New Radar Demonstration Kits

Pasternack recently introduced the its new PEM11000-KIT and PEM11002-KIT radar demonstration kits. Covering the 2.4-GHz industrial, scientific, and medical (ISM) band, the demo kits are excellent resources for studying radar fundamentals (e.g., object detection, motion detection, and object range) and R&D projects. Pasternack-Radar-Demo-Kit-SQYou can select experimental radar operating modes for CW, FMSW, or Doppler, and you can set output waveforms for single tone, frequency ramp, or sawtooth. The kit—for which no special licensing is required—features a radar board with an integrated speaker and a signal indicator to support A/V feedback of the received signal strength. A tunable signal filter enables you to design and implement customized passive or active filtering.

The PEM11002-KIT model features a radar board, antennas, cables, and accessories that include a mounting plate, tripod, and USB battery pack. It comes with a user guide, programming manual, and lesson guide.

The new PEM11000-KIT and PEM11002-KIT radar demonstration kits are in stock.  The PEM11000-KIT starts at $2,399. The PEM11002-KIT starts at $2,613.

Source: Pasternack Enterprises

ISM Basics (EE Tip #100)

The industrial, scientific, and medical (ISM) bands are radio frequency ranges freely available for industrial, scientific and medical applications, although there are also many devices aimed at private users that operate in these bands. ISM devices require only general type approval and no individual testing.

Source: Wolfgang Rudolph & Burkhard Kainka’s article, “ATM18 on the Air,” 080852, Elektor, 1/2009.

Source: Wolfgang Rudolph & Burkhard Kainka’s article, “ATM18 on the Air,” 080852, Elektor, 1/2009.

The radio communication sector of the International Telecommunication Union (ITUR) defines the ISM bands at an international level. Wi-Fi and Bluetooth operate in ISM bands, as do many radio headphones and remote cameras, although these are not usually described as ISM devices. These devices are responsible for considerable radio communications interference (especially at 433 MHz and at 2.4 GHz).

ITU-R defines the following bands, not all of which are available in every country:

  • 6.765 to 6.795 MHz
  • 13.553 to 13.567 MHz
  • 26.957 to 27.283 MHz
  • 40.66 to 40.70 MHz
  • 433.05 to 434.79 MHz
  • 902 to 928 MHz
  • 2.400 to 2.500 GHz
  • 5.725 to 5.875 GHz
  • 24 to 24.25 GHz

Some countries allocate further ISM bands in addition to those above. ISM applications have the lowest priority within any given band. Many bands available for ISM are shared with other spectrum users: for example the 433 MHz ISM band is shared with 70 cm amateur radio communications.

ISM users must not interfere with other users, but must be able to tolerate the interference to their own communications caused by higher-priority users in the same band. The band from 868 MHz to 870 MHz is often mistakenly characterized as an ISM band. It is nevertheless available to short-range radio devices, such as RFID tags, remote switches, remote alarm systems, and radio modules.

For more information, refer to Wolfgang Rudolph & Burkhard Kainka’s article, “ATM18 on the Air,” 080852, Elektor, 1/2009.