IoT Innovation: Show Off Your W5500 Project (Sponsored Post)

The WIZnet Connect the Magic Challenge offers you a variety of opportunities to show off your engineering skills and present your Internet of Things (IoT) designs to the world. It’s your shot to win a share of $15,000 in prizes, gain international recognition as innovator, and more.

Elektor/Circuit Cellar is the challenge administrator for the WIZnet Connect the Magic 2014 Design Challenge

Elektor/Circuit Cellar is the challenge administrator

Don’t delay! The submission deadline is ​August​ 3, 2014. All Entries must be received on or before 12:00 PM EDT on ​August 3​, 201​4​.

To Enter, simply upload your Entry via the Entry Dropbox.

OTHER OPPORTUNITIES
Didn’t finish your project? You can still participate.

If the deadline approaches and your entry is not complete, we still encourage you to submit your project or submit a project after the deadline. While only these on-time files are submitted to the judges, consider that there are many more opportunities for contest success, such as Elektor/Circuit Cellar’s “Distinctive Excellence” awards.

While Elektor/Circuit Cellar must follow the Sponsor’s rules about submission and judging when it comes to the contest’s official prizes, Elektor/Circuit Cellar is able to include its own award program that takes into account design skills that may otherwise go unrecognized.

By submitting even an unfinished project by the deadline for official judging, you qualify for a Distinctive Excellence review. If there is merit and the project warrants further consideration, those projects that may be offered a Distinctive Excellence award may be updated by the entrant after the contest deadline.

Historically, there have been some really fascinating Distinctive Excellence projects for previous Elektor/Circuit Cellar design contests. Those who win this designation see their projects posted online similar to the official winners and enjoy much of the same exposure. Many are offered separate print magazine publishing deals through Elektor/Circuit Cellar. The benefits of having Elektor/Circuit Cellar recognize and publicize your work in a high profile campaign like this should not be underestimated.\

Plus … Due to Elektor and Circuit Cellar’s international reach, you’ll get even more exposure than ever before! Imagine getting a Distinctive Excellence award—or getting your article published—and being recognized by readers throughout the world! That could lead any number of positive outcomes. Job opportunities? Design deals? The sky is the limit!

THE CHALLENGE

You are challenged to design and build an innovative project that uses least one WIZnet WIZ550io Ethernet controller module or W5500 chip. You can use any other MCU and/or module along with the WIZ550io Ethernet module.

W5500

W5500

WIZnet PARTS

Your project must use at least one WIZnet WIZ550io Ethernet controller module or WIZnet W5500 chip. You can use any other MCU and other module along with the WIZ550io Ethernet module or W5500 chip. Visit the Eligible Parts page for more information.

WIZnet's WIZ550io auto configurable Ethernet controller module includes a W5500, transformer, & RJ-45.

WIZnet’s WIZ550io auto configurable Ethernet controller module includes a W5500, transformer, & RJ-45.

HOW TO PARTICIPATE

Participation is simple. First, read the Rules. Second, build and thoroughly document a project featuring a WIZnet WIZ550io Ethernet Controller module or W5500 chip. Next, Register for the Challenge and obtain a Project Registration Number. Lastly, Submit a complete project Entry.

JUDGING 

The goal of the Challenge is to showcase the functionality of the WIZnet WIZ550io module. All Challenge entries will be judged by a panel of judges on the following: technical merit 30%, originality 30%, usefulness 20%, cost-effectiveness 10%, and design optimization 10%. It would be smart to highlight these achievements in your documentation. Call attention to your project’s special features.

WIZnet Challenge Entry Tips (Sponsored Post)

The WIZnet Connect the Magic Challenge deadline is ​August​ 3, 2014. Let’s go over the challenge and cover some tips for entering.WIZnetconnect_logo_horweb_550x

What is the Challenge?

You are challenged to design and build an innovative project that uses least one WIZnet WIZ550io Ethernet controller module or W5500 chip. You can use any other MCU and/or module along with the WIZ550io Ethernet module.

What devices must I use with my project?
Your project must use at least one WIZnet WIZ550io Ethernet controller module or WIZnet W5500 chip. You can use any other MCU and other module along with the WIZ550io Ethernet module or W5500 chip. Visit the Eligible Parts page for more information.

WIZnet's WIZ550io auto configurable Ethernet controller module includes a W5500, transformer, & RJ-45.

WIZnet’s WIZ550io auto configurable Ethernet controller module includes a W5500, transformer, & RJ-45.

How do I participate?

Participation is simple. First, read the Rules. Second, build and thoroughly document a project featuring a WIZnet WIZ550io Ethernet Controller module or W5500 chip. Next, Register for the Challenge and obtain a Project Registration Number. Lastly, Submit a complete project Entry.

​​May I submit multiple entries?
Yes. You may submit as many entries as you want. Each Entry must have its own Project Registration Number. Complete a Project Registration Form for each Entry you intend to submit.
What types of projects win design contests?
The goal of the Challenge is to showcase the functionality of the WIZnet WIZ550io module. All Challenge entries will be judged by a panel of judges on the following: technical merit 30%, originality 30%, usefulness 20%, cost-effectiveness 10%, and design optimization 10%. It would be smart to highlight these achievements in your documentation. Call attention to your project’s special features.

A Rat’s Nest-Less Workspace: Clean with Plenty of Screens

Two sorts of things we love to see in an electronics workspace: cleanliness and multiple monitors! San Antonio, TX-based Jorge Amodio’s L-shaped modular desk is great setup that gives him easy access to his projects, test equipment, and computers. The wires to all of his equipment are intelligently placed behind and below the workspace. Hence, no rat’s nest of wires! He doesn’t need to work on top of cords and peripherals like, well, a few of us do here in our office. We like how he “sectioned” his space to provide maximum multitasking capability. The setup enables him to move easily from doing R&D work to emailing to grabbing his iPhone without any more effort than a slide of his chair. Very nice.

Jorge Amodio’s workspace (Source: J. Amodio)

Submitted by Jorge Amodio, independent consultant and principal engineer (Serious Integrated, Inc.), San Antonio, TX, USA

“For the past few years I’ve been working on R&D of intelligent graphic/touch display modules for HMI (Human Machine Interface) and control panels, with embedded networking for ‘Internet of Things’ applications.” – Jorge Amodio

Jorge perform R&D with handy test equipment an arm’s length away (Source: J. Amodio)

A closer look at Jorge’s project space (Source: J. Amodio)

Jorge has easy access to his other monitors and iPhone (Source: J. Amodio)

Do you want to share images of your workspace, hackspace, or “circuit cellar”? Send your images and space info to editor at circuitcellar dotcom.

Integrated Wi-Fi System in Package Module

EconaisThe EC19W01 is a small, smart, highly integrated 802.11b/g/n Wi-Fi system in package (SiP) module. The module is well suited for home automation and smart appliances; Wi-Fi audio speakers and headphones; wireless sensors and sensor networks; wireless monitoring (audio and video); smart appliances; health care and fitness devices; wearable devices; security, authentication, and admittance control; lighting; building/energy/industrial management/control; cloud-connected devices; remote control, data acquisition, and monitoring; and machine-to-machine (M2M) and Internet of Things (IoT) design.

The EC19W01’s features include an integrated 32-bit processor to support application customization, on-board flash and antenna, low power consumption, support for Serial-to-Wi-Fi and SPI-to-Wi-Fi, wireless transmit/receive rates of up to 20 Mbps, and a small 14-mm × 16-mm × 2.8-mm footprint.

Contact Econais for pricing.

Econais, Inc.
www.econais.com

DIY IoT: Build a ‘Net-Connected System Today

It’s time to join the Internet of Things (IoT) revolution. Try building a ‘Net-enabled design with WIZnet’s W5500 “smart” Ethernet chip. It’s easier than you think.

In a thorough introduction to the technology, Tom Cantrell presented a garage door monitoring design. He explained:

The W5500 (see Figure 1) starts with a standard 10/100 Ethernet interface (i.e., MAC and PHY) but then goes further with large RAM buffers (16-KB transmit and 16-KB receive) and hardware TCP/IP protocol processing. I discovered WIZnet’s first chip, the  W3100, way back in 2001. Of course by now, as with all things  silicon, the new W5500 is better, faster, and  lower cost. But the concept is still exactly  the same: “Internet enable” applications by  handling the network chores in hardware so  the application microcontroller doesn’t have to do it in software.

Cantrell - WIZ550io

Figure 1: The WIZnet W5500 is an Ethernet chip with a difference—large RAM buffers and hardware TCP/IP processing that make it easy for any microcontroller to go online.

The large RAM buffers help decouple the  microcontroller from network activity. In a  recent project (see my article, “Weatherize  Your Embedded App,” Circuit Cellar 273,  2013), I used the RAM to receive an entire  10-KB+ webpage, completely eliminating the  need for the microcontroller to juggle data at  network speed. And any of the 32-KB on-chip  RAM that isn’t needed for network buffering  is free for general-purpose use, a big plus for  typically RAM-constrained microcontrollers. The other major WIZnet hardware assist  is TCP/IP processing using IP addresses, sockets, and familiar commands including OPEN, CONNECT, SEND, RECEIVE, DISCONNECT.  The high-level interface to the network frees  up microcontroller cycles and code space that  would otherwise be needed for a software TCP/IP stack.

Cantrell goes on to present his design for a ‘Net-connected garage door monitoring system.

For prototyping, check out the WIZnet  ioShield (see Photo 1), which is a baseboard  for the WIZ550io that includes an SD card  socket. There are ioShields for different  platforms (e.g., Arduino, LaunchPad,  mbed, etc.), and with 0.1” headers they are  breadboard friendly.

Photo 1: If you want a fancy server with lots of eye candy, a microSD card is the way to go. The WIZnet ioShields include the card socket and are available for various platforms. The Arduino version is shown here.

Photo 1: If you want a fancy server with lots of eye candy, a microSD card is the way to go. The WIZnet ioShields include the card socket and are available for various platforms. The Arduino version is shown here.

Cantrell prototyped a client version of what he calls his “garage  door ‘Thing’ using an Arduino  and a WIZ550io connected to Exosite (see Photo 2).

A prototype of the client version of my garage “Thing” is shown.

Photo 2: A prototype of the client version of my garage “Thing”

Wondering how to get two clients (e.g., ) to interact with each other? Cantrell used Exosite.

Over on the Exosite website, after signing up for a  free “Developer” account, it was a quick and easy mainly point-and-click exercise to configure my “Device,” “Data,”  “Events,” and “Alerts” (see Photo 3).  As a client, there’s no need to keep the “Thing’s”  Ethernet link powered all the time. Data only needs to  be sent when the garage door opens or closes, but I also  recommend sending a periodic heartbeat just in case. My  garage door monitor will only generate a minute or two  of network activity (i.e., door state changes and hourly  heartbeats) per day, so there’s opportunity for significant  energy savings compared to a 24/7 server.

It only takes a few minutes to set up a simple Exosite dashboard including an e-mail alert. I can “see“ my  garage door without getting off the couch and now, via Exosite, from the farthest reaches of the web.

It only takes a few minutes to set up a simple Exosite dashboard including an e-mail alert. I can “see“ my garage door without getting off the couch and now, via Exosite, from the farthest reaches of the web.

You can download the entire article,  “Connect the Magic: An Introduction to the WIZnet W550,” for free to learn about Cantrell’s garage door control system built with a WIZnet and an Arduino Uno.

Editor’s note: If you have an idea for an innovative, ’Net-enabled electronics system, this is your opportunity to share your original design with the world. Enter the WIZnet Connect the Magic 2014 Design Challenge for a chance to win a share of $15,000 in prizes and gain recognition by Elektor International Media and Circuit Cellar. WIZnet is the sponsor. Eligible entries will be judged on their technical merit, originality, usefulness, cost-effectiveness, and design optimization. The Entry submission deadline is 12:00 PM EST August 3, 2014. How to enter: Implement WIZnet’s WIZ550io Ethernet module, or W5500 chip, in an innovative design; document your project; and then submit your entry. The complete rules and regulations are available on the Challenge webpage.

 

WIZnet Announces WIZ550io & W5500 Discounts at EELive

Today at EELive! in San Jose, CA, WIZnet announced a special promotion tied to the WIZnet Connect the Magic 2014 Design Challenge, which it is sponsoring. For a limited time, WIZnet is offering discounted WIZ550io Ethernet controller modules and W5500 chips via its webshopWiznet-Challenge-EELive

Disclosure: Elektor International Media and Circuit Cellar comprise the challenge administration team.

At this time, WIZnet’s WIZ550io is on sale for $9.95 (original price, $17.00) and the W550 cost $1.49 (original price, $2.87).

WIZnet’s WIZ550io is a module for rapidly developing ’Net-enabled systems. It is an auto-configurable Ethernet controller module that includes the W5500 (TCP/IP-hard-wired chip and PHY embedded), a transformer, and an RJ-45 connector. The module has a unique, embedded real MAC address and auto network configuration capability.

WIZnet's WIZ550io auto configurable Ethernet controller module includes a W5500, transformer, & RJ-45.

WIZnet’s WIZ550io auto configurable Ethernet controller module includes a W5500, transformer, & RJ-45.

The W5500 is a hardwired TCP/IP embedded Ethernet controller that enables Internet connection for embedded systems using Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI).

W5500

W5500

Visit the WIZnet Connect the Magic 2014 Design Challenge webpage for more information about participation and eligibility.

The Future of Small Radar Technology

Directing the limited resources of Fighter Command to intercept a fleet of Luftwaffe bombers en route to London or accurately engaging the Imperial Navy at 18,000 yards in the dead of night. This was our grandfather’s radar, the technology that evened the odds in World War II.

This is the combat information center aboard a World War II destroyer with two radar displays.

This is the combat information center aboard a World War II destroyer with two radar displays.

Today there is an insatiable demand for short-range sensors (i.e., small radar technology)—from autonomous vehicles to gaming consoles and consumer devices. State-of-the-art sensors that can provide full 3-D mapping of a small-target scenes include laser radar and time-of-flight (ToF) cameras. Less expensive and less accurate acoustic and infrared devices sense proximity and coarse angle of arrival. The one sensor often overlooked by the both the DIY and professional designer is radar.

However, some are beginning to apply small radar technology to solve the world’s problems. Here are specific examples:

Autonomous vehicles: In 2007, the General Motors and Carnegie Mellon University Tartan Racing team won the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Urban Challenge, where autonomous vehicles had to drive through a city in the shortest possible time period. Numerous small radar devices aided in their real-time decision making. Small radar devices will be a key enabling technology for autonomous vehicles—from self-driving automobiles to unmanned aerial drones.

Consumer products: Recently, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) researchers developed a radar sensor for gaming systems, shown to be capable of detecting gestures and other complex movements inside a room and through interior walls. Expect small radar devices to play a key role in enabling user interface on gaming consoles to smartphones.

The Internet of Things (IoT): Fybr is a technology company that uses small radar sensors to detect the presence of parked automobiles, creating the most accurate parking detection system in the world for smart cities to manage parking and traffic congestion in real time. Small radar sensors will enable the IoT by providing accurate intelligence to data aggregators.

Automotive: Small radar devices are found in mid- to high-priced automobiles in automated cruise control, blind-spot detection, and parking aids. Small radar devices will soon play a key role in automatic braking, obstacle-avoidance systems, and eventually self-driving automobiles, greatly increasing passenger safety.

Through-Wall Imaging: Advances in small radar have numerous possible military applications, including recent MIT work on through-wall imaging of human targets through solid concrete walls. Expect more military uses of small radar technology.

What is taking so long? A tremendous knowledge gap exists between writing the application and emitting, then detecting, scattered microwave fields and understanding the result. Radar was originally developed by physicists who had a deep understanding of electromagnetics and were interested in the theory of microwave propagation and scattering. They created everything from scratch, from antennas to specialized vacuum tubes.

Microwave tube development, for example, required a working knowledge of particle physics. Due to this legacy, radar textbooks are often intensely theoretical. Furthermore, microwave components were very expensive—handmade and gold-plated. Radar was primarily developed by governments and the military, which made high-dollar investments for national security.

Small radar devices such as the RFBeam Microwave K-LC1a radio transceiver cost less than $10 when purchased in quantity.

Small radar devices such as the RFBeam Microwave K-LC1a radio transceiver cost less than $10 when purchased in quantity.

It’s time we make radar a viable option for DIY projects and consumer devices by developing low-cost, easy-to-use, capable technology and bridging the knowledge gap!
Today you can buy small radar sensors for less than $10. Couple this with learning practical radar processing methods, and you can solve a critical sensing problem for your project.

Learn by doing. I created the MIT short-course “Build a Small Radar Sensor,” where students learn about radar by building a device from scratch. Those interested can take the online course for free through MIT Opencourseware or enroll in the five-day MIT Professional Education course.

Dive deeper. My soon-to-be published multimedia book, Small and Short-Range Radar Systems, explains the principles and building of numerous small radar devices and then demonstrates them so readers at all levels can create their own radar devices or learn how to use data from off-the-shelf radar sensors.

This is just the beginning. Soon small radar sensors will be everywhere.

ARM mbed Platform for Bluetooth Smart Applications

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe nRF51822-mKIT simplifies and accelerates the prototyping process for Bluetooth Smart sensors connecting to the Internet of Things (IoT). The platform is designed for fast, easy, and flexible development of Bluetooth Smart applications.

The nRF51822 system-on-chip (SoC) combines a Bluetooth v4.1-compliant 2.4-GHz multiprotocol radio with an ARM Cortex-M0 CPU core on a single chip optimized for ultra-low-power operation. The SoC simplifies and accelerates the prototyping process for Bluetooth Smart sensors connecting to the IoT.

The nRF51822-mKIT’s features include a Bluetooth Smart API, 31 pin-assignable general-purpose input/output (GPIO), a CMSIS-DAP debugger, Programmable Peripheral Interconnect (PPI), and the ability to run from a single 2032 coin-cell battery.

Through mbed, the kit is supported by a cloud-based approach to writing code, adding libraries, and compiling firmware. A lightweight online IDE operates on all popular browsers running on Windows, Mac OSX, iOS, Android, and Linux OSes. Developers can use the kit to access a cloud-based ARM RVDS 4.1 compiler that optimizes code size and performance.

The nRF51822-mKIT costs $59.95.

Nordic Semiconductor ASA
www.nordicsemi.com

Internet of Things Challenge: WIZ55io Modules Moved Fast

As soon as the WIZNet Connect the Magic 2014 Design Challenge launched on March 3, 2014, Internet of Things (IoT) innovators—from professional electrical engineers to creative electronics DIYers—around world began requesting free WIZnet WIZ550io Ethernet controller modules. And due to the popular demand for the modules, the supply of free units ran out on March 11.

Although free modules are no longer available, anyone with a WIZ550io Ethernet module, or W5500 chip, may participate in the competition.

Participants can purchase eligible parts at shopwiznet.com or shop.wiznet.eu.

The WIZ550io is an auto-configurable Ethernet controller module that includes the W5500 (TCP/IP-hard-wired chip and PHY embedded), transformer, and an RJ-45 connector. The module has a unique, embedded real MAC address and auto network configuration capability.

WIZnet's WIZ550io auto configurable Ethernet controller module includes a W5500, transformer, & RJ-45.

WIZnet’s WIZ550io auto configurable Ethernet controller module includes a W5500, transformer, & RJ-45.

The W5500 chip is a Hardwired TCP/IP embedded Ethernet controller that enables Internet connection for embedded systems using Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI).

W5500

W5500

The challenge is straightforward. Participants must implement a WIZ550io Ethernet module, or W5500 chip, in an innovative electronics design for a chance to win a share of $15,000 in prizes. The project submission deadline is August 3, 2014. For more information about the challenge, visit http://circuitcellar.com/wiznet2014/.

Sponsor: WIZnet

A Low-Cost Connection to the IoT

In Circuit Cellar’s March issue, columnist Jeff Bachiochi tests the services of a company he says is “poised to make a big impact” on the Internet of Things (IoT).

This shows the I2C interface Bachiochi designed to enable available clamp-on current sensors to be monitored. He added four of these circuits to a PCB, which includes the circuitry for an imp card.

This shows the I2C interface Bachiochi designed to enable available clamp-on current sensors to be monitored. He added four of these circuits to a PCB, which includes the circuitry for an imp card.

Established in 2011, Electric Imp offers a flexible connectivity platform meant to enable any device to be connected to the IoT. The platform, called the “imp,” provides an SD-card sized module (including an 802.11b/g/n Wi-Fi radio package) that can be installed on any electronic device to go online. A powerful processor runs the imp OS.

“You only need to supply an SD card socket (and a few other components) to your product to give it connectivity,” Bachiochi says. “The imp’s processor has the power to run your entire product if you wish, or it can be connected via one of the supported serial protocols. The imp OS provides secure connectivity to the imp cloud. The imp cloud keeps your imp updated with the latest firmware, features online development tools, and provides cloud-side services for every imp in the field.”

“As with many cloud service organizations, development is generally free,” Bachiochi adds. “Once you’ve committed and have product rollout, the service will charge for its use. This could be a flat fee, a per-connection or data throughput fee, or a combination of fees. Basically you (or your customer) will have to pay to have access to the information, which pays for the support framework that keeps it all working.”

In his article, Bachiochi dives into a straightforward data-collection project to demonstrate how to use the imp in a product. The goal of his application was to log the activity of 220-V water pump and twin water softeners.  The project is the launching point for his comprehensive and detailed look at the imp’s hardware, software, and costs.

“It’s easy to design product hardware to use the imp,” he says. “There are two imp models, a card that can be inserted into an SD-type socket or an on-board module that is soldered into your product. Each version has advantages and disadvantages.”

Regarding software, Bachiochi says:

“Developing an imp application requires two parts to provide Wi-Fi access to your project: the device code (running in the imp) and the agent code (running on the imp cloud). The imp cloud, which is your connection to your device via the imp APIs, provides you with a development IDE. Web-based development means there is nothing else you need to purchase or install on your PC. Everything you need is available through your browser anytime and anywhere.”

Bachiochi also discusses the Electric Imp platform’s broader goals. While an individual can use the imp for device connectivity, a bigger purpose is to enable manufacturers to provide convenient Internet access as part of their product, Bachiochi says.

“The imp has two costs: The hardware is simple, it currently costs approximately $25 for an imp card or module. If you are using this in your own circuit within your own network, then you’re done,” he says. “If you want to roll out a product for sale to the world, you must take the next step and register for the BlinkUp SDK and Operations Console, which enable you to create and track factory-blessed products.”

BlinkUp, according to the Electric Imp website, integrates smoothly into apps and enables manufacturers and their customers to quickly connect products using a smartphone or tablet. The Operations Console enables tracking product activity and updating product firmware at any time, Bachiochi says.

The imp offers more than a low-cost way for DIYers and developers to connect devices to the Internet, Bachiochi says. A designer using the imp can save project costs by eliminating a microcontroller, he says. “Almost any peripheral can be easily connected to and serviced by the imp’s 32-bit Cortex M3 processor running the imp OS. All code is written in Squirrel.”

Bachiochi’s comprehensive article about his imp experience and insights can be found in the March issue, now available for membership download or single-issue purchase.

Bachiochi used the Electric IMP IDE to develop this code. Agent code on the top left runs on the imp cloud server. The device code on the top right is downloaded into the connected imp.

Bachiochi used the Electric IMP IDE to develop this code. Agent code on the top left runs on the imp cloud server. The device code on the top right is downloaded into the connected imp.

Internet of Things Challenge: WIZnet Connect the Magic 2014 Launches

Elektor International Media (EIM) and WIZnet Co, Ltd today officially launched the WIZnet Connect the Magic 2014 Design Challenge, which is a five-month-long contest for electrical engineers, students, and DIYers to develop innovative, ’Net-connected electronic systems around a WIZNet WIZ550io Ethernet controller module or W5500 chip.

According to the Challenge’s rules, entrants must use at least one WIZnet WIZ550io or W5500 chip in a project. Entries will be judged on their technical merit, originality, usefulness, cost-effectiveness, and design optimization. Winners will receive a share of $15,000 in prizes and recognition in Elektor and Circuit Cellar magazines. The entry submission deadline is August 3, 2014.

WIZnet's WIZ550io auto configurable Ethernet controller module includes a W5500, transformer, & RJ-45.

WIZnet’s WIZ550io auto configurable Ethernet controller module includes a W5500, transformer, & RJ-45.

The WIZ550io is an auto-configurable Ethernet controller module that includes the W5500 (TCP/IP-hard-wired chip and PHY embedded), transformer, and an RJ-45 connector. The module has a unique, embedded real MAC address and auto network configuration capability. The W5500 chip is a Hardwired TCP/IP embedded Ethernet controller that enables Internet connection for embedded systems using Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI).

“The WIZnet Connect the Magic 2014 Design Challenge is an excellent opportunity for engineers, designers, and students to build ’Net-connected systems with WIZnet’s WIZ550io auto-configurable Ethernet controller module and W5500 chip,” said C. J. Abate, Editor in Chief for EIM’s Circuit Cellar magazine.

The challenge is intended to engage more engineers and innovators in the Internet of Things revolution, which has become a major focus for electronics developers worldwide during the past several months.

W5500

WIZnet W5500 chip

“The engineers, students, and academics that read our publications and comprise our community see the Internet of Things as more than a convenience. They see it as an opportunity—that is, an opportunity to create cutting-edged connected devices and bring them to market,” Abate said. “Thus, it’s our job to introduce our community members to the best components and tools to achieve their IoT-related design goals. We’re doing that by managing this challenge for our partner, WIZnet, whose W5500 chip and WIZ550io Ethernet module enable designers to quickly develop ’Net-connected systems.”

WIZnet has made available a limited number of free WIZ550io Ethernet controller modules for use in the WIZnet 2014 Connect the Magic Design Challenge. To submit a request for a free WIZ550io module, eligible participants can fill out an online sample request form at http://circuitcellar.com/wiznet2014/samplerequest/.

WIZnet is a private fabless semiconductor company founded in 1998 in Korea. WIZnet provides IOcP (Internet Offload co-Processors) and HW TCP/IP chips, best fitted for low-end Non-OS devices connecting to the Ethernet for the internet of things. Visit www.wiznet.co.kr/ for more information.

Elektor International Media (EIM) is the world’s leading source of essential technical information and electronics products for pro engineers, electronics designers, and the companies seeking to engage them. Each day, its international team develops and delivers high-quality content—via a variety of media channels (e.g., magazines, video, digital media, and social media) in several languages—relating to embedded systems, electronics design, DIY electronics, and hi-fi audio. EIM’s brands include Elektor, Circuit Cellar, audioXpress, and Voice Coil. Visit www.elektor.com for more information.

Design Challenge Contact
Challenge Administration
EIM/Circuit Cellar
contest@circuitcellar.com
860-289-0800

WIZnet Support
Americas: support_team@wiznettechnology.com
Asia: support@wiznet.hk
China: support-bj@wiznet.hk
EU: support@wiznet.eu
Korea: support@wiznet.co.kr

Circuit Cellar Editorial
Mary Wilson
Managing Editor
mary@circuitcellar.com
860-289-0800

Doing the Robot, 21st-Century Style

Growing up in the 1970s, the first robot I remember was Rosie from The Jetsons. In the 1980s, I discovered Transformers, which were touted as “robots in disguise,” I imitated Michael Jackson’s version of “the robot,” and (unbeknownst to me) the Arthrobot surgical robot was first developed. This was years before Honda debuted ASIMO, the first humanoid robot, in 2004.

“In the 1970s, microprocessors gave me hope that real robots would eventually become part of our future,” RobotBASIC codeveloper John Blankenship told me in a 2013 interview. It appears that the “future” may already be here.

Honda's ASIMO humanoid robot

Honda’s ASIMO humanoid robot

Welcome to the 21st century. Technology is becoming “smarter,“ as evidenced at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) 2014, which took place in January. The show unveiled a variety of smartphone-controlled robots and drones as well as wireless tracking devices.

Circuit Cellar’s columnists and contributors have been busy with their own developments. Steve Lubbers wondered if robots could be programmed to influence each other’s behavior. He used Texas Instruments’s LaunchPad hardware and a low-cost radio link to build a group of robots to test his theory. The results are on p. 18.

RobotBASIC’s Blankenship wanted to program robots more quickly. His article explains how he uses robot simulation to decrease development time (p. 30).

The Internet of Things (IoT), which relies on embedded technology for communication, is also making advancements. According to information technology research and advisory company Gartner, by 2020, there will be close to 26 billion devices on the IoT.

With the IoT, nothing is out of the realm of a designer’s imagination. For instance, if you’re not at home, you can use IoT-based platforms (such as the one columnist Jeff Bachiochi writes about on p. 58) to preheat your oven or turn off your sprinklers when it starts to rain.

Meanwhile, I will program my crockpot and try to explain to my 8-year-old how I survived childhood without the Internet.

Dynamic Efficiency Microcontrollers

STMicroThe STM32F401 Dynamic Efficiency microcontrollers extend battery life and support innovative new features in mobile phones, tablets, and smart watches. They help manage MEMS sensors in smart-connected devices and are well suited for Internet-of-Things (IoT) applications and fieldbus-powered industrial equipment.

The STM32F401 microcontrollers include an ART accelerator, a prefetch queue, and a branch cache. This enables zero-wait-state execution from flash, which boosts performance to 105 DMIPS (285 CoreMark) at 84 MHz. The microcontrollers’ 90-nm process technology boosts performance and reduces dynamic power. Its dynamic voltage scaling optimizes the operating voltage to meet performance demands and minimize leakage.

The STM32F401 microcontrollers integrate up to 512 KB of flash and 96 KB SRAM in a 3.06-mm × 3.06-mm chip-scale package and feature a 9-µA at 1.8 V Stop mode current. The devices’ peripherals include three 1-Mbps I2C ports, three USARTs, four SPI ports, two full-duplex I2S audio interfaces, a USB 2.0 OTG full-speed interface, an SDIO interface, 12-bit 2.4-MSPS 16-channel ADC, and up to 10 timers.

Pricing for the STM32F401 microcontrollers starts at $2.88 in 10,000-unit quantities.

STMicroelectronics
www.st.com

Next-Generation Wi-Fi Modules

eConaisThe EC19D family is small, easily integrated, low-standby power single chip 802.11b/g/n Wi-Fi System In Package (SiP) modules for the Internet of Things (IoT).

The SiP modules help designers quickly and easily connect their devices to 802.11b/g/n Wi-Fi networks. At 8-mm × 8-mm, the EC19D modules can be embedded in almost any product or application. The EC19D will also include FCC, IC, and EC certifications to further simplify and speed up product design and production for use with Wi-Fi networks.

The EC19D incorporates the newest Wi-Fi 802.11b/g/n standards and features to provide designers with many options for embedding the module in their designs. The EC19D’s features include Wi-Fi Direct, ProbMeTM configuration, full TCP/IP stack, HTTPS/SSL, DHCP Client/Server, WPS, legacy Wi-Fi Client, and SoftAP modes with WPA/WPA2 support, serial to Wi-Fi, and Cloud service support.

Contact eConais for pricing.

eConais Inc.
www.econais.com

Remote Control and Monitoring of Household Devices

Raul Alvarez, a freelance electronic engineer from Bolivia, has long been interested in wireless device-to-device communication.

“So when the idea of the Internet of Things (IoT) came around, it was like rediscovering the Internet,” he says.

I’m guessing that his dual fascinations with wireless and the IoT inspired his Home Energy Gateway project, which won second place in the 2012 DesignSpark chipKIT challenge administered by Circuit Cellar.

“The system enables users to remotely monitor their home’s power consumption and control household devices (e.g., fans, lights, coffee machines, etc.),” Alvarez says. “The main system consists of an embedded gateway/web server that, aside from its ability to communicate over the Internet, is also capable of local communications over a home area wireless network.”

Alvarez catered to his interests by creating his own wireless communication protocol for the system.

“As a learning exercise, I specifically developed the communication protocol I used in the home area wireless network from scratch,” he says. “I used low-cost RF transceivers to implement the protocol. It is simple and provides just the core functionality necessary for the application.”

Figure1: The Home Energy Gateway includes a Hope Microelectronics RFM12B transceiver, a Digilent chipKIT Max32 board, and a Microchip Technology ENC28J60 Ethernet controller chip.

Figure 1: The Home Energy Gateway includes a Hope Microelectronics RFM12B transceiver, a Digilent chipKIT Max32 board, and a Microchip Technology ENC28J60 Ethernet controller chip.

Alvarez writes about his project in the February issue of Circuit Cellar. His article concentrates on the project’s TCI/IP communications aspects and explains how they interface.

Here is his article’s overview of how the system functions and its primary hardware components:

Figure 1 shows the system’s block diagram and functional configuration. The smart meter collects the entire house’s power consumption information and sends that data every time it is requested by the gateway. In turn, the smart plugs receive commands from the gateway to turn on/off the household devices attached to them. This happens every time the user turns on/off the controls in the web control panel.

Photo 1: These are the three smart node hardware prototypes: upper left,  smart plug;  upper right, a second smart plug in a breadboard; and at bottom,  the smart meter.

Photo 1: These are the three smart node hardware prototypes: upper left, smart plug; upper right, a second smart plug in a breadboard; and at bottom, the smart meter.

I used the simple wireless protocol (SWP) I developed for this project for all of the home area wireless network’s wireless communications. I used low-cost Hope Microelectronics 433-/868-/915-MHz RFM12B transceivers to implement the smart nodes. (see Photo 1)
The wireless network is configured to work in a star topology. The gateway assumes the role of a central coordinator or master node and the smart devices act as end devices or slave nodes that react to requests sent by the master node.

The gateway/server is implemented in hardware around a Digilent chipKIT Max32 board (see Photo 2). It uses an RFM12B transceiver to connect to the home area wireless network and a Microchip Technology ENC28J60 chip module to connect to the LAN using Ethernet.

As the name implies, the gateway makes it possible to access the home area wireless network over the LAN or even remotely over the Internet. So, the smart devices are easily accessible from a PC, tablet, or smartphone using just a web browser. To achieve this, the gateway implements the SWP for wireless communications and simultaneously uses Microchip Technology’s TCP/IP Stack to work as a web server.

Photo 2: The Home Energy Gateway’s hardware includes a Digilent chipKIT Max32 board and a custom shield board.

Photo 2: The Home Energy Gateway’s hardware includes a Digilent chipKIT Max32 board and a custom shield board.

Thus, the Home Energy Gateway generates and serves the control panel web page over HTTP (this page contains the individual controls to turn on/off each smart plug and at the same time shows the power consumption in the house in real-time). It also uses the wireless network to pass control data from the user to the smart plugs and to read power consumption data from the smart meter.

The hardware module includes three main submodules: The chipKIT Max 32 board, the RFM12B wireless transceiver, and the ENC28J60 Ethernet module. The smart meter hardware module has an RFM12B transceiver for wireless communications and uses an 8-bit Microchip Technology PIC16F628A microcontroller as a main processor. The smart plug hardware module shows the smart plugs’ main hardware components and has the same microcontroller and radio transceiver as the smart meter. But the smart plugs also have a Sharp Microelectronics S212S01F solid-state relay to turn on/off the household devices.

On the software side, the gateway firmware is written in C for the Microchip Technology C32 Compiler. The smart meter’s PIC16F628A code is written in C for the Hi-TECH C compiler. The smart plug software is very similar.

Alvarez says DIY home-automation enthusiasts will find his prototype inexpensive and capable. He would like to add several features to the system, including the ability to e-mail notifications and reports to users.

For more details, check out the February issue now available for download by members or single-issue purchase.