LoRa SiP Devices Provide Low Power IoT Node Solution

Microchip Technology has introduced a highly integrated LoRa System-in-Package (SiP) family with an ultra-low-power 32-bit MCU, sub-GHz RF LoRa transceiver and software stack. The SAM R34/35 SiPs come with certified reference designs and interoperability with major LoRaWAN gateway and network providers. The devices also provide the ultra-low power consumption in sleep modes, offering extended battery life in remote IoT nodes.

Most LoRa end devices remain in sleep mode for extended periods of time, only waking up occasionally to transmit small data packets. Powered by the ultra-low-power SAM L21 Arm Cortex-M0+ based MCU, the SAM R34 devices provide sleep modes as low as 790 nA to significantly reduce power consumption and extend battery life in end applications. Highly integrated in a compact 6 mm x 6 mm package, the SAM R34/35 family is well suited for a broad array of long-range, low-power IoT applications that require small form factor designs and multiple years of battery life.

In addition to ultra-low-power consumption, the simplified development process means developers can accelerate their designs by combining their application code with Microchip’s LoRaWAN stack and quickly prototype with the ATSAMR34-XPRO development board (DM320111), which is supported by the Atmel Studio 7 Software Development Kit (SDK). The development board is certified with the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), Industry Canada (IC) and Radio Equipment Directive (RED), providing developers with the confidence that their designs will meet government requirements across geographies.
LoRa technology is designed to enable low-power applications to communicate over longer ranges than Zigbee, Wi-Fi and Bluetooth using the LoRaWAN open protocol. Ideal for a range of applications such as smart cities, agricultural monitoring and supply chain tracking, LoRaWAN enables the creation of flexible IoT networks that can operate in both urban and rural environments. According to the LoRa Alliance, the number of LoRaWAN operators has doubled from 40 to 80 over the last 12 months, with more than 100 countries actively developing LoRaWAN networks.

The SAM R34/35 family is supported by Microchip’s LoRaWAN stack, as well as a certified and proven chip-down package that enables customers to accelerate the design of RF applications with reduced risk. With support for worldwide LoRaWAN operation from 862 to 1,020 MHz, developers can use a single part variant across geographies, simplifying the design process and reducing inventory burden. The SAM R34/35 family supports Class A and Class C end devices as well as proprietary point-to-point connections.

Microchip’s SAM R34/35 LoRa family is available in six device variants. SAM R34 devices in a 64-lead TFBGA package begin at $3.76 each in 10,000-unit quantities. SAM R35 devices are available without a USB interface starting at $3.66 each in 10,000-unit quantities.

Microchip Technology | www.microchip.com

Smart Vehicles Leverage Semtech’s LoRa Technology

Semtech has announced that EasyReach Solutions, an Indian startup specializing in smart IoT solutions for industrial applications, has incorporated Semtech’s LoRa devices and wireless radio frequency technology (LoRa Technology) into its industrial and smart vehicle monitoring products. EasyReach’s LoRa-enabled sensors have been developed to include electrical current testing, temperature reading and GPS capabilities. All sensors are compatible with the LoRaWAN protocol and have been verified for GPS tracking ability over eight kilometers line of sight.
According to EasyReach, the LoRa Technology allows the company to remotely monitor its equipment and vehicles in new ways and to more intelligently manage its industrial resources. Meanwhile, the flexible capabilities of the sensors allow the solution to scale to its needs. EasyReach’s LoRa-based applications for smart industry include sensors for steam traps, concrete mixers, forklifts, diesel tankers, back hoes, water meters, and trucks.

Semtech | www.semtech.com

 

Semtech LoRa Technology Leveraged for Flood Sensor System

Semtech has announced that Green Stream has incorporated Semtech’s LoRa devices and wireless radio frequency technology (LoRa Technology) and Senet’s LoRaWAN-based network into its autonomous flood sensor systems for use in coastal areas, including towns and cities.

Green Stream’s solutions use LoRa Technology, a proven technology used in IoT environmental solutions. Green Stream’s end-to-end flood monitoring solutions are designed using commercial, off-the-shelf ultrasonic sensors and easy-to-deploy LoRa-enabled gateways. The data is communicated over a LoRaWAN-based network provided by Senet, a leading provider of Cloud-based LoRaWAN services platforms that enable the on-demand build out and management of IoT connectivity. The Green Stream LoRa-based flood sensors are autonomous, requiring no external power or wired network connection.

Each sensor is a self-contained, weather-proof, solar-powered unit that comes with a universal mounting bracket and extension arm. These sensors are small enough to be installed on top of crosswalks, light or electric poles, and bridges. The rugged sensor gateway is positioned above a body of water or over dry land.

Semtech | www.semtech.com

LDO Regulators Target LoRa-Based IoT Systems

Semtech has added a new product to its nanoSmart platform of low power, Low Dropout (LDO) regulators that targets applications for IoT sensors including Semtech’s LoRa devices and wireless radio frequency technology (LoRa Technology).

A consistent voltage output with low noise (100μVRMS) is necessary for low-power radio devices, such as LoRa-based sensors, to function without noise interference with radio information transmission. The new nanoSmart SC573 device’s low quiescent current (50μA) enables energy savings in everyday products by extending operating life for battery-powered IoT sensors up to 10 years. The IC is ideal for developers designing solutions for industrial and consumer applications including smart metering and smart building.

Semtech’s nanoSmart ultra-low power technology enables energy savings in everyday products. The nanoSmart LDO products support multiple energy accumulation technologies including thermal, RF and indoor and outdoor solar. The platform implements advanced system power management and has a real-time clock making it ideal for remote sensing and control applications.

Features:

  • Shutdown current — 100 nA
  • Output noise — 100 μVRMS /V
  • Quiescent supply current — 50 μA
  • Input voltage range — 2.3 V to 5V
  • Single 300 mA (maximum) output
  • Internal 100 Ω output discharge
  • Dropout at 300 mA load — 180 mV

The new nanoSmart LDO is currently available in 2 voltages (3.3V and 1.8V) and is priced at $0.130 in volumes of 10,000 units.

Semtech | www.semtech.com

Firms Team to Enable LoRaWAN Availability in 10 Cities

Semtech has announced that machineQ, Comcast’s enterprise Internet of Things (IoT) network service, has connected operational LoRaWAN networks to 10 U.S. cities. The extensive and comprehensive network coverage in these markets increases access at the network edge to add value to solutions providers and enterprises, establishing a strong foundation for nationwide deployment.

According to ABI Research, IoT technology revenues across 12 key smart city technologies and verticals, including metering, parking and street lighting, is expected to grow from around $25 billion in 2017 to $62 billion in 2026 at an average growth rate of 11%. This rapid adoption will need a proven infrastructure that is able to scale and provide key LoRa capabilities to support multiple applications.
MachineQ has rolled out networks in Philadelphia, Chicago, San Francisco, Atlanta, Baltimore, Boston, Denver, Detroit, Indianapolis, Miami, Minneapolis/St. Paul, Oakland, Pittsburgh, Seattle and Washington D.C. The comprehensive network presence in these 10 cities demonstrates the steady progress of enabling smart business decisions with the broad adoption of Semtech’s LoRa devices and wireless radio frequency technology (LoRa Technology) for their smart applications.

According to Semtech, machineQ’s optimized LoRaWAN network drives even more diverse applications and IoT adoption. MachineQ’s widespread and comprehensive presence in these 10 cities demonstrates shows that Semtech’s LoRa Technology is able to support a diverse number of applications in making cities smarter, from improving parking congestion to remote lighting control for street lights.

Semtech | www.semtech.com

IoT Edge Server Manages Distributed Devices

Advantech has announced its new generation of wireless connectivity: the Edge Intelligence Server EIS-D210 series. As smart cities and industry 4.0 deployment installs millions of IoT sensors and devices, wireless communications has become the fastest growing sector and wireless networks have been part of every application. As a result, the task of remotely managing distributed devices becomes more complex.

To echo market requirements, Advantech EIS-D210 series is powered by an Intel Celeron processor N3350 and has LoRa/Wi-Fi/Bluetooth and WISE-PaaS/EdgeSense edge intelligence and sensing software built-in. It is also pre-integrated with Microsoft Azure IoT Edge and AWS Greengrass to extend cloud intelligence to edge devices and enable real-time decisions at the edge. Advantech EIS-D210 is an integrated solution from the edge to the cloud and simplifies IoT application deployment. It’s well suited for applications in smart factory, smart energy and intelligent agriculture applications that need wireless sensor network management.

EIS-D210W has a built-in certificated Wi-Fi (IEEE802.11a/b/g/n/ac 2.4GHz/5GHz standard) and Bluetooth 4.1 module, and EIS-D210L incorporates a built-in private LoRa long-range modem. All EIS-D210 series have built-in dual GbE, COM (RS-232/422/485), VGA/HDMI, four USB 3.0 and mPCIe ports. The mPCIe ports can be extended to support 3G/4G LTE. EIS-D210 series provide several connection capabilities and peripheral support for multiple wireless/wired communications.

EIS-D210 series comes with Advantech’s WISE-PaaS/EdgeSense edge intelligence and sensing integration software, which provides an IoT SDK and documents for wireless sensor (LoRa, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth) data integration and supporting field protocols (MQTT/OPC/Modbus) for sensor/device data acquisition. With these, customers can quickly incorporate data integration, data pre-processing, and edge analytics to their applications.

EIS-D210 series is also pre-integrated with Azure IoT Edge and AWS Greengrass, ensuring that IoT devices can respond quickly to local events, interact with local resources, operate with intermittent connections, and minimize the cost of transmitting IoT data to the cloud. Furthermore, after data modeling and machine learning with data, results can be pushed back to edge (IoT Edge/ Greengrass) to provide data prediction for IoT applications.

EIS-D210W (Wi-Fi/Bluetooth) became available at end of April and EIS-D210L (LoRa) will become available in June.

Advantech | www.advantech.com

Gumstix Inks Global Distribution Deal with Mouser

Mouser Electronics has entered into a distribution agreement with Gumstix.. As part of the agreement, Mouser Electronics becomes an authorized distributor of Gumstix’s comprehensive portfolio of SBCs and embedded boards for the industrial, Internet of Things (IoT), smart home, medical, military and automotive markets.

The Gumustix Overo COMs are available from Mouser Electronics in three varieties to provide engineers with design flexibility: the entry-level Overo EarthSTORM COM, graphics-focused Overo IceSTORM COM, and Overo IronSTORM-Y COM (shown) with Bluetooth 4.1 low energy technology and 802.11b/g/n wireless communications with Access Point mode.

To enable engineers to test LoRa protocol solutions based on an Overo COM, the Overo Conduit LoRa Gateway includes a Microchip LAN9221 controller for 10/100 Base-T Ethernet capabilities, plus headers to connect to a RisingHF RHF0M301 module and an Overo COM.

For engineers using a BeagleBone Black for prototyping, Gumstix offers two capes. The BBB Astro Cape is a capacitive-touchscreen-ready expansion board with Wi-Fi and Bluetooth technologies. The BBB Rover Cape is a “robot-ready” expansion board with 9-axis inertial module, GPS capabilities, wireless connectivity, and pulse-width modulators (PWM) for servo control.

To support Raspberry Pi boards and the Raspberry Pi Compute Module, engineers can take advantage of expansion boards from Gumstix. The Pi Compute FastFlash provides a compact, cost-effective solution that quickly flashes the embedded memory of the Raspberry Pi Compute Module. The Pi Newgate breakout board enables engineers to connect to all of the module’s external signals via 0.1-inch-pitch pins to monitor digital, analog, and differential signals. The Pi Compute Dev Board is a complete multimedia expansion board for portable devices and IoT boards with camera and HDMI capabilities.

Mouser is also stocking a series of GPS and camera peripherals for Gumstix devices. The Pre-GO PPP (Precise Point Positioning), with either surface mounted antennae or SMA antenna connectors, provides a high level of global positioning accuracy. The Tiny Caspa parallel camera sensor board delivers reliable video feeds directly to the Overo family of COMs and to many expansion boards and SBCs in the Gumstix line.

Additionally, Mouser offers the Gumstix Pepper and more advanced Poblano single board computers. Running on Android or Yocto Project, the Pepper 43C and Pepper 43R boards feature an Arm Cortex-A8 processor, 512 MB of DDR3, 802.11 b/g/n connectivity with AP mode, and Bluetooth 4.1 and Bluetooth low energy. The boards are supported by the Pepper 43 Handheld Development Kits, which come equipped with a 4.3-inch LCD touchscreen, audio in/out, and a Texas Instruments WiLink 8 combo-connectivity module.

The Poblano 43C features a powerful TI Sitara AM438 processor, 3D graphics processor, multi-touch capabilities, Wi-Fi, camera connector, and embedded NAND flash storage. The board is supported by the Poblano 43C Handheld Development Kit, which contains a Poblano 43C board, 4.3-inch LCD capacitive touch display, USB cable, 5V power adapter, U.FL antenna, and SD card pre-loaded with Yocto Linux.

Gumstix | www.gumstix.com

Mouser Electronics | www.mouser.com/gumstix.

Advantech Joins Amazon’s AWS Partner Network

Advantech has joined the Amazon Web Services (AWS) Partner Network (APN) as Standard Technology Partner. As an APN Standard Technology Partner, Advantech provides a comprehensive range of wireless sensors and edge intelligence computers with complete IoT software solutions on AWS. Embedded developers can connect devices to a range of services offered on AWS in order to build scalable, global, and secure IoT applications, bringing computing capabilities to edge devices to several domain-focused vertical markets such as smart city, smart manufacturing and smart energy markets.

Advantech’s WISE-1520 Wireless Sensor Node (shown) is on Amazon FreeRTOS so that customers can easily and securely connect small devices and sensors directly to AWS or to powerful edge devices running AWS Greengrass, thus allowing them to collect data for their IoT applications. As the first wireless sensor node for the M2.COM family, the WISE-1520 comes with an Arm Cortex-M4 processor and low-power Wi-Fi connectivity, providing full compatibility with existing Wi-Fi infrastructure.

Advantech also offers the EIS-D210 Edge Intelligence Server, which is equipped with an Intel Celeron Processor N3350 and is compatible with AWS Greengrass core, thus ensuring that IoT devices can respond quickly to local events, interact with local resources, operate with intermittent connections, and minimize the cost of transmitting IoT data to the cloud. In addition to supporting field protocols(MQTT/OPC/Modbus) for sensor/device data acquisition, the EIS-D210 can be used with the Advantech IoT SDK for wireless sensor (Wi-Fi, LoRa, Zigbee) data integration. Furthermore, the EIS-D210 comes pre-integrated with Advantech’s WISE-PaaS/EdgeSense software solution, allowing users to incorporate sensor data aggregation, edge analytics, and cloud applications for fast and easy real-time operational intelligence. This EIS provides a range of connectivity options with excellent data handling and networking connection capabilities for various IoT applications.

Advantech’s EPC-R4760 IoT gateway, powered by the Qualcomm Arm Cortex-A53 APQ8016 platform, provides a unique combination of power and performance. The system also integrates abundant wireless solutions including Wi-Fi, BT, GPS, and extended 3G/LTE connectivity. For OS support, the EPC-R4760 can run Debian Linux, Yocto Linux, Ubuntu Linux, Android, and Windows 10 IoT Core, and it also supports AWS Greengrass, which gives users tremendous flexibility by allowing them to create AWS Lambda functions that can be validated on AWS and then be easily deployed to devices.

Advantech’s UTX-3117 IoT gateway is compatible with AWS Greengrass and Wind River Pulsar and, in addition to having a small footprint, it offers real-time security and supports various protocols that are needed to run IoT applications seamlessly across both AWS and on local devices or sensor nodes. In addition, by equipping it with a LoRa solution, the UTX-3117 offers a wide range of wireless connection options for controlling and collecting data from devices and sensor nodes. With these solutions, the UTX-3117 IoT gateway is ideal for smart energy applications. For example, it can collect solar panel and solar radiation data in real time via LoRa, and with AWS Greengrass built in, it can analyze the data and adjust the angle of solar panels to follow the sun and thereby maximize the effectiveness of the solar panels. AWS Greengrass can also be employed to analyze weather data so that the panels can be adjusted to prevent damage from elements such as strong wind or hail.

Advantech | www.advantech.com

 

Semtech LoRa Technology Tapped for Smart Agriculture

Semtech announced that WaterBit, a venture backed precision agriculture irrigation company and National Science Foundation (NSF) grant winner, has incorporated Semtech’s LoRa devices and wireless radio frequency technology (LoRa Technology) into its Autonomous Irrigation Solution (AIS).

WaterBit provides irrigation automation for growers based on analysis of granular, ground-truth data collected through the WaterBit system, including line pressure and flow, soil moisture and temperature and more. With WaterBit’s AIS, growers maximize yield across soil types, while optimizing the use of labor and other input resources. The complete solution is used across a wide variety of crops including grapes, berries, tree nuts, cotton, corn and leafy greens.

WaterBit’s goal when developing its solution was to create the highest quality and most reliable networking product in agriculture. To achieve this, WaterBit eliminated batteries in its production units and enabled duplex communications as well as better control with LoRa Technology.

Key Features of LoRa Technology:

  • Long Range: A single base station using LoRa Technology enables deep penetration capability for dense urban environments and indoor coverage, while also providing the ability to connect to sensors more than 15-30 miles away in rural areas.
  • Low Power: Enables unprecedented battery lifetime of up to 10 years depending on the application.
  • Geolocation: Enables tracking applications without GPS or additional power consumption.
  • Low Cost: LoRa Technology reduces up front infrastructure investments and operating costs, as well as end-node sensor costs.
  • Open Standard: The LoRaWAN open protocol ensures interoperability among applications, IoT solution providers and telecom operators to speed adoption and deployment.

Semtech | www.semtech.com

Online Course Covers IoT-Enabled Embedded Systems

STMicroelectronics has announced the availability to all–including students, makers, and budding engineers and computer scientists–of the online “Introduction to Embedded Systems with SensorTile” course. With a curriculum developed by Professor William Kaiser at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), and used to teach his freshman engineering class, the online course resources provide a foundation to understand the fundamentals of a sensor-based Internet of Things (IoT)-enabled embedded system. Professors at other universities are also encouraged to adapt and contribute to the course.

The introductory course of 8 self-paced tutorials is designed around ST’s SensorTile, a unique real-time IoT-enabled embedded system on a postage-stamp-sized module. The tiny 13.5 mm x 13.5 mm module combines a high-performance, low-power STM32 Arm-Cortex-M-core microcontroller, 5 valuable MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems) sensors—an inertial sensor containing an accelerometer and gyroscope, an eCompass, a pressure sensor, and a microphone—and a Bluetooth network processor. A kit with the module, cables, cradle and a battery is available from major resellers for about $80.

The joint effort with ST makes the 8 tutorials freely available online, with a full complement of documentation, open-source algorithms and development solutions, and unfettered access to a growing user forum. Anyone interested in learning more about the tutorial or purchasing a SensorTile kit should visit the web site www.st.com/sensortile-edu). Additional information is available, as well, on the ST blog: blog.st.com/introduction-embedded-systems-sensortile-online-course/

STMicroelectronics | www.st.com

Chipsets Provide Low Power LoRa Solutions

Semtech has announced its next generation LoRa devices and wireless radio frequency (RF) technology (LoRa Technology) chipsets enabling innovative LPWAN use cases for consumers with its advanced technology. Addressing the need for cost-effective and reliable sensor-to-cloud connectivity in any type of RF environment, the new features and capabilities will significantly improve the performance and capability of IoT sensor applications that demand ultra-low power, small form factor and long range wireless connectivity with a shortened product development cycle.

The next generation LoRa radios extends Semtech’s industry leading link budget by 20% with a 50% reduction in receiver current (4.5 mA) and a high power +22 dBm option. This extends battery life of LoRa-based sensors up to 30%, which reduces the frequency of battery replacement. The extended connectivity range, with the ability to reach deep indoor and outdoor sensor locations, will create new markets as different types of verticals integrate LoRa Technology in their IoT applications including healthcare and pharmaceuticals, media and advertising, logistics/shipping and asset tracking.

The new platform has a command interface that simplifies radio configuration and shortens the development cycle, needing only 10 lines of code to transmit or receive a packet, which will allow users to focus on applications. The small footprint, 45% less than the current generation, is highly configurable to meet different application requirements utilizing the global LoRaWAN open standard. The chipsets also supports FSK modulation to allow compatibility with legacy protocols that are migrating to the LoRaWAN open protocol for all the performance benefits LoRa Technology provides.

Three new devices, SX1262 (+22dBm), SX1261 (+15dBm) and SX1268 (+22dBm, China frequency bands) are currently sampling to lead customers and partners and will be available in full production in late Q1 2018. Development kits for various regions and associated software will also be available at that time.

LoRa Technology New Features:

  • 50% less power in receive mode
  • 20% more extended range
  • +22 dBm transmit power
  • A 45% reduction in size: 4mm by 4mm
  • Global continuous frequency coverage: 150-960MHz
  • Simplified user interface with implementation of commands
  • New spreading factor of SF5 to support dense networks
  • Protocol compatible with existing deployed LoRaWAN networks

 

Semtech | www.semtech.com/iot

Flexible Printed Batteries Target IoT Devices

Semtech and Imprint Energy have announced a collaboration to accelerate the widespread deployment of IoT devices. Imprint Energy will design and produce ultrathin, flexible printed batteries that are especially designed to power IoT devices integrated with Semtech’s LoRa devices and wireless RF technology (LoRa Technology). LoRa Technology, with its long-range, low-power capabilities, is regarded by many as the defacto platform for building low-power wide area networks (LPWAN).

ImprintTo help accelerate a next generation of battery technology, Semtech has invested in Imprint Energy. The companies are working closely to target applications that have the potential to create entirely new markets. The Imprint Energy battery enables new applications which have a thin and small form factor and due to the integrated manufacturing process, the batteries are low cost to produce, making high volume deployments feasible.

A key benefit of the Imprint Energy battery technology is the ability to be printed using multiple types of conventional high-volume printing equipment; this enables quick integration by traditional electronic manufacturers in their existing production lines. Test production runs are currently being processed and the resulting batteries are being used in applications prototypes to validate assumptions and engage early adopters.

Imprint Energy | www.imprintenergy.com

Semtech | www.semtech.com

STMicro and Objenious Collaborate on IoT LoRa Network Deal

STMicroelectronics and Objenious are working together to accelerate the connection of IoT nodes to LoRa networks. ST’s development kits certified on the Objenious network are available now, greatly reducing R&D effort and time to market in the creation of new LoRa devices.

STM32 Nucleo LoRa kits are now certified and available to developers through ST sales channels.

STM32 Nucleo LoRa kits are now certified and available to developers through ST sales channels.

LoRAWAN is a Low Power Wide Area Network (LPWAN) based on LoRa technology that is opening up a world of possibilities to create networks of connected devices ideal to address a broad range of IoT applications. The benefits of LoRa especially suit applications where nodes have limited power capability, can be difficult to access, and data transfers don’t require high bandwidth. LoRa can target a wide spectrum of applications such as tracking, proactive maintenance, and many others. Industry analysts estimate there will be tens of billions of connected devices deployed in the world by 2020.

Objenious launched and operates the first LoRa network in France, with more than 4,200 antennas deployed around the country. Leveraging the network know-how inherited from Bouygues Telecom, Objenious now proposes its LoRa network, platform, and services for LPWAN IoT to partners and customers locally and internationally thanks to roaming agreements.

STMicro helps developers by providing tools and software libraries that aid the STM32 MCU-based embedded design as part of its freely available STM32 Open Development Environment (ODE). By integrating Objenious’ network access software on top of the STM32 ODE, developing connected devices is even easier. STM32 Nucleo LoRa kits are now certified and available to developers through ST sales channels.

STMicroelectronics | www.st.com

Sensor Node Gets LoRaWAN Certification

Advantech offers its standardized M2.COM IoT LoRaWAN certified sensor node WISE-1510 with integrated ARM Cortex-M4 processor and LoRa transceiver. The module the  is able to provide multi-interfaces for sensors and I/O control such as UART, I2C, SPI, GPIO, PWM and ADC. The WISE-1510 sensor node is well suited for for smart cities, WISE-1510_3D _S20170602171747agriculture, metering, street lighting and environment monitoring. With power consumption optimization and wide area reception, LoRa  sensors or applications with low data rate requirements can achieve years of battery life and kilometers of long distance connection.

WISE-1510 has has received LoRaWAN certification from the LoRa Alliance. Depending on deployment requirements, developers can select to use Public LoRaWAN network services or build a private LoRa system with WISE-3610 LoRa IoT gateway. Advantech’s WISE-3610  is a Qualcomm ARM Cortex A7 based hardware platform with private LoRa ecosystem solution that can connect up to 500 WISE-1510 sensor node devices. Powered by Advantech’s WISE-PaaS IoT Software Platform, WISE-3610 features automatic cloud connection through its WISE-PaaS/WISE Agent service, manages wireless nodes and data via WSN management APIs, and helps customers streamline their IoT data acquisition development through sensor service APIs, and WSN drivers.

Developers can leverage microprocessors on WISE-1510 to build their own applications. WISE-1510 offers unified software—ARM Mbed OS and SDK for easy development with APIs and related documents. Developers can also find extensive resources from Github such as code review, library integration and free core tools. WISE-1510 also offers worldwide certification which allow developers to leverage their IoT devices anywhere. Using Advantech’s WISE-3610 LoRa IoT Gateway, WISE-1510 can be connected to WISE-  PaaS/RMM or  ARM Mbed Cloud service with IoT communication protocols including LWM2M, CoAP, and MQTT. End-to-end integration assists system integrators to overcome complex challenges and helps them build IoT applications quickly and easily.

WISE-1510 features and specifications:

  • ARM Cortex-M4 core processor
  • Compatible support for public LoRaWAN or private LoRa networks
  • Great for low power/wide range applications
  • Multiple I/O interfaces for sensor and control
  • Supports wide temperatures  -40 °C to 85 °C

Advantech | www.advantech.com

Antenna Measurement Made Easy

For web Lacoste Lead Image

Covering the Basics

If you’re doing any kind of wireless communications application, that probably means including an antenna in your design. The science of antennas is complex. But here Robert shows how the task of measuring an antenna’s performance is less costly and exotic than you’d think.

By Robert Lacoste

Now that wireless communications is ubiquitous, chances are you’ll be using Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, cellular, LoRa, MiWi or other flavor of wireless interface in your next design. And that means including an antenna. Unfortunately, antenna design is not an easy topic. Even very experienced designers sometimes have had to wrestle with unexpected bad performances by their antennas. Case in point: Google “iPhone 4 antenna problem” and you will get more than 3 million web pages! In a nutshell, Apple tried to integrate a clever antenna in that model that was threaded around the phone. They didn’t anticipate that some users would put their fingers exactly where the antenna was the most sensitive to detuning. Was it a design flaw? Or a mistake by the users? It was hotly debated, but this so-called “Antennagate” probably had significant impact on Apple’s sales for a while.

I already devoted an article to antenna design and impedance matching (“The Darker Side: Antenna Basics”, Circuit Cellar 211, February 2008). Whether you include a standard antenna or design your own, you will never be sure it is working properly until you measure its actual performance. Of course, you could simply evaluate how far the system is working. But how do you go farther if the range is not enough? How do you figure out if the problem is coming from the receiver, the transmitter, propagation conditions or the antenna itself? My personal experience has been that the antenna is very often the culprit. With that in mind, it really is mandatory to measure whether or not an antenna is behaving correctly. Take a seat. This month, I will explain how to easily measure the actual performance of an antenna. You will see that the process is quite easy and that it won’t even need costly or exotic equipment.

SOME ANTENNA BASICS

Let’s start with some basics on antennas. First, all passive antennas have the same performance whether transmitting or receiving. For this article, I’ll consider the antenna as transmitting because that’s easier to measure. Let’s consider an antenna that we inject with a given radio frequency power Pconducted into its connector. Where will this power go? First off, impedance matching should be checked. If the impedance of the antenna is not well matched to the impedance of the power generator, then a part of the power will be reflected back to the generator. This will happen in particular when the transmit frequency is not equal to the resonant frequency of the antenna. In such a case, a part of Pconducted will be lost.  That is known as mismatch losses: Pavailable= Pconducted – MismatchLosses. While that itself is a very interesting subject, I have already discussed impedance matching in detail in my February 2008 article. I also devoted another article to a closely linked topic: standing waves. Standing waves appear when there is a mismatch. The article is “The Darker Side: Let’s play with standing waves” (Circuit Cellar 271, February 2013).

For the purpose of discussion here, I will for now assume that there isn’t any mismatching—and therefore no mismatch loss. …

Read the full article in the October 327 issue of Circuit Cellar

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