Semtech LoRa Tech Leveraged for Construction and Mining Gear

Semtech has announced that MachineMax, a provider of smart solutions for fleet management, construction and mining applications, has integrated Semtech’s LoRa devices and wireless radio frequency technology (LoRa Technology) into a new smart construction machine usage tracking solution. With Semtech’s LoRa Technology, MachineMax says they were able to create simple, easy to deploy solutions which effectively monitor machine status from anywhere on a construction or mining site.

Machine idling, where a machine’s engine is running but the machine is not actively in use, accounts for an estimated 37% of the time a construction or mining machine is operating on average. Idling results in an increased amount of fuel waste and machine wear, without creating productive machine output. Previously, monitoring the usage status of a mining or construction fleet was accomplished manually, with site managers continually checking on the use status of machines, an expensive and time consuming task.

MachineMax developed a LoRa-based solution which can be easily deployed onto fleet machines in under a minute. The devices attach magnetically and gather real-time data on machine usage status, such as whether or not a machine is idle. With real-time data on when a machine is in use, site managers can make more efficient use of a machine’s time to prevent idling, reducing the amount of fuel used and prolonging machine life.

Semtech’s LoRa devices and wireless radio frequency technology is a widely adopted long-range, low-power solution for IoT that gives telecom companies, IoT application makers and system integrators the feature set necessary to deploy low-cost, interoperable IoT networks, gateways, sensors, module products and IoT services worldwide. IoT networks based on the LoRaWAN specification have been deployed in 100 countries and Semtech is a founding member of the LoRa Alliance.

Semtech | www.semtech.com

 

Cloud-Based Geolocation Service is LoRaWAN-Compatible

Semtech has announced the availability of LoRa Cloud Geolocation, a new cloud-based geolocation service that is compatible with the LoRaWAN protocol and almost any network server. The geolocation service can be easily integrated to provide a low-cost, performance-optimized solution, and is the first of a variety of cloud services products that Semtech will be offering to support IoT application development.

Over the past year, Semtech has trialed a free Cloud-based geolocation service with hundreds of users providing positive feedback on the ease-of-use and the performance of the service. LoRa Cloud Geolocation was in beta test this year with limited partners and over the coming quarter, many more users are expected to integrate the new service into their platforms. The new Cloud-based geolocation service was designed to support flexibility in deployment options providing geolocation service availability to any IoT devices.

Semtech is currently onboarding early customers and general availability with sign-up via a new LoRa Cloud services portal is expected in the summer of 2019. Different pricing tiers will be available for selection.

LoRa Cloud Geolocation Features:

  • Simple API accepting signal-strength, signal-to-noise ratio and time of arrival data from LoRaWAN-based gateways and returning an estimated location.
  • Supporting all LoRaWAN-based gateways, with or without accurate time of arrival data
  • Compatible with all LoRaWAN-based devices on all LoRaWAN-based networks
  • Options for including multiple packets (uplinks) in a single query for improved accuracy
  • 100% stateless with all required data included in the query
  • No device identity required – total device anonymity ensured
  • Support for multiple antennae per gateway
  • Deploy in public Cloud or on-premise

Semtech | www.semtech.com

 

IoT Monitoring System for Commercial Fridges

Using LoRa Technology

IoT implementations can take many shapes and forms. Learn how these four Camosun College students developed a system to monitor all the refrigeration units in a commercial kitchen simultaneously. The system uses Microchip PIC MCU-based monitoring units and wireless communication leveraging the LoRa wireless protocol.

By Tyler Canton, Akio Yasu, Trevor Ford and Luke Vinden

In 2017, the commercial food service industry created an estimated 14.6 million wet tons of food in the United States [1]. The second leading cause of food waste in commercial food service, next to overproduction, is product loss due to defects in product quality and/or equipment failure [2].

While one of our team members was working as the chef of a hotel in Vancouver, more than once he’d arrive at work to find that the hotel’s refrigeration equipment had failed overnight or over the weekend, and that thousands of dollars of food had become unusable due to being stored at unsafe temperatures. He always saw this as an unnecessary loss—especially because the establishment had multiple refrigeration units and ample space to move product around. In this IoT age, this is clearly a preventable problem.

For our Electronics & Computer Engineering Technologist Capstone project, we set forth to design a commercial refrigeration monitoring system that would concurrently monitor all the units in an establishment, and alert the chefs or managers when their product was not being stored safely. This system would also allow the chef to check in on his/her product at any time for peace of mind (Figure 1).

Figure 1
This was the first picture we took of our finished project assembled. This SLA printed enclosure houses our 10.1″ LCD screen, a Raspberry Pi Model 3B and custom designed PCB.

We began with some simple range testing using RFM95W LoRa modules from RF Solutions, to see if we could reliably transmit data from inside a steel box (a refrigerator), up several flights of stairs, through concrete walls, with electrical noise and the most disruptive interference: hollering chefs. It is common for commercial kitchens to feel like a cellular blackout zone, so reliable communication would be essential to our system’s success.

System Overview

We designed our main unit to be powered and controlled by a Raspberry Pi 3B (RPi) board. The RPi communicates with an RFM95W LoRa transceiver using Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI). This unit receives temperature data from our satellite units, and displays the temperatures on a 10.1″ LCD screen from Waveshare. A block diagram of the system is shown in Figure 2. We decided to go with Node-RED flow-based programming tool to design our GUI. This main unit is also responsible for logging the data online to a Google Form. We also used Node-RED’s “email” nodes to alert the users when their product is stored at unsafe temperatures. In the future, we plan to design an app that can notify the user via push notifications. This is not the ideal system for the type of user that at any time has 1,000+ emails in their inbox, but for our target user who won’t allow more than 3 or 4 to pile up it has worked fine.

Figure 2
The main unit can receive temperature data from as many satellite units as required. Data are stored locally on the Raspberry Pi 3B, displayed using a GUI designed by Node-RED and logged online via Google Sheets.

We designed an individual prototype (Figure 3) for each satellite monitoring unit, to measure the equipment’s temperature and periodically transmit the data to a centralized main unit through LoRa communication. The units were intended to operate at least a year on a single battery charge. These satellites, controlled by a Microchip Technology PIC24FJ64GA704 microcontroller (MCU), were designed with an internal Maxim Integrated DS18B20 digital sensor (TO-92 package) and an optional external Maxim

Figure 3
This enclosure houses the electronics responsible for monitoring the temperatures and transmitting to the main unit. These were 3D printed on Ultimaker 3 printers.

Integrated DS18B20 (waterproof stainless steel tube package) to measure the temperature using the serial 1-Wire interface.

Hardware

All our boards were designed using Altium Designer 2017 and manufactured by JLCPCB. We highly recommend JLCPCB for PCB manufacturing. On a Tuesday we submitted our order to the website, and the finished PCB’s were manufactured, shipped, and delivered within a week. We were amazed by the turnaround time and the quality of the boards we received for the price ($2 USD / 10 PCB).

Figure 4
The main unit PCB’s role is simply to allow the devices to communicate with each other. This includes the RFM95W LoRa transceivers, RPi, LCD screen and a small fan

Main Unit Hardware: As shown in Figure 4, our main board’s purpose is communicating with the RPi and the LCD. We first had to select an LCD display for the main unit. This was an important decision, as it was the primary human interface device (HID) between the system and its user. We wanted a display that was around 10″—a good compromise between physical size and readability. Shortly after beginning our search, we learned that displays between 7″ and 19″ are not only significantly more difficult to come by, but also significantly more expensive. Thankfully, we managed to source a 10.1″ display that met our budget from robotshop.com. On the back of the display was a set of female header pins designed to interface with the first 26 pins of the RPi’s GPIO pins. The only problem with the display was that we needed access to those same GPIO pins to interface with the rest of our peripherals.

Figure 5
Our main board, labeled Mr. Therm, was designed to attach directly to the LCD screen headers. RPi pins 1-26 share the same connectivity as the main board and the LCD.

We initially planned on fixing this problem by placing our circuit board between the RPi and the display, creating a three-board-stack. Upon delivery and initial inspection of the display, however, we noticed an undocumented footprint that was connected to all the same nets directly beneath the female headers. We quickly decided to abandon the idea of the three-board-stack and decided instead to connect our main board to that unused footprint in the same way the RPi connects to display (Figure 5). This enabled us to interface all three boards, while maintaining a relatively thin profile. The main board connects four separate components to the rest of the circuit. It connects the RFM95W transceiver to the RPi, front panel buttons, power supply and a small fan.

Read the full article in the April 345 issue of Circuit Cellar
(Full article word count: 3378 words; Figure count: 11 Figures.)

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Note: We’ve made the October 2017 issue of Circuit Cellar available as a free sample issue. In it, you’ll find a rich variety of the kinds of articles and information that exemplify a typical issue of the current magazine.

RPi-Based IoT gateway Offers Cellular, Zigbee, Z-Wave or LoRa

By Eric Brown

Newark Element14 and Avnet have announced a Raspberry Pi based “SmartEdge Industrial IoT Gateway” with 2x Ethernet, Wi-Fi/BT, CAN, serial and optional Zigbee, Z-Wave or LoRa.

Avnet, which last year launched the Zynq UltraScale+ based ‘Ultra96 96Boards CE SBC, announced plans for the Avnet SmartEdge Industrial IoT Gateway at the CES show in early January. At Embedded World last month, Premier Farnell revealed more details on the Raspberry Pi based IoT gateway, which will launch this summer at Newark Element14 in North America and Farnell Element14 in Europe.


Avnet SmartEdge Industrial IoT Gateway 
(click image to enlarge)
The Avnet SmartEdge Industrial IoT Gateway will support Avnet’s IoT Connectplatform to enable cloud connectivity to Microsoft Azure. The Linux-driven embedded PC will support industrial automation applications such as remote monitoring, predictive maintenance, process control, and automation.

Premier Farnell did not say which Raspberry Pi is under the hood, but based on the WiFi support, it would appear to be the RPi 3 Model B rather than the B+. The limited specs announced for the gateway include 8GB eMMC, an HDMI port, and TPM 2.0 security. The image suggests there are also at least 2x USB ports and a coincell battery holder for a real-time clock.

For communications, you get dual 10/100 Ethernet ports as well as 2.4GHz WiFi and BLE 4.2 with an integrated antenna and external mount. The gateway also provides a mini-PCIe interface for optional cellular modems. In addition, the enclosure “features space for an additional internal accessory to provide Zigbee, Z-Wave, or LoRa capabilities, for example, or for multiple accessories through case expansion,” say Premier Farnell.

The system is further equipped with CAN-BUS and RS-232/485 interfaces with Modbus and DeviceNet support, as well as isolated digital I/O. There’s also a 40-pin expansion header for Raspberry Pi HATs and other add-on boards. The system has a wide-range 12-24V DC input plus DIN rail and wall mounting.

Further information

The Avnet SmartEdge Industrial IoT Gateway will launch this summer at Newark Element14 in North America and Farnell Element14 in Europe, with pricing undisclosed. More information is available in the Premier Farnell announcement and more may eventually appear on the Avnet website.

This article originally appeared on LinuxGizmos.com on March 4..

Avnet | www.avnet.com

Farnell Element14 | www.element14.com

Newark Element14 | www.newark.com

April Circuit Cellar: Sneak Preview

The April issue of Circuit Cellar magazine is out next week (March 20th)!. We’ve worked hard to cook up a tasty selection of in-depth embedded electronics articles just for you. We’ll be serving them up to in our 84-page magazine.

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Here’s a sneak preview of April 2019 Circuit Cellar:

VIDEO AND DISPLAY TECHNOLOGIES IN ACTION

Video Technology in Drones
Because video is the main mission of the majority of commercial drones, video technology has become a center of gravity in today’s drone design decisions. The topic covers everything including single-chip video processing, 4k HD video capture, image stabilization, complex board-level video processing, drone-mounted cameras, hybrid IR/video camera and mesh-networks. In this article, Circuit Cellar’s Editor-in-Chief, Jeff Child, looks at the technology and trends in video technology for drones.

Building an All-in-One Serial Terminal
Many embedded systems require as least some sort of human interface. While Jeff Bachiochi was researching alternatives to mechanical keypads, he came across the touchscreen display products from 4D Systems. He chose their inexpensive, low-power 2.4-inch, resistive touch screen as the basis for his display subsystem project. He makes use of the display’s Espressif Systems ESP8266 processor and Arduino IDE support to turn the display module into a serial terminal with a serial TTL connection to other equipment.

MICROCONTROLLERS ARE EVERYWHERE

Product Focus: 32-Bit Microcontrollers
As the workhorse of today’s embedded systems, 32-bit microcontrollers serve a wide variety of embedded applications-including the IoT. MCU vendors continue to add more connectivity, security and I/O functionality to their 32-bit product families. This Product Focus section updates readers on these trends and provides a product album of representative 32-bit MCU products.

Build a PIC32-Based Recording Studio
In this project article, learn how Cornell students Radhika Chinni, Brandon Quinlan, Raymond Xu built a miniature recording studio using the Microchip PIC32. It can be used as an electric keyboard with the additional functionality of recording and playing back multiple layers of sounds. There is also a microphone that the user can use to make custom recordings.

WONDERFUL WORLD OF WIRELESS

Low-Power Wireless Comms
The growth in demand for IoT solutions has fueled the need for products and technology to do wireless communication from low-power edge devices. Using technologies including Bluetooth Low-Energy (BLE), wireless radio frequency technology (LoRa) and others, embedded system developers are searching for ways to get efficient IoT connectivity while drawing as little power as possible. Circuit Cellar Chief Editor Jeff Child explores the latest technology trends and product developments in low-power wireless communications.

Bluetooth Mesh (Part 2)
Continuing his article series on Bluetooth mesh, this month Bob Japenga looks at the provisioning process required to get a device onto a Bluetooth mesh network. Then he examines two application examples and evaluates the various options for each example.

Build a Prescription Reminder
Pharmaceuticals prescribed by physicians are important to patients both old and young. But these medications will only do their job if taken according to a proper schedule. In this article, Devlin Gualtieri describes his Raspberry-Rx Prescription Reminder project, a network-accessible, the Wi-Fi connected, Raspberry Pi-based device that alerts a person when a particular medication should be administered. It also keeps a log of the actual times when medications were administered.

ENGINEERING TIPS, TRICKS AND TECHNIQUES

The Art of Current Probing
In his February column, Robert Lacoste talked about oscilloscope probes—or more specifically, voltage measurement probes. He explained how selecting the correct probe for a given measurement, and using it as it properly, is as important as having a good scope. In this article, Robert continues the discussion with another common measurement task: Accurately measuring current using an oscilloscope.

Software Engineering
There’s no doubt that achieving high software quality is human-driven endeavor. No amount of automated code development can substitute for best practices. A great tool for such efforts is the IEEE Computer Society’s Guide to the Software Engineering Body of Knowledge. In this article, George Novacek discusses some highlights of this resource, and why he has frequently consulted this document when preparing development plans.

HV Differential Probe
A high-voltage differential probe is a critical piece of test equipment for anyone who wants to safely examine high voltage signals on a standard oscilloscope. In his article, Andrew Levido describes his design of a high-voltage differential probe with features similar to commercial devices, but at a considerably lower cost. It uses just three op amps in a classic instrumentation amplifier configuration and provides a great exercise in precision analog design.

Firms Team Up to Provide End-to-End LoRa Security Solution

Microchip Technology, in partnership with The Things Industries, has announced the what it claims is industry’s first end-to-end security solution that adds secure, trusted and managed authentication to LoRaWAN devices at a global scale. The solution brings hardware-based security to the LoRa ecosystem, combining the MCU- and radio-agnostic ATECC608A-MAHTN-T CryptoAuthentication device with The Things Industries’ managed join servers and Microchip’s secure provisioning service.

The joint solution significantly simplifies provisioning LoRaWAN devices and addresses the inherent logistical challenges that come with managing LoRaWAN authentication keys from inception and throughout the life of a device. Traditionally, network and application server keys are unprotected in the edge node, and unmonitored, as LoRaWAN devices pass through various supply chain steps and are installed in the field.

The Common Criteria Joint Interpretation Library (JIL) “high”-rated ATECC608A comes pre-configured with secure key storage, keeping a device’s LoRaWAN secret keys isolated from the system so that sensitive keys are never exposed throughout the supply chain nor when the device is deployed. Microchip’s secure manufacturing facilities safely provision keys, eliminating the risk of exposure during manufacturing. Combined with The Things Industries’ agnostic secure join server service to the LoRaWAN network and application server providers, the solution decreases the risk of device identity corruption by establishing a trusted authentication when a device connects to a network.

Similar to how a prepaid data plan works for a mobile device, each purchase of an ATECC608A-MAHTN-T device comes with one year of managed LoRaWAN join server service through The Things Industries. Once a device identifies itself to join a LoRaWAN network, the network contacts The Things Industries join server to verify that the identity comes from a trusted device and not a fraudulent one. The temporary session keys are then sent securely to the network server and application server of choice. The Things Industries’ join server supports any LoRaWAN network, from commercially operated networks to private networks built on open-source components. After the one-year period, The Things Industries provides the option to extend the service.

Microchip and The Things Industries have also partnered to make the onboarding process of LoRaWAN devices seamless and secure. LoRaWAN device identities are claimed by The Things Industries’ join server with minimal intervention, relieving developers from needing expertise in security. Customers can not only choose any LoRaWAN network but can also migrate to any other LoRaWAN join server by rekeying the device. This means there is not a vendor lock-in and customers have full control over where and how the device keys are stored.

The ATECC608A is agnostic and can be paired with any MCU and LoRa radio. Developers can deploy secure LoRaWAN devices by combining the ATECC608A with the SAM L21 MCU, supported by the Arm Mbed OS LoRaWAN stack, or the recently-announced SAM R34 System-in-Package with Microchip’s LoRaWAN stack. For rapid prototyping, designers can use the CryptoAuthoXPRO socket board and The Things Industries provisioned parts in samples with the SAM L21 Xplained Pro (atsamd21-xpro) or SAM R34 Xplained Pro (DM320111).

The ATECC608A-MAHTN-T device for The Things Industries, including the initial year of prepaid TTN service, is available in volume production for $0.81 each in 10,000-unit quantities.

Microchip Technology | www.microchip.com

 

Utility Metering Solution Taps Semtech’s LoRa Technology

Semtech has announced that Lemonbeat, an IoT solution provider, has integated Semtech’s LoRa devices and wireless radio frequency technology (LoRa Technology) into its smart metering solutions for easier reading and collection of utility usage. Lemonbeat’s LoRa-connected smart meters work by utilizing embedded LoRa-based IoT technology to connect the meter to their own purpose-built receiver units.

Using this connectivity, meters send data through multiple floors in bigger buildings or all way in to the street, where network operators conveniently collect the data without having to enter the building. Using the meters’ other radio frequency, Lemonbeat Radio, meters provide customers accurate data on their energy consumption. With a third-party application, individuals can view and analyze this data, and change their habits accordingly.

Semtech’s LoRa devices and wireless radio frequency technology is a widely adopted long-range, low-power solution for IoT that gives telecom companies, IoT application makers and system integrators the feature set necessary to deploy low-cost, interoperable IoT networks, gateways, sensors, module products, and IoT services worldwide. IoT networks based on the LoRaWAN specification have been deployed in over 100 countries and Semtech is a founding member of the LoRa Alliance.

Lemonbeat | www.lemonbeat.com

Semtech | www.semtech.com

IoT System Monitors Water Quality in French Polynesia

Kontron, along with teams from Assystem Pacific, Bioceanor and Easy Global Market (EGM), are installing intelligent systems to monitor water quality in the Pacific Ocean. They are working together under the leadership of System Factory, the Cluster 4.0 for France’s “Region Sud”, dedicated to the engineering of complex systems. These systems, set up at the Centre de Recherches Insulaires et Observatoire de l’Environnement (CRIOBE), aim to measure the physico-chemical parameters of the water in the Opunohu lagoon in Moorea and monitor its pollution.

Connected buoys developed by Bioceanor in collaboration with EGM now make it possible to monitor the environment of coral reefs using data collected in real time. Monitored parameters include temperature, salinity, turbidity and even certain pollutants. A box PC developed by Kontron acts as both a LoRaWAN-compatible IoT gateway and a network server. It converts the status information sent by these sensors into MQTT streams and enables continuous secure retrieval and remote analysis of this data. Assystem Pacifique and Easy Global Market teams integrated this networked LoRa system.

According to Kontron, the next step will be to build a 24- to 48-hour forecasting system based on the analysis of the collected data. In addition, the collaboration between System Factory and local organizations in French Polynesia will continue. Assystem, Bioceanor, Easy Global Market (EGM) and Kontron presented the technology used in the system at the System Factory Day on December 11 at the Palais du Commerce et de la Mer in Toulon.

Kontron | www.kontron.com

 

LoRa SiP Devices Provide Low Power IoT Node Solution

Microchip Technology has introduced a highly integrated LoRa System-in-Package (SiP) family with an ultra-low-power 32-bit MCU, sub-GHz RF LoRa transceiver and software stack. The SAM R34/35 SiPs come with certified reference designs and interoperability with major LoRaWAN gateway and network providers. The devices also provide the ultra-low power consumption in sleep modes, offering extended battery life in remote IoT nodes.

Most LoRa end devices remain in sleep mode for extended periods of time, only waking up occasionally to transmit small data packets. Powered by the ultra-low-power SAM L21 Arm Cortex-M0+ based MCU, the SAM R34 devices provide sleep modes as low as 790 nA to significantly reduce power consumption and extend battery life in end applications. Highly integrated in a compact 6 mm x 6 mm package, the SAM R34/35 family is well suited for a broad array of long-range, low-power IoT applications that require small form factor designs and multiple years of battery life.

In addition to ultra-low-power consumption, the simplified development process means developers can accelerate their designs by combining their application code with Microchip’s LoRaWAN stack and quickly prototype with the ATSAMR34-XPRO development board (DM320111), which is supported by the Atmel Studio 7 Software Development Kit (SDK). The development board is certified with the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), Industry Canada (IC) and Radio Equipment Directive (RED), providing developers with the confidence that their designs will meet government requirements across geographies.
LoRa technology is designed to enable low-power applications to communicate over longer ranges than Zigbee, Wi-Fi and Bluetooth using the LoRaWAN open protocol. Ideal for a range of applications such as smart cities, agricultural monitoring and supply chain tracking, LoRaWAN enables the creation of flexible IoT networks that can operate in both urban and rural environments. According to the LoRa Alliance, the number of LoRaWAN operators has doubled from 40 to 80 over the last 12 months, with more than 100 countries actively developing LoRaWAN networks.

The SAM R34/35 family is supported by Microchip’s LoRaWAN stack, as well as a certified and proven chip-down package that enables customers to accelerate the design of RF applications with reduced risk. With support for worldwide LoRaWAN operation from 862 to 1,020 MHz, developers can use a single part variant across geographies, simplifying the design process and reducing inventory burden. The SAM R34/35 family supports Class A and Class C end devices as well as proprietary point-to-point connections.

Microchip’s SAM R34/35 LoRa family is available in six device variants. SAM R34 devices in a 64-lead TFBGA package begin at $3.76 each in 10,000-unit quantities. SAM R35 devices are available without a USB interface starting at $3.66 each in 10,000-unit quantities.

Microchip Technology | www.microchip.com

Smart Vehicles Leverage Semtech’s LoRa Technology

Semtech has announced that EasyReach Solutions, an Indian startup specializing in smart IoT solutions for industrial applications, has incorporated Semtech’s LoRa devices and wireless radio frequency technology (LoRa Technology) into its industrial and smart vehicle monitoring products. EasyReach’s LoRa-enabled sensors have been developed to include electrical current testing, temperature reading and GPS capabilities. All sensors are compatible with the LoRaWAN protocol and have been verified for GPS tracking ability over eight kilometers line of sight.
According to EasyReach, the LoRa Technology allows the company to remotely monitor its equipment and vehicles in new ways and to more intelligently manage its industrial resources. Meanwhile, the flexible capabilities of the sensors allow the solution to scale to its needs. EasyReach’s LoRa-based applications for smart industry include sensors for steam traps, concrete mixers, forklifts, diesel tankers, back hoes, water meters, and trucks.

Semtech | www.semtech.com

 

Semtech LoRa Technology Leveraged for Flood Sensor System

Semtech has announced that Green Stream has incorporated Semtech’s LoRa devices and wireless radio frequency technology (LoRa Technology) and Senet’s LoRaWAN-based network into its autonomous flood sensor systems for use in coastal areas, including towns and cities.

Green Stream’s solutions use LoRa Technology, a proven technology used in IoT environmental solutions. Green Stream’s end-to-end flood monitoring solutions are designed using commercial, off-the-shelf ultrasonic sensors and easy-to-deploy LoRa-enabled gateways. The data is communicated over a LoRaWAN-based network provided by Senet, a leading provider of Cloud-based LoRaWAN services platforms that enable the on-demand build out and management of IoT connectivity. The Green Stream LoRa-based flood sensors are autonomous, requiring no external power or wired network connection.

Each sensor is a self-contained, weather-proof, solar-powered unit that comes with a universal mounting bracket and extension arm. These sensors are small enough to be installed on top of crosswalks, light or electric poles, and bridges. The rugged sensor gateway is positioned above a body of water or over dry land.

Semtech | www.semtech.com

LDO Regulators Target LoRa-Based IoT Systems

Semtech has added a new product to its nanoSmart platform of low power, Low Dropout (LDO) regulators that targets applications for IoT sensors including Semtech’s LoRa devices and wireless radio frequency technology (LoRa Technology).

A consistent voltage output with low noise (100μVRMS) is necessary for low-power radio devices, such as LoRa-based sensors, to function without noise interference with radio information transmission. The new nanoSmart SC573 device’s low quiescent current (50μA) enables energy savings in everyday products by extending operating life for battery-powered IoT sensors up to 10 years. The IC is ideal for developers designing solutions for industrial and consumer applications including smart metering and smart building.

Semtech’s nanoSmart ultra-low power technology enables energy savings in everyday products. The nanoSmart LDO products support multiple energy accumulation technologies including thermal, RF and indoor and outdoor solar. The platform implements advanced system power management and has a real-time clock making it ideal for remote sensing and control applications.

Features:

  • Shutdown current — 100 nA
  • Output noise — 100 μVRMS /V
  • Quiescent supply current — 50 μA
  • Input voltage range — 2.3 V to 5V
  • Single 300 mA (maximum) output
  • Internal 100 Ω output discharge
  • Dropout at 300 mA load — 180 mV

The new nanoSmart LDO is currently available in 2 voltages (3.3V and 1.8V) and is priced at $0.130 in volumes of 10,000 units.

Semtech | www.semtech.com

Firms Team to Enable LoRaWAN Availability in 10 Cities

Semtech has announced that machineQ, Comcast’s enterprise Internet of Things (IoT) network service, has connected operational LoRaWAN networks to 10 U.S. cities. The extensive and comprehensive network coverage in these markets increases access at the network edge to add value to solutions providers and enterprises, establishing a strong foundation for nationwide deployment.

According to ABI Research, IoT technology revenues across 12 key smart city technologies and verticals, including metering, parking and street lighting, is expected to grow from around $25 billion in 2017 to $62 billion in 2026 at an average growth rate of 11%. This rapid adoption will need a proven infrastructure that is able to scale and provide key LoRa capabilities to support multiple applications.
MachineQ has rolled out networks in Philadelphia, Chicago, San Francisco, Atlanta, Baltimore, Boston, Denver, Detroit, Indianapolis, Miami, Minneapolis/St. Paul, Oakland, Pittsburgh, Seattle and Washington D.C. The comprehensive network presence in these 10 cities demonstrates the steady progress of enabling smart business decisions with the broad adoption of Semtech’s LoRa devices and wireless radio frequency technology (LoRa Technology) for their smart applications.

According to Semtech, machineQ’s optimized LoRaWAN network drives even more diverse applications and IoT adoption. MachineQ’s widespread and comprehensive presence in these 10 cities demonstrates shows that Semtech’s LoRa Technology is able to support a diverse number of applications in making cities smarter, from improving parking congestion to remote lighting control for street lights.

Semtech | www.semtech.com

IoT Edge Server Manages Distributed Devices

Advantech has announced its new generation of wireless connectivity: the Edge Intelligence Server EIS-D210 series. As smart cities and industry 4.0 deployment installs millions of IoT sensors and devices, wireless communications has become the fastest growing sector and wireless networks have been part of every application. As a result, the task of remotely managing distributed devices becomes more complex.

To echo market requirements, Advantech EIS-D210 series is powered by an Intel Celeron processor N3350 and has LoRa/Wi-Fi/Bluetooth and WISE-PaaS/EdgeSense edge intelligence and sensing software built-in. It is also pre-integrated with Microsoft Azure IoT Edge and AWS Greengrass to extend cloud intelligence to edge devices and enable real-time decisions at the edge. Advantech EIS-D210 is an integrated solution from the edge to the cloud and simplifies IoT application deployment. It’s well suited for applications in smart factory, smart energy and intelligent agriculture applications that need wireless sensor network management.

EIS-D210W has a built-in certificated Wi-Fi (IEEE802.11a/b/g/n/ac 2.4GHz/5GHz standard) and Bluetooth 4.1 module, and EIS-D210L incorporates a built-in private LoRa long-range modem. All EIS-D210 series have built-in dual GbE, COM (RS-232/422/485), VGA/HDMI, four USB 3.0 and mPCIe ports. The mPCIe ports can be extended to support 3G/4G LTE. EIS-D210 series provide several connection capabilities and peripheral support for multiple wireless/wired communications.

EIS-D210 series comes with Advantech’s WISE-PaaS/EdgeSense edge intelligence and sensing integration software, which provides an IoT SDK and documents for wireless sensor (LoRa, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth) data integration and supporting field protocols (MQTT/OPC/Modbus) for sensor/device data acquisition. With these, customers can quickly incorporate data integration, data pre-processing, and edge analytics to their applications.

EIS-D210 series is also pre-integrated with Azure IoT Edge and AWS Greengrass, ensuring that IoT devices can respond quickly to local events, interact with local resources, operate with intermittent connections, and minimize the cost of transmitting IoT data to the cloud. Furthermore, after data modeling and machine learning with data, results can be pushed back to edge (IoT Edge/ Greengrass) to provide data prediction for IoT applications.

EIS-D210W (Wi-Fi/Bluetooth) became available at end of April and EIS-D210L (LoRa) will become available in June.

Advantech | www.advantech.com

Gumstix Inks Global Distribution Deal with Mouser

Mouser Electronics has entered into a distribution agreement with Gumstix.. As part of the agreement, Mouser Electronics becomes an authorized distributor of Gumstix’s comprehensive portfolio of SBCs and embedded boards for the industrial, Internet of Things (IoT), smart home, medical, military and automotive markets.

The Gumustix Overo COMs are available from Mouser Electronics in three varieties to provide engineers with design flexibility: the entry-level Overo EarthSTORM COM, graphics-focused Overo IceSTORM COM, and Overo IronSTORM-Y COM (shown) with Bluetooth 4.1 low energy technology and 802.11b/g/n wireless communications with Access Point mode.

To enable engineers to test LoRa protocol solutions based on an Overo COM, the Overo Conduit LoRa Gateway includes a Microchip LAN9221 controller for 10/100 Base-T Ethernet capabilities, plus headers to connect to a RisingHF RHF0M301 module and an Overo COM.

For engineers using a BeagleBone Black for prototyping, Gumstix offers two capes. The BBB Astro Cape is a capacitive-touchscreen-ready expansion board with Wi-Fi and Bluetooth technologies. The BBB Rover Cape is a “robot-ready” expansion board with 9-axis inertial module, GPS capabilities, wireless connectivity, and pulse-width modulators (PWM) for servo control.

To support Raspberry Pi boards and the Raspberry Pi Compute Module, engineers can take advantage of expansion boards from Gumstix. The Pi Compute FastFlash provides a compact, cost-effective solution that quickly flashes the embedded memory of the Raspberry Pi Compute Module. The Pi Newgate breakout board enables engineers to connect to all of the module’s external signals via 0.1-inch-pitch pins to monitor digital, analog, and differential signals. The Pi Compute Dev Board is a complete multimedia expansion board for portable devices and IoT boards with camera and HDMI capabilities.

Mouser is also stocking a series of GPS and camera peripherals for Gumstix devices. The Pre-GO PPP (Precise Point Positioning), with either surface mounted antennae or SMA antenna connectors, provides a high level of global positioning accuracy. The Tiny Caspa parallel camera sensor board delivers reliable video feeds directly to the Overo family of COMs and to many expansion boards and SBCs in the Gumstix line.

Additionally, Mouser offers the Gumstix Pepper and more advanced Poblano single board computers. Running on Android or Yocto Project, the Pepper 43C and Pepper 43R boards feature an Arm Cortex-A8 processor, 512 MB of DDR3, 802.11 b/g/n connectivity with AP mode, and Bluetooth 4.1 and Bluetooth low energy. The boards are supported by the Pepper 43 Handheld Development Kits, which come equipped with a 4.3-inch LCD touchscreen, audio in/out, and a Texas Instruments WiLink 8 combo-connectivity module.

The Poblano 43C features a powerful TI Sitara AM438 processor, 3D graphics processor, multi-touch capabilities, Wi-Fi, camera connector, and embedded NAND flash storage. The board is supported by the Poblano 43C Handheld Development Kit, which contains a Poblano 43C board, 4.3-inch LCD capacitive touch display, USB cable, 5V power adapter, U.FL antenna, and SD card pre-loaded with Yocto Linux.

Gumstix | www.gumstix.com

Mouser Electronics | www.mouser.com/gumstix.