Internet of Things Challenge: WIZ55io Modules Moved Fast

As soon as the WIZNet Connect the Magic 2014 Design Challenge launched on March 3, 2014, Internet of Things (IoT) innovators—from professional electrical engineers to creative electronics DIYers—around world began requesting free WIZnet WIZ550io Ethernet controller modules. And due to the popular demand for the modules, the supply of free units ran out on March 11.

Although free modules are no longer available, anyone with a WIZ550io Ethernet module, or W5500 chip, may participate in the competition.

Participants can purchase eligible parts at shopwiznet.com or shop.wiznet.eu.

The WIZ550io is an auto-configurable Ethernet controller module that includes the W5500 (TCP/IP-hard-wired chip and PHY embedded), transformer, and an RJ-45 connector. The module has a unique, embedded real MAC address and auto network configuration capability.

WIZnet's WIZ550io auto configurable Ethernet controller module includes a W5500, transformer, & RJ-45.

WIZnet’s WIZ550io auto configurable Ethernet controller module includes a W5500, transformer, & RJ-45.

The W5500 chip is a Hardwired TCP/IP embedded Ethernet controller that enables Internet connection for embedded systems using Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI).

W5500

W5500

The challenge is straightforward. Participants must implement a WIZ550io Ethernet module, or W5500 chip, in an innovative electronics design for a chance to win a share of $15,000 in prizes. The project submission deadline is August 3, 2014. For more information about the challenge, visit http://circuitcellar.com/wiznet2014/.

Sponsor: WIZnet

A Low-Cost Connection to the IoT

In Circuit Cellar’s March issue, columnist Jeff Bachiochi tests the services of a company he says is “poised to make a big impact” on the Internet of Things (IoT).

This shows the I2C interface Bachiochi designed to enable available clamp-on current sensors to be monitored. He added four of these circuits to a PCB, which includes the circuitry for an imp card.

This shows the I2C interface Bachiochi designed to enable available clamp-on current sensors to be monitored. He added four of these circuits to a PCB, which includes the circuitry for an imp card.

Established in 2011, Electric Imp offers a flexible connectivity platform meant to enable any device to be connected to the IoT. The platform, called the “imp,” provides an SD-card sized module (including an 802.11b/g/n Wi-Fi radio package) that can be installed on any electronic device to go online. A powerful processor runs the imp OS.

“You only need to supply an SD card socket (and a few other components) to your product to give it connectivity,” Bachiochi says. “The imp’s processor has the power to run your entire product if you wish, or it can be connected via one of the supported serial protocols. The imp OS provides secure connectivity to the imp cloud. The imp cloud keeps your imp updated with the latest firmware, features online development tools, and provides cloud-side services for every imp in the field.”

“As with many cloud service organizations, development is generally free,” Bachiochi adds. “Once you’ve committed and have product rollout, the service will charge for its use. This could be a flat fee, a per-connection or data throughput fee, or a combination of fees. Basically you (or your customer) will have to pay to have access to the information, which pays for the support framework that keeps it all working.”

In his article, Bachiochi dives into a straightforward data-collection project to demonstrate how to use the imp in a product. The goal of his application was to log the activity of 220-V water pump and twin water softeners.  The project is the launching point for his comprehensive and detailed look at the imp’s hardware, software, and costs.

“It’s easy to design product hardware to use the imp,” he says. “There are two imp models, a card that can be inserted into an SD-type socket or an on-board module that is soldered into your product. Each version has advantages and disadvantages.”

Regarding software, Bachiochi says:

“Developing an imp application requires two parts to provide Wi-Fi access to your project: the device code (running in the imp) and the agent code (running on the imp cloud). The imp cloud, which is your connection to your device via the imp APIs, provides you with a development IDE. Web-based development means there is nothing else you need to purchase or install on your PC. Everything you need is available through your browser anytime and anywhere.”

Bachiochi also discusses the Electric Imp platform’s broader goals. While an individual can use the imp for device connectivity, a bigger purpose is to enable manufacturers to provide convenient Internet access as part of their product, Bachiochi says.

“The imp has two costs: The hardware is simple, it currently costs approximately $25 for an imp card or module. If you are using this in your own circuit within your own network, then you’re done,” he says. “If you want to roll out a product for sale to the world, you must take the next step and register for the BlinkUp SDK and Operations Console, which enable you to create and track factory-blessed products.”

BlinkUp, according to the Electric Imp website, integrates smoothly into apps and enables manufacturers and their customers to quickly connect products using a smartphone or tablet. The Operations Console enables tracking product activity and updating product firmware at any time, Bachiochi says.

The imp offers more than a low-cost way for DIYers and developers to connect devices to the Internet, Bachiochi says. A designer using the imp can save project costs by eliminating a microcontroller, he says. “Almost any peripheral can be easily connected to and serviced by the imp’s 32-bit Cortex M3 processor running the imp OS. All code is written in Squirrel.”

Bachiochi’s comprehensive article about his imp experience and insights can be found in the March issue, now available for membership download or single-issue purchase.

Bachiochi used the Electric IMP IDE to develop this code. Agent code on the top left runs on the imp cloud server. The device code on the top right is downloaded into the connected imp.

Bachiochi used the Electric IMP IDE to develop this code. Agent code on the top left runs on the imp cloud server. The device code on the top right is downloaded into the connected imp.

Internet of Things Challenge: WIZnet Connect the Magic 2014 Launches

Elektor International Media (EIM) and WIZnet Co, Ltd today officially launched the WIZnet Connect the Magic 2014 Design Challenge, which is a five-month-long contest for electrical engineers, students, and DIYers to develop innovative, ’Net-connected electronic systems around a WIZNet WIZ550io Ethernet controller module or W5500 chip.

According to the Challenge’s rules, entrants must use at least one WIZnet WIZ550io or W5500 chip in a project. Entries will be judged on their technical merit, originality, usefulness, cost-effectiveness, and design optimization. Winners will receive a share of $15,000 in prizes and recognition in Elektor and Circuit Cellar magazines. The entry submission deadline is August 3, 2014.

WIZnet's WIZ550io auto configurable Ethernet controller module includes a W5500, transformer, & RJ-45.

WIZnet’s WIZ550io auto configurable Ethernet controller module includes a W5500, transformer, & RJ-45.

The WIZ550io is an auto-configurable Ethernet controller module that includes the W5500 (TCP/IP-hard-wired chip and PHY embedded), transformer, and an RJ-45 connector. The module has a unique, embedded real MAC address and auto network configuration capability. The W5500 chip is a Hardwired TCP/IP embedded Ethernet controller that enables Internet connection for embedded systems using Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI).

“The WIZnet Connect the Magic 2014 Design Challenge is an excellent opportunity for engineers, designers, and students to build ’Net-connected systems with WIZnet’s WIZ550io auto-configurable Ethernet controller module and W5500 chip,” said C. J. Abate, Editor in Chief for EIM’s Circuit Cellar magazine.

The challenge is intended to engage more engineers and innovators in the Internet of Things revolution, which has become a major focus for electronics developers worldwide during the past several months.

W5500

WIZnet W5500 chip

“The engineers, students, and academics that read our publications and comprise our community see the Internet of Things as more than a convenience. They see it as an opportunity—that is, an opportunity to create cutting-edged connected devices and bring them to market,” Abate said. “Thus, it’s our job to introduce our community members to the best components and tools to achieve their IoT-related design goals. We’re doing that by managing this challenge for our partner, WIZnet, whose W5500 chip and WIZ550io Ethernet module enable designers to quickly develop ’Net-connected systems.”

WIZnet has made available a limited number of free WIZ550io Ethernet controller modules for use in the WIZnet 2014 Connect the Magic Design Challenge. To submit a request for a free WIZ550io module, eligible participants can fill out an online sample request form at http://circuitcellar.com/wiznet2014/samplerequest/.

WIZnet is a private fabless semiconductor company founded in 1998 in Korea. WIZnet provides IOcP (Internet Offload co-Processors) and HW TCP/IP chips, best fitted for low-end Non-OS devices connecting to the Ethernet for the internet of things. Visit www.wiznet.co.kr/ for more information.

Elektor International Media (EIM) is the world’s leading source of essential technical information and electronics products for pro engineers, electronics designers, and the companies seeking to engage them. Each day, its international team develops and delivers high-quality content—via a variety of media channels (e.g., magazines, video, digital media, and social media) in several languages—relating to embedded systems, electronics design, DIY electronics, and hi-fi audio. EIM’s brands include Elektor, Circuit Cellar, audioXpress, and Voice Coil. Visit www.elektor.com for more information.

Design Challenge Contact
Challenge Administration
EIM/Circuit Cellar
contest@circuitcellar.com
860-289-0800

WIZnet Support
Americas: support_team@wiznettechnology.com
Asia: support@wiznet.hk
China: support-bj@wiznet.hk
EU: support@wiznet.eu
Korea: support@wiznet.co.kr

Circuit Cellar Editorial
Mary Wilson
Managing Editor
mary@circuitcellar.com
860-289-0800

Doing the Robot, 21st-Century Style

Growing up in the 1970s, the first robot I remember was Rosie from The Jetsons. In the 1980s, I discovered Transformers, which were touted as “robots in disguise,” I imitated Michael Jackson’s version of “the robot,” and (unbeknownst to me) the Arthrobot surgical robot was first developed. This was years before Honda debuted ASIMO, the first humanoid robot, in 2004.

“In the 1970s, microprocessors gave me hope that real robots would eventually become part of our future,” RobotBASIC codeveloper John Blankenship told me in a 2013 interview. It appears that the “future” may already be here.

Honda's ASIMO humanoid robot

Honda’s ASIMO humanoid robot

Welcome to the 21st century. Technology is becoming “smarter,“ as evidenced at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) 2014, which took place in January. The show unveiled a variety of smartphone-controlled robots and drones as well as wireless tracking devices.

Circuit Cellar’s columnists and contributors have been busy with their own developments. Steve Lubbers wondered if robots could be programmed to influence each other’s behavior. He used Texas Instruments’s LaunchPad hardware and a low-cost radio link to build a group of robots to test his theory. The results are on p. 18.

RobotBASIC’s Blankenship wanted to program robots more quickly. His article explains how he uses robot simulation to decrease development time (p. 30).

The Internet of Things (IoT), which relies on embedded technology for communication, is also making advancements. According to information technology research and advisory company Gartner, by 2020, there will be close to 26 billion devices on the IoT.

With the IoT, nothing is out of the realm of a designer’s imagination. For instance, if you’re not at home, you can use IoT-based platforms (such as the one columnist Jeff Bachiochi writes about on p. 58) to preheat your oven or turn off your sprinklers when it starts to rain.

Meanwhile, I will program my crockpot and try to explain to my 8-year-old how I survived childhood without the Internet.

Dynamic Efficiency Microcontrollers

STMicroThe STM32F401 Dynamic Efficiency microcontrollers extend battery life and support innovative new features in mobile phones, tablets, and smart watches. They help manage MEMS sensors in smart-connected devices and are well suited for Internet-of-Things (IoT) applications and fieldbus-powered industrial equipment.

The STM32F401 microcontrollers include an ART accelerator, a prefetch queue, and a branch cache. This enables zero-wait-state execution from flash, which boosts performance to 105 DMIPS (285 CoreMark) at 84 MHz. The microcontrollers’ 90-nm process technology boosts performance and reduces dynamic power. Its dynamic voltage scaling optimizes the operating voltage to meet performance demands and minimize leakage.

The STM32F401 microcontrollers integrate up to 512 KB of flash and 96 KB SRAM in a 3.06-mm × 3.06-mm chip-scale package and feature a 9-µA at 1.8 V Stop mode current. The devices’ peripherals include three 1-Mbps I2C ports, three USARTs, four SPI ports, two full-duplex I2S audio interfaces, a USB 2.0 OTG full-speed interface, an SDIO interface, 12-bit 2.4-MSPS 16-channel ADC, and up to 10 timers.

Pricing for the STM32F401 microcontrollers starts at $2.88 in 10,000-unit quantities.

STMicroelectronics
www.st.com

Next-Generation Wi-Fi Modules

eConaisThe EC19D family is small, easily integrated, low-standby power single chip 802.11b/g/n Wi-Fi System In Package (SiP) modules for the Internet of Things (IoT).

The SiP modules help designers quickly and easily connect their devices to 802.11b/g/n Wi-Fi networks. At 8-mm × 8-mm, the EC19D modules can be embedded in almost any product or application. The EC19D will also include FCC, IC, and EC certifications to further simplify and speed up product design and production for use with Wi-Fi networks.

The EC19D incorporates the newest Wi-Fi 802.11b/g/n standards and features to provide designers with many options for embedding the module in their designs. The EC19D’s features include Wi-Fi Direct, ProbMeTM configuration, full TCP/IP stack, HTTPS/SSL, DHCP Client/Server, WPS, legacy Wi-Fi Client, and SoftAP modes with WPA/WPA2 support, serial to Wi-Fi, and Cloud service support.

Contact eConais for pricing.

eConais Inc.
www.econais.com

Remote Control and Monitoring of Household Devices

Raul Alvarez, a freelance electronic engineer from Bolivia, has long been interested in wireless device-to-device communication.

“So when the idea of the Internet of Things (IoT) came around, it was like rediscovering the Internet,” he says.

I’m guessing that his dual fascinations with wireless and the IoT inspired his Home Energy Gateway project, which won second place in the 2012 DesignSpark chipKIT challenge administered by Circuit Cellar.

“The system enables users to remotely monitor their home’s power consumption and control household devices (e.g., fans, lights, coffee machines, etc.),” Alvarez says. “The main system consists of an embedded gateway/web server that, aside from its ability to communicate over the Internet, is also capable of local communications over a home area wireless network.”

Alvarez catered to his interests by creating his own wireless communication protocol for the system.

“As a learning exercise, I specifically developed the communication protocol I used in the home area wireless network from scratch,” he says. “I used low-cost RF transceivers to implement the protocol. It is simple and provides just the core functionality necessary for the application.”

Figure1: The Home Energy Gateway includes a Hope Microelectronics RFM12B transceiver, a Digilent chipKIT Max32 board, and a Microchip Technology ENC28J60 Ethernet controller chip.

Figure 1: The Home Energy Gateway includes a Hope Microelectronics RFM12B transceiver, a Digilent chipKIT Max32 board, and a Microchip Technology ENC28J60 Ethernet controller chip.

Alvarez writes about his project in the February issue of Circuit Cellar. His article concentrates on the project’s TCI/IP communications aspects and explains how they interface.

Here is his article’s overview of how the system functions and its primary hardware components:

Figure 1 shows the system’s block diagram and functional configuration. The smart meter collects the entire house’s power consumption information and sends that data every time it is requested by the gateway. In turn, the smart plugs receive commands from the gateway to turn on/off the household devices attached to them. This happens every time the user turns on/off the controls in the web control panel.

Photo 1: These are the three smart node hardware prototypes: upper left,  smart plug;  upper right, a second smart plug in a breadboard; and at bottom,  the smart meter.

Photo 1: These are the three smart node hardware prototypes: upper left, smart plug; upper right, a second smart plug in a breadboard; and at bottom, the smart meter.

I used the simple wireless protocol (SWP) I developed for this project for all of the home area wireless network’s wireless communications. I used low-cost Hope Microelectronics 433-/868-/915-MHz RFM12B transceivers to implement the smart nodes. (see Photo 1)
The wireless network is configured to work in a star topology. The gateway assumes the role of a central coordinator or master node and the smart devices act as end devices or slave nodes that react to requests sent by the master node.

The gateway/server is implemented in hardware around a Digilent chipKIT Max32 board (see Photo 2). It uses an RFM12B transceiver to connect to the home area wireless network and a Microchip Technology ENC28J60 chip module to connect to the LAN using Ethernet.

As the name implies, the gateway makes it possible to access the home area wireless network over the LAN or even remotely over the Internet. So, the smart devices are easily accessible from a PC, tablet, or smartphone using just a web browser. To achieve this, the gateway implements the SWP for wireless communications and simultaneously uses Microchip Technology’s TCP/IP Stack to work as a web server.

Photo 2: The Home Energy Gateway’s hardware includes a Digilent chipKIT Max32 board and a custom shield board.

Photo 2: The Home Energy Gateway’s hardware includes a Digilent chipKIT Max32 board and a custom shield board.

Thus, the Home Energy Gateway generates and serves the control panel web page over HTTP (this page contains the individual controls to turn on/off each smart plug and at the same time shows the power consumption in the house in real-time). It also uses the wireless network to pass control data from the user to the smart plugs and to read power consumption data from the smart meter.

The hardware module includes three main submodules: The chipKIT Max 32 board, the RFM12B wireless transceiver, and the ENC28J60 Ethernet module. The smart meter hardware module has an RFM12B transceiver for wireless communications and uses an 8-bit Microchip Technology PIC16F628A microcontroller as a main processor. The smart plug hardware module shows the smart plugs’ main hardware components and has the same microcontroller and radio transceiver as the smart meter. But the smart plugs also have a Sharp Microelectronics S212S01F solid-state relay to turn on/off the household devices.

On the software side, the gateway firmware is written in C for the Microchip Technology C32 Compiler. The smart meter’s PIC16F628A code is written in C for the Hi-TECH C compiler. The smart plug software is very similar.

Alvarez says DIY home-automation enthusiasts will find his prototype inexpensive and capable. He would like to add several features to the system, including the ability to e-mail notifications and reports to users.

For more details, check out the February issue now available for download by members or single-issue purchase.

Places for the IoT Inside Your Home

It’s estimated that by the year 2020, more than 30 billion devices worldwide will be wirelessly connected to the IoT. While the IoT has massive implications for government and industry, individual electronics DIYers have long recognized how projects that enable wireless communication between everyday devices can solve or avert big problems for homeowners.

February CoverOur February issue focusing on Wireless Communications features two such projects, including  Raul Alvarez Torrico’s Home Energy Gateway, which enables users to remotely monitor energy consumption and control household devices (e.g., lights and appliances).

A Digilent chipKIT Max32-based embedded gateway/web server communicates with a single smart power meter and several smart plugs in a home area wireless network. ”The user sees a web interface containing the controls to turn on/off the smart plugs and sees the monitored power consumption data that comes from the smart meter in real time,” Torrico says.

While energy use is one common priority for homeowners, another is protecting property from hidden dangers such as undetected water leaks. Devlin Gualtieri wanted a water alarm system that could integrate several wireless units signaling a single receiver. But he didn’t want to buy one designed to work with expensive home alarm systems charging monthly fees.

In this issue, Gualtieri writes about his wireless water alarm network, which has simple hardware including a Microchip Technology PIC12F675 microcontroller and water conductance sensors (i.e., interdigital electrodes) made out of copper wire wrapped around perforated board.

It’s an inexpensive and efficient approach that can be expanded. “Multiple interdigital sensors can be wired in parallel at a single alarm,” Gualtieri says. A single alarm unit can monitor multiple water sources (e.g., a hot water tank, a clothes washer, and a home heating system boiler).

Also in this issue, columnist George Novacek begins a series on wireless data links. His first article addresses the basic principles of radio communications that can be used in control systems.

Other issue highlights include advice on extending flash memory life; using C language in FPGA design; detecting capacitor dielectric absorption; a Georgia Tech researcher’s essay on the future of inkjet-printed circuitry; and an overview of the hackerspaces and enterprising designs represented at the World Maker Faire in New York.

Editor’s Note: Circuit Cellar‘s February issue will be available online in mid-to-late January for download by members or single-issue purchase by web shop visitors.

Registration Open for Sensors Expo & Conference

Thousands of engineers, scientists, and industry professionals are expected to gather for the 28th Annual Sensors Expo & Conference to assess and discuss the development and deployment of sensors and sensors systems.

The Expo & Conference will take place at The Donald E. Stephens Convention Center in Rosemont, IL, from June 25-June 26, 2014, with pre-conference symposia on June 24. Registration is now open at www.sensorsexpo.com.

This event, exclusively focused on sensor technology, will offer more than 65 technical sessions on the latest solutions to current sensing challenges while exploring the most recent sensing technologies. In addition to two full days of education sessions, attendees can participate in three full-day pre-conference symposia, taking place Tuesday, June 24.  The topics include “Designing MEMS In: How to Engage the Supply Chain,” chaired by Karen Lightman, executive director, MEMS Industry Group; “Energy Harvesting for Powering Wireless Sensors,” chaired by Randy Frank, president, Randy Frank & Associates, Ltd.; and “Making the Internet of Things a Reality: A Toolkit for Designing ‘Smart,’ ” chaired by Will Tu, ARM.

“Our team has been working diligently with our advisory board and partners to develop a stellar program offering nine tracks including Chemical & Gas Sensing, Energy Harvesting for Sensor Applications, Internet of Things, M2M, MEMS, Novel Approaches to Measurement and Detection, Power Management for Sensing Applications, Sensors @ Work, and Wireless, in addition to an expanded trade show floor offering hundreds of top vendors in the industry,” said Wendy Loew, group show director.

Conference program topics include smart power grid monitoring, the future of mobile intelligence with sensor fusion, sensors conditioning, challenges of high temperature sensing, and what you need to know to make your product a success. The Expo Hall provides access to suppliers along with information and education on their sensing products and solutions.

In the Expo Hall, attendees will see the latest sensing technologies and solutions, identify new ways to improve products and expand their functionalities using sensors, and learn about “hot” and cutting-edge technology areas. The Expo Hall will feature exhibitors including Analog Devices, Anaren, GridConnect, Microchip Technology, Mouser Electronics, Parker-Hannifin Corporation, Rowebots, STMicroelectronics, and Wyless.

Client Profile: Digi International, Inc

Contact: Elizabeth Presson
elizabeth.presson@digi.com

Featured Product: The XBee product family (www.digi.com/xbee) is a series of modular products that make adding wireless technology easy and cost-effective. Whether you need a ZigBee module or a fast multipoint solution, 2.4 GHz or long-range 900 MHz—there’s an XBee to meet your specific requirements.

XBee Cloud Kit

Digi International XBee Cloud Kit

Product information: Digi now offers the XBee Wi-Fi Cloud Kit (www.digi.com/xbeewificloudkit) for those who want to try the XBee Wi-Fi (XB2B-WFUT-001) with seamless cloud connectivity. The Cloud Kit brings the Internet of Things (IoT) to the popular XBee platform. Built around Digi’s new XBee Wi-Fi
module, which fully integrates into the Device Cloud by Etherios, the kit is a simple way for anyone with an interest in M2M and the IoT to build a hardware prototype and integrate it into an Internet-based application. This kit is suitable for electronics engineers, software designers, educators, and innovators.

Exclusive Offer: The XBee Wi-Fi Cloud Kit includes an XBee Wi-Fi module; a development board with a variety of sensors and actuators; loose electronic prototyping parts to make circuits of your own; a free subscription to Device Cloud; fully customizable widgets to monitor and control connected devices; an open-source application that enables two-way communication and control with the development board over the Internet; and cables, accessories, and everything needed to connect to the web. The Cloud Kit costs $149.

Small Plug-In Embedded Cellular Modem

Skywire plug-in modem

Skywire plug-in modem

The Skywire is a small plug-in embedded cellular modem. It uses a standard XBee form factor and 1xRTT CDMA operating mode to help developers minimize hardware and network costs. Its U.FL port ensures antenna flexibility.

The Skywire modem features a Telit CE910-DUAL wireless module and is available with bundled CDMA 1xRTT data plans from leading carriers, enabling developers to add fully compliant cellular connectivity without applying for certification. Future versions of the Skywire will support GSM and LTE. Skywire is smaller than many other embedded solutions and simple to deploy due to its bundled carrier service plans.

Skywire is available with a complete development kit that includes the cellular modem, a baseboard, an antenna, a power supply, debug cables, and a cellular service plan. The Skywire baseboard is an Arduino shield, which enables direct connection to an Arduino microcontroller.

Skywire modems cost $129 individually and $99 for 1,000-unit quantities. A complete development kit including the modem costs $262.

NimbeLink, LLC
www.nimbelink.com

Internet of Things (IoT) Resources

Here we list several handy resources for engineers interested in the Internet of Things (IoT).IoT-WordCloud

  • The IoT Events site is an easy-to-use resource for find IoT events and meet-ups around the world.
  • The Internet of Things Conference is a resource for information relating to “IoT applications, IoT solutions, IoT example and m2m opportunities in smart cities, connected cars, smart grids, consumer electronics and mobile healthcare.”
  • The IoT Counsel website includes useful info such as bios and contact info for engineers, innovators, and thinkers working on IoT-related projects.
  • Michael Chui, Markus Loffler, and Roger Roberts present a comprehensive article on IoT in the McKinsey Quarterly. While this isn’t a design-centric document, you’ll find it’s an interesting in-depth overview of the technology and its applications.
  • The Business Leaders Network (BLN) has a page on the IoT. The most recent IoT even took place in June, but the site still has some interesting info about speakers, partners, and more.

Let us know about other good resources. Send your links via email or Twitter @circuitcellar.