Step-Down Converters Save Energy and Space in IoT Devices

STMicroelectronics has announced its ST1PS01 step-down converters. The devices are engineered for small size, low quiescent current and high efficiency at all values of load current, to save energy and real-estate in keep-alive point-of-load supplies and IoT devices such as asset trackers, wearables, smart sensors and smart meters.

Leveraging synchronous rectification, efficiency is 92% at 400 mA full load and 95% when delivering just 1 mA. Power-saving design features keep the quiescent current to a miserly 500 nA and include a low-power voltage reference. There is also a pulse-frequency counter for controlling converter current at light load, with two high-speed comparators to help minimize output ripple.
Integrated feedback-loop compensation, soft-start circuitry and power switches ensure a space-saving solution that requires just a few small-outline passives to complete the circuit. The typical inductor value is 2.2 µH. In addition, output-voltage selection logic not only saves external voltage-setting components but also gives flexibility to configure modules digitally at manufacture or let the host system change the output voltage on the fly. Eight variants, each with four optional output-voltage settings, allow a choice of regulated outputs from 3.3 V to 0.62 5V. All models feature a Power-good indicator.

A wide input-voltage range, from 1.8 V to 5.5 V, further enhances flexibility for designers by allowing various battery chemistries or configurations as simple as a single lithium cell and extending runtime as the battery discharges. ST1PS01 regulators are also ideal for devices powered from energy-harvesting systems and feature a low noise-architecture that allows use in noise-sensitive applications.

An evaluation board, STEVAL-1PS01EJR, helps developers quickly understand how to take advantage of the ST1PS01’s high energy efficiency and feature integration.

ST1PS01 regulators are now in full production, packaged as 400 µm-pitch flip-chip devices measuring just 1.11 mm x 1.41 mm, and priced from $0.686 for orders of 1, 000 pieces.

STMicroelectronics | www.st.com

 

Telit and Boatrax Partner to Create Smart IoT Boat Monitoring Solution

Telit has announced its partnership with the vessel tracking company Boatrax. With Telit’s deviceWISE IoT Platform and cellular IoT communication modules, the Miami, Florida-based company created the Boatrax Box, a monitoring and diagnostic solution that aggregates important data about boat performance and owner behavior in real-time.
Launched in October 2018, the Boatrax Box brings boat owners peace of mind with a smart-boat experience that gets smarter the more it is used. With proprietary algorithms that adapt to the boat operator’s behaviors, it delivers critical information such as location, predictive maintenance alerts and engine diagnostics to ensure top efficiency. Engineered with the MultiTech SocketModem Cell that leverages Telit’s XE910 family of modules, the Boatrax Box is easy to mount and simple to use, while delivering the most comprehensive set of connectivity features in a compact form factor.

Boatrax | www.boatrax.com

Telit | www.telit.com

 

U-blox Low Power GNSS Receiver Tapped for Smart Watch Design

Technologies from U‑blox and TransSiP have been selected for the recently announced PowerWatch 2 from MATRIX Industries. Power Watch 2 claims to be the world’s first GPS smartwatch that you never need to recharge. The smartwatch embeds the ultra‑small, ultra‑low power U‑blox ZOE‑M8B GNSS receiver. Meanwhile, TransSiP’s PI technology ensures energy harvested is used at maximum efficiency.

The PowerWatch 2 does away with cables and external batteries by continually topping up its battery using thermoelectric energy generated from body heat as well as solar energy. The watch can connect to your smartphone and display notifications on your wrist, while tracking activities and visualizing them using dedicated iOS and Android apps, as well as with popular third-party health and fitness platforms.

The PowerWatch 2 delivers location tracking using the low‑power U‑blox ZOE‑M8B GNSS receiver module that consumes as low as 12 mW. Packaged as a (System‑in‑Package), the 4.5 x 4.5 x 1.0 mm module helps achieve the watch’s comparatively low 16‑mm thickness. And concurrent reception of up to three GNSS constellations means that it delivers high accuracy positioning in challenging situations such as urban or dense forest environments and when swimming.

Satellite based positioning is typically the most power‑hungry process on a sports watch. Providing highly efficient conversion of harvested energy into a very quiet supply of DC power, TransSiP PI enhances the ability of the ZOE‑M8B GNSS receiver module incorporating U‑blox Super‑E technology, to strike an ideal balance between power and performance. Working on a tight power budget, the watch supports 30 minutes of continuous GNSS tracking per day, with unused time accumulating in the watch’s battery pack—powering two hours of location tracking every four days.

TransSiP | www.transsip.com

U‑blox | www.u‑blox.com

Tuesday’s Newsletter: IoT Tech Focus

Coming to your inbox tomorrow: Circuit Cellar’s IoT Technology Focus newsletter. Tomorrow’s newsletter covers what’s happening with Internet-of-Things (IoT) technology–-from devices to gateway networks to cloud architectures. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

Bonus: We’ve added Drawings for Free Stuff to our weekly newsletters. Make sure you’ve subscribed to the newsletter so you can participate.

Already a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber? Great!
You’ll get your IoT Technology Focus newsletter issue tomorrow.

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Our weekly Circuit Cellar Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

Embedded Boards.(2/26) The focus here is on both standard and non-standard embedded computer boards that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up to production volumes.

Analog & Power. (3/5) This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op amps, batteries and more.

Microcontroller Watch (3/12) This newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

Modular DIN Rail Box PC Targets Transportation Systems

MEN Micro has announced the MC50M, a modular DIN rail box PC for embedded applications in transportation. The computer platform is based on Intel’s Atom E3900 CPU series. This makes the MC50M the ideal basis for functions such as security gateway, predictive maintenance, CCTV, ticketing systems or as a diagnostic server.

The MC50M can be used as a stand-alone product or in combination with a range of pre-fabricated extension modules, providing additional features and short delivery times. Extension modules can provide application-specific functions such as wireless communication (LTE advanced, WLAN, GNSS), MVB, CAN bus or other I/Os. A removable storage shuttle supports the integration of one to two 2.5″ SATA hard disks/SSDs. The wide range PSU allows isolated power supply from 24 V DC to 110 V DC nominal and extends the entire system to EN 50155 compliance.

The board management controller provides increased reliability and reduces downtime. The Trusted Platform Module supports security and encryption features. With the ignition switch for remote startup and shutdown control, the platform provides additional energy saving features. The aluminum housing with cooling fins ensures conductive cooling and fanless operation. The MC50M has no moving parts, so it can be operated maintenance-free.

The long-term availability of 15 years from product launch minimizes life cycle management by making the MC50M available for at least this period. MEN’s DIN rail concept is designed for flexible configuration of module combinations and is suitable for embedded IoT applications in various markets. The CPU modules can be flexibly combined with various expansion modules and power supplies.

In the modular system, the data transfer between the individual modules as well as the power supply of the components is implemented via the expansion connectors standardized by MEN.The concept specifications include housing dimensions, mounting, cooling and IP protection. In addition, the expansion connectors and their pin assignment are defined. DIN rail mounting (35 mm) is standard. Wall and 19” rack mounting is possible using adaption brackets.

MEN Micro | www.menmicro.com

March Circuit Cellar: Sneak Preview

The March issue of Circuit Cellar magazine is out next week!. We’ve rounded up an outstanding selection of in-depth embedded electronics articles just for you, and rustled them all into our 84-page magazine.

Not a Circuit Cellar subscriber?  Don’t be left out! Sign up today:

 

Here’s a sneak preview of March 2019 Circuit Cellar:

POWER MAKES IT POSSIBLE

Power Issues for Wearables
Wearable devices put extreme demands on the embedded electronics that make them work—and power is front and center among those demands. Devices spanning across the consumer, fitness and medical markets all need an advanced power source and power management technologies to perform as expected. Circuit Cellar Chief Editor Jeff Child examines how today’s microcontroller and power electronics are enabling today’s wearable products.

Power Supplies for Medical Systems
Over the past year, there’s been an increasing trend toward new products that have some sort of application or industry focus. That means supplies that include either certifications, special performance specs or tailored packaging intended for a specific application area such as medical. This Product Focus section updates readers on these technology trends and provides a product gallery of representative medical-focused power supplies.

DESIGN RESOURCES, ISSUES AND CHALLENGES

Flex PCB Design Services
While not exactly a brand-new technology, flexible printed circuit boards are a critical part of many of today’s challenging embedded system applications from wearable devices to mobile healthcare electronics. Circuit Cellar’s Editor-in-Chief, Jeff Child, explores the Flex PCB design capabilities available today and whose providing them.

Design Flow Ensures Automotive Safety
Fault analysis has been around for years, and many methods have been created to optimize evaluation of hundreds of concurrent faults in specialized simulators. However, there are many challenges in running a fault campaign. Mentor’s Doug Smith presents an improved formal verification flow that reduces the number of faults while simultaneously providing much higher quality of results.

Cooling Electronic Systems
Any good embedded system engineer knows that heat is the enemy of reliability. As new systems cram more functionality at higher speeds into ever smaller packages, it’s no wonder an increasing amount of engineering mindshare is focusing on cooling electronic systems. In this article, George Novacek reviews some of the essential math and science around cooling and looks are several cooling technologies—from cold pates to heat pipes.

MICROCONTROLLER PROJECTS WITH ALL THE DETAILS

MCU-Based Solution Links USB to Legacy PC I/O
In PCs, serial interfaces have now been just about completely replaced by USB. But many of those interfaces are still used in control and monitoring embedded systems. In this project article, Hossam Abdelbaki describes his ATSTAMP design. ATSTAMP is an MCS-51 (8051) compatible microcontroller chip that can be connected to the USB port of any PC via any USB-to-serial bridge currently available in the market.

Pet Collar Uses GPS and Wi-Fi
The PIC32 has proven effective for a myriad of applications, so why not a dog collar? Learn how Cornell graduates Vidya Ramesh and Vaidehi Garg built a GPS-enabled pet collar prototype. The article discusses the hardware peripherals used in the project, the setup, and the software. It also describes the motivation behind the project, and possibilities to expand the project in the future.

Guitar Video Game Uses PIC32
While music-playing video games are fun, their user interfaces tend leave a lot to be desired. Learn how Cornell students Jake Podell and Jonah Wexler designed and built a musical video game that’s interfaced with using a custom-built wireless guitar controller. The game is run on a Microchip PIC32 MCU and uses a TFT LCD display to show notes that move across the screen towards a strum region.

… AND MORE FROM OUR EXPERT COLUMNISTS

Non-Evasive Current Sensor
Gone are the days when you could do most of your own maintenance on your car’s engine. Today they’re sophisticated electronic systems. But there are some things you can do with the right tools. In his article, By Jeff Bachiochi talks about how using the timing light on his car engine introduced him to non-contact sensor technology. He talks about the types of probes available and how to use them to read the magnitude of alternating current (AC

Impedance Spectroscopy using the AD5933
Impedance spectroscopy is the measurement of a device’s impedance (or resistance) over a range of frequencies. Brian Millier has designed many voltammographs and conductivity meters over the years. But he recently came across the Analog Devices AD5933 chip made by which performs most all the functions needed to do impedance spectroscopy. In this article, explores the technology, circuit design and software that serve these efforts.

Side-Channel Power Analysis
Side-channel power analysis is a method of breaking security on embedded systems, and something Colin O’Flynn has covered extensively in his column. This time Colin shows how you can prove some of the fundamental assumptions that underpin side-channel power analysis. He uses the open-source ChipWhisperer project with Jupyter notebooks for easy interactive evaluation.

Low-Power Pico-ITX SBC Serves Industrial IoT Needs

Axiomtek has introduced its PICO318 board, a palm-sized fanless pico-ITX motherboard powered by the Intel Pentium processor N4200 or Celeron processor N3350 (code named Apollo Lake). The PICO318 is a low power consumption, 2.5” embedded board that is expandable, rugged, feature-rich and versatile to help facilitate quick deployment.
The PICO318 is equipped with one 204-pin DDR3L-1867 SO-DIMM for up to 8 GB system memory. A dual-display capability is available through 18/24-bit single/dual channel LVDS and DisplayPort. For storage, there are one M.2 key B slot for SATA or PCIe x2 SSD card and one half-size PCI Express Mini Card slot with support for mSATA. Moreover, the Pico-ITX form factor SBC features 12 V DC power supply input with AT Auto Power On function.

The Intel Apollo Lake-based pico-ITX board provides rich I/O connectivity including two USB 3.0 ports, two USB 2.0 ports, one RS-232/422/485 port, one RS-232 port, two Gigabit LAN ports with Intel i211AT Ethernet controller, one HD Codec audio, and 4-channel digital I/O. The PICO318 offers watchdog timer and hardware monitoring for reliable operation. It also supports AXView 2.0, intelligent remote management software for industrial IoT applications. Additionally, its I2C interface offers smart battery support. The PICO318 will be available in March, 2019.

Features:

  • Intel Pentium processor N4200 and Celeron processor N3350 (code name: Apollo Lake)
  • One 204-pin DDR3L-1867 SO-DIMM, up to 8GB
  • Two USB 2.0 ports and two USB 3.0 ports
  • Two Gigabit Ethernet ports and two COM ports
  • PCI Express Mini Card slot with mSATA support
  • Supports M.2 Key B (SATA, USB 2.0, PCIe x2 for option) in 22 mm x 42 mm or 30 mm x 42 mm

Axiomtek | www.axiomtek.com

 

Tuesday’s Newsletter: Microcontroller Watch

Coming to your inbox tomorrow: Circuit Cellar’s Microcontroller Watch newsletter. Tomorrow’s newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

Bonus: We’ve added Drawings for Free Stuff to our weekly newsletters. Make sure you’ve subscribed to the newsletter so you can participate.

Already a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber? Great!
You’ll get your Microcontroller Watch newsletter issue tomorrow.

Not a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber?
Don’t be left out! Sign up now:

Our weekly Circuit Cellar Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

IoT Technology Focus. (2/19) Covers what’s happening with Internet-of-Things (IoT) technology–-from devices to gateway networks to cloud architectures. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

Embedded Boards.(2/26) The focus here is on both standard and non-standard embedded computer boards that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up to production volumes.

Analog & Power. (3/5) This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op amps, batteries and more.

Utility Metering Solution Taps Semtech’s LoRa Technology

Semtech has announced that Lemonbeat, an IoT solution provider, has integated Semtech’s LoRa devices and wireless radio frequency technology (LoRa Technology) into its smart metering solutions for easier reading and collection of utility usage. Lemonbeat’s LoRa-connected smart meters work by utilizing embedded LoRa-based IoT technology to connect the meter to their own purpose-built receiver units.

Using this connectivity, meters send data through multiple floors in bigger buildings or all way in to the street, where network operators conveniently collect the data without having to enter the building. Using the meters’ other radio frequency, Lemonbeat Radio, meters provide customers accurate data on their energy consumption. With a third-party application, individuals can view and analyze this data, and change their habits accordingly.

Semtech’s LoRa devices and wireless radio frequency technology is a widely adopted long-range, low-power solution for IoT that gives telecom companies, IoT application makers and system integrators the feature set necessary to deploy low-cost, interoperable IoT networks, gateways, sensors, module products, and IoT services worldwide. IoT networks based on the LoRaWAN specification have been deployed in over 100 countries and Semtech is a founding member of the LoRa Alliance.

Lemonbeat | www.lemonbeat.com

Semtech | www.semtech.com

Free IoT Security Platform Runs on OpenWrt Routers and the Raspberry Pi

By Eric Brown

At the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas, Minim announced a free spin-off of Minim, its cloud-managed Wi-Fi and security Software as a Service (SaaS) platform. Minim Labs is designed to work with a new open source software agent called Unum that runs on Raspbian and OpenWrt Linux devices. Optimized images are available for the OpenWrt-based Gli.Net GL-B1300 router and Raspberry Pi. The first 50 sign-ups will get the B1300 router for free (see below).


Minim Labs setup screen
(click image to enlarge)
The Minim Labs toolkit “secures and manages all connected devices in the home, such as the Google Home Hub, Sony Smart TV, and FreeRTOS devices,” providing “device fingerprinting, security scans, AI-powered recommendations, router management, analytics, and parental controls,” says Minim. By signing up to a Minim Labs account you receive a MAC address to register an Unum-enabled device.

The GitHub hosted Unum agent runs on the Linux router where it identifies connected devices and securely streams device telemetry to the Minim platform. Users can open a free Minim Labs account to register up to 10 Unum-enabled devices, offering access to Minim WiFi management apps and APIs. Alternately, you can use Unum with your own application server.

The GL-B1300 and Raspberry Pi builds are designed to walk “home network tinkerers” through the process of protecting devices with Unum and Minim Labs. More advanced developers can download a Unum SDK to modify the software for any OpenWrt-based router.

“By open sourcing our agent and giving technologists free access to our platform, we hope to build a global community that’ll contribute valuable product feedback and code,” stated Jeremy Hitchcock, Founder and CEO of Minim.

Gli.Net’s OpenWrt routers

Gli.Net’s GL-B1300 router runs OpenWrt on a quad-core, Cortex-A7 Qualcomm Atheros IPQ4028 SoC clocked to 717 MHz. The SoC is equipped with a DSP, 256MB RAM, 32 MB flash, and dual-band 802.11ac with 2×2 MIMO. The SoC and supports up to 5-port Ethernet routers abd provides Qualcomm TEE, Crypto Engine, and Secure Boot technologies.


 
GL-B1300 (left) and GL-AR750S
(click images to enlarge)
The GL-B1300 router has dual GbE ports, a WAN port, and a USB 3.0 port. The $89 price includes a 12V adapter and Ethernet cable.

The testimonial quote below says that the GL-AR750S Slate router, which is a CES 2019 Innovation Awards Honoree, will also support Unum and Minim Labs out of the box. The $70 GL-AR750S Slate runs on a MIPS-based, 775MHz Qualcomm QCA9563 processor and is equipped with 128MB RAM, 128MB NAND flash, and a microSD slot.

The Slate router provides 3x GbE ports and dual-band 802.11ac with dual external antennas. Other features include USB 2.0 and micro-USB power ports plus a UART and GPIO. The router supports WireGuard, OpenVPN, and Cloudflare DNS over TLS.


Gli.Net router comparison chart, including GL-B1300 and GL-AR750S
(click image to enlarge)
In addition to its routers, Gli.Net also sells the OpenWrt-on-Atheros/MIPS Domino Core computer-on-module. The Domino Core shipped in a Kickstarter launched Domino.IO IoT kit back in 2015.

“We are glad that Minim is going to launch open-source tools for DIY users and increase awareness of personal Internet security,” stated GL.iNet CTO Dr. Alfie Zhao. “This initiative shows shared value and vision with GL.iNet. We are happy to provide support for Minim tools on our GL-AR750S Slate router and GL-B1300 router, both of which have support to the latest OpenWrt.”

Further information

The free Minim Labs security platform is available for signup now, and the open source Unum agent is available for download. Minim is offering the first 50 Minim Labs signups with a free startup kit containing the GL-B1300 router. More information may be found at the Minim Labs product page.

This article originally appeared on LinuxGizmos.com on January 9.

Minim | www.minim.co

 

Tuesday’s Newsletter: Analog & Power

Coming to your inbox on Tuesday: Circuit Cellar’s Analog & Power newsletter. This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including ADCs, DACs, DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op amps, batteries and more.

Bonus: We’ve added Drawings for Free Stuff to our weekly newsletters. Make sure you’ve subscribed to the newsletter so you can participate.

Already a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber? Great!
You’ll get your Analog & Power newsletter issue tomorrow.

Not a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber?
Don’t be left out! Sign up now:

Our weekly Circuit Cellar Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

Microcontroller Watch. (2/12) This newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

IoT Technology Focus. (2/19) Covers what’s happening with Internet-of-Things (IoT) technology–-from devices to gateway networks to cloud architectures. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

Embedded Boards.(2/26) The focus here is on both standard and non-standard embedded computer boards that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up to production volumes.

Next Newsletter: ICs for Consumer Electronics

Coming to your inbox tomorrow: Circuit Cellar’s ICs for Consumer Electronics newsletter. Today’;s consumer electronic product designs demand ICs that enable low-power, high-functionality and cutthroat costs. Today’s microcontroller, analog IC and power chip vendors are laser-focused on this lucrative, high-stakes market. This newsletter looks at the latest technology trends and product developments in for consumer electronics ICs.

Bonus: We’ve added Drawings for Free Stuff to our weekly newsletters. Make sure you’ve subscribed to the newsletter so you can participate.

Already a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber? Great!
You’ll get your
ICs for Consumer Electronics newsletter issue tomorrow.

Not a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber?
Don’t be left out! Sign up now:

Our weekly Circuit Cellar Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

Analog & Power. (2/5) This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op amps, batteries and more.

Microcontroller Watch (2/12) This newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

IoT Technology Focus. (2/19) Covers what’s happening with Internet-of-Things (IoT) technology–-from devices to gateway networks to cloud architectures. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

Nordic Semi’s BLE SoC Selected for Ultra Low Power IoT Module

Nordic Semiconductor has announced that Nanopower has selected Nordic’s nRF52832 Bluetooth Low Energy (Bluetooth LE) System-on-Chip (SoC) to provide the wireless connectivity for its nP-BLE52 module, designed for developers of IoT applications with highly restricted power budgets.

The nP-BLE52 module employs a proprietary power management IC—integrated alongside Nordic’s nRF52832 Wafer-Level Chip Scale Package (WL-CSP) SoC in a System-in-Package (SiP)—which enables it to cut power to the SoC, putting it in sleep mode, before waking it up a pre-set time and in the same state as before it was put to sleep. In doing so the SoC’s power consumption in sleep mode is reduced to 10 nA, making it well suited for IoT applications where battery life is critical by potentially increasing cell lifespan 10x.

In active mode, the nRF52832 SoC runs normally. The SoC has been engineered to minimize power consumption with features such as the 2.4GHz radio’s 5.5mA peak RX/TX currents and a fully-automatic power management system. Once the Nordic SoC has completed its tasks, it instructs the nP-BLE52 to put it to sleep and wake it up again at the pre-set time. The nP-BLE52 then stores the Nordics SoC’s state variables and waits until the nRF52832 SoC needs to be powered up again. On wake-up, the device uploads the previous state variables, allowing the Nordic SoC to be restored to the same operational state as before the power was cut. The SoC’s start-up is much more rapid than if it was activated from a non-powered mode.

The nP-BLE52 module also features a low power MCU which can be set to handle external sensors and actuators when the Nordic chip is switched off. In this state, the module still monitors sensors and buffer readings and can trigger wake-ups if these readings are above predetermined thresholds, while consuming less than 1 uA. The nP-BLE52 also integrates an embedded inertial measurement unit (IMU).

The module’s power management is controlled through a simple API, whereby the user can predetermine the duration of the Nordic SoC’s sleep mode, set the wake-up time and date parameters, and select pins for other on/off triggers.

The module offers IoT developers several advantages, either extending battery life and/or reducing the size of the battery required to power the application thereby reducing the end-product footprint. Longer battery life also reduces or eliminates battery swaps and enables the developer to better adjust for remaining useful battery life as the battery discharges. The module is suitable for any battery-powered device which is not required to be constantly active, for example asset tracking, remote monitoring, beacons, and some smart-home applications.

The nRF52832 WL-CSP SoC measures just 3.0 mm by 3.2mm while offering all the features of the conventionally-packaged chip. The nRF52832 is a powerful multiprotocol SoC ideally suited for Bluetooth LE and 2.4 GHz ultra low-power wireless applications. It combines an 64 MHz, 32-bit Arm Cortex M4F processor with a 2.4 GHz multiprotocol radio (supporting Bluetooth 5, ANT, and proprietary 2.4 GHz RF software) featuring -96dB RX sensitivity, with 512kB Flash memory and 64kB RAM.

The WL-CSP SoC is supplied with Nordic’s S132 SoftDevice, a Bluetooth 5-certifed RF software protocol stack for building advanced Bluetooth LE applications. The S132 SoftDevice features Central, Peripheral, Broadcaster, and Observer Bluetooth LE roles, supports up to twenty connections, and enables concurrent role operation. Nordic’s unique software architecture provides clear separation between the RF protocol software and the developer’s application code, easing product development.

Nordic Semiconductor | www.nordicsemi.com

SIMO PMICs Shrink Power Regulator Size in Half

Six new low-power power-management integrated circuits (PMICs) from Maxim Integrated Products are designed to reduce the power-management footprint by up to 50 percent for space-constrained products such as wearables, hearables, sensors, smart-home automation hubs and internet of things (IoT) devices. They increase the overall system efficiency by nine percent compared to the closest competitive solution, while also reducing heat dissipation, an important consideration for wearable products that make skin contact.
The unique control architecture in the MAX17270 (shown), MAX77278, MAX77640/MAX77641 and MAX77680/MAX77681 PMICs allows a single inductor to serve as the critical energy-storage element for multiple, independent DC-rail outputs. This allows engineers to reduce the number of bulky inductors in their designs, thereby improving efficiency, shrinking form factor and reducing heat dissipation. In addition, the low quiescent current of the PMICs plays an important role in extending battery life. With the intrinsic buck-boost operation of the PMICs, the power rails can operate over a battery’s entire range.

MAX17270: Smallest Size and Lowest Quiescent Current
At 50 percent smaller than previous-generation SIMO-only solutions, the MAX17270 SIMO buck-boost converter provides the industry’s smallest solution size while reducing the number of inductors and ICs that are required for a power tree. Its quiescent current of 850nA for one SIMO channel and 1.3µA for three SIMO channels is the lowest in the market and helps extend battery life of end devices. In addition, the product’s low power consumption prevents overheating and reduces frequent charging cycles for wearables and hearables. They are available in TQFN and WLP package options.

MAX77278: Power Path Charger Optimized for Small Li+ Batteries
This ultra-low-power SIMO PMIC provides three buck-boost regulators with independent voltage outputs (0.8VOUT to 5.25VOUT), 16µA operating quiescent current/300nA standby current and flexible power sequencing. The device is also a charger for small Li+ cells (7.5mA – 300mA CC range). It includes an adjustable 425mA current sink for an LED, eight general-purpose input/output (GPIO) pins and a 3.7125V to 5.3V, 50mA low-noise low-dropout regulator (LDO) with fixed headroom control in a total solution size as low as 24mm2. The PMIC’s I2C interface allows an applications processor to monitor the status and control power management. The MAX77278 is ideal for remote controls, health and fitness monitors, body cameras and IoT applications.

MAX77640/MAX77641: Highly Integrated Battery Charging and Power Solutions
These ultra-low-power SIMO PMICs feature three buck-boost regulators, a low-noise 150mA LDO, a GPIO output port, a triple current sink for an RGB LED array and flexible power sequencing. Operating current is just 5.6µA and shutdown current is 300nA. Available in a 16mm2 total solution size, the MAX77640 and MAX77641 are ideal for applications with a built-in charger in areas like wearables, fitness and health monitoring and IoT.

MAX77680/MAX77681: Mini PMICs for Always-On, Low-Power Applications
These ultra-low-power SIMO PMICs provide three buck-boost regulators, 3.0µA operating quiescent current, 300nA shutdown current and flexible power sequencing. Total solution size is only 15.5mm2. Given their feature set, the MAX77680 and MAX77681 are ideal for more minimalistic platforms that require streamlined resources, such as hearables (Bluetooth headsets/earbuds) and miniaturized IoT devices (rings, watches, e-pens).

The MAX17270 is available for $1.84 (1000-up, FOB USA); the MAX77278 is available for $2.18 (1000-up, FOB USA); the MAX77680 and MAX77681 are available for $1.24 (1000-up, FOB USA); and the MAX77640 and MAX77641 are available for $1.71 (1000-up, FOB USA) at Maxim’s website. The ICs are also available from select authorized distributors.

The MAX17270EVKIT# evaluation kit is available for $100; the MAX77278EVKIT# evaluation kit is available for $100; the MAX77680/MAX77681EVKIT# evaluation kit is available for $100; and the MAX77640/MAX77641EVKIT# is available for $100.

Maxim Integrated | www.maximintegrated.com

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