Connected Padlock Uses U-Blox BLE and Cellular Modules

U‑blox has announced their collaboration with India‑based Play Inc. on a connected GPS padlock for industrial applications. The lock, which doubles as a location tracker, features a U‑blox M8 GNSS receiver, MAX‑M8Q, and uses the u‑blox CellLocate service to extend positioning to indoor locations. U‑blox Bluetooth low energy with NINA‑B112, and 2G, 3G and 4G U‑blox cellular communication modules, including some that are ATEX certified, enable communication between users and the lock.
According to the company, In many industrial settings, locks are an unwelcome bottleneck. They typically require the physical presence of a person with a key to open them, they need to be checked periodically for signs of tampering, and when they are forced open, owners typically find out too late. Play Inc’s i‑Lock combines physical toughness and wireless technology to address these challenges. Offering a variety of access methods, including physical keys and keyless approaches using remote GPRS and SMS passwords as well as Bluetooth low energy or cloud‑based communication via mobile device apps, the i‑Lock lets plant managers or other customers flexibly grant authorization to access the goods that are under lock. And in the event that the padlock is forcefully opened, they are immediately alerted via a server or, optionally, SMS texting.

In addition to securing mobile and stationary goods, the lock’s GNSS receiver lets users track goods in transit. The i‑Lock supports a variety of tracking modes to optimize power consumption for increased autonomy. Location‑awareness further enables geofence restricted applications, in which the i‑Lock can only be open if it is within predefined geographical bounds—for example a petroleum filling station.

The security lock was designed to endure both physical attempts of tampering and cyberattacks. Its fiberglass reinforced enclosure withstands temperatures from -20 to +80 degrees C. The lock features Super Admin, Admin, and User access levels, 128-bit AES encryption, user‑configurable passwords, and a secure protocol to ensure data‑transmission accuracy.

The i‑Lock will be presented at The IoT Solutions Congress Barcelona on October 16‑18, 2018.

U-blox | www.u-blox.com

IoT Edge-as-a-Service Solution Targets Smart Buildings

Rigado has announced it has integrated its IoT edge infrastructure with Microsoft Azure Digital Twins to support deployment of Smart Workplace solutions. Commercial real estate operators are increasingly looking to develop Smart Workplace solutions for enhanced employee experiences and efficacy in the workplace. The joint solution already provides IoT data in technically advanced buildings like the Salesforce Tower (shown) in San Francisco.
Microsoft Azure Digital Twins is a new service announced today that enables IoT service and solution providers to easily build their own applications for smart buildings and smart spaces. Rigado Cascade feeds into Azure Digital Twins providing connectivity to a wide variety of sensors and building systems. It also provides a secure and scalable edge computing platform at Commercial IoT scale. In addition to smart buildings, such as Salesforce Tower, Rigado Cascade integration with Azure Digital Twins solutions can support a range of use cases, including smart hospitals, sporting venues, retail, warehouses and more.

Rigado Cascade enables the smart building manufacturer and integrator to quickly develop and deploy highly scalable architectures. Cascade Edge-as-a-Service is a secure edge computing platform that is ideal for Smart Building solutions that require local control and edge data processing. With Cascade, smart building teams are able to significantly decrease upfront costs, reduce security and financial risk and speed time to market—often by six to nine months. As a result, smart building operators are able to more quickly realize bottom-line impacting benefits such as the ability to more quickly attain new leasing customers, grow tenant satisfaction and loyalty, and maximize the revenue potential of every square foot.

Rigado | www.rigado.com

Firms Team for End-to-End, Open, Modular IoT Architecture

Eurotech has announced the availability of an end-to-end IoT architecture based on open standards, developed in collaboration with Cloudera and Red Hat. The new IoT architecture is an open, modular, multi-cloud architecture with security features organically built-in to enable scalable and more secure end-to-end device management and analytics from the edge to the cloud. It combines operational technology (OT), information technology (IT), data analytics and application integration.
The architecture has been built on top of key open source projects and innovations out of the Eclipse Foundation and Apache Foundation. By bridging OT and IT, this open source-based architecture can help address the main aspects of managing an IoT infrastructure including connectivity, configuration, and embedded application life cycle. The architecture can also aggregate real-time data streams from the edge, archive them, or route them towards enterprise IT systems and analytics.

With this solution, Eurotech, Red Hat and Cloudera are aiming to make it easier for organizations to roll out IoT use cases by providing a validated, modular, end-to-end IoT architecture built to be open, interoperable and cost effective.

Eurotech | www.eurotech.com

IoT Module Family Features Ultra-Compact Form Factor

Telit has announced the xE310 family of miniature IoT modules. With initial models planned in LTE-M, NB-IoT and European 2G, the new form factor will enable Telit to meet growing demand for ultra-small, high-performance modules for wearable medical devices, fitness trackers, industrial sensors, smart metering, and other mass-production, massive deployment applications. Telit will start shipping xE310 modules in Q4 this year.
Telit claims the xE310 family is one of the smallest LGA form factors available in the market with a flexible perimeter footprint supporting various sizes from compact to smaller than 200 mm2. The xE310’s 94 pads include spares to provide Telit the flexibility to quickly deliver support for additional features as technologies, applications and markets evolve. Spares can be used for modules supporting Bluetooth, Wi-Fi or enhanced location technologies—in addition to cellular—while maintaining compatibility with cellular only models. They can also be used for additional connections that may be required for new 5G-enabled features.

The new form factor also gives OEMs greater flexibility, efficiency and yield during design and manufacturing. The xE310 family provides easy PCB routing while minimizing manufacturing process issues such as planarity and bending. The unique circular pad facilitates correct package orientation for automated assembly.

To learn more about the new xE310 family, visit the Telit stand 431 at IoT Solutions World Congress in Barcelona, Spain on October 16-18.

For a look at how this new design is enabling smart metering applications, register for the Telit webinar on November 15: “From 2G to 5G: 5 things you need to know for smarter utilities”: https://www.smart-energy.com/industry-sectors/data_analytics/webinar-15-november-5-things-you-need-to-know-for-smarter-utilities/.

Telit | www.telit.com

Module Meets Needs of Simple Bluetooth Low Energy Systems

Laird has announced its new Bluetooth 5 module series, designed to simplify the process of bringing wireless designs to market. The BL651 Series is the latest addition to Laird’s Nordic Semiconductor family of Bluetooth 5 offerings. Building on the success of the BL652 and BL654 series, the BL651 is a cost-effective solution for simple Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) applications that provides all the capabilities of the Nordic nRF52810 silicon in a small, fully certified module.

The BL651 leverages the benefits of Bluetooth 5 features, including higher data throughput and increased broadcasting capacity, in a tiny footprint. According to the company, the BL651 has been designed to allow a seamless hardware upgrade path to the more fully featured BL652 series if additional flash and RAM requirements are identified in the customer development process.

The BL651 series delivers the capabilities of the Nordic nRF52810 silicon in a small, fully certified module with simple soldering castellation for easy prototyping and mass production manufacturing. Designers can use the Nordic SDK and SoftDevice or Zephyr RTOS to build their BLE application. In addition, the BL651 series is 100% PCB footprint drop in compatible with the BL652 Series of modules, allowing flexibility to upscale designs if more flash/RAM or further feature sets are required during the design process.

In large factories Bluetooth sensor networks can easily span an entire campus and gather sensor data that can provide deep insights needed to maintain efficiency, productivity and security. The BL651 Series helps make these types of sensor networks easy to build, scale, and maintain.

Laird Connectivity | www.lairdtech.com

Managed Linux and Zephyr Distros for IoT offer OTA and Container Tech

By Eric Brown

A Cambridge, UK based startup called Foundries.io, which is funded by Linaro, has launched a microPlatforms service with managed, subscription-based Linux and Zephyr distributions. The microPlatforms offering will target IoT, edge, and automotive applications, and provide continuous over-the-air (OTA) updates to improve security. Linaro CEO George Grey also serves as CEO of Foundries.io.

The distributions are designed to work with any private or public cloud platform, with the microPlatform cloud service acting as an intermediary. The microPlatforms packages include firmware, kernel, services, and applications, “delivered continuously from initial product design to end-of-life,” says Foundries.io.


Linux microPlatform architecture
(click image to enlarge)
Benefits from microPlatforms include improved security, lower development costs, and “faster time-to-market for products across a wide range of IoT connected devices,” says the company. There’s also a combined Linux/Zephyr offering that bridges both sides of the IoT architectural divide designed for projects that include both a Linux gateway/edge device and Zephyr controlled sensor devices.

Subscriptions range from $10 per month for evaluation and non-commercial use to $10,000 or $25,000 per year for professional Zephyr and Linux packages, respectfully. There are no per unit fees, and Foundries.io notes: “We regularly upstream our open source work; you can end your subscription any time and keep using the software.” There’s also a community website with forums and support services.

Linux microPlatforms

The Linux microPlatform (LmP) supports support Arm, Intel, and RISC-V based devices. The initial targets include the Raspberry Pi and several 96Boards (see farther below). LmP starts with a minimal Linux distro built with OpenEmbedded/Yocto and “a recent stable kernel.” The distribution is designed to be compact and resource efficient, with minimal attack surfaces.


Linux microPlatforms with containers
(click image to enlarge)
The Linux stack includes secure updatable firmware and a Docker container-based application runtime with reference container Dockerfiles and images. Source code is available, and you can also download binaries for supported target boards. The use of containers is optional, as you can also run LmP natively.

LmP also includes a cloud management service, which offers a “continuously tested and stabilized stream of updates,” says Foundries.io. The platform lets you “securely and remotely manage your product’s software” using standard tools such as Ansible and Kubernetes.

DragonBoard 820C

The initial LmP targets include:

Zephyr microPlatforms

The Zephyr microPlatform is the first downstream distribution for the Linux Foundation hosted, open source Zephyr RTOS. ZmP
builds on the Zephyr RTOS foundation with “MCUboot software, services, and reference applications to provide a continuously tested, secure, updatable, cross-architecture solution for microcontroller-based products,” says the startup.

 
Zephyr microPlatform architecture (left) and combined Linux and Zephyr microPlatform 
(click images to enlarge)
The Zephyr stack supports all the hardware listed by the Zephyr Project, including products from Nordic Semiconductor, NXP, and STMicroelectronics. This week, the Zephyr Project announced an expansion of support to 100 boards, including Arduino-compatible HiFive1 and Arduino Cinque boards, and the BBC Microbit and 96Boards Carbon. Supported SBCs that primarily run Linux but can also run Zephyr on their MCU companion chips include the MinnowBoard Max, Udoo Neo, and UP Squared.

Toradex and Linaro partnerships

Foundries.io’s launch partners are Toradex and Linaro — the open source code development organization backed by Arm and several of its major licensees. Linaro will offer microPlatforms support for its 96Boards SBCs. Toradex, whose Colibri iMX7 is a target platform, is “using the Linux microPlatform as a secure and updateable base for its upcoming software offering,” says Foundries.io. Toradex CTO Roman Schnarwiler adds: “Toradex will be announcing exciting news about our upcoming software offerings for our SoMs, based on the Foundries.io Linux microPlatform soon.”

Colibri iMX7

Also today, Toradex announced a software development partnership with The Qt Company. Toradex will provide the Qt development platform on its modules including Qt Device Creation. It will also Boot2Qt with Toradex Easy Installer.

OTA and containers in IoT

Continuous OTA updates are widely seen as one the best ways to improve IoT security. OTA is central to several recent IoT frameworks, including Google’s recently announced Cloud IoT Edge for devices equipped with its new Edge TPU machine learning co-processor chips. OTA is also central to Microsoft’s secure, Linux-based Azure Sphere IoT platform, which was further detailed today at the Hot Chips 2018conference.

Container technology, meanwhile, is seen as a way to ease embedded Linux remote management and automated updates. For example, Resin.io provides an embedded Linux container technology with its OTA-enabled ResinOS. Canonical’s Ubuntu Corealso uses a container-like scheme to provide transactional updates.

Further information

The Foundries.io microPlatforms subscriptions are now available, ranging from $10 per month for evaluation and non-commercial use to $10,000 or $25,000 per year for professional Zephyr and Linux packages, respectfully. Downloads of microPlatforms source code, binaries, and documentation are available at the Foundries.io website.

This article originally appeared on LinuxGizmos.com on August 21.

Foundries.io | foundries.io

Tuesday’s Newsletter: IoT Tech Focus

Coming to your inbox tomorrow: Circuit Cellar’s IoT Technology Focus newsletter. Tomorrow’s newsletter covers what’s happening with Internet-of-Things (IoT) technology–-from devices to gateway networks to cloud architectures. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

Bonus: We’ve added Drawings for Free Stuff to our weekly newsletters. Make sure you’ve subscribed to the newsletter so you can participate.

Already a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber? Great!
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Our weekly Circuit Cellar Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

Embedded Boards.(10/23) The focus here is on both standard and non-standard embedded computer boards that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up to production volumes.

October has a 5th Tuesday, so we’re bringing you a bonus newsletter:
Digital Signage (10/30)  Digital signage ranks among the most dynamic areas of today’s embedded computing space. Makers of digital signage players, board-level products and other technologies continue to roll out new solutions for implementing powerful digital signage systems. This newsletter looks at the latest technology trends and product developments in digital signage.

Analog & Power. (11/6) This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op amps, batteries and more.

Microcontroller Watch (11/13) This newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

IoT Gateway/Dongle Solution Taps Nordic Semi’s BLE SoC

Nordic Semiconductor has announced that Fanstel has selected Nordic’s nRF52840 Bluetooth® 5/Bluetooth Low Energy (Bluetooth LE) advanced multiprotocol System-on-Chip (SoC) for its BWG840F gateway and USB840F dongle. The gateway and the dongle are designed to enable OEMs to rapidly develop solutions for customers—including IoT Cloud service providers and enterprises employing Cloud servers—to monitor IoT devices. Both solutions enable the rapid commissioning and mass deployment of IoT devices in commercial mesh networks via Bluetooth LE and Thread wireless protocols.

Designed to simplify the RF development and certification work required to develop IoT applications, both the gateway and dongle are U.S. FCC and European CE certified and supplied in market-ready enclosures.
The gateway and the dongle employ Fanstel’s Bluenor BT840F module for ultra low power and long range IoT applications. The module is based on the Bluetooth 5- and Thread-compliant nRF52840 SoC-based enabling it support multiprotocol wireless connectivity between the gateway or dongle and Bluetooth LE or Thread nodes in a mesh network. To further support the rapid development of IoT mesh networking solutions based on the gateway, Fanstel provides the DK-BWG840F development kit, allowing users to load firmware into the BT840F module using Nordic’s nRF5 Software Development Kit (SDK) and nRFgo software tools.

The BWG840F gateway’s Wi-Fi module provides Internet connectivity, enabling an IoT mesh network to be monitored and controlled remotely via a Cloud server. Alternatively, the USB840F dongle plugs into a PC’s USB port and relays data between the PC and any node in the mesh network using Bluetooth LE or Thread. For large scale applications, multiple dongles can be deployed in parallel, by being plugged into a wall USB port throughout a facility and then relaying commands and data to any node in the network within range of the ports.

Nordic’s nRF52840 SoC combines a 64 MHz, 32-bit Arm Cortex M4F processor with a 2.4 GHz multiprotocol radio (supporting Bluetooth 5, ANT, Thread, IEEE 802.15.4, and proprietary 2.4 GHz RF protocol software) with 1MB Flash memory and 256 KB RAM. The chip supports all the features of Bluetooth 5 (including 4x the range or 2x the raw data bandwidth (2 Mbps) compared with Bluetooth 4.2). Designed to address the inherent security challenges that are faced in IoT, the nRF52840 SoC incorporates the Arm CryptoCell-310 cryptographic accelerator, offering best-in-class security.

The SoC is supplied with Nordic’s S140 SoftDevice, a Bluetooth 5-certified software protocol stack for building long range and high data Bluetooth LE applications. The S140 SoftDevice offers concurrent Central, Peripheral, Broadcaster, and Observer Bluetooth LE roles, and supports high throughput and long range modes as well as advertising extensions.

The nRF52840 SoC also supports complex Bluetooth LE and other low-power wireless applications that were previously not possible with a single-chip solution. The nRF52840 is Bluetooth 5- and Thread 1.1-certified and its Dynamic Multiprotocol feature uniquely supports concurrent wireless connectivity of both protocols. Its radio architecture—featuring -96-dBm RX sensitivity and an on-chip power amplifier that boosts maximum output power of 8 dBm for a total link budget of >104 dBm—enables the gateway and dongle to achieve an estimated Bluetooth LE range of 2300 m when used in environments with a clear line of sight, low RF interference, and low multiple path interference, according to Fanstel.

Nordic Semiconductor | www.nordicsemi.com

Semtech LoRa Technology Leveraged for Flood Sensor System

Semtech has announced that Green Stream has incorporated Semtech’s LoRa devices and wireless radio frequency technology (LoRa Technology) and Senet’s LoRaWAN-based network into its autonomous flood sensor systems for use in coastal areas, including towns and cities.

Green Stream’s solutions use LoRa Technology, a proven technology used in IoT environmental solutions. Green Stream’s end-to-end flood monitoring solutions are designed using commercial, off-the-shelf ultrasonic sensors and easy-to-deploy LoRa-enabled gateways. The data is communicated over a LoRaWAN-based network provided by Senet, a leading provider of Cloud-based LoRaWAN services platforms that enable the on-demand build out and management of IoT connectivity. The Green Stream LoRa-based flood sensors are autonomous, requiring no external power or wired network connection.

Each sensor is a self-contained, weather-proof, solar-powered unit that comes with a universal mounting bracket and extension arm. These sensors are small enough to be installed on top of crosswalks, light or electric poles, and bridges. The rugged sensor gateway is positioned above a body of water or over dry land.

Semtech | www.semtech.com

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Tuesday’s Newsletter: Microcontroller Watch

Coming to your inbox tomorrow: Circuit Cellar’s Microcontroller Watch newsletter. Tomorrow’s newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

Bonus: We’ve added Drawings for Free Stuff to our weekly newsletters. Make sure you’ve subscribed to the newsletter so you can participate.

Already a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber? Great!
You’ll get your Microcontroller Watch newsletter issue tomorrow.

Not a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber?
Don’t be left out! Sign up now:

Our weekly Circuit Cellar Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

IoT Technology Focus. (10/16) Covers what’s happening with Internet-of-Things (IoT) technology–-from devices to gateway networks to cloud architectures. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

Embedded Boards.(10/23) The focus here is on both standard and non-standard embedded computer boards that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up to production volumes.

October has a 5th Tuesday, so we’re bringing you a bonus newsletter:
Digital Signage (10/30)  Digital signage ranks among the most dynamic areas of today’s embedded computing space. Makers of digital signage players, board-level products and other technologies continue to roll out new solutions for implementing powerful digital signage systems. This newsletter looks at the latest technology trends and product developments in digital signage.

Analog & Power. (11/6) This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op amps, batteries and more.

Security Takes Center Stage for MCUs

Enabling Secure IoT

Embedded systems face security challenges unlike those in the IT realm. To meet those needs, microcontroller vendors continue to add ever-more sophisticated security features to their devices—both on their own and via partnerships with security specialists.

By Jeff Child, Editor-in-Chief

For embedded systems, there is no one piece of technology that can take on all the security responsibilities of a system on their own. Indeed, everything from application software to firmware to data storage has a role to play in security. That said, microcontollers have been trending toward assuming a central role in embedded security. One driving factor for this is the Internet-of-Things (IoT). As the IoT era moves into full gear, all kinds of devices are getting more connected. And because MCUs are a key component in those connected systems, MCUs have evolved in recent years to include more robust security features on chip.

That trend has continued over the last 12 months, with the leading MCU vendors ramping up those embedded security capabilities in a variety of ways—some on their own and some by teaming up with hardware and software security specialists.

Built for IoT Security

Exemplifying these trends, Microchip Technology in June released its SAM L10 and SAM L11 MCU families (Figure 1). The devices were designed to address the increasing risks of exposing intellectual property (IP) and sensitive information in IoT-based embedded systems. The MCU families are based on the Arm Cortex-M23 core, with the SAM L11 featuring Arm TrustZone for Armv8-M, a programmable environment that provides hardware isolation between certified libraries, IP and application code. Security features on the MCUs include tamper resistance, secure boot and secure key storage. These, combined with TrustZone technology, protect applications from both remote and physical attacks.

Figure 1
The SAM L10 and SAM L11 MCU families provide TrustZone for Armv8-M hardware isolation between certified libraries, IP and application code. The MCUs also feature tamper resistance, secure boot and secure key storage.

In addition to TrustZone technology, the SAM L11 security features include an on-board cryptographic module supporting Advanced Encryption Standard (AES), Galois Counter Mode (GCM) and Secure Hash Algorithm (SHA). The secure boot and secure key storage with tamper detection capabilities establish a hardware root of trust. It also offers a secure bootloader for secure firmware upgrades.

Microchip has partnered with Trustonic, a member of Microchip’s Security Design Partner Program, to offer a comprehensive security solution framework that simplifies implementation of security and enables customers to introduce end products faster. Microchip has also partnered with Secure Thingz and Data I/O Corporation to offer secure provisioning services for SAM L11 customers that have a proven security framework.

Wireless MCU

Likewise focusing on IoT security, NXP Semiconductor in February announced its K32W0x wireless MCU platform. According to NXP, it’s the first single-chip device with a dual-core architecture and embedded multi-protocol radio. It provides a solution for miniaturizing sophisticated applications that typically require a larger, more costly two-chip solution. Examples include consumer devices such as wearables, smart door locks, thermostats and other smart home devices.

The K32W0x embeds a dual-core architecture comprised of an Arm Cortex-M4 core for high performance application processing and a Cortex-M0+ core for low-power connectivity and sensor processing. Memory on chip includes 1.25 MB of flash and 384 KB of SRAM. Its multi-protocol radio supports Bluetooth 5 and IEEE 802.15.4 including the Thread IP-based mesh networking stack and the Zigbee 3.0 mesh networking stack.

Figure 2
Security features of the K32W0x MCU include a cryptographic sub-system that has a dedicated core, dedicated instruction and data memory for encryption, signing and hashing algorithms including AES, DES, SHA, RSA and ECC.

Features of the K32W0x’s security system include a cryptographic sub-system that has a dedicated core, dedicated instruction and data memory for encryption, signing and hashing algorithms including AES, DES, SHA, RSA and ECC. Secure key management is provided for storing and protecting sensitive security keys (Figure 2). Support is enabled for erasing the cryptographic sub-system memory, including security keys, upon sensing a security breach or physical tamper event. The device has a Resource Domain Controller for access control, system memory protection and peripheral isolation. Built-in secure boot and secure over-the-air programming is supported to assure only authorized and authenticated code runs in the device.

To extend the on-chip security features of the K32W0x MCU platform, NXP has collaborated with B-Secur, an expert in biometric authentication, to develop a system that uses an individual’s unique heart pattern (electrocardiogram/ECG) to validate identity, making systems more secure than using an individual’s fingerprint or voice.

IP Boosts Security

For its part, Renesas Electronics addressed the IoT security challenge late last year when it expanded its RX65N/RX651 Group MCU lineup.  …

Read the full article in the October 339 issue of Circuit Cellar

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Note: We’ve made the October 2017 issue of Circuit Cellar available as a free sample issue. In it, you’ll find a rich variety of the kinds of articles and information that exemplify a typical issue of the current magazine.

Compact, Arm-based Mini-PC is Toughened up for IIoT

By Eric Brown

DFI’s Pico-ITX-based, DIN-rail mountable “EC900-FS6” mini-PC runs Linux or Android on an i.MX6 DualLite, and offers 2x GbE, 2x USB, 2x serial, mini-PCIe, and extensive ruggedization features.

A reader recently noted our excessive use of the term “rugged,” which is fair enough. In our defense, embedded gear is increasingly tolerant of wide temperature ranges, and to a lesser extent, excessive shock, vibration, and dust and water ingress. From now on, we will no longer use “rugged” to describe a system that has a wide temperature range without also offering other protections. We will, however, continue to apply it to systems like DFI’s i.MX6-based EC900-FS6 mini-PC, which is not only rugged, but quite compact at 143 mm x 96.4 mmx 34 mm.


 
EC900-FS6
(click images to enlarge)

Designed for industrial IoT (IIoT) gateways and other embedded applications, the EC900-FS6 features -20 to 60°C or -40 to 70°C support, as well as 3G, 11ms shock resistance and IEC68-2-64 (3G) compliant vibration resistance (random 5~500Hz). It also has a 10 to 90% RH (non-condensing) humidity range and provides a wide-range 9-36V DC input via a terminal block. The fanless, DIN-rail mountable system has a 15-year lifecycle guarantee.

The EC900-FS6 is built around DFI’s Pico-ITX form-factor FS053 SBC, which is equipped with a dual Cortex-A9 i.MX6 DualLite SoC clocked to 1GHz. Both the SBC and the system ship with Android 5.1 beta, as well as a stack built with Yocto Project 1.8 beta, both with Linux Kernel 3.14.52.

 
DFI FS053 (left) and detail views
(click images to enlarge)
The EC900-FS6 provides 1GB or 2GB of DDR3L, 8GB or 16GB of eMMC, 4MB NOR flash, and a microSD slot. You get dual GbE ports (Atheros AR8033-AL1B and Microchip LAN7500-ABZJ controllers), as well as dual USB 2.0 ports and internal USB 2.0 and USB OTG interfaces.


EC900-FS6 detail view
(click image to enlarge)

The EC900-FS6 is further equipped with an HD-resolution HDMI port, 4-bit DIO, a UART console, and RS-485 and RS-232 interfaces deployed via 2-pole terminal blocks. A mini-PCIe slot is accompanied by dual mounting holes for WiFi antennas. Other features include a watchdog timer, a reset button, and a status LED.

Further information

The EC900-FS6 appears to be available now at an undisclosed price. More information may be found in this EC900-FS6 announcement and datasheet (PDF).

This article originally appeared on LinuxGizmos.com on August 29.

DFI | www.dfi.com

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