Declaration of Embedded Independence

Input Voltage

–Jeff Child, Editor-in-Chief

JeffHeadShot

There’s no doubt that we’re living in an exciting era for embedded systems developers. Readers like you that design and develop embedded systems no longer have to compromise. Most of you probably remember when the processor or microcontroller you chose dictated both the development tools and embedded operating system (OS) you had to use. Today more than ever, there are all kinds of resources available to help you develop prototypes—everything from tools to chips to information resources on-line. There’s inexpensive computing modules available aimed at makers and DIY experts that are also useful for professional engineers working on high-volume end products.

The embedded operating systems market is one particular area where customers no longer have to compromise. That wasn’t always the case. Most people identify the late 90s with the dot.com bubble … and that bubble bursting. But closer to our industry was the embedded Linux start-up bubble. The embedded operating systems market began to see numerous start-ups appearing as “embedded Linux” companies. Since Linux is a free, open-source OS, these companies didn’t sell Linux, but rather provided services to help customers create and support implementations of open-source Linux. But, as often happens with disruptive technology, the establishment then pushed back. The establishment in that case were the commercial “non-open” embedded OS vendors. I recall a lot of great spirited debates at the time—both in print and live during panel discussions at industry trade shows—arguing for and against the very idea of embedded Linux. For my part, I can’t help remembering, having both written some of those articles and having sat on those panels myself.

Coinciding with the dot-com bubble bursting, the embedded Linux bubble burst as well. That’s not to say that embedded Linux lost any luster. It continued its upward rise, and remains an incredibly important technology today. Case in point: The Android OS is based on the Linux kernel. What burst was the bubble of embedded Linux start-up companies, from which only a handful of firms survived. What’s interesting is that all the major embedded OS companies shifted to a “let’s not beat them, let’s join them” approach to Linux. In other words, they now provide support for users to develop systems that use Linux alongside their commercial embedded operating systems.

The freedom not to have to compromise in your choices of tools, OSes and systems architectures—all that is a positive evolution for embedded system developers like you. But in my opinion, I think it’s possible to misinterpret the user-centric model and perhaps declare victory too soon. When you’re developing an embedded system aimed at a professional, commercial application, not everything can be done in DIY mode. There’s value in having the support of sophisticated technology vendors to help you develop and integrate your system. Today’s embedded systems routinely use millions of lines of code, and in most systems these days software running on a processor is what provides most of the functionality. If you develop that software in-house, you need high quality tools to makes sure it’s running error free. And if you out-source some of that embedded software, you have to be sure the vendor of that embedded software is providing a product you can rely on.

The situation is similar on the embedded board-level computing side. Yes, there’s a huge crop of low-cost embedded computer modules available to purchase these days. But not all embedded computing modules are created equal. If you’re developing a system with a long shelf life, what happens when the DRAMs, processors or I/O chips go end-of-life? Is it your problem? Or does the board vendor take on that burden? Have the boards been tested for vibration or temperature so that they can be used in the environment your application requires? You have to weigh the costs versus the kinds of support a vendor provides.

All in all, the trend toward a ”no compromises” situation for embedded systems developers is a huge win. But when you get beyond the DIY project level of development, it’s important to keep in mind that the vendor-customer relationship is still a critical part of the system design process. With all that in mind, it’s cool that we can today make a declaration of independence for embedded systems technology. But I’d rather think of it as a declaration of interdependence.

This appears in the October (327) issue of Circuit Cellar magazine

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Don’t Miss Our Newsletter: IoT Technology Focus

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Embedded Boards. This content looks at embedded board-level computers. The focus here is on modules—Arduino, Raspberry Pi, COM Express, and other small-form-factor —that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up production volumes.

Analog & Power. This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op-amps, batteries, and more.

Microcontroller Watch. This newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

Wi-Fi MCU Platform Update Targets Smart Home

Cypress Semiconductor has announced an updated version of its turnkey development platform for the IoT that simplifies the integration of wireless connectivity into smart home applications. The Wireless Internet Connectivity for Embedded Devices (WICED) Studio platform now adds iCloud remote access support for Wi-Fi-based accessories that support Apple HomeKit. Developers can leverage iCloud support in the WICED software Cypress WICED IoT Development Kit_0development kit (SDK) and Cypress’ CYW43907 Wi-Fi MCU to create hub-independent platforms that connect directly to Siri voice control and the Apple Home app remotely. Developers can access the WICED Studio platform, ecosystem and community at www.cypress.com/wicedcommunity.

Using Cypress’ WICED development platform and ultra-low power CYW20719 Bluetooth/BLE MCU, developers can integrate HomeKit support into products such as smart lighting devices, leverage Siri voice control and connect to the Apple Home app seamlessly. WICED Studio provides a single development environment for multiple wireless technologies, including Cypress’ world-class Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and combo solutions, with an easy-to-use application programming interface in the world’s most integrated and interoperable wireless SDK. The kit includes broadly deployed and rigorously tested Wi-Fi and Bluetooth protocol stacks, and it offers simplified application programming interfaces that free developers from needing to learn about complex wireless technologies. The SDK also supports Cypress’ high-performance 802.11ac Wi-Fi solutions that use high-speed transmissions to enable IoT devices with faster downloads and better range, as well as lower power consumption by quickly exploiting deep sleep modes.

The Cypress CYW43907 SoC integrates dual-band IEEE 802.11b/g/n Wi-Fi with a 320-MHz ARM Cortex-R4 RISC processor and 2 MB of SRAM to run applications and manage IoT protocols. The SoC’s power management unit simplifies power topologies and optimizing energy consumption. The WICED SDK provides code examples, tools and development support for the CYW43907.

 WICED Studio IoT Development Platform

The WICED platform supports a broad range of other popular cloud services and eliminates the need for developers to implement the various protocols to connect to them, reducing development time and costs. The WICED Studio SDK enables cloud connectivity in minutes with its robust libraries that uniquely integrate popular cloud services such as iCloud, Amazon Web Services, IBM Bluemix, Alibaba Cloud, and Microsoft Azure, along with services from private cloud partners and China’s Weibo social media platform.

In line with the IoT trend toward dual-mode connectivity, the kit supports Cypress’ Wi-Fi and Bluetooth combination solutions and its low-power Bluetooth and Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) combination solutions. The SDK features a single installer package for multiple wireless technologies with an Eclipse-based Integrated Development Environment (IDE) that runs on multiple operating systems, including Windows, MacOS and Linux.

Cypress’ WICED Studio connectivity suite is microcontroller (MCU)-agnostic and provides ready support for a variety of third-party MCUs to address the needs of complex IoT applications. The platform also enables cost efficient solutions for simple IoT applications by integrating MCU functionality into the connectivity device. Wi-Fi and Bluetooth protocol stacks can run transparently on a host MCU or in embedded mode, allowing for flexible platform architectures with common firmware.

Cypress Semiconductor | www.cypress.com

Analog Devices Collaborates on IoT Farm-to-Fork Project

Analog Devices has announced a collaboration with The Cornucopia Project and ripe.io to explore the local food supply chain and use this work as a vehicle for educating students at ConVal Regional High School in Peterborough, NH, and local farmers on 21st century agriculture skills. The initiative instructs student farmers how to use Internet of Things and blockchain technologies to track the conditions and movement of produce from “Farm to Fork” to make decisions that improve quality, yields, and profitability. Together with the Cornucopia Project, the endeavor is funded by Analog Devices and ripe.io, with both companies also providing technical training.

Analog Devices Smart Agriculture Manager Erick Olsen (center) and Senior Engineer Rob O'Reilly are pictured alongside ConVal Regional High School Farm to Fork Fellows viewing tomatoes grown with the company's crop monitoring solution. (Photo: Business Wire)

Analog Devices Smart Agriculture Manager Erick Olsen (center) and Senior Engineer Rob O’Reilly are pictured alongside ConVal Regional High School Farm to Fork Fellows viewing tomatoes grown with the company’s crop monitoring solution. (Photo: Business Wire)

For the project, Analog Devices is providing a prototype version of its crop monitoring solution, which will be capable of measuring environmental factors that help farmers make sound decisions about crops related to irrigation, fertilization, pest management, and harvesting. The sensor-to-cloud, Internet of Things solution enables farmers to make better decisions based on accumulated learning from the near-real-time monitoring. These 24/7 measurements are combined with a near infrared (NIR) miniaturized spectrometer that conducts non-destructive analysis of food quality not previously possible in a farm environment.

The Cornucopia Project, a non-profit located in Peterborough, N.H., provides garden and agricultural programs to students from elementary through high school. Student farmers in its Farm to Fork program learn how to use advanced sensor instrumentation in their greenhouse, which provide valuable data to assess the attributes of tomatoes, and how these factors affect taste and quality. The program also educates students on how crops can be tracked throughout the agricultural supply chain to support food quality, sustainability, traceability and nutrition.

ripe.io is contributing its blockchain technology to model the entire fresh produce supply chain, combining the crop growing data, transportation, and storage conditions. Blockchain – a distributed ledger, consensus data technology that is used to maintain a continuously growing list of records – will track crop lifecycle from seed to distributor to retailer to consumer, bringing transparency and accountability to the agricultural supply chain.

Analog Devices | www.analog.com

Don’t Miss Our Newsletter: Microcontroller Watch

Circuit Cellar’s Microcontroller Watch newsletter is coming to your inbox tomorrow. This newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. We examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.20150220-rh850-d1x

Bonus: We’ve added Drawings for Free Stuff to our weekly newsletters. Make sure you’ve subscribed to the newsletter so you can participate.

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Remember, our new enhanced weekly CC Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

IoT Technology Focus. The Internet-of-Things (IoT) phenomenon is rich with opportunity. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

Embedded Boards. Embedded boards are critical building blocks around which system developers can build all manor of intelligent systems. The focus here is on both standard and non-standard embedded computer boards.

Analog & Power. This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op-amps, batteries and more.

Don’t Miss Our Newsletter: Analog & Power

Circuit Cellar’s Analog & Power themed newsletter is coming to your inbox tomorrow. In tomorrow’s newsletter you’ll get news about the products and technologies trends in the analog, mixed-signal and power markets.MAX77756_EVKit_image

This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op-amps, batteries and more.

 

Bonus: We’ve added Drawings for Free Stuff to our weekly newsletters. Make sure you’ve subscribed to the newsletter so you can participate.

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Remember, our new enhanced weekly CC Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

Microcontroller Watch. This newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

IoT Technology Focus. The Internet-of-Things (IoT) phenomenon is rich with opportunity. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

Embedded Boards. Embedded boards are critical building blocks around which system developers can build all manor of intelligent systems. The focus here is on both standard and non-standard embedded computer boards.

U-blox Modules Demo on T-Mobile’s NB-IoT Network

U‑blox featured a live Narrowband IoT (NB‑IoT or LTE Cat NB1) demo at MWC Americas in San Francisco, featuring SARA‑R410M‑02B, a configurable LTE Cat M1/NB1 multi‑mode module with worldwide coverage. NB‑IoT is a highly efficient type of spectrum and the globally preferred standard due to benefits like cost savings, extended battery life SARA-R410Mand the ability to support a large number of connected devices.

U‑blox has partnered with Bluvision, a provider of highly scalable end‑to‑end IoT platforms, to display Cold Chain Temperature Monitoring and Condition Monitoring using Bluvision’s BluCell. BluCell, a narrowband gateway that uses Bluetooth to wirelessly monitor hundreds of beacons, each measuring temperature, vibration analysis, door openings, location and movement. BluCell is connected via the U‑blox SARA‑R410M‑02B to T‑Mobile’s network, expected to be the first NB‑IoT network in North America. The module is expected to be certified and available in early 2018 for T‑Mobile’s NB‑IoT network, which is expected to launch nationwide in mid‑2018.

For the demo, Bluvision’s BEEKs beacons with sensors for temperature, vibration, magnetic fields and ambient light were attached to a cooler. The beacons transmited telemetry data, which includes real‑time and historical temperature log for the cooler and the vibration data from the compressor motor in the cooler, to the Bluzone cloud solution.

SARA‑R410M is a configurable LTE Cat M1/NB1 multi‑mode module with worldwide coverage. Measuring just 16 x 26 mm, it offers both LTE Cat M1 and Cat NB1 in a single hardware package, as well as software‑based configurability for all deployed global bands. It provides enormous efficiencies in logistics and SKU management. Customers can easily respond to changes in business or market conditions, since supported frequencies and operator configuration decisions can now be made at “zero hour” or even later in the field.

U-blox | www.u-blox.com

Infineon Invests in Voice-Interface Tech for IoT

Infineon has made a strategic minority investment in XMOS Limited, a Bristol based fabless semiconductor company that provides voice processors for IoT devices. Infineon leads the recent $15 million Series-E funding round. According to Infineon, cars, homes, industrial plants and consumer devices are rapidly becoming connected to the Internet: 3 xcore-microphone-arrayyears from now, 30 billion devices will belong to the IoT. While today the interaction between humans and machines is mostly done by touch, the next evolutionary step of IoT will lead to the omni-presence of high-performance voice control. Infineon Technologies  wants to further develop its capabilities to shape this market segment.

Today, voice controllers, used in voice recognition systems, struggle to differentiate between speech from a person in the room, and a synthesized source such as a radio, TV; they often identify the voice of interest based on the loudest noise. Earlier in 2017 Infineon and XMOS demonstrated an enhanced solution to overcome these issues, using intelligent human-sensing microphones and gesture recognition. The solution featured a combination of Infineon’s radar and silicon microphone sensors to detect the position and the distance of the speaker from the microphones, with XMOS far field voice processing technology used to capture speech.

Infineon Technologies | www.infineon.com

XMOS | www.xmos.com

Embedded Analytics Firm Makes ‘Self-Aware Chip’ Push

UltraSoC has announced a significant global expansion to address the increasing demand for more sophisticated, ‘self-aware’ silicon chips in a range of electronic products, from lightweight sensors to the server farms that power the Internet. The company’s growth plans are centering on shifts in applications such as server optimization, the IoT, and UltraSoC_EmbeddedAnalyticsautomotive safety and security, all of which demand significant improvements in the intelligence embedded inside chips.

UltraSoC’s semiconductor intellectual property (SIP) simplifies development and provides valuable embedded analytic features for designers of SoCs (systems on chip). UltraSoC has developed its technology—originally designed as a chip development tool to help developers make better products—to now fulfill much wider, pressing needs in an array of applications: safety and security in the automotive industry, where the move towards autonomous vehicles is creating unprecedented change and risk; optimization in big data applications, from Internet search to data centers; and security for the Internet of Things.

These developments will be accelerated by the addition of a new facility in Bristol, UK, which will be home to an engineering and innovation team headed by Marcin Hlond, newly appointed as Director of System Engineering. Hlond will oversee UltraSoC’s embedded analytics and visualization products, and lead product development and innovation. He has over two decades of experience as system architect and developer, most recently at Blu Wireless, NVidia and Icera. He will focus on fulfilling customers’ needs for more capable analytics and rich information to enable more efficient development of SoCs, and to enhance the reliability and security of a broad range of electronic products. At the same time, the company will continue to expand engineering headcount at its headquarters in Cambridge, UK.

UltraSoC | www.ultrasoc.com

Fresenius Taps Eurotech Gear for Medical IoT Project

Eurotech announced that Fresenius Medical Care has chosen Eurotech’s IoT Gateways, IoT device middleware ESF and integration platform Everyware Cloud as the hardware and software building blocks for their IoT project to connect globally deployed medical everyware_server_M2M_clouddevices. Given the confidentiality agreements in force, no further financial details were disclosed. Fresenius Medical Care and Eurotech have been collaborating closely to integrate Eurotech’s IoT technologies with both Fresenius Medical Cares’ products on the field and Fresenius Medical Cares’ software applications on the IT side, with the goal of zero changes on both the products and the applications.

According to  Eurotech, the successful result is a solution that enables, in a very secure and effective way, to carry out technical services of Fresenius Medical Care medical devices installed in dialysis clinics worldwide. The challenges associated with the global deployment and servicing of intelligent medical devices are manifold and require the highest levels of flexibility when it comes to the software at the edge. A IoT architecture for distributed medical devices has to offer solid end-to-end security and has to provide local processing capabilities to enable functionality like access to technical data of medical devices and their configuration management. This is achieved by leveraging both ESF andEveryware Cloud in combination with Eurotech’s ReliaGATE Multi-service IoT Gateway.

The IoT device application framework ESF (Everyware Software Framework), speeds up the development and deployment of the specific application or business logic on the IoT edge device. ESF is a commercial, enterprise-ready edition of Eclipse Kura, the popular open source Java/ OSGi middleware for IoT multi-service gateways and smart devices.

Everyware Cloud, the IoT/M2M integration platform interfaces easily with existing enterprise IT infrastructures, offering simple access through standard APIs to real-time and historical data from devices. In addition, this IoT Integration Platform also enables effective remote device management as well as the device life cycle features that ensure a smooth deployment and management of these devices in the field. This IoT/M2M integration platform is also available for on-premises and private cloud deployment.

Eurotech | www.eurotech.com

CENTRI Demos Chip-to-Cloud IoT Security on ST MCUs

CENTRI has announced compatibility of its IoTAS platform with the STMicroelectronics STM32 microcontroller family based on ARM Cortex-M processor cores. CENTRI successfully completed and demonstrated two proofs of concept on the STM32 platform DJDTab0VoAAB_sKto protect all application data in motion from chipset to public Cloud using CENTRI IoTAS. CENTRI Internet of Things Advanced Security (IoTAS) for secure communications was used in an application on an STM32L476RC device with connected server applications running on both Microsoft Azure and Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (Amazon EC2) Clouds. The proofs of concept used wireless connections to showcase the real-world applicability of IoT device communications in the field and to highlight the value of IoTAS compression and encryption.

IoTAS uses hardware-based ID to establish secure device authentication on the initial connection. The solution features patented single-pass data encryption and optimization to ensure maximum security while providing optimal efficiency and speed of data transmissions. The small footprint of IoTAS combined with the flexibility and compute power of the STM32 platform with seamless interoperability into the world’s most popular Cloud services provides device makers a complete, secure chip-to-Cloud IoT platform. CENTRI demonstrated IoTAS capabilities at the ST Developers Conference, September 6, 2017 at the Santa Clara Convention Center.

CENTRI |

STMicroelectronics | www.st.com

Cloud Platform Supports BeagleBone Black Dev Kit

Anaren IoT Group has announced the release of version 2.1 of its innovative Anaren Atmosphere online development platform. Atmosphere affords embedded, mobile and cloud developers an exceptionally fast way to create IoT applications with an easy-to-use IoT development environment. The new version of Atmosphere 2.1, now offers support for the BeagleBone Black Embedded Linux Development Kit, as well as a new cloud-only project type that allows users to build libraries for C#/.Net, C/C++, and Python to enable connections to their own embedded solutions in Atmosphere Cloud.

AtmosphereIntroCloudMonitor

As with version 2.0, users of Atmosphere 2.1 are able to simultaneously create and deploy corresponding hosted web applications. All design functions, including cloud visualization, use a drag-and-drop approach that does not require the need for command line coding – although code can be customized if desired. Atmosphere 2.1 also provides access to a large and growing library of sensors and other IoT elements for easy application creation. Atmosphere’s unique approach immediately accelerates design cycles, lowers risk, while removing cost in the development process as no specialized knowledge in hardware embedded coding, mobile application creation or web development is needed.

Atmosphere 2.1 can also host device and sensor data in its cloud-based environment and offers a highly customizable web-based user interface. The Atmosphere Cloud™ hosting option allows each user to host up to five devices at once – free of charge. The Atmosphere toolset is ideal for a variety of developers – from those who are simply looking to record single sensor data to those developing rich, complex device monitoring and control applications.

Anaren IoT | www.anaren.com/iot

Don’t Miss Our Bonus Newsletter: FPGA Technologies

As you know, Circuit Cellar’s newsletter covers four key themes each month. But August is a special month with a 5th Tuesday! As result, tomorrow coming to your inbox with be a special bonus newsletter theme: FPGA Technologies. In tomorrow’s newsletter you’ll get news about the products and technologies trends in the FPGA market. FPGAs have sv_gs_diagramevolved to become complete system chips. Today’s FPGAs pack in levels of processing, I/O and memory on one chip that once required several ICs or boards.

Also: We’ve added Drawings for Free Stuff to our weekly newsletters. Make sure you’ve subscribed to the newsletter so you can participate.

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Remember, our new enhanced weekly CC Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

Analog & Power. This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op-amps, batteries, and more.

Microcontroller Watch. This newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

IoT Technology Focus. The Internet-of-Things (IoT) phenomenon is rich with opportunity. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

Embedded Boards. Embedded boards are critical building blocks around which system developers can build all manor of intelligent systems. The focus here is on both standard and non-standard embedded computer boards.

Don’t Wait for IoT Standards

Input Voltage

–Jeff Child, Editor-in-Chief

JeffHeadShot

I’ll admit it. When the phrase “Internet-of-Things” started to gain momentum some years ago, I was pretty dismissive of it. In the world of embedded systems technology that I’ve been covering for decades, the idea of network-connected embedded devices was far from new. At that point, I’d seen numerous catch phrases come and go—few of them ever sticking around. Fast forward to today, and boy was my skepticism misplaced! Market analysts vary in how they slice up the IoT market, but the general thinking puts the gowth range at several trillion dollars by the year 2020. IoT cuts across several market areas with industrial, transportation, smart homes and energy segments growing fastest. Even when you exclude PCs, phones, servers and tablets—concentrating on embedded devices using processors, microcontrollers, connectivity and high-level operating systems—we’re still talking billions of units.

Now that I’m sold that the hype around IoT is justified, I’m intrigued with this question: What specific IoT standards and protocols are really necessary to get started building an IoT implementation? From my point of view, I think there’s perhaps been too much hesitation on that score. I think there’s a false perception among some that joining the IoT game is some future possibility—a possibility waiting for standards.

Over the past couple years, major players like Google, GE, Qualcomm and others have scrambled to come up with standards suited for broad and narrow types of IoT devices. And those efforts have all helped move IoT forward. But in reality, all the pieces—from sensors to connectivity standards to gateway technologies to cloud infrastructures—all exist today. Businesses and organizations can move forward today to build highly efficient and scalable IoT infrastructures. They can make use of the key connectivity technologies that are usable today, rather than get too caught up with “future” thinking based on nascent industry standards.

In terms of the basic connectivity technologies for IoT, the industry is rich with choices. It’s actually rather rare that an IoT system can be completely hardwired end-to-end. As a result, most IoT systems of any large scale depend on a variety of wireless technologies including everything from device-level technologies to Wi-Fi to cellular networking. At the device-level, the ISM 802.15.4 is a popular standard for low power kinds of gear. 802.15.4 is the basis for established industrial network schemes like ZigBee, and can be used with protocols like 6LoWPAN to add higher layer functions using IP technology. Where power is less of a constraint, the standard Wi-Fi 802.11 is also a good method of IoT activity—whether leveraging off of existing Wi-Fi infrastructures or just using Wi-Fi hubs and routers in a purpose-built network implementation.

Another attractive IoT edge connectivity technology is Bluetooth LE (low energy) or BLE. While it was created for applications in healthcare, fitness, security and home entertainment, Bluetooth LE offers connectivity for any low power device. It’s especially useful in devices that need to operate for more than a year without recharging. If cellular networks make sense as a part of your IoT architecture, virtual networking platforms are available via all the major carriers—AT&T, Sprint, T-Mobile and Verizon Wireless.

IoT is definitely having an impact in the microcontroller-based embedded design space that’s at the heart of Circuit Cellar’s coverage. Not to overstate the matter, IoT systems today make up less than a tenth of the microcontroller application market. MCUs are used in a myriad of non-IoT systems. But, according to market research done by IHS in 2015, IoT is growing at a rate of 11% in the MCU space, while the overall MCU market is expected to grow at just 4% through 2019.

IoT requires the integration of edge technologies where data is created, connectivity technologies that move and share data using Internet and related technologies and then finally aggregating data where it can be processed by applications using Cloud-based gateways and servers. While that sounds complex, all the building blocks to implement such IoT installations are not future technologies. They are simply an integration of hardware, software and service elements that are readily available today. In the spirit of Circuit Cellar’s tag line “Inspiring the Evolution of Embedded Design,” get inspired and start building your IoT system today.

This appears in the September (326) issue of Circuit Cellar magazine

Sensor-Based IoT Development Platform With Bluetooth

Fujitsu Components America’s BlueBrain development platform for high-performance IoT applications is now available with a development breakout board and interface board. It enables designers to easily create a wireless monitoring and data collection system via Bluetooth. The enhanced BlueBrain Sensor-Based IoT System Platform will be available in this summer as a standard product through distribution. Jointly Fujitsu Components America bluebrain-sbs highdeveloped with CRATUS Technology, the BlueBrain platform features a high-performance CORTEX-M4 microcontroller from STMicroelectronics and a Bluetooth Low Energy wireless module from Fujitsu Components. The embedded hardware, software, and industry-standard interfaces and peripherals reduce the time and expertise needed to develop and deploy wireless, sensor-based products running simple or complicated algorithms.

The Breakout Board provides switch inputs and LED outputs to test I/O ports and functions, as well as programming interfaces for proof of concept and application development. The Interface Board provides additional sensors and interfaces and may also be used in parallel to expand the development platform. The BlueBrain Edge Processing Module attaches to a standard, 32-Pin 1.6” X 0.7” EEPROM-style IC socket, or equivalent footprint, on a mezzanine board to address specific markets and applications including industrial, agriculture, automotive and telematics, retail, smart buildings and civil infrastructure. Pricing for the BlueBrain Sensor-Based IoT System Platform is $425.

Fujitsu Components America | us.fujitsu.com/components