MCU Leverages New ARM Security Scheme

STMicroelectronics supports ARM’s new Platform Security Architecture (PSA) in ST’s STM32H7 high-performing microcontrollers. People and organizations are increasingly dependent on connected electronic devices to manage time, monitor health, handle social interactions, consume or deliver services, maximize productivity, and many other activities. Preventing unauthorized interactions with these devices is essential to protecting identity, personal information, physical assets, and intellectual property. As device manufacturers must always innovate to beat new and inventive hacking exploits, PSA helps them implement state-of-the-art security cost-effectively in small, resource-constrained devices.

en.STM32H7_Support_Arm_Security_T3989S_bigST’s STM32H7 MCU devices integrate hardware-based security features including a True Random-Number Generator (TRNG) and advanced cryptographic processor, which will simplify protecting embedded applications and global IoT systems against attacks like eavesdropping, spoofing, or man-in-the-middle interception. In addition, secure firmware loading facilities help OEMs ensure their products can be programmed safely and securely, even off-site at a contract manufacturer or programming house.

To enable secure loading, security keys and software services already on-board the MCU permit OEMs to provide manufacturing partners with already-encrypted firmware, making intercepting, copying, or tampering with the code impossible. This enables programming and authenticating the device to establish the root-of-trust mechanism needed for the device to be connected to the end-user’s network and remotely updated over the air (OTA) to apply security patches or feature upgrades throughout the lifetime of the device.

A member of the STM32H7 series supporting the PSA, the STM32H753 MCU with ARM’s highest-performing embedded core (Cortex-M7) delivers a record performance of 2020 CoreMark/856 DMIPS running at 400MHz, executing code from embedded Flash memory. Additional innovations and features implemented by ST further boost performance. These include the Chrom-ART Accelerator for fast and efficient graphical user-interfaces, a hardware JPEG codec that allows high-speed image manipulation, highly efficient Direct Memory Access (DMA) controllers, up to 2 MB of on-chip dual-bank Flash memory with read-while-write capability, and the L1 cache allowing full-speed interaction with off-chip memory.

Multiple power domains allow developers to minimize the energy consumed by their applications, while plentiful I/Os, communication interfaces, and audio and analog peripherals can address a wide range of entertainment, remote-monitoring and control applications. The STM32H753 is in production now, priced $8.90 for orders or 10,000 pieces.

STMicroelectronics | www.st.com

IoT Tool Suite Supports Bluetooth 5

Rigado has announced its Edge Connectivity Suite with full support for Bluetooth 5. Designed for large-scale commercial IoT deployments, Rigado’s Edge Connectivity solution is comprised of Bluetooth 5 end-device modules and the Vesta IoT Gateway, which includes cloud-based tools for secure deployment and updating.

The Edge Connectivity Suite actively addresses a growing need for low-power wireless within commercial IoT applications like asset tracking, smart lighting and connected retail and hospitality. The company’s Bluetooth 5-enabled solutions support the flexibility, interoperability and security demands of large-scale commercial IoT deployments. Moreover, the suite addresses the market need for Edge Computing at scale, paving a secure and cost-effective road for data from device-to-cloud.

Specifically designed for companies who need to develop, deploy and manage a large number of connected devices and gateways, the Rigado Edge Connectivity Suite provides seamless integration between IoT devices and the Cloud. It includes:

  • BMD-340 angleCertified end device modules – Rigado modules (see photo) save connected product teams six months and $200K+ in design, test and certification. Fully Bluetooth 5 enabled, Rigado modules also feature mesh networking capabilities, ideal for applications like smart lighting, asset tracking, and connected retail.
  • Edge computing gateways – Rigado Vesta gateways manage connectivity to end devices and ensure data reaches public and private cloud services. They also support custom edge applications to process data and offer local device control. Flexible wireless options and customizability mean that companies can optimize their gateway for cost-effective enterprise deployment.
  • Cloud-based tools for secure deployment and updating– Companies require a scalable solution to securely manage updates to devices in the field. With that in mind, every Rigado gateway ships with Rigado’s provisioning and release management system that integrates with existing development tools for secure updating at scale.

Rigado | www.rigado.com

New Consortium to Focus on Industry 4.0

Advantech has announced that it has partnered with Mitsubishi Electric, Omron, NEC, IBM Japan and Oracle Japan to establish the “Edgecross Consortium” to overcome boundaries between companies and industries in order to realize collaboration between factory automation (FA) and IT. The objective is to create new value centered on edge computing. The joint press conference to announce the establishment of the Edgecross Consortium was held on November 6, 2017, in Tokyo, Japan, and the establishment of the consortium is planned for November 29, 2017.

content-image-1510189308969

The Edgecross Consortium will focus on the easy realization of FA and IT collaboration through its open software platform (“Edgecross Software Platform”), which is based on edge computing. By residing on the edge layer, the Edgecross Software Platform facilitates connectivity between factory shop floors and value chains, while enabling the rapid acquisition, analysis, and utilization of data, which are essential to smart manufacturing. In addition, user applications can be easily created and shared on the edge to realize various IoT utilization purposes.

The consortium aims to co-develop the platform specifications for and achieve certification of Edgecross products, in addition to co-marketing promotion and global co-selling for consortium members. Starting from Japan and then globally, you will be able to catch a glimpse of the Edgecross booth display at the SCF 2017 Fair and Smart Factory EXPO 2018. Advantech is organizing the IoT Co-Creation Summit from November 1 to 3, 2018, in Suzhou, China, with more than 2500 attendees from all over the world. The summit will seek to foster the three phases of growth brought about by IoT and to demonstrate the co-creation achievement of IoT WISE-PaaS, EISs, and SRPs.

Advantech | www.advantech.com

Tuesday’s Newsletter: Embedded Boards

Coming to your inbox tomorrow: Circuit Cellar’s Embedded Boards newsletter. Tomorrow’s newsletter content focuses on both standard and non-standard embedded computer boards that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up to production volumes.

Bonus: We’ve added Drawings for Free Stuff to our weekly newsletters. Make sure you’ve subscribed to the newsletter so you can participate.

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Our weekly Circuit Cellar Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

Analog & Power. (12/5) This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op amps, batteries and more.

Microcontroller Watch. (12/12) This newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

IoT Technology Focus. (12/19) Covers what’s happening with Internet-of-Things (IoT) technology–-from devices to gateway networks to cloud architectures. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

A Year in the Drone Age

Input Voltage

–Jeff Child, Editor-in-Chief

JeffHeadShot

When you’re trying to keep tabs on any young, fast-growing technology, it’s tempting to say “this is the big year” for that technology. Problem is that odds are the following year could be just as significant. Such is the case with commercial drones. Drone technology fascinates me partly because it represents one of the clearest examples of an application that wouldn’t exist without today’s level of chip integration driven by Moore’s law. That integration has enabled 4k HD video capture, image stabilization, new levels of autonomy and even highly compact supercomputing to fly aboard today’s commercial and consumer drones.

Beyond the technology side, drones make for a rich topic of discussion because of the many safety, privacy and regulatory issues surrounding them. And then there are the wide-open questions on what new applications will drones be used for?

For its part, the Federal Aviation Administration has had its hands full this year regarding drones. In the spring, for example, the FAA completed its fifth and final field evaluation of potential drone detection systems at Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport. The evaluation was the latest in a series of detection system evaluations that began in February 2016 at several airports. For the DFW test, the FAA teamed with Gryphon Sensors as its industry partner. The company’s drone detection technologies include radar, radio frequency and electro-optical systems. The FAA intends to use the information gathered during these kinds of evaluations to craft performance standards for any drone detection technology that may be deployed in or around U.S. airports.

In early summer, the FAA set up a new Aviation Rulemaking Committee tasked to help the agency create standards for remotely identifying and tracking unmanned aircraft during operations. The rulemaking committee will examine what technology is available or needs to be created to identify and track unmanned aircraft in flight.

This year as also saw vivid examples of the transformative role drones are playing. A perfect example was the role drones played in August during the flooding in Texas after Hurricane Harvey. In his keynote speech at this year’s InterDrone show, FAA Administrator Michael Huerta described how drones made an incredible impact. “After the floodwaters had inundated homes, businesses, roadways and industries, a wide variety of agencies sought FAA authorization to fly drones in airspace covered by Temporary Flight Restrictions,” said Huerta. “We recognized that we needed to move fast—faster than we have ever moved before. In most cases, we were able to approve individual operations within minutes of receiving a request.”

Huerta went on to described some of the ways drones were used. A railroad company used drones to survey damage to a rail line that cuts through Houston. Oil and energy companies flew drones to spot damage to their flooded infrastructure. Drones helped a fire department and county emergency management officials check for damage to roads, bridges, underpasses and water treatment plants that could require immediate repair. Meanwhile, cell tower companies flew them to assess damage to their towers and associated ground equipment and insurance companies began assessing damage to neighborhoods. In many of those situations, drones were able to conduct low-level operations more efficiently—and more safely—than could have been done with manned aircraft.

“I don’t think it’s an exaggeration to say that the hurricane response will be looked back upon as a landmark in the evolution of drone usage in this country,” said Huerta. “And I believe the drone industry itself deserves a lot of credit for enabling this to happen. That’s because the pace of innovation in the drone industry is like nothing we have seen before. If people can dream up a new use for drones, they’re transforming it into reality.”

Clearly, it’s been significant year for drone technology. And I’m excited for Circuit Cellar to go deeper with our drone embedded technology coverage in 2018. But I don’t think I’ll dare say that “this was the big year” for drones. I have a feeling it’s just one of many to come.

This appears in the December (329) issue of Circuit Cellar magazine

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Next Newsletter: IoT Technology Focus

Coming to your inbox tomorrow: Circuit Cellar’s IoT Technology Focus newsletter. Tomorrow’s newsletter covers what’s happening with Internet-of-Things (IoT) technology–-from devices to gateway networks to cloud architectures. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

Bonus: We’ve added Drawings for Free Stuff to our weekly newsletters. Make sure you’ve subscribed to the newsletter so you can participate.

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Our weekly Circuit Cellar Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

Embedded Boards.(11/28) The focus here is on both standard and non-standard embedded computer boards that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up to production volumes.

Analog & Power. (12/5) This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op amps, batteries and more.

Microcontroller Watch (12/12) This newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

Tuesday’s Newsletter: Microcontroller Watch

Coming to your inbox tomorrow: Circuit Cellar’s Microcontroller Watch newsletter. Tomorrow’s newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

Bonus: We’ve added Drawings for Free Stuff to our weekly newsletters. Make sure you’ve subscribed to the newsletter so you can participate.

LX2160AAlready a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber? Great!
You’ll get your Microcontroller Watch newsletter issue tomorrow.

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Our weekly Circuit Cellar Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

IoT Technology Focus. (11/21) Covers what’s happening with Internet-of-Things (IoT) technology–-from devices to gateway networks to cloud architectures. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

Embedded Boards.(11/28) The focus here is on both standard and non-standard embedded computer boards that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up to production volumes.

Analog & Power. (12/5) This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op amps, batteries and more.

Tuesday’s Newsletter: Analog & Power

Coming to your inbox tomorrow: Circuit Cellar’s Analog & Power newsletter. Tomorrow’s newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op amps, batteries and more.

Bonus: We’ve added Drawings for Free Stuff to our weekly newsletters. Make sure you’ve subscribed to the newsletter so you can participate.

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Our weekly Circuit Cellar Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

Microcontroller Watch. (11/14) This newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

IoT Technology Focus. (11/21) Covers what’s happening with Internet-of-Things (IoT) technology–-from devices to gateway networks to cloud architectures. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

Embedded Boards.(11/28) The focus here is on both standard and non-standard embedded computer boards that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up to production volumes.

STMicro and Objenious Collaborate on IoT LoRa Network Deal

STMicroelectronics and Objenious are working together to accelerate the connection of IoT nodes to LoRa networks. ST’s development kits certified on the Objenious network are available now, greatly reducing R&D effort and time to market in the creation of new LoRa devices.

STM32 Nucleo LoRa kits are now certified and available to developers through ST sales channels.

STM32 Nucleo LoRa kits are now certified and available to developers through ST sales channels.

LoRAWAN is a Low Power Wide Area Network (LPWAN) based on LoRa technology that is opening up a world of possibilities to create networks of connected devices ideal to address a broad range of IoT applications. The benefits of LoRa especially suit applications where nodes have limited power capability, can be difficult to access, and data transfers don’t require high bandwidth. LoRa can target a wide spectrum of applications such as tracking, proactive maintenance, and many others. Industry analysts estimate there will be tens of billions of connected devices deployed in the world by 2020.

Objenious launched and operates the first LoRa network in France, with more than 4,200 antennas deployed around the country. Leveraging the network know-how inherited from Bouygues Telecom, Objenious now proposes its LoRa network, platform, and services for LPWAN IoT to partners and customers locally and internationally thanks to roaming agreements.

STMicro helps developers by providing tools and software libraries that aid the STM32 MCU-based embedded design as part of its freely available STM32 Open Development Environment (ODE). By integrating Objenious’ network access software on top of the STM32 ODE, developing connected devices is even easier. STM32 Nucleo LoRa kits are now certified and available to developers through ST sales channels.

STMicroelectronics | www.st.com

Sensor Node Gets LoRaWAN Certification

Advantech offers its standardized M2.COM IoT LoRaWAN certified sensor node WISE-1510 with integrated ARM Cortex-M4 processor and LoRa transceiver. The module the  is able to provide multi-interfaces for sensors and I/O control such as UART, I2C, SPI, GPIO, PWM and ADC. The WISE-1510 sensor node is well suited for for smart cities, WISE-1510_3D _S20170602171747agriculture, metering, street lighting and environment monitoring. With power consumption optimization and wide area reception, LoRa  sensors or applications with low data rate requirements can achieve years of battery life and kilometers of long distance connection.

WISE-1510 has has received LoRaWAN certification from the LoRa Alliance. Depending on deployment requirements, developers can select to use Public LoRaWAN network services or build a private LoRa system with WISE-3610 LoRa IoT gateway. Advantech’s WISE-3610  is a Qualcomm ARM Cortex A7 based hardware platform with private LoRa ecosystem solution that can connect up to 500 WISE-1510 sensor node devices. Powered by Advantech’s WISE-PaaS IoT Software Platform, WISE-3610 features automatic cloud connection through its WISE-PaaS/WISE Agent service, manages wireless nodes and data via WSN management APIs, and helps customers streamline their IoT data acquisition development through sensor service APIs, and WSN drivers.

Developers can leverage microprocessors on WISE-1510 to build their own applications. WISE-1510 offers unified software—ARM Mbed OS and SDK for easy development with APIs and related documents. Developers can also find extensive resources from Github such as code review, library integration and free core tools. WISE-1510 also offers worldwide certification which allow developers to leverage their IoT devices anywhere. Using Advantech’s WISE-3610 LoRa IoT Gateway, WISE-1510 can be connected to WISE-  PaaS/RMM or  ARM Mbed Cloud service with IoT communication protocols including LWM2M, CoAP, and MQTT. End-to-end integration assists system integrators to overcome complex challenges and helps them build IoT applications quickly and easily.

WISE-1510 features and specifications:

  • ARM Cortex-M4 core processor
  • Compatible support for public LoRaWAN or private LoRa networks
  • Great for low power/wide range applications
  • Multiple I/O interfaces for sensor and control
  • Supports wide temperatures  -40 °C to 85 °C

Advantech | www.advantech.com

Bonus Newsletter Tomorrow: PCB Design

Coming to your inbox tomorrow: October has a 5th Tuesday . That’s means there’s an extra Newsletter this month! The bonus topic is PCB Design. The process of PCB design is always facing new complexities. Rules-based autorouting, chips with higher lead counts and higher speed interconnections are just a few of the challenges forcing PCB design software to keep pace. This newsletter updates you on the latest happenings in this area.

Also, we’ve added Drawings for Free Stuff to our weekly newsletters. Make sure you’ve subscribed to the newsletter so you can participate.

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Our weekly Circuit Cellar Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

Analog & Power. (11/7) This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op amps, batteries and more.

Microcontroller Watch. (11/14) This newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

IoT Technology Focus. (11/21) Covers what’s happening with Internet-of-Things (IoT) technology–-from devices to gateway networks to cloud architectures. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

Embedded Boards. (11/28) This newsletter content focuses on both standard and non-standard embedded computer boards that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up to production volumes.

MCU Delivers Enhanced Security for Connected Devices

Renesas Electronics has announced the expansion of its RX65N/RX651 Group microcontroller lineup that addresses advanced security needs for connected devices operating in industrial automation, building automation, and smart metering systems. The expanded lineup features MCUs with integrated Trusted Secure IP, and enhanced, trusted flash functionality and human-machine interface (HMI) for industrial and network control systems.

2017113-rx65n-rx651-securityThe expansion of devices operating at the edge of the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) has increased system manufacturers’ need for secure network connectivity and reliability, including secure on-the-go firmware updates. The expanded RX65N/RX651 devices support these evolving security and reprogrammability needs, offering integrated Trusted Secure IP, enhanced flash protection, and other technology advancements to create a secure and stable integrated solution far above others in the market, as proven by the Cryptographic Algorithm Validation (CAVP) certification. In turn, these security advancements enable seamless flash firmware updates in the field through secure network communications.

The new MCUs expanded with enhanced security features are based on the high-performance RXv2 core and a 40nm process, which provide strong power efficiency for CPU operation at 4.55 Core Mark/MHz. Integrating the Trusted Secure IP into the new MCUs enables system control engineers to realize high root-of-trust levels for device operation through a combination of three new features:

  •    Protect encryption key by Trusted Secure IP
  •    Integration of encryption hardware accelerators including AES, 3DES, SHA, and      TRNG as part of Trusted Secure IP
  •    Protect boot code by area of Flash

The Trusted Secure IP received the CAVP certification, which ensures the customer will use a device with a high security level.

Renesas has optimized the new RX65N/RX651 MCUs for connected industrial environments. The new MCUs offer network connectivity and HMI support that makes it possible to:

  •     Monitor the operating state of machinery from both inside and outside the factory
  •     Exchange data for making changes to production instructions
  •     Reprogram the MCU’s memory to update equipment settings

Design engineers are often asked to integrate small thin-film-transistor (TFT) displays into their IoT edge devices or system control applications. These displays allow users to monitor machine behavior through a modern low-cost HMI solution. The RX65N/RX651 is an ideal solution for controlling these displays as it features an embedded TFT controller and an integrated 2D graphic accelerator to provide advanced graphics features and high-performance applications. Selecting a WQVGA display size allows the large 640 KB of on-chip RAM to be used as display frame buffer, which saves external RAM, ensuring a cost-optimized design.

Compared with other IoT devices, industrial applications are designed for long-term operation, which involves unique and sometimes challenging requirements, such as firmware updates in the field. The new RX65N/RX651 MCUs feature dual bank flash integration supporting both BGO (Back Ground Operation) and the SWAP function, making it easier for system and network control manufacturers to execute in-the-field firmware updates securely and reliably.

Firmware Integration Technology (FIT) is a holistic concept that emphasizes the embedded peripheral function module drivers and portability improvement between the RX65N/RX651 MCUs. The technology aims to lighten the burden of program development and resource management in software development using the entire family of RX MCUs. FIT provides a common application program interface for peripheral drivers and middleware for RX family, based on a solid Board Support Package, which controls the common information for these functions like initial MCU, clock, and board settings. FIT is available for all RX devices and fully integrated into the development environment.

Renesas has expanded its robust RX tool infrastructure to help engineers jump start their development work. The new Envision Kit provides an evaluation environment that allows engineers to easily benchmark MCU performance and start developing their own software. The new RX65N Renesas Starter Kit (RSK) includes a development board with MCU, display, on-chip debugger, trial Renesas C compiler and Integrated Development Environment (IDE), enabling engineers to get their evaluations and development up and running within a matter of minutes. To jumpstart their display designs, RX users can also leverage several ecosystem partner tools, including easy-to-use graphic GUI tools.

The expanded RX65N/RX651 MCUs, Renesas RX65N Starter Kit, and Envision Kit are available now

.Renesas Electronics | www.renesas.com

Mini Sensor Dies Target IoT and Autos

TDK has announced new miniaturized EPCOS MEMS pressure sensor dies. The automotive versions of the C33 series boast dimensions of just 1 mm x 1 mm x 0.4 mm. They are designed for absolute pressures of 1.2 bar to 10 bar and are qualified based on bild-wo-background-en-HighResolutionDataAEC-Q101. The typical operating voltage is 3 V. With a supply voltage of 5 V they offer sensitivities of between 15 mV/bar and 80 mV/bar, depending on the type. The miniaturized pressure sensors are suitable for a temperature range from -40 °C to +135 °C and can even withstand 140 °C for short periods. They also offer a very long-term stability of ± 0.35% FS (full scale).

The C39 type, with its footprint of just 0.65 mm x 0.65 mm is especially suitable for IoT and consumer applications. One noteworthy feature of the C39 is its low insertion height of just 0.24 mm, which makes the low-profile MEMS pressure sensor die ideal for applications in smartphones and wearables, for example, where space requirements are critical. The C39 is designed for an absolute pressure of 1.2 bar and, like the C33 series, offers long-term stability of ± 0.35% FS. All the pressure sensor dies operate on the piezoresistive principle and deliver, via a Wheatstone bridge, an analog signal that is proportional to the applied pressure and the supply voltage.

Further information on the products at www.epcos.com/pressure_sensor_elements

TDK-Lambda | www.us.tdk-lambda.com

Hop on the Moving Train

Input Voltage

–Jeff Child, Editor-in-Chief

JeffHeadShot

We work pretty far in advance to get Circuit Cellar produced and in your hands on-time and at the level of quality you expect and deserve. Given that timing, as we go to press on this issue we’re getting into the early days of fall. In my 27 years in the technology magazine business, this part of the year has always included time set aside to finalize next year’s editorial calendar. The process for me over years has run the gamut from elaborate multi-day summer meetings to small one-on-one conversations with a handful of staff. But in every case, the purpose has never been only about choosing the monthly section topics. It’s also a deeper and broader discussion about “directions.” By that I mean the direction embedded systems technologies are going in—and how it’s impacting you our readers. Because these technologies change so rapidly, getting a handle on it is a bit like jumping onto a moving train.

A well thought out editorial calendar helps us plan out and select which article topics are most important—for both staff-written and contributed articles. And because we want to include all of the most insightful, in-depth stories we can, we will continue to include a mix of feature articles beyond the monthly calendar topics. Beyond its role for article planning, a magazine’s editorial calendar also makes a statement on what the magazine’s priorities are in terms of technology, application segments and product areas. In our case, it speaks to the kind of magazine that Circuit Cellar is—and what it isn’t.

An awareness of what types of product areas are critical to today’s developers is important. But because Circuit Cellar is not just a generic product magazine, we’re always looking at how various chips, boards and software solutions fit together in a systems context. This applies to our technology trend features as well as our detailed project-based articles that explore a microcontroller-based design in all its interesting detail. On the other hand, Circuit Cellar isn’t an academic style technical journal that’s divorced from any discussion of commercial products. In contrast, we embrace the commercial world enthusiastically. The deluge of new chip, board and software products often help inspire engineers to take a new direction in their system designs. New products serve as key milestones illustrating where technology is trending and at what rate of change.

Part of the discussion—for 2018 especially—is looking at how the definition of a “system” is changing. Driven by Moore’s Law, chip integration has shifted the level of system functionally at the IC, board and box level. We see an FPGA, SoC or microcontroller of today doing what used to require a whole embedded board. In turn, embedded boards can do what once required a box full of slot-card boards. Meanwhile, the high-speed interconnects between those new “system” blocks constantly have to keep those processing elements fed. The new levels of compute density, functionality and networking available today are opening up new options for embedded applications. Highly integrated FPGAs, comprehensive software development tools, high-speed fabric interconnects and turnkey box-level systems are just a few of the players in this story of embedded system evolution.

Finally, one of the most important new realities in embedded design is the emergence of intelligent systems. Using this term in a fairly broad sense, it’s basically now easier than ever to apply high-levels of embedded intelligence into any device or system. In some cases, this means adding a 32-bit MCU to an application that never used such technology. At the other extreme are full supercomputing-level AI technologies installed in a small drone or a vehicle. Such systems can meet immense throughput and processing requirements in space-constrained applications handling huge amounts of real-time incoming data. And at both those extremes, there’s connectivity to cloud-based computing analytics that exemplifies the cutting edge of the IoT. In fact, the IoT phenomenon is so important and opportunity rich that we plan to hit it from a variety of angles in 2018.

Those are the kinds of technology discussions that informed our creation of Circuit Cellar’s 2018 Ed Cal. Available now on www.circuitcellar.com, the structure of the calendar has been expanded for 2018 to ensure we cover all the critical embedded technology topics important to today’s engineering professional. Technology changes rapidly, so we invite you to hop on this moving train and ride along with us.

This appears in the November (328) issue of Circuit Cellar magazine

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Analog ICs Meet Industrial System Needs

Jeff Lead Image Analog Inustrial

Connectivity, Control and IIoT

Whether it’s connecting with analog sensors or driving actuators, analog ICs play many critical roles in industrial applications. Networked systems add new wrinkles to the industrial analog landscape.

By Jeff Child

While analog ICs are important in a variety of application areas, their place in the industrial market stands out. Industrial applications depend heavily on all kinds of interfacing between real-world analog signals and the digital realm of processing and control. Today’s factory environments are filled with motors to control, sensors to link with and measurements to automate. And as net-connected systems become the norm, analog chip vendors are making advances to serve the new requirements of the Industrial Internet-of-Things (IIoT) and Smart Factories.

It’s noteworthy, for example, that Analog Devices‘ third quarter fiscal year 2017 report this summer cited the “highly diverse and profitable industrial market” as the lead engine of its broad-based year-over-year growth. Taken together, these factors all make industrial applications a significant market for analog IC vendors, and those vendors are keeping pace by rolling out diverse solutions to meet those needs.

Figure 1

Figure 1 This diagram from Texas Instruments illustrates the diverse kinds of analog sub-systems that are common in industrial systems—an industrial drive/control system in this case.

While it’s impossible to generalize about industrial systems, Figure 1 illustrates the diverse kinds of analog sub-systems that are common in industrial systems—industrial drive/control in that case. All throughout 2017, manufacturers of analog ICs have released a rich variety of chips and development solutions to meet a wide range of industrial application needs.

SOLUTIONS FOR PLCs

Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs) remain a staple in many industrial systems. As communications demands increase and power management gets more difficult, transceiver technologies have evolved to keep up. PLC and IO-Link gateway systems must dissipate large amounts of power depending. That amount of power is often tied to I/O configuration—IO-Link, digital I/O and/or analog I/O. As these PLCs evolve into new Industrial 4.0 smart factories, special attention must be considered to achieve smarter, faster, and lower power solutions. Exemplifying those trends, this summer Maxim Integrated announced the MAX14819, a dual-channel, IO-Link master transceiver.

The architecture of the MAX14819 dissipates 50% less heat compared to other IO-Link Master solutions and is fully compatible in all modes for IO-Link and SIO compliance. It provides robust L+ supply controllers with settable current limiting and reverse voltage/current protection to help ensure robust communications with the lowest power consumption. With just one microcontroller, the integrated framer/UART enables a scalable and cost-effective architecture while enabling very fast cycle times (up to
400 µs) and reducing latency. The MAX14819 is available in a 48-pin (7 mm x 7 mm) TQFN package and operates over a -40°C to +125°C temperature range.  …

Read the full article in the November 328 issue of Circuit Cellar

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