ARM mbed Platform for Bluetooth Smart Applications

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe nRF51822-mKIT simplifies and accelerates the prototyping process for Bluetooth Smart sensors connecting to the Internet of Things (IoT). The platform is designed for fast, easy, and flexible development of Bluetooth Smart applications.

The nRF51822 system-on-chip (SoC) combines a Bluetooth v4.1-compliant 2.4-GHz multiprotocol radio with an ARM Cortex-M0 CPU core on a single chip optimized for ultra-low-power operation. The SoC simplifies and accelerates the prototyping process for Bluetooth Smart sensors connecting to the IoT.

The nRF51822-mKIT’s features include a Bluetooth Smart API, 31 pin-assignable general-purpose input/output (GPIO), a CMSIS-DAP debugger, Programmable Peripheral Interconnect (PPI), and the ability to run from a single 2032 coin-cell battery.

Through mbed, the kit is supported by a cloud-based approach to writing code, adding libraries, and compiling firmware. A lightweight online IDE operates on all popular browsers running on Windows, Mac OSX, iOS, Android, and Linux OSes. Developers can use the kit to access a cloud-based ARM RVDS 4.1 compiler that optimizes code size and performance.

The nRF51822-mKIT costs $59.95.

Nordic Semiconductor ASA
www.nordicsemi.com

A Low-Cost Connection to the IoT

In Circuit Cellar’s March issue, columnist Jeff Bachiochi tests the services of a company he says is “poised to make a big impact” on the Internet of Things (IoT).

This shows the I2C interface Bachiochi designed to enable available clamp-on current sensors to be monitored. He added four of these circuits to a PCB, which includes the circuitry for an imp card.

This shows the I2C interface Bachiochi designed to enable available clamp-on current sensors to be monitored. He added four of these circuits to a PCB, which includes the circuitry for an imp card.

Established in 2011, Electric Imp offers a flexible connectivity platform meant to enable any device to be connected to the IoT. The platform, called the “imp,” provides an SD-card sized module (including an 802.11b/g/n Wi-Fi radio package) that can be installed on any electronic device to go online. A powerful processor runs the imp OS.

“You only need to supply an SD card socket (and a few other components) to your product to give it connectivity,” Bachiochi says. “The imp’s processor has the power to run your entire product if you wish, or it can be connected via one of the supported serial protocols. The imp OS provides secure connectivity to the imp cloud. The imp cloud keeps your imp updated with the latest firmware, features online development tools, and provides cloud-side services for every imp in the field.”

“As with many cloud service organizations, development is generally free,” Bachiochi adds. “Once you’ve committed and have product rollout, the service will charge for its use. This could be a flat fee, a per-connection or data throughput fee, or a combination of fees. Basically you (or your customer) will have to pay to have access to the information, which pays for the support framework that keeps it all working.”

In his article, Bachiochi dives into a straightforward data-collection project to demonstrate how to use the imp in a product. The goal of his application was to log the activity of 220-V water pump and twin water softeners.  The project is the launching point for his comprehensive and detailed look at the imp’s hardware, software, and costs.

“It’s easy to design product hardware to use the imp,” he says. “There are two imp models, a card that can be inserted into an SD-type socket or an on-board module that is soldered into your product. Each version has advantages and disadvantages.”

Regarding software, Bachiochi says:

“Developing an imp application requires two parts to provide Wi-Fi access to your project: the device code (running in the imp) and the agent code (running on the imp cloud). The imp cloud, which is your connection to your device via the imp APIs, provides you with a development IDE. Web-based development means there is nothing else you need to purchase or install on your PC. Everything you need is available through your browser anytime and anywhere.”

Bachiochi also discusses the Electric Imp platform’s broader goals. While an individual can use the imp for device connectivity, a bigger purpose is to enable manufacturers to provide convenient Internet access as part of their product, Bachiochi says.

“The imp has two costs: The hardware is simple, it currently costs approximately $25 for an imp card or module. If you are using this in your own circuit within your own network, then you’re done,” he says. “If you want to roll out a product for sale to the world, you must take the next step and register for the BlinkUp SDK and Operations Console, which enable you to create and track factory-blessed products.”

BlinkUp, according to the Electric Imp website, integrates smoothly into apps and enables manufacturers and their customers to quickly connect products using a smartphone or tablet. The Operations Console enables tracking product activity and updating product firmware at any time, Bachiochi says.

The imp offers more than a low-cost way for DIYers and developers to connect devices to the Internet, Bachiochi says. A designer using the imp can save project costs by eliminating a microcontroller, he says. “Almost any peripheral can be easily connected to and serviced by the imp’s 32-bit Cortex M3 processor running the imp OS. All code is written in Squirrel.”

Bachiochi’s comprehensive article about his imp experience and insights can be found in the March issue, now available for membership download or single-issue purchase.

Bachiochi used the Electric IMP IDE to develop this code. Agent code on the top left runs on the imp cloud server. The device code on the top right is downloaded into the connected imp.

Bachiochi used the Electric IMP IDE to develop this code. Agent code on the top left runs on the imp cloud server. The device code on the top right is downloaded into the connected imp.

Dynamic Efficiency Microcontrollers

STMicroThe STM32F401 Dynamic Efficiency microcontrollers extend battery life and support innovative new features in mobile phones, tablets, and smart watches. They help manage MEMS sensors in smart-connected devices and are well suited for Internet-of-Things (IoT) applications and fieldbus-powered industrial equipment.

The STM32F401 microcontrollers include an ART accelerator, a prefetch queue, and a branch cache. This enables zero-wait-state execution from flash, which boosts performance to 105 DMIPS (285 CoreMark) at 84 MHz. The microcontrollers’ 90-nm process technology boosts performance and reduces dynamic power. Its dynamic voltage scaling optimizes the operating voltage to meet performance demands and minimize leakage.

The STM32F401 microcontrollers integrate up to 512 KB of flash and 96 KB SRAM in a 3.06-mm × 3.06-mm chip-scale package and feature a 9-µA at 1.8 V Stop mode current. The devices’ peripherals include three 1-Mbps I2C ports, three USARTs, four SPI ports, two full-duplex I2S audio interfaces, a USB 2.0 OTG full-speed interface, an SDIO interface, 12-bit 2.4-MSPS 16-channel ADC, and up to 10 timers.

Pricing for the STM32F401 microcontrollers starts at $2.88 in 10,000-unit quantities.

STMicroelectronics
www.st.com

Next-Generation Wi-Fi Modules

eConaisThe EC19D family is small, easily integrated, low-standby power single chip 802.11b/g/n Wi-Fi System In Package (SiP) modules for the Internet of Things (IoT).

The SiP modules help designers quickly and easily connect their devices to 802.11b/g/n Wi-Fi networks. At 8-mm × 8-mm, the EC19D modules can be embedded in almost any product or application. The EC19D will also include FCC, IC, and EC certifications to further simplify and speed up product design and production for use with Wi-Fi networks.

The EC19D incorporates the newest Wi-Fi 802.11b/g/n standards and features to provide designers with many options for embedding the module in their designs. The EC19D’s features include Wi-Fi Direct, ProbMeTM configuration, full TCP/IP stack, HTTPS/SSL, DHCP Client/Server, WPS, legacy Wi-Fi Client, and SoftAP modes with WPA/WPA2 support, serial to Wi-Fi, and Cloud service support.

Contact eConais for pricing.

eConais Inc.
www.econais.com

Places for the IoT Inside Your Home

It’s estimated that by the year 2020, more than 30 billion devices worldwide will be wirelessly connected to the IoT. While the IoT has massive implications for government and industry, individual electronics DIYers have long recognized how projects that enable wireless communication between everyday devices can solve or avert big problems for homeowners.

February CoverOur February issue focusing on Wireless Communications features two such projects, including  Raul Alvarez Torrico’s Home Energy Gateway, which enables users to remotely monitor energy consumption and control household devices (e.g., lights and appliances).

A Digilent chipKIT Max32-based embedded gateway/web server communicates with a single smart power meter and several smart plugs in a home area wireless network. ”The user sees a web interface containing the controls to turn on/off the smart plugs and sees the monitored power consumption data that comes from the smart meter in real time,” Torrico says.

While energy use is one common priority for homeowners, another is protecting property from hidden dangers such as undetected water leaks. Devlin Gualtieri wanted a water alarm system that could integrate several wireless units signaling a single receiver. But he didn’t want to buy one designed to work with expensive home alarm systems charging monthly fees.

In this issue, Gualtieri writes about his wireless water alarm network, which has simple hardware including a Microchip Technology PIC12F675 microcontroller and water conductance sensors (i.e., interdigital electrodes) made out of copper wire wrapped around perforated board.

It’s an inexpensive and efficient approach that can be expanded. “Multiple interdigital sensors can be wired in parallel at a single alarm,” Gualtieri says. A single alarm unit can monitor multiple water sources (e.g., a hot water tank, a clothes washer, and a home heating system boiler).

Also in this issue, columnist George Novacek begins a series on wireless data links. His first article addresses the basic principles of radio communications that can be used in control systems.

Other issue highlights include advice on extending flash memory life; using C language in FPGA design; detecting capacitor dielectric absorption; a Georgia Tech researcher’s essay on the future of inkjet-printed circuitry; and an overview of the hackerspaces and enterprising designs represented at the World Maker Faire in New York.

Editor’s Note: Circuit Cellar‘s February issue will be available online in mid-to-late January for download by members or single-issue purchase by web shop visitors.