MPLAB Harmony Firmware Dev Framework for 32-Bit MCUs

Microchip Technology announced Monday the availability of MPLAB Harmony Version 1.0, which was described as a “fully integrated firmware development platform for all 32-bit PIC32 microcontrollers (MCUs).”  Microchip-MPLAB-Harmony

According to Microchp’s release, “It takes key elements of modular and object-oriented design, adds in the flexibility to use a RTOS or work without one, and provides a framework of software modules that are easy to use, configurable for specific design requirements and that are purpose built to work together.”

Features:

  • MPLAB Harmony Configurator for fast driver and middleware settings management
  • A pro graphics library in addition to functional and performance improvements across many of the Harmony driver libraries
  • IPv6 certification of the Microchip TCP/IP stack

The MPLAB Harmony Integrated Software Framework is supported by Microchip’s free MPLAB X Integrated Development Environment (IDE). The MPLAB Harmony basic framework is currently available as a free download.

Source: Microchip Technology, Inc.

New 8-Bit PICs for Sensor Applications

Microchip Technology recently expanded it’s PIC12/16LF155X 8-bit microcontroller family with the PIC16LF1554 and PIC16LF1559 (PIC16LF1554/9), which are targeted toward a variety of sensor applications. The PIC16LF1554/9 features two independent 10-bit, 100,000 samples per second ADCs with hardware Capacitive Voltage Divider (CVD) support for capacitive touch sensing.

Source: Microchip Techno

Source: Microchip Techno

Watch a short video:

The PIC16LF1554 MCUs are available now for sampling and production in 14-pin PDIP, TSSOP, SOIC, and 16-pin QFN (4 x 4 x .9 mm) packages. The PIC16LF1559 MCUs are available for sampling and production in 20-pin PDIP, SSOP, and QFN (4 x 4 x .9 mm) packages. Pricing starts at $0.63 each, in 10,000-unit quantities.

Source: Microchip Technology

Got Problematic Little Bits? (EE Tip #142)

While testing a project, something strange happened (see the nearby image). The terminal showed nonsense, but the logic analyzer properly displayed “Elektor” in ASCII. The latter also indicated that the UART was operating at 4800 baud instead of the 19200 baud that I had programmed (at least that’s what I thought), a difference with a factor of four. The change I had made in my code was a fourfold increase in the clock speed of the dsPIC. The conclusion I had to arrive at is that the clock speed was not being changed. But why not?

Source: Raymond Vermeulen (Elektor, October 2011)

Source: Raymond Vermeulen (Elektor, October 2011)

The inspiration came, and where else, in the shower. In a hobby project, I had used an ATmega32u4 with a bootloader whose only limitation was being unable to program the fuse bits. “That’s not going to be…” I was thinking. But yes, the bootloader I used in my dsPIC cannot program the configuration bits either. Experienced programmers would have realized that long ago, but we all have our off-days. (The solution is to use a “real” programmer, such as the ICD3).—By Raymond Vermeulen (Elektor Labs, Elektor, October 2011)

 

New PIC32 Bluetooth Starter Kit

Microchip Technology recently announced the new PIC32 Bluetooth Starter Kit, which is intended for low-cost applications such as a Bluetooth thermostat, wireless diagnostic tools, and Bluetooth GPS receivers. According to Microchip, the kit includes “a PIC32 microcontroller, HCI-based Bluetooth radio, Cree high-output multi-color LED, three standard single-color LEDs, an analog three-axis accelerometer, analog temperature sensor, and five push buttons for user-defined inputs.”

PIC32 Bluetooth Starter Kit (Source: Microchip Technology)

PIC32 Bluetooth Starter Kit (Source: Microchip Technology)

PICkit On Board (PKOB) eliminates the need for an external debugger/programmer, USB connectivity, and GPIOs for rapid development of Bluetooth Serial Port Profile (SPP), USB and general-purpose applications.  The starter kit also features a plug-in interface for an audio CODEC daughter card. The kit’s PIC32MX270F256D microcontroller operates at 83 DMIPS with 256-KB flash memory and 64-KB RAM.

The PIC32 Bluetooth Starter Kit is supported by Microchip’s free MPLAB X IDE and MPLAB Harmony Integrated Software Framework.  Additionally, the free Quick Start Package is available with an Android application development environment. It also includes a free SDK with the application source code and binary for Microchip’s Bluetooth SPP library.  Both are optimized for the on-board PIC32 MCU and are available for free at www.microchip.com/get/1AVL.

 

The PIC32 Bluetooth Starter Kit costs $79.99.

RN4020 Bluetooth Smart Module

Microchip Technology recently announced its first Bluetooth 4.1 Low Energy module, the RN4020, which carries both worldwide regulatory certifications and is Bluetooth Special Interest Group (SIG) certified. The integrated Bluetooth Low Energy (BTLE) stack and on-board support for the common SIG low-energy profiles speeds time to market while ensuring Bluetooth compatibility, eliminating expensive certification costs and reducing development risks. The module comes preloaded with the Microchip Low-energy Data Profile (MLDP), which enables designers to easily stream any type of data across the BTLE link. MicrochipRN4020

The RN4020 is a stack-on-board module, so it can connect to any microcontroller with a UART interface, including hundreds of PIC MCUs, or it can operate standalone without an MCU for basic data collection and communication, such as a beacon or sensor. Standalone operation is facilitated by Microchip’s unique no-compile scripting, which allows module configuration via a simple ASCII command interface—no tools or compiling are required.

The RN4020 Bluetooth Low Energy Module is available for $6.78 each in 1,000-unit quantities.

[Via Microchip Technology]