WIZnet Challenge Entry Tips (Sponsored Post)

The WIZnet Connect the Magic Challenge deadline is ​August​ 3, 2014. Let’s go over the challenge and cover some tips for entering.WIZnetconnect_logo_horweb_550x

What is the Challenge?

You are challenged to design and build an innovative project that uses least one WIZnet WIZ550io Ethernet controller module or W5500 chip. You can use any other MCU and/or module along with the WIZ550io Ethernet module.

What devices must I use with my project?
Your project must use at least one WIZnet WIZ550io Ethernet controller module or WIZnet W5500 chip. You can use any other MCU and other module along with the WIZ550io Ethernet module or W5500 chip. Visit the Eligible Parts page for more information.

WIZnet's WIZ550io auto configurable Ethernet controller module includes a W5500, transformer, & RJ-45.

WIZnet’s WIZ550io auto configurable Ethernet controller module includes a W5500, transformer, & RJ-45.

How do I participate?

Participation is simple. First, read the Rules. Second, build and thoroughly document a project featuring a WIZnet WIZ550io Ethernet Controller module or W5500 chip. Next, Register for the Challenge and obtain a Project Registration Number. Lastly, Submit a complete project Entry.

​​May I submit multiple entries?
Yes. You may submit as many entries as you want. Each Entry must have its own Project Registration Number. Complete a Project Registration Form for each Entry you intend to submit.
What types of projects win design contests?
The goal of the Challenge is to showcase the functionality of the WIZnet WIZ550io module. All Challenge entries will be judged by a panel of judges on the following: technical merit 30%, originality 30%, usefulness 20%, cost-effectiveness 10%, and design optimization 10%. It would be smart to highlight these achievements in your documentation. Call attention to your project’s special features.

A Rat’s Nest-Less Workspace: Clean with Plenty of Screens

Two sorts of things we love to see in an electronics workspace: cleanliness and multiple monitors! San Antonio, TX-based Jorge Amodio’s L-shaped modular desk is great setup that gives him easy access to his projects, test equipment, and computers. The wires to all of his equipment are intelligently placed behind and below the workspace. Hence, no rat’s nest of wires! He doesn’t need to work on top of cords and peripherals like, well, a few of us do here in our office. We like how he “sectioned” his space to provide maximum multitasking capability. The setup enables him to move easily from doing R&D work to emailing to grabbing his iPhone without any more effort than a slide of his chair. Very nice.

Jorge Amodio’s workspace (Source: J. Amodio)

Submitted by Jorge Amodio, independent consultant and principal engineer (Serious Integrated, Inc.), San Antonio, TX, USA

“For the past few years I’ve been working on R&D of intelligent graphic/touch display modules for HMI (Human Machine Interface) and control panels, with embedded networking for ‘Internet of Things’ applications.” – Jorge Amodio

Jorge perform R&D with handy test equipment an arm’s length away (Source: J. Amodio)

A closer look at Jorge’s project space (Source: J. Amodio)

Jorge has easy access to his other monitors and iPhone (Source: J. Amodio)

Do you want to share images of your workspace, hackspace, or “circuit cellar”? Send your images and space info to editor at circuitcellar dotcom.

Integrated Wi-Fi System in Package Module

EconaisThe EC19W01 is a small, smart, highly integrated 802.11b/g/n Wi-Fi system in package (SiP) module. The module is well suited for home automation and smart appliances; Wi-Fi audio speakers and headphones; wireless sensors and sensor networks; wireless monitoring (audio and video); smart appliances; health care and fitness devices; wearable devices; security, authentication, and admittance control; lighting; building/energy/industrial management/control; cloud-connected devices; remote control, data acquisition, and monitoring; and machine-to-machine (M2M) and Internet of Things (IoT) design.

The EC19W01’s features include an integrated 32-bit processor to support application customization, on-board flash and antenna, low power consumption, support for Serial-to-Wi-Fi and SPI-to-Wi-Fi, wireless transmit/receive rates of up to 20 Mbps, and a small 14-mm × 16-mm × 2.8-mm footprint.

Contact Econais for pricing.

Econais, Inc.
www.econais.com

DIY IoT: Build a ‘Net-Connected System Today

It’s time to join the Internet of Things (IoT) revolution. Try building a ‘Net-enabled design with WIZnet’s W5500 “smart” Ethernet chip. It’s easier than you think.

In a thorough introduction to the technology, Tom Cantrell presented a garage door monitoring design. He explained:

The W5500 (see Figure 1) starts with a standard 10/100 Ethernet interface (i.e., MAC and PHY) but then goes further with large RAM buffers (16-KB transmit and 16-KB receive) and hardware TCP/IP protocol processing. I discovered WIZnet’s first chip, the  W3100, way back in 2001. Of course by now, as with all things  silicon, the new W5500 is better, faster, and  lower cost. But the concept is still exactly  the same: “Internet enable” applications by  handling the network chores in hardware so  the application microcontroller doesn’t have to do it in software.

Cantrell - WIZ550io

Figure 1: The WIZnet W5500 is an Ethernet chip with a difference—large RAM buffers and hardware TCP/IP processing that make it easy for any microcontroller to go online.

The large RAM buffers help decouple the  microcontroller from network activity. In a  recent project (see my article, “Weatherize  Your Embedded App,” Circuit Cellar 273,  2013), I used the RAM to receive an entire  10-KB+ webpage, completely eliminating the  need for the microcontroller to juggle data at  network speed. And any of the 32-KB on-chip  RAM that isn’t needed for network buffering  is free for general-purpose use, a big plus for  typically RAM-constrained microcontrollers. The other major WIZnet hardware assist  is TCP/IP processing using IP addresses, sockets, and familiar commands including OPEN, CONNECT, SEND, RECEIVE, DISCONNECT.  The high-level interface to the network frees  up microcontroller cycles and code space that  would otherwise be needed for a software TCP/IP stack.

Cantrell goes on to present his design for a ‘Net-connected garage door monitoring system.

For prototyping, check out the WIZnet  ioShield (see Photo 1), which is a baseboard  for the WIZ550io that includes an SD card  socket. There are ioShields for different  platforms (e.g., Arduino, LaunchPad,  mbed, etc.), and with 0.1” headers they are  breadboard friendly.

Photo 1: If you want a fancy server with lots of eye candy, a microSD card is the way to go. The WIZnet ioShields include the card socket and are available for various platforms. The Arduino version is shown here.

Photo 1: If you want a fancy server with lots of eye candy, a microSD card is the way to go. The WIZnet ioShields include the card socket and are available for various platforms. The Arduino version is shown here.

Cantrell prototyped a client version of what he calls his “garage  door ‘Thing’ using an Arduino  and a WIZ550io connected to Exosite (see Photo 2).

A prototype of the client version of my garage “Thing” is shown.

Photo 2: A prototype of the client version of my garage “Thing”

Wondering how to get two clients (e.g., ) to interact with each other? Cantrell used Exosite.

Over on the Exosite website, after signing up for a  free “Developer” account, it was a quick and easy mainly point-and-click exercise to configure my “Device,” “Data,”  “Events,” and “Alerts” (see Photo 3).  As a client, there’s no need to keep the “Thing’s”  Ethernet link powered all the time. Data only needs to  be sent when the garage door opens or closes, but I also  recommend sending a periodic heartbeat just in case. My  garage door monitor will only generate a minute or two  of network activity (i.e., door state changes and hourly  heartbeats) per day, so there’s opportunity for significant  energy savings compared to a 24/7 server.

It only takes a few minutes to set up a simple Exosite dashboard including an e-mail alert. I can “see“ my  garage door without getting off the couch and now, via Exosite, from the farthest reaches of the web.

It only takes a few minutes to set up a simple Exosite dashboard including an e-mail alert. I can “see“ my garage door without getting off the couch and now, via Exosite, from the farthest reaches of the web.

You can download the entire article,  “Connect the Magic: An Introduction to the WIZnet W550,” for free to learn about Cantrell’s garage door control system built with a WIZnet and an Arduino Uno.

Editor’s note: If you have an idea for an innovative, ’Net-enabled electronics system, this is your opportunity to share your original design with the world. Enter the WIZnet Connect the Magic 2014 Design Challenge for a chance to win a share of $15,000 in prizes and gain recognition by Elektor International Media and Circuit Cellar. WIZnet is the sponsor. Eligible entries will be judged on their technical merit, originality, usefulness, cost-effectiveness, and design optimization. The Entry submission deadline is 12:00 PM EST August 3, 2014. How to enter: Implement WIZnet’s WIZ550io Ethernet module, or W5500 chip, in an innovative design; document your project; and then submit your entry. The complete rules and regulations are available on the Challenge webpage.

 

WIZnet Announces WIZ550io & W5500 Discounts at EELive

Today at EELive! in San Jose, CA, WIZnet announced a special promotion tied to the WIZnet Connect the Magic 2014 Design Challenge, which it is sponsoring. For a limited time, WIZnet is offering discounted WIZ550io Ethernet controller modules and W5500 chips via its webshopWiznet-Challenge-EELive

Disclosure: Elektor International Media and Circuit Cellar comprise the challenge administration team.

At this time, WIZnet’s WIZ550io is on sale for $9.95 (original price, $17.00) and the W550 cost $1.49 (original price, $2.87).

WIZnet’s WIZ550io is a module for rapidly developing ’Net-enabled systems. It is an auto-configurable Ethernet controller module that includes the W5500 (TCP/IP-hard-wired chip and PHY embedded), a transformer, and an RJ-45 connector. The module has a unique, embedded real MAC address and auto network configuration capability.

WIZnet's WIZ550io auto configurable Ethernet controller module includes a W5500, transformer, & RJ-45.

WIZnet’s WIZ550io auto configurable Ethernet controller module includes a W5500, transformer, & RJ-45.

The W5500 is a hardwired TCP/IP embedded Ethernet controller that enables Internet connection for embedded systems using Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI).

W5500

W5500

Visit the WIZnet Connect the Magic 2014 Design Challenge webpage for more information about participation and eligibility.