Flowcode (Part 4): Dev Boards to Pro Apps

In the first article in this series, you were introduced to Flowcode 7, flowchart-driven electronic IDE that enables you to produce hex code for more than 1,300 different microcontrollers, including PIC8, PIC16, PIC32, AVR, Arduino, and ARM. The second article detailed how to get working with displays in Flowcode. The third article detailed some of the more complex communications components, Modbus and DMX. This article details the Matrix Industrial Automotive Controller (MIAC), which gives you the ruggedness and power of a PLC with the flexibility and ease of programming a controller. You learn how to use a MIAC and Flowcode 7 in an application. Download the article.

Click to download the free article

Click to download the free article

Want a Free Trial and/or Buy Flowcode 7? Download Now

Flowcode is an IDE for electronic and electromechanical system development. Pro engineers, electronics enthusiasts, and academics can use Flowcode to develop systems for control and measurement based on microcontrollers or on rugged industrial interfaces using Windows-compatible personal computers. Visit www.flowcode.co.uk/circuitcellar to learn about Flowcode 7. You can access a free version, or you can purchase advanced features and professional Flowcode licenses through the modular licensing system. If you make a purchase through that page, Circuit Cellar will receive a commission.

Flowcode 7 (Part 3): Modbus and DMX512 (Sponsor: Matrix)

In the first article in this series, you were introduced to Flowcode 7, flowchart-driven electronic IDE that enables you to produce hex code for more than 1,300 different microcontrollers, including PIC8, PIC16, PIC32, AVR, Arduino, and ARM. The second article detailed how to get working with displays in Flowcode. This article will investigate some of the more complex communications components, Modbus and DMX. Both of these components basically let you do the same thing, which is to use one device (Master) to control one or more remote devices (Slaves). Access the third article.

Click to download the free article

Want a Free Trial and/or Buy Flowcode 7? Download Now

Flowcode is an IDE for electronic and electromechanical system development. Pro engineers, electronics enthusiasts, and academics can use Flowcode to develop systems for control and measurement based on microcontrollers or on rugged industrial interfaces using Windows-compatible personal computers. Visit www.flowcode.co.uk/circuitcellar to learn about Flowcode 7. You can access a free version, or you can purchase advanced features and professional Flowcode licenses through the modular licensing system. If you make a purchase through that page, Circuit Cellar will receive a commission.

The Flow Coder

Products come and go. New products are developed all the time. So, what’s the key to success? John Dobson has successfully run Halifax, UK-based Matrix TSL 23 years. During that time, the company has gone through some changes. He recently gave Circuit Cellar a tour Matrix’s headquarters, shared a bit about the company’s history, and talked about product diversification.

Matrix started 23 years ago as a Matrix Multimedia, a CD-ROM publisher. “The Internet came along and destroyed that business, and we had to diversify, and so we diversified into electronics and into education in particular,” Dobson said.

Matrix’s flagship product is Flowcode software. “It basically uses flowcharts to allow people without a huge amount of coding experience to develop complex electronics systems,” Dobson explained. “Sometimes programming in C or other languages is a little complicated and time consuming. So Flowcode has a lot of components to it with libraries and things and lots of features that allow people to design complex electronic systems quickly.”

Today, while still focused on the education market, the latest version of Flowcode has about 3,000 industrial users. Dobson said many of the industrial users are test engineers whose specialty isn’t necessary coding.

Note: Circuit Cellar is currently running a Flowcode 7 promotion with Matrix TSL. Learn More

Flowcode 7 (Part 2): Displays in Flowcode (Sponsor: Matrix)

In the first part of this series, you were introduced to Flowcode 7, a flowchart-driven electronic IDE that enables you to produce hex code for more than 1,300 different microcontrollers, including PIC8, PIC16, PIC32, AVR, Arduino, and ARM. In the second free article in this series, embedded engineer Ben Rowland gets you working with displays in Flowcode. He covers: communicating with displays, code and display porting, a bitmap drawer component, and more.

A maze generation algorithm being tested using a graphical LCD and the Flowcode simulation.

A maze generation algorithm being tested using a graphical LCD and the Flowcode simulation.

Want a Free Trial and/or Buy Flowcode 7? Download Now

Flowcode is an IDE for electronic and electromechanical system development. Pro engineers, electronics enthusiasts, and academics can use Flowcode to develop systems for control and measurement based on microcontrollers or on rugged industrial interfaces using Windows-compatible personal computers. Visit www.flowcode.co.uk/circuitcellar to learn about Flowcode 7. You can access a free version, or you can purchase advanced features and professional Flowcode licenses through the modular licensing system. If you make a purchase through that page, Circuit Cellar will receive a commission.

Click to download the article

Flowcode 7 (Part 1): Simplifying Microcontroller Programming (Sponsor: Matrix)

These days the most commonly used device in electronic systems is the microcontroller: it is hard to find a piece of electronics without one, and you use thousands of them a day. In this free article, John Dobson, managing director at Matrix TSL, introduces Flowcode 7 and explains how you can use it for your next microcontroller-based design.

Want a Free Trial and/or Buy Flowcode 7? Download Now

Flowcode is an IDE for electronic and electromechanical system development. Pro engineers, electronics enthusiasts, and academics can use Flowcode to develop systems for control and measurement based on microcontrollers or on rugged industrial interfaces using Windows-compatible personal computers. Visit www.flowcode.co.uk/circuitcellar to learn about Flowcode 7. You can access a free version, or you can purchase advanced features and professional Flowcode licenses through the modular licensing system. If you make a purchase through that page, Circuit Cellar will receive a commission.

Click to download the article

Click to download the article

Matrix Launches Formula AllCode Kickstarter Campaign (sponsored)

Matrix TSL has launched a Kickstarter campaign for its Formula AllCode robotics course, which features a high-specification, Bluetooth-enabled robot. You can program the robot via Python, AppBuilder, Flowcode, Matlab, LabVIEW, C, and more. It is compatible with Raspberry Pi, Android, iPhone, and Windows devices.AllCodeKickstarter

KICKSTARTER CAMPAIGN

Formula AllCode is a platform for both novice or advanced electronics enthusiasts to learn and test their robotics skills. Participate in the campaign: Formula AllCode

The funds raised from this Kickstarter project will allow Matrix to take the current prototype development shown in the project videos to the next level with a technical specification to beat any other like-for-like robot buggy and subsequent manufacture of 1000 units to be launched world-wide.

By backing the  Kickstarter campaign, you are supporting a project which allows users to develop their robotics understanding on a platform of their choice. Whether your starting out with your first robotics project or you’re a fully fledged robotics developer, the Formula AllCode will work for you. The project must be funded by Sunday, September 6, 2015.AllCodeSpecs

SPECS

Inputs

  • 2 Push to make switch
  • 8 IR distance sensors
  • Light sensor
  • Microphone
  • I2C accelerometer/compass
  • 2 Line following sensors
  • Audio gain

Outputs

  • 8 LEDs (one port)
  • Speaker
  • Expansion port (8 bit)
  • 4 Servo outputs
  • E-blocks expansion port

Motors

  • Left and Right
  • Integrated gear box
  • Integrated encoders

System

  • Reset switch
  • 16-bit PIC24 microcontroller
  • USB rechargeable lithium battery
  • 4 × 40 char backlit LCD
  • Micro SD card
  • Integrated Bluetooth
  • Crystal Oscillator
  • Micro USB Socket