A Workspace for “Engineering Magic”

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Photo 1—Brandsma describes his workspace as his “little corner where the engineering magic happens.”

Sjoerd Brandsma, an R&D manager at CycloMedia, enjoys designing with cameras, GPS receivers, and transceivers. His creates his projects in a small workspace in Kerkwijk, The Netherlands (see Photo 1). He also designs in his garage, where he uses a mill and a lathe for some small and medium metal work (see Photo 2).

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Photo 2—Brandsma uses this Weiler lathe for metal work.

The Weiler lathe has served me and the previous owners for many years, but is still healthy and precise. The black and red mill does an acceptable job and is still on my list to be converted to a computer numerical control (CNC) machine.

Brandsma described some of his projects.

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Photo 3—Some of Brandsma’s projects include an mbed-based camera project (left), a camera with an 8-bit parallel databus interface (center), and an MP3 player that uses a decoder chip that is connected to an mbed module (right).

I built a COMedia C328 UART camera with a 100° lens placed on a 360° servomotor (see Photo 3, left).  Both are connected to an mbed module. When the system starts, the camera takes a full-circle picture every 90°. The four images are stored on an SD card and can be stitched into a panoramic image. I built this project for the NXP mbed design challenge 2010 but never finished the project because the initial idea involved doing some stitching on the mbed module itself. This seemed to be a bit too complicated due to memory limitations.

I built this project built around a 16-MB framebuffer for the Aptina MT9D131 camera (see Photo 3, center). This camera has an 8-bit parallel databus interface that operates on 6 to 80 MHz. This is way too fast for most microcontrollers (e.g., Arduino, Atmel AVR, Microchip Technology PIC, etc.). With this framebuffer, it’s possible to capture still images and store/process the image data at a later point.

This project involves an MP3 player that uses a VLSI VS1053 decoder chip that is connected to an mbed module (see Photo 3, right). The great thing about the mbed platform is that there’s plenty of library code available. This is also the case for the VS1053. With that, it’s a piece of cake to build your own MP3 player. The green button is a Skip button. But beware! If you press that button it will play a song you don’t like and you cannot skip that song.

He continued by describing his test equipment.

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Photo 4—Brandsma’s test equipment collection includes a Tektronix TDS220 oscilloscope (top), a Total Phase Beagle protocol analyzer (second from top), a Seeed Technology Open Workbench Logic Sniffer (second from bottom), and a Cypress Semiconductor CY7C68013A USB microcontroller (bottom).

Most of the time, I’ll use my good old Tektronix TDS220 oscilloscope. It still works fine for the basic stuff I’m doing (see Photo 4, top). The Total Phase Beagle I2C/SPI protocol analyzer Beagle/SPI is a great tool to monitor and analyze I2C/SPI traffic (see Photo 4, second from top).

The red PCB is a Seeed Technology 16-channel Open Workbench Logic Sniffer (see Photo 4, second from bottom). This is actually a really cool low-budget open-source USB logic analyzer that’s quite handy once in a while when I need to analyze some data bus issues.

The board on the bottom is a Cypress CY7C68013A USB microcontroller high-speed USB peripheral controller that can be used as an eight-channel logic analyzer or as any other high-speed data-capture device (see Photo 4, bottom). It’s still on my “to-do” list to connect it to the Aptina MT9D131 camera and do some video streaming.

Brandsma believes that “books tell a lot about a person.” Photo 5 shows some books he uses when designing and or programming his projects.

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Photo 5—A few of Brandsma’s “go-to” books are shown.

The technical difficulty of the books differs a lot. Electronica echt niet moeilijk (Electronics Made Easy) is an entry-level book that helped me understand the basics of electronics. On the other hand, the books about operating systems and the C++ programming language are certainly of a different level.

An article about Brandsma’s Sun Chaser GPS Reference Station is scheduled to appear in Circuit Cellar’s June issue.

Traveling With a “Portable Workspace”

As a freelance engineer, Raul Alvarez spends a lot of time on the go. He says the last four or five years he has been traveling due to work and family reasons, therefore he never stays in one place long enough to set up a proper workspace. “Whenever I need to move again, I just pack whatever I can: boards, modules, components, cables, and so forth, and then I’m good to go,” he explains.

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Alvarez sits at his “current” workstation.

He continued by saying:

In my case, there’s not much of a workspace to show because my workspace is whichever desk I have at hand in a given location. My tools are all the tools that I can fit into my traveling backpack, along with my software tools that are installed in my laptop.

Because in my personal projects I mostly work with microcontroller boards, modular components, and firmware, until now I think it didn’t bother me not having more fancy (and useful) tools such as a bench oscilloscope, a logic analyzer, or a spectrum analyzer. I just try to work with whatever I have at hand because, well, I don’t have much choice.

Given my circumstances, probably the most useful tools I have for debugging embedded hardware and firmware are a good-old UART port, a multimeter, and a bunch of LEDs. For the UART interface I use a Future Technology Devices International FT232-based UART-to-USB interface board and Tera Term serial terminal software.

Currently, I’m working mostly with Microchip Technology PIC and ARM microcontrollers. So for my PIC projects my tiny Microchip Technology PICkit 3 Programmer/Debugger usually saves the day.

Regarding ARM, I generally use some of the new low-cost ARM development boards that include programming/debugging interfaces. I carry an LPC1769 LPCXpresso board, an mbed board, three STMicroelectronics Discovery boards (Cortex-M0, Cortex-M3, and Cortex-M4), my STMicroelectronics STM32 Primer2, three Texas Instruments LaunchPads (the MSP430, the Piccolo, and the Stellaris), and the following Linux boards: two BeagleBoard.org BeagleBones (the gray one and a BeagleBone Black), a Cubieboard, an Odroid-X2, and a Raspberry Pi Model B.

Additionally, I always carry an Arduino UNO, a Digilent chipKIT Max 32 Arduino-compatible board (which I mostly use with MPLAB X IDE and “regular” C language), and a self-made Parallax Propeller microcontroller board. I also have a Wi-Fi 3G TP-LINK TL-WR703N mini router flashed   with OpenWRT that enables me to experiment with Wi-Fi and Ethernet and to tinker with their embedded Linux environment. It also provides me Internet access with the use of a 3G modem.

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Not a bad set up for someone on the go. Alvarez’s “portable workstation” includes ICs, resistors, and capacitors, among other things. He says his most useful tools are a UART port, a multimeter, and some LEDs.

In three or four small boxes I carry a lot of sensors, modules, ICs, resistors, capacitors, crystals, jumper cables, breadboard strips, and some DC-DC converter/regulator boards for supplying power to my circuits. I also carry a small video camera for shooting my video tutorials, which I publish from time to time at my website (www.raulalvarez.net). I have installed in my laptop TechSmith’s Camtasia for screen capture and Sony Vegas for editing the final video and audio.

Some IDEs that I have currently installed in my laptop are: LPCXpresso, Texas Instruments’s Code Composer Studio, IAR EW for Renesas RL78 and 8051, Ride7, Keil uVision for ARM, MPLAB X, and the Arduino IDE, among others. For PC coding I have installed Eclipse, MS Visual Studio, GNAT Programming Studio (I like to tinker with Ada from time to time), QT Creator, Python IDLE, MATLAB, and Octave. For schematics and PCB design I mostly use CadSoft’s EAGLE, ExpressPCB, DesignSpark PCB, and sometimes KiCad.

Traveling with my portable rig isn’t particularly pleasant for me. I always get delayed at security and customs checkpoints in airports. I get questioned a lot especially about my circuit boards and prototypes and I almost always have to buy a new set of screwdrivers after arriving at my destination. Luckily for me, my nomad lifestyle is about to come to an end soon and finally I will be able to settle down in my hometown in Cochabamba, Bolivia. The first two things I’m planning to do are to buy a really big workbench and a decent digital oscilloscope.

Alvarez’s article “The Home Energy Gateway: Remotely Control and Monitor Household Devices” appeared in Circuit Cellar’s February issue. For more information about Alvarez, visit his website or follow him on Twitter @RaulAlvarezT.

Tech Highlights from Design West: RL78, AndroPod, Stellaris, mbed, & more

The Embedded Systems Conference has always been a top venue for studying, discussing, and handling the embedded industry’s newest leading-edge technologies. This year in San Jose, CA, I walked the floor looking for the tech Circuit Cellar and Elektor members would love to get their hands on and implement in novel projects. Here I review some of the hundreds of interesting products and systems at Design West 2012.

RENESAS

Renesas launched the RL78 Design Challenge at Design West. The following novel RL78 applications were particularly intriguing.

  • An RL78 L12 MCU powered by a lemon:

    A lemon powers the RL78 (Photo: Circuit Cellar)

  • An RL78 kit used for motor control:

    The RL78 used for motor control (Photo: Circuit Cellar)

  • An RL78 demo for home control applications:

    The RL78 used for home control (Photo: Circuit Cellar)

TEXAS INSTRUMENTS

Circuit Cellar members have used TI products in countless applications. Below are two interesting TI Cortex-based designs

A Cortex-M3 digital guitar (you can see the Android connection):

TI's digital guitar (Photo: Circuit Cellar)

Stellaris fans will be happy to see the Stellaris ARM Cortex -M4F in a small wireless application:

The Stellaris goes wireless (Photo: Circuit Cellar)

NXP mbed

Due to the success of the recent NXP mbed Design Challenge, I stopped at the mbed station to see what exciting technologies our NXP friends were exhibiting. They didn’t disappoint. Check out the mbed-based slingshot developed for playing Angry Birds!

mbed-Based sligshot for going after "Angry Birds" (Photo: Circuit Cellar)

Below is a video of the project on the mbedmicro YouTube page:

FTDI

I was pleased to see the Elektor AndroPod hard at work at the FTDI booth. The design enables users to easily control a robotic arm with Android smartphones and tablets.

FTDI demonstrates robot control with Android (Photo: Circuit Cellar)

As you can imagine, the possible applications are endless.

The AndroPod at work! (Photo: Circuit Cellar)

Build a CNC Panel Cutter Controller

Want a CNC panel cutter and controller for your lab, hackspace, or workspace? James Koehler of Canada built an NXP Semiconductors mbed-based system to control a three-axis milling machine, which he uses to cut panels for electronic equipment. You can customize one yourself.

Panel Cutter Controller (Source: James Koehler)

According to Koehler:

Modern electronic equipment often requires front panels with large cut-outs for LCD’s, for meters and, in general, openings more complicated than can be made with a drill. It is tedious to do this by hand and difficult to achieve a nice finished appearance. This controller allows it to be done simply, quickly and to be replicated exactly.

Koehler’s design is an interesting alternative to a PC program. The self-contained controller enables him to run a milling machine either manually or automatically (following a script) without having to clutter his workspace with a PC. It’s both effective and space-saving!

The Controller Setup (Source: James Koehler)

How does it work? The design controls three stepping motors.

The Complete System (Source: James Koehler)

Inside the controller are a power supply and a PCB, which carries the NXP mbed module plus the necessary interface circuitry and a socket for an SD card.

The Controller (Source: James Koehler)

Koehler explains:

In use, a piece of material for the panel is clamped onto the milling machine table and the cutting tool is moved to a starting position using the rotary encoders. Then the controller is switched to its ‘automatic’ mode and a script on the SD card is then followed to cut the panel. A very simple ‘language’ is used for the script; to go to any particular (x, y) position, to lift the cutting tool, to lower the cutting tool, to cut a rectangle of any dimension and to cut a circle of any dimension, etc. More complex instructions sequences such as those needed to cut the rectangular opening plus four mounting holes for a LCD are just combinations, called macros, of those simple instructions; every new device (meter mounting holes, LCD mounts, etc.) will have its own macro. The complete script for a particular panel can be any combination of simple commands plus macros. The milling machine, a Taig ‘micro mill’, with stepping motors is shown in Figure 2. In its ‘manual’ mode, the system can be used as a conventional three axis mill controlled via the rotary encoders. The absolute position of the cutting tool is displayed in units of either inches, mm or thousandths of an inch.

Click here to read Koehler’s project abstract. Click here to read his complete documentation PDF, which includes block diagrams, schematics, and more.

This project won Third Place in the 2010 NXP mbed Design Challenge and is posted as per the terms of the Challenge.