before you can collect your mail, you must enter your username and password, which can be stored in EEPROM for your convenience. The firmware then retrieves the headers and displays the Mail Menu, where you can browse through your e-mail. Apart from the size and the date, the first 42 characters of the subject and the mail sender are shown. In the first row, additional icons indicate (from left to right) whether a message is new, has been marked for deletion, or has been read. You can view the content of the selected message by pressing Return. When the mail is fetched from the server, it is prepared for viewing. The header and HTML tags, as well as long runs of the same character, are stripped from the mail and base64 decoding (used to encode 8-bit characters) is performed, so the content of the message is as readable as plain text. Binary attachments (e.g., images) can’t be handled. Following this, the mail is viewed in the text editor (with editing disabled).

A similar action is performed when you press “r” in the Mail Menu. In that case, you can edit the text so you can add your reply. Leaving the text editor will bring you back to the Send Mail menu, where the reply address and subject will be filled in so your mail will be clear for take-off. To delete a message, simply press D to mark it for deletion….

OUTLOOK

I hadn’t imagined how many details would need to be considered when I started this project more than a year ago. It has been a very interesting and challenging project. It has also been a lot of fun.

The MiniEmail system provides all of the basics for communicating via email, but such a project is never really finished. There are still dozens of items on my to-do list. Fortunately, the ATmega32 can be replaced with a new member of the AVR family, the Atmel ATmega644, which is pin-compatible to the ATmega32 and has twice the flash memory (and internal SRAM). That will provide enough space for many of my new ideas. I want to get rid of the static IP address, add CC and BCC fields, use a bigger display or a smaller (variable-width) font, improve the filtering and display of mail content and attachments, and add an address book (it would be best in combination with an additional external EEPROM with an SPI, such as the AT25256).

This project proves, rather impressively, that the ATmega32 and the ENC28J60 are a powerful combination. They can be used for many useful Internet applications. My e-mail client system is surely one of the most exciting. I can think of many other interesting possibilities. At the moment, my MiniEmail assembly serves as an online thermometer so I can check my room’s temperature from anywhere in the world…

Mann’s entire article appears in Circuit Cellar 204, 2007. Type “miniemailopen”  to access the password-protected article.

Q&A: Guido Ottaviani (Roboticist, Author)

Guido Ottaviani designs and creates innovative microcontroller-based robot systems in the city from which remarkable innovations in science and art have originated for centuries.

Guido Ottaviani

By day, the Rome-based designer is a technical manager for a large Italian editorial group. In his spare time he designs robots and interacts with various other “electronics addicts.” In an a candid interview published in Circuit Cellar 265 (August 2012), Guido described his fascination with robotics, his preferred microcontrollers, and some of his favorite design projects. Below is an abridged version of the interview.

NAN PRICE: What was the first MCU you worked with? Where were you at the time? Tell us about the project and what you learned.

GUIDO OTTAVIANI: The very first one was not technically an MCU, that was too early. It was in the mid 1980s. I worked on an 8085 CPU-based board with a lot of peripherals, clocked at 470 kHz (less than half a megahertz!) used for a radio set control panel. I was an analog circuits designer in a big electronics company, and I had started studying digital electronics on my own on a Bugbook series of self-instruction books, which were very expensive at that time. When the company needed an assembly programmer to work on this board, I said, “Don’t worry, I know the 8085 CPU very well.” Of course this was not true, but they never complained, because that job was done well and within the scheduled time.

I learned a lot about how to optimize CPU cycles on a slow processor. The program had very little time to switch off the receiver to avoid destroying it before the powerful transmitter started.

Flow charts on paper, a Motorola developing system with the program saved on an 8” floppy disk, a very primitive character-based editor, the program burned on an external EPROM and erased with a UV lamp. That was the environment! When, 20 years later, I started again with embedded programming for my hobby, using Microchip Technology’s MPLAB IDE (maybe still version 6.xx) and a Microchip Technology PIC16F84, it looked like paradise to me, even if I had to relearn almost everything.

But, what I’ve learned about code optimization—both for speed and size—is still useful even when I program the many resources on the dsPIC33F series…

NAN: You worked in the field of analog and digital development for several years. Tell us a bit about your background and experiences.

GUIDO: Let me talk about my first day of work, exactly 31 years ago.

Being a radio amateur and electronics fan, I went often to the surplus stores to find some useful components and devices, or just to touch the wonderful receivers or instruments: Bird wattmeters, Collins or Racal receivers, BC 312, BC 603 or BC 1000 military receivers and everything else on the shelves.

The first day of work in the laboratory they told to me, “Start learning that instrument.” It was a Hewlett-Packard spectrum analyzer (maybe an HP85-something) that cost more than 10 times my annual gross salary at that time. I still remember the excitement of being able to touch it, for that day and the following days. Working in a company full of these kinds of instruments (the building even had a repair and calibration laboratory with HP employees), with more than a thousand engineers who knew everything from DC to microwaves to learn from, was like living in Eden. The salary was a secondary issue (at that time).

I worked on audio and RF circuits in the HF to UHF bands: active antennas, radiogoniometers, first tests on frequency hopping and spread spectrum, and a first sample of a Motorola 68000-based GPS as big as a microwave oven.

Each instrument had an HPIB (or GPIB or IEEE488) interface to the computer. So I started approaching this new (for me) world of programming an HP9845 computer (with a cost equivalent to 5 years of my salary then) to build up automatic test sets for the circuits I developed. I was very satisfied when I was able to obtain a 10-Hz frequency hopping by a Takeda-Riken frequency synthesizer. It was not easy with such a slow computer, BASIC language, and a bus with long latencies. I had to buffer each string of commands in an array and use some special pre-caching features of the HPIB interface I found in the manual.

Every circuit, even if it was analog, was interfaced with digital ports. The boards were full of SN74xx (or SN54xx) ICs, just to make some simple functions as switching, multiplexing, or similar. Here again, my lack of knowledge was filled with the “long history experience” on Bugbook series.

Well, audio, RF, programming, communications, interfacing, digital circuits. What was I still missing to have a good background for the next-coming hobby of robotics? Ah! Embedded programming. But I’ve already mentioned this experience.

After all these design jobs, because my knowledge started spreading on many different projects, it was natural to start working as a system engineer, taking care of all the aspects of a complex system, including project management.

NAN: You have a long-time interest in robotics and autonomous robot design. When did you first become interested in robots and why?

GUIDO: I’ve loved the very simple robots in the toy store windows since I was young, the same I have on my website (Pino and Nino). But they were too simple. Just making something a little bit more sophisticated required too much electronics at that time.

After a big gap in my electronics activity, I discovered a newly published robotic magazine, with an electronic parts supplement. This enabled me to build a programmable robot based on a Microchip PIC16F84. A new adventure started. I felt much younger. Suddenly, all the electronics-specialized neurons inside my brain, after being asleep for many years, woke up and started running again. Thanks to the Internet (not yet available when I left professional electronics design), I discovered a lot of new things: MCUs, free IDEs running even on a simple computer, free compilers, very cheap programming devices, and lots of documentation freely available. I threw away the last Texas Instruments databook I still had on my bookshelf and started studying again. There were a lot of new things to know, but, with a good background, it was a pleasant (if frantic) study. I’ve also bought some books, but they became old before I finished reading them.

Within a few months, jumping among all the hardware and software versions Microchip released at an astonishing rate, I found Johann Borenstein et al’s book Where Am I?: Systems and Methods for Mobile Robot Positioning (University of Michigan, 1996). This report and Borenstein’s website taught me a lot about autonomous navigation techniques. David P. Anderson’s “My Robots” webpage (www.geology.smu.edu/~dpa-www/myrobots.html) inspired all my robots, completed or forthcoming.

I’ve never wanted to make a remote-controlled car, so my robots must navigate autonomously in an unknown environment, reacting to the external stimuli. …

NAN: Robotics is a focal theme in many of the articles you have contributed to Circuit Cellar. One of your article series, “Robot Navigation and Control” (224–225, 2009), was about a navigation control subsystem you built for an autonomous differential steering explorer robot. The first part focused on the robotic platform that drives motors and controls an H-bridge. You then described the software development phase of the project. Is the project still in use? Have you made any updates to it?

The “dsNavCon” system features a Microchip Technology dsPIC30F4012 motor controller and a general-purpose dsPIC30F3013. (Source: G. Ottaviani, CC224)

GUIDO: After I wrote that article series, that project evolved until the beginning of this year. There is a new switched power supply, a new audio sensor, the latest version of dsNav dsPIC33-based board became commercially available online, some mechanical changing, improvements on telemetry console, a lot of modifications in the firmware, and the UMBmark calibration performed successfully.

The goal is reached. That robot was a lab to experiment sensors, solutions, and technologies. Now I’m ready for a further step: outdoors.

NAN: You wrote another robotics-related article in 2010 titled, “A Sensor System for Robotics Applications” (Circuit Cellar 236). Here you describe adding senses—sight, hearing, and touch—to a robotics design. Tell us about the design, which is built around an Arduino Diecimila board. How does the board factor into the design?

An Arduino-based robot platform (Source: G. Ottavini, CC236)

GUIDO: That was the first time I used an Arduino. I’ve always used PICs, and I wanted to test this well-known board. In that case, I needed to interface many I2C, analog sensors, and an I2C I/O expander. I didn’t want to waste time configuring peripherals. All the sensors had 5-V I/O. The computing time constraints were not so strict. Arduino fits perfectly into all of these prerequisites. The learning curve was very fast. There was already a library of every device I’ve used. There was no need for a voltage level translation between 3.3 and 5 V. Everything was easy, fast, and cheap. Why not use it for these kinds of projects?

NAN: You designed an audio sensor for a Rino robotic platform (“Sound Tone Detection with a PSoC Part 1 and Part 2,” Circuit Cellar 256–257, 2011). Why did you design the system? Did you design it for use at work or home? Give us some examples of how you’ve used the sensor.

GUIDO: I already had a sound board based on classic op-amp ICs. I discovered the PSoC devices in a robotic meeting. At that moment, there was a special offer for the PSoC1 programmer and, incidentally, it was close to my birthday. What a perfect gift from my relatives!

This was another excuse to study a completely different programmable device and add something new to my background. The learning curve was not as easy as the Arduino one. It is really different because… it does a very different job. The new PSoC-based audio board was smaller, simpler, and with many more features than the previous one. The original project was designed to detect a fixed 4-kHz tone, but now it is easy to change the central frequency, the band, and the behavior of the board. This confirms once more, if needed, that nowadays, this kind of professional design is also available to hobbyists. …

NAN: What do you consider to be the “next big thing” in the embedded design industry? Is there a particular technology that you’ve used or seen that will change the way engineers design in the coming months and years?

GUIDO: As often happens, the “big thing” is one of the smallest ones. Many manufacturers are working on micro-nano-pico watt devices. I’ve done a little but not very extreme experimenting with my Pendulum project. Using the sleeping features of a simple PIC10F22P with some care, I’ve maintained the pendulum’s oscillation bob for a year with a couple of AAA batteries and it is still oscillating behind me right now.

Because of this kind of MCU, we can start seriously thinking about energy harvesting. We can get energy from light, heat, any kind of RF, movement or whatever, to have a self-powered, autonomous device. Thanks to smartphones, PDAs, tablets, and other portable devices, the MEMS sensors have become smaller and less expensive.

In my opinion, all this technology—together with supercapacitors, solid-state batteries or similar—will spread many small devices everywhere to monitor everything.

The entire interview is published in Circuit Cellar 265 (August 2012).