Expanded 32-bit MCU Family with Integrated Floating Point Unit Series

Microchip Technology has launched a new series of its high-performance PIC32MZ family of 32-bit microcontrollers that features an integrated hardware floating point unit (FPU) for high performance and lower latency in intensive single and double-precision math applications. This new 48-member PIC32MZ EF series also offers a 12-bit, 18 MSPS analog-to-digital converter (ADC) for a wide array of high-speed, wide-bandwidth applications. Additionally, the PIC32MZ EF supports an extensive DSP instruction set. This combination of DSP instructions, a double-precision FPU and a high-speed ADC improves code density, decreases latency and accelerates performance in process-intensive applications.Microchip32MZ

The PIC32MZ EF series is powered by Imagination’s MIPS M-Class core at 200MHz/330 DMIPS and 3.28 CoreMarks/MHz, along with dual-panel, live-update flash memory (up to 2 MB), large RAM (512 KB), and the widest selection of connectivity peripherals in the entire PIC32 portfolio, including a 10/100 Ethernet MAC, Hi-Speed USB MAC/PHY, and dual CAN ports.

The PIC32MZ EF, in the LCCG configuration, can support up to a WQVGA display without the added cost of external graphics controllers. An optional, full-featured hardware crypto engine is also available with a random number generator for high-throughput data encryption/decryption and authentication (e.g., AES, 3DES, SHA, MD5, and HMAC).
Accelerating product cycles and rapidly evolving customer demands are increasing time-to-market pressures on designers. Microchip’s MPLAB Harmony Integrated Software Framework provides a modular, easy-to-use GUI-based development ecosystem that helps ease integration and reduces testing and speed adaptation.

The new PIC32MZ EF series is also supported by Microchip’s free MPLAB X Integrated Development Environment (IDE), within which Harmony operates, as well as the MPLAB XC32 Compilers. The MPLAB ICD 3 In-Circuit Debugger (part # DV164035, $199.95) and MPLAB REAL ICE In-Circuit Emulator System (part # DV244005, $499.98) are also available.

Four new PIC32MZ EF development tools are also available today. The complete, turn-key PIC32MZ Embedded Connectivity with FPU EF Starter Kit ($119); the PIC32MZ Embedded connectivity with Floating Point Unit and Crypto Starter Kit ($119); the PIC32MZ2048EF PIM Explorer 16 Plug In Module ($25); and the PIC32MZ EF Audio 144-pin PIM for Bluetooth Audio Development Kit ($25).

The 48 members of the PIC32MZ EF series are available for sampling and volume production. The crypto engine is integrated into 16 of the PIC32MZ EF MCUs, and there are 12 MCUs with 512 KB of flash memory, 24 MCUs with 1 MB of flash memory, and 12 MCUs with 2 MB of flash memory. Pricing starts at $5.48 each in 10,000-unit quantities.

Source: Microchip Technology

New STM32 Micrcontrollers in Small Memory Sizes

STMicroelectronics’s new STM32F446 microcontrollers feature ARM Cortex-M4 based processing combined with 256- or 512-KB on-chip flash memory options. In addition to using STMicro’s ART Accelerator, the microcontrollers feature smart architecture, advanced flash technology, and an embedded ARM Cortex-M4 core to achieve a performance of 225 DMIPS and 608 CoreMark at 180 MHz executing from embedded flash.

Source: STMicroelectronics

Source: STMicroelectronics

Key features include:

  • At 180 MHz, the STM32F446 delivers 225 DMIPS/608 CoreMark performance executing from flash memory with 0-wait states. The DSP instructions and the floating-point unit expand the range of addressable applications.
  • Using a 90-nm process, the current consumption in Run mode and executing from flash memory is as low as 200 µA/MHz at 180 MHz. In Stop mode, the power consumption is 50 µA typical.
  • Two dedicated audio PLL, SPDIF input, three half-duplex I²S, and two serial audio interfaces (SAI) supporting full-duplex I²S as well as time division multiplex (TDM) mode.
  • Up to 20 communication interfaces (including 4x USARTs plus 2x UARTs running at up to 11.25 Mbps, 4x SPI running at up to 45 Mbps, 3x I²C with a new optional digital filter capability, 2x CAN, SDIO, HDMI CEC and camera interface)
  • Two 12-bit DACs, three 12-bit ADCs reaching 2.4 MSPS or 7.2 MSPS in interleaved mode up to 17 timers: 16- and 32-bit running at up to 180 MHz
  • Easily extendable memory range using the flexible 90-MHz memory controller with a 32-bit parallel interface, and supporting Compact Flash, SRAM, PSRAM, NOR, NAND and SDRAM memories
  • Cost-effective NOR flash extension with the 90-MHz Dual quadSPI interface supporting memory-mapped mode
  • STM32F446 samples are now available for lead customers. Volume production is scheduled for Q1 2015 in packages from a tiny WLCSP81 measuring 3.728 × 3.85 mm to a 20 × 20 mm LQFP144 with 256- or 512-KB flash memory, all with 128-KB SRAM. Pricing starts at $3.75 for the STM32F446RC in a 64-pin LQFP64 package with 256-KB flash memory and 128-KB SRAM for orders of 10,000 units.

Source: STMicroelectronics

New PIC32 Bluetooth Starter Kit

Microchip Technology recently announced the new PIC32 Bluetooth Starter Kit, which is intended for low-cost applications such as a Bluetooth thermostat, wireless diagnostic tools, and Bluetooth GPS receivers. According to Microchip, the kit includes “a PIC32 microcontroller, HCI-based Bluetooth radio, Cree high-output multi-color LED, three standard single-color LEDs, an analog three-axis accelerometer, analog temperature sensor, and five push buttons for user-defined inputs.”

PIC32 Bluetooth Starter Kit (Source: Microchip Technology)

PIC32 Bluetooth Starter Kit (Source: Microchip Technology)

PICkit On Board (PKOB) eliminates the need for an external debugger/programmer, USB connectivity, and GPIOs for rapid development of Bluetooth Serial Port Profile (SPP), USB and general-purpose applications.  The starter kit also features a plug-in interface for an audio CODEC daughter card. The kit’s PIC32MX270F256D microcontroller operates at 83 DMIPS with 256-KB flash memory and 64-KB RAM.

The PIC32 Bluetooth Starter Kit is supported by Microchip’s free MPLAB X IDE and MPLAB Harmony Integrated Software Framework.  Additionally, the free Quick Start Package is available with an Android application development environment. It also includes a free SDK with the application source code and binary for Microchip’s Bluetooth SPP library.  Both are optimized for the on-board PIC32 MCU and are available for free at www.microchip.com/get/1AVL.


The PIC32 Bluetooth Starter Kit costs $79.99.

Experimentation and Engineering

Frederic Vecoven is software engineer living in Luxembourg who enjoys experimenting with everything from his home’s central heating controller to FPGAs. He has been designing micrcontroller-based projects for more than a dozen years and is currently working on an EPROM emulator.—Nan Price, Associate Editor


NAN: What is your current occupation?

FREDERIC:: I am a software principal engineer at Oracle.

NAN: Your website Vecoven.com features projects involving capacitors, microcontrollers, and EEPROM and hardware emulators. Tell us a little about the projects and your design process.

vecovenFREDERIC: At work I design firmware for high-end servers. At home I like to design my own stuff, so I have full control and can create new devices and/or enhance existing ones. I work on various projects and I don’t find enough time to document all of them on the website. For example, I designed a controller for the central heating in my house, but never documented it (it’s too “custom”). I love retrocomputing, which is how my FreHD project started. This is a hard-drive emulator for TRS-80 computers.

My design process starts from an idea (I have too many, so I must carefully select one) then a lot of thinking about the future implementation (as always, designing something is about compromises). Once I have a clear view in my mind about how things should work, I start prototyping. If possible, I use a breadboard or I create a PCB. Sometimes I do a lot of simulation before starting the prototyping, as this will save a lot of time. However, that cannot be done for all projects.

NAN: How long have you been designing microcontroller-based systems?

FREDERIC: More than 15 years.

NAN: How did you become interested in technology?

FREDERIC: When I was 13 years old I fell in love with computers when I saw a TRS-80 model in high school. I am thankful to my parents, who gave me a computer one year later.
I went to college and got a master’s degree in computer science. But I wasn’t satisfied, so I studied some more years to get another master’s degree, this time in electrical engineering. The combination of software and hardware is really powerful. A few years later, I relocated to the San Francisco Bay Area, but I am back in Europe now.

NAN: Describe the first embedded system you designed. Where were you at the time? What did you learn from the experience?

FREDERIC: My first big experience with a real embedded system was when I was working for Sun Microsystems. My group was writing the firmware for the system controllers of the SunFire 3800-6900 line. The embedded system was a small SPARC CPU running Wind River Systems’s VxWorks and the firmware was almost entirely written in Java.

NAN: What was the last electronics design-related product you purchased and how did you use it?

FREDERIC: I bought some FPGAs recently. I haven’t released any project with it yet, it is still a work in progress. My hobby time is very limited.

My idea is to use a CPU core and enhance it with new instructions to enable the generation of real-time signals. FPGAs are very powerful in that area, where a microcontroller would spend most of its time processing interrupts.

NAN: Are you currently working on or planning any projects?


This is Frederic’s PWM prototype for his Roland Super JX synthesizer.

FREDERIC: Yes, I have rewritten the Roland JX-10/MKS-70 firmware from scratch because I wanted to add PWM waveforms. This quickly turned into a big project. Currently, the prototype setup involves a simulator running the “assigner” code on my laptop. The laptop sends the sound board commands in System Exclusive (SysEx) Musical Instrument Digital Interface (MIDI) messages, which go to a microcontroller that extracts the payload from the SysEx. The payload is then sent to the sound board, which believes it got its instructions directly from the assigner. The sound board (which runs its own microcontroller) uses an EPROM emulator connected over USB, so I can easily modify the assigner code (running in the simulator) or the sound board code (running in the EPROM emulator) without having to program any chip. Note that I didn’t have an EPROM emulator, so I designed mine.


This oscilloscope capture shows the generated PWM signal.

FREDERIC: The power of CPUs and GPUs are really exciting. You can pretty much do everything with software now (a 32-bit core costs less than $5).
On the other side, people don’t pay enough attention to optimization, so I am sad anytime I see poorly written code. I am also excited with all the tools and hardware available today for so little cost. That wasn’t the case in the past, so it opens door to students and hobbyists.

NAN: Last question. Let’s say you had a full year and a nice budget to work on any embedded design project you wanted. Call it your “dream project.” What would it be?

FREDERIC: I would love to do some robotic design, but I am not an expert in mechanics and I don’t have the tools (e.g., lathe, milling machine, etc.). That would fill the gap: hardware, software, and mechanics.