New RP6V2 Robot Kit

Global Specialties recently introduced a new RP6V2 Robot Kit with RC5 remote and battery charger. The C-programmable autonomous mobile robot system is accessible enough for students and electronics enthusiasts to use. It comes with several example programs and a large C function library.

Source: Global Specialties

Source: Global Specialties

Features:

  • Atmel ATmega32 8-bit RISC microcontroller with 8 MIPS and an 8-MHz clock
  • Delivered fully assembled (no soldering needed)
  • CD with software and 138-page manual
  • AVR-GCC and RobotLoader open-source software for use with Windows and Linux
  • Programmable in C
  • Receives IR codes in RC5 format from the included remote control
  • USB Interface for easy programming and communication
  • Modular I2C bus expansion system
  • Expansion boards may be stacked as needed
  • Sample C programs and large C function library
  • Powerful tank drive train can negotiate steep ramps and obstacles
  • Large payload capacity
  • Light, collision, speed and IR-obstacle sensors integrated
  • Two 7.2-V DC motors
  • 625 CPR encoder resolution for precise speed regulation
  • Six PCB expansion areas

Source: Global Specialties

 

 

What Is Emissivity? (EE Tip #133)

All objects radiate infrared energy. The warmer an object is, the faster the molecules in the object move about, and as a result the more infrared energy it radiates. The wavelength of this radiation lies roughly between 0.5 and 100 μm. This depends on the temperature: the higher the temperature, the shorter the wavelength of the radiated IR energy, as illustrated in Figure 1 for several different temperatures.Fig1-IR-Rad-Elektor

This means that an IR thermometer must be able to detect energy radiated in a specific spectrum in the IR band in order to be able to measure temperatures accurately over a wide temperature range. In addition, you should bear in mind that only perfect radiators (in technical terms, “black bodies”) actually radiate all of their thermal energy. With other types of objects, the amount of energy radiated also depends on factors other than the temperature of the object, such as the properties of the material and surface reflection. This is expressed by the emissivity or emission coefficient of the material, and it can strongly affect the accuracy of IR temperature measurements.

Emissivity (or the emission coefficient) is an indication of the extent to which the thermal infrared radiation emitted by an object is determined by the object’s own temperature. A value of 1 means that the infrared radiation is determined solely by the object’s own temperature. A value less than 1 indicates that the emitted radiation depends in part on factors other than the object’s own temperature, such as nearby objects or heat transmission.Table-Emissivity-Elektor

Simple IR thermometers usually have a fixed emission coefficient setting of 0.95. If the emissivity of the object to be measured differs from this, the resulting readings will be inaccurate. More expensive instruments have an adjustable emission coefficient setting.

The emissivity values of a number of materials are listed in the table. They have been compiled from lists provided by various manufacturers of IR thermometers. The emissivity of metals is strongly influenced by the processing undergone by the metal and the surface treatment.

When compiling the table, we noticed that every manufacturer states somewhat different values, which makes it rather difficult to derive the correct emissivity settings for an instrument from the table supplied with the instrument. The only sure way to determine the correct setting is to measure the temperature with a contact sensor.—By Harry Baggen (Elektor Netherlands Editorial), Elektor, April 2011

IR Remote Control Testing (EE Tip #119)

On the Internet you can find them in all shapes and sizes: circuits to test remote controls. Here I describe a simple and cheap method that is not that well-known.

This method is based on the principle that an LED does not only generate light when you apply a voltage to it, but also works in the opposite direction to generate a voltage when light falls on it. Within constraints it can therefore be used as an alternative for a proper phototransistor or photodiode. The major advantage is that you will usually have an LED around somewhere, which may not be true for a photodiode.

IR remote tester

IR remote tester

This is also true for infrared (IR) diodes and this makes them eminently suitable for testing a remote control. You only need to connect a voltmeter to the IR diode and the remote control tester is finished. Set the multimeter so it measures DC voltage and turn it on. Hold the remote control close to the IR diode and push any button. If the remote control is working then the voltage shown on the display will quickly rise. When you release the button the voltage will drop again.

However, don’t expect a very high voltage from the IR diode! The voltage generated by the diode will only be about 300 mV, but this is sufficient to show whether the remote control is working or not. There are quite a few other objects that emit IR radiation. So, first note the voltage indicated by the voltmeter before pushing any of the buttons on the remote control and use this as a reference value. Also, don’t do this test in a well lit room or a room with the sun shining in, because there is the chance that there is too much IR radiation present.

To quickly reduce the diode voltage to zero before doing the next measurement you can short-circuit the pins of the diode briefly. This will not damage the diode.—Tom van Steenkiste, Elektor, 11/2010

Want tips about testing power supplies? We’ve got you covered! EE Tip #112 will help you determine the stability of your lab or bench-top supply!

Multi-Zone Home Audio System

Dave Erickson built his first multi-zone audio system in the early 1990s using C microprocessor code he developed on Freescale MC68HC11 microprocessors. The system has been an important part of his home.

“I used this system for more than 15 years and was satisfied with its ability to send different sounds to the different rooms in my house as well as the basement and the deck,” he says. “But the system needed an upgrade.”

In Circuit Cellar’s January and February issues, Erickson describes how he upgraded the eight-zone system, which uses microprocessor-controlled analog circuitry. In the end, his project not only improved his home audio experience, it also won second place in a 2011 STMicroelectronics design contest.

Several system components needed updating, including the IR remote, graphic LCD, and microprocessor. “IR remotes went obsolete, so the IR codes needed to change,” Erickson says. “The system was 90% hand-wired and pretty messy. The LCD and several other parts became obsolete and the C development tools had expired. Processors had evolved to include flash memory and development tools evolved beyond the old burn-and-pray method.”

“My goal was to build a modern, smaller, cleaner, and more efficient system,” he says. “I decided to upgrade it with a recent processor and LCD and to use real PC boards.”

Photo 1: Clockwise from the upper left, the whole-house system includes the crosspoint board, two quad preamplifiers, two two-zone stereo amplifiers, an AC transformer, power supplies, and the CPU board with the STMicroelectronics STM32VLDISCOVERY board.

Photo 1: Clockwise from the upper left, the whole-house system includes the crosspoint board, two quad preamplifiers, two two-zone stereo amplifiers, an AC transformer, power supplies, and the CPU board with the STMicroelectronics STM32VLDISCOVERY board.

Erickson chose the STMicroelectronics STM32F100 microprocessor and the work incentive of a design contest deadline (see Photo 1).

“STMicroelectronics’s excellent libraries and examples helped me get the complex ARM Cortex-M3 peripherals working quickly,” he says. “Choosing the STM32F100 processor was a bit of overkill, but I hoped to later use it to add future capabilities (e.g., a web page and Ethernet control) and possibly even a simple music server and audio streaming.”

In Part 1 of the series, Erickson explains the design’s audio sections, including the crosspoint board, quad preamplifiers, modular audio amplifiers, and packaging. He also addresses challenges along the way.

Erickson’s Part 1 provides the following overview of the system, including its “analog heart”—the crosspoint board:

Figure 1 shows the system design including the power supplies, front-panel controls, and the audio and CPU boards. The system is modular, so there is flexibility in the front-panel controls and the number of channels and amplifiers. My goal was to fit it all into one 19”, 2U (3.5”) high rack enclosure.

The CPU board is based on a STM32F100 module containing a Cortex-M3-based processor and a USB programming interface. The CPU receives commands from a front-panel keypad, an IR remote control, an encoder knob, RS-232, and external keypads for each zone. It displays its status on a graphic LCD and controls the audio circuitry on the crosspoint and two quad preamplifier boards.

The system block diagram shows the boards, controls, amplifiers, and power supplies.

The system block diagram shows the boards, controls, amplifiers, and power supplies.


Photo 2 shows the crosspoint board, which is the analog heart of the system. It receives line-level audio signals from up to eight stereo sources via RCA jacks and routes audio to the eight preamplifier channels located on two quad preamplifier boards. It also distributes digital control and power to the preamplifiers. The preamplifier boards can either send line-level outputs or drive stereo amplifiers, either internal or external to the system.

My current system uses four line-level outputs to drive PCs or powered speakers in four of the zones. It also contains internal 40-W stereo amplifiers to directly drive speakers in the four other zones. Up to six stereo amplifiers can reside in the enclosure.

Photo 2: The crosspoint board shows the RCA input jacks (top), ribbon cable connections to the quad preamplifiers (right), and control and power cable from the CPU (bottom). Rev0 has a few black wires (lower center).

Photo 2: The crosspoint board shows the RCA input jacks (top), ribbon cable connections to the quad preamplifiers (right), and control and power cable from the CPU (bottom). Rev0 has a few black wires (lower center).

DIYers dealing with signal leakage issues in their projects may learn something from Erickson’s approach to achieving low channel-to-channel crosstalk and no audible digital crosstalk. “The low crosstalk requirement is to prevent loud music in one zone from disturbing quiet passages in another,” he says.

In Part 1, Erickson explains the crosspoint and his “grounding/guarding” approach to transmitting high-quality audio, power, and logic control signals on the same cable:

The crosspoint receives digital control from the CPU board, receives external audio signals, and distributes audio signals to the preamplifier boards and then on to the amplifiers. It was convenient to use this board to distribute the control signals and the power supply voltages to the preamplifier channels. I used 0.1” dual-row ribbon cables to simplify the wiring. These are low-cost and easy to build.

To transmit high-quality audio along with power and logic control signals on the same cable, it is important to use a lot of grounds. Two 34-pin cables each connect to a quad preamplifier board. In each of these cables, four channels of stereo audio are sent with alternating signals and grounds. The alternating grounds act as electric field “guards” to reduce crosstalk. There are just two active logic signals: I2C clock and data. Power supply voltages (±12 and 5 V) are also sent to the preamplifiers with multiple grounds to carry the return currents.

I used a similar grounding/guarding approach throughout the design to minimize crosstalk, both from channel to channel and from digital to analog. On the two-layer boards, I used ground planes on the bottom layer. Grounded guard traces or ground planes are used on the top layer. These measures minimize the capacitance between analog traces and thus minimize crosstalk. The digital and I2C signals are physically separated from analog signals. Where they need to be run nearby, they are separated by ground planes or guard traces.

To find out more about how Erickson upgraded his audio system, download the January issue (now available online) and the upcoming February issue. In Part 2, Erickson focuses on his improved system’s digital CPU, the controls, and future plans.

Infrared Communications for Atmel Microcontrollers

Are you planning an IR communications project? Do you need to choose a microcontroller? Check out the information Cornell University Senior Lecturer Bruce Land sent us about inexpensive IR communication with Atmel ATmega microcontrollers. It’s another example of the sort of indispensable information covered in Cornell’s excellent ECE4760 course.

Land informed us:

I designed a basic packet communication scheme using cheap remote control IR receivers and LED transmitters. The scheme supports 4800 baud transmission,
with transmitter ID and checksum. Throughput is about twenty 20-character packets/sec. The range is at least 3 meters with 99.9% packet receive and moderate (<30 mA) IR LED drive current.

On the ECE4760 project page, Land writes:

I improved Remin’s protocol by setting up the link software so that timing constraints on the IR receiver AGC were guaranteed to be met. It turns out that there are several types of IR reciever, some of which are better at short data bursts, while others are better for sustained data. I chose a Vishay TSOP34156 for its good sustained data characteristics, minimal burst timing requirements, and reasonable data rate. The system I build works solidly at 4800 baud over IR with 5 characters of overhead/packet (start token, transmitter number, 2 char checksum , end token). It works with increasing packet loss up to 9000 baud.

Here is the receiver circuit.

The receiver circuit (Source: B. Land, Cornell University ECE4760 Infrared Communications
for Atmel Mega644/1284 Microcontrollers)

Land explains:

The RC circuit acts a low-pass filter on the power to surpress spike noise and improve receiver performance. The RC circuit should be close to the receiver. The range with a 100 ohm resistor is at least 3 meters with the transmitter roughly pointing at the receiver, and a packet loss of less then 0.1 percent. To manage burst length limitations there is a short pause between characters, and only 7-bit characters are sent, with two stop bits. The 7-bit limit means that you can send all of the printing characters on the US keyboard, but no extended ASCII. All data is therefore sent as printable strings, NOT as raw hexidecimal.

Land’s writeup also includes a list of programs and packet format information.